Skip to main content

Full text of "73 Magazine (March 1982)"

See other formats


tfjnuu 



1* 


41 1 


.1! * J^ 


H J_ ,1' i 



i 



i 



March 1982 S2.95 



wy 



I 



sm 



M ui>' 



tmi 



'i 



^i 






«u^<IHllr 



iu» 



M « 



I *lt 



/WW\t* 



i^MI 




PL 






|M4I 



i^liM 



t*f ii 



#'■* 



1^ > 




II 


'^^ 


««•*" ^ "' 







«ltiiti 



%* » 



•MM 




a 




, 


I^TT^^B* 1 


i 


tttR r 



OSCAR Pathfindef: 



'*•♦# 






hilii 



• i« 



« ta M to* 



^»*#t« 



i#r <« .^ 



'4 k^ 



Satellite Superstar "*jj: i- 1 



The Remarkable Partl&iPeater 



i ^ 








itti.'l -' ^ i 


41 


fl 



• «#f 



Bonanza in Used G'ear! 







74470"65946 



03 







Amateur Communications using Space Age Techniques 



rm 



hv 



mo nel, 2 

microphone standard. 



le IC-25 A uiicrs 
hout 
5 m— orie^-j -. scanning 
"O's and touchtone''' HM^ 







orf»t^ 



" 


rf-^ 


n 






V 


*•* 






^K^ 


t»l 


m 


■ -■ fa ^^^^ ■ ik ■ 


?^-: 

.* I , 


\ ' -— :^-.. ""»«"" • 


u^ 


;''^t \^ 


r^ * 





iZ *A 




^ 


:y 


v^ 


••^-^ 


-1 




'^ 


U 


w 


■^ 





*!*'*!:: 



f#i(^ 



%^> 



% 



% 




The best 2 meter 

multimode mobile 

on the market today, the 

IC-290A has features to make 

muldmode mobile a snap. 2 VFO^s, 

5 memories, priority channel, memor>' and 

band scannings squelch on SSB, selectable AGC and NB» 

and RIT, Touchtone ^ encoding provided with HM-8 

microphone standard. 



*N>ttH 



6 meter mobile 
at its best with the 
IC-56O3 a multimode 
mobile transceiver for working 
repeaten or sideband simplex, 
local or DXj 3 memories, 2 VFO's, scanning, 

squelch on SSB. 



• 






«/V. 







Sensible 

and affordable, the IC-22U 

offers simplicity with ease of operation 

Easy to use push buttons for up and down 

tuning. 800 channels at the push of a button, 

4 MHz coverage. EX-199 optional remotable 

frequency selector. 



112-116rh Avenue NE, Bellevuc, WA 98004/3331 Towerwood Drive, Suire 307, Dallas, TX 75234 




ICOM 



^^l] «t<afcd 4pccif>cnttiiifi^ sf« afVpYioxuiuiic and »ubjiei:t to cKunKif withnui ruitkr w ohlig;titi,>n.^ ALL ICi^'^M ndlcHi MgnilicaniH cxc^t?rd fCC rp^ubtioru timitinf iptiri^TUi 



CALL US FIRST! CASH-IN ON 



SERVING HAMS 
BETTER. 

North., .south, , . east. .. west. 

Bob Fftrrero,W6FtJ/fCSAHV, 
Jim Rafftrty, N6RJ 

- omer we I J known hams 
o've you courteous, 

^aonait^©d 
service. 



FREE PHONE 

800 

854-6046 

9:30AM to 5:30PM 

PACiFlCTlME 
Monday thru Saturday. 

CAUF. CUSTOMERS PLEASE 
CALL OR VISIT USTED STORES 



5-STORE BUYING POWER! 

FAST SHIPMENT POPULAR ITEMS FROM HUGE STOCKS. 
QUANTITY BUYING MEANS TOP DISCOUNTS, BEST PRICES. 

Amateurs world-wide are taking advantage of 
our fast service and special prices. 




ANAHEIM, CA 92801 

2620 W,. La Palma, 
(714) 761-3033 (213) 860-2040 

Between Disneyland &. Knott's Berry Farm 

BURLINGAME, CA 94010 
999 Howard Ave., (415) 342-5757 
5 rnifes south on 101 from S.l^ Airport. 

OAKLAND, CA 94609 

2811 Tefegraph Ave., (415) 451-5757 
Hwy 24 Downtown. Left 27th off-ramp. 

SAN OIEGO, CA 92123 

5375 Kearny Villa Road (714)560-4900 

hwy 163 & CJairemont Mesa Blvd, 

VAN NUYS, CA 91 401 

6265 Sepulveda Blvd.. (213) 968-2212 
San Diego Fwy at Victory Sivd. 

OVER-THE-COUNTER 
Mon. thru Sat. 10AM to 5:30PM 

AEA "ALLfANCE- ALPHA ■AMECO-AMPHEhJOL-ARRL-ASTRON 
-AVANTh BENCHES' B£RK^TEK*BlRi]*B*W'CALLBOOK^CDE 
-COLLINS»CU0IC»CURTI3 *CUSHCRAFT» DAIWA ■ DATOMG 
- DENTflOK- DRAKE 'OX ENGINEERING ' EIMAC ' HUStLEfl 

* HV-GAIN ■ IGOM' J.WMILLER- KENWOOO ■ KLM ^ LAflSEN 

* LUNAfl * fiAETZ ■ MFJ » MICRO - LOG • tAWf - PHODUCTS 
'MIRAGE » NVE ■ PALOMAR- R080T- ROHN- SHORE * SWAN 
^ TELEX -TELREJ^. TEMPO ^ TEM- TEC* THISTAO 

VAESU and many more ' 






SAVE substantially! 

Call now for 

your price 



TS-130S 



TR-2500 





TR-7850 



TS-830S 



R.L. DRAKE 
TR-7/DR-7 




Continuous receiver 
coverage, 1.5-30MHz. 

Transmit coverage: AH 

amateur bands, 160 thru 
10 meters. Optional pro- 
gram Ijoard for MARS, 
commercialp government, 
future ham bands, 

Up-conversion w/l-Fof 
48.05MHz. Hi-fevel bal- 
anced mixer front end tor 
superior strong signal 
handling performance. 



• True passbarid tuning. 

• Standard 2.3kHz fJiler 
w/spaceforSoptiona! 
crystal filters, pusli- 
button selected, 

• Sroacf band, lull solid- 
state design. 

• Rugged, built-in solid- 
state power j^mpyfi^t 

• SSB(w/USa/LSBj, AM 
CW. RTTY 



NEW! YAESU FT-ONE 
HF TRANSCEIVER 



■r ^ 


— H'* . 


^ 


"^^^ jt^^ii.^ 




% 


— t t"** " ■■ 


Bf flj^g^^H r ^ V .< 




4 ^- _* ■ 


.. t* *"* -^ -^ ■ 




■ "2?^ ■*' \^^^ ^^2^:^ 


, •■■••• 


■9.- '•• \T T.- 


^->......* ^^ 


j^j^yr J. ^^ 4H ^V ^H 



• General coverage recefverp 
150kHz to 29, 999MHz. 

• Transmit coverage: Mfne 
present and proposed bands, 

• Keyboard freq. entry. Fully 

dipitaNy synttiesized. 
Main tuning dial or push- 
button scanner in 
10 or 100Hz steps. 

• DtialVFOs. 

• Full CW break-in. 

• Up conversion w/first 
l-F at 73MHz. 



• Diode ring first mixer. 

• Optional 600H2 or 300Hz 

crystal ti iters. 

• Variable bandwidtti. 

• i-F shift. 

• Speech processor. 

• Digital readout for VFO, 
memory Chan., RIToftset. 

• NoJsa blanker 

• 240W pep Input, SSB. 

• 115/220VACor13.5DC 
operation. 



CALL FOR YOUR PRfCE 



Etd alpha 




All ALPHA amplifiers are in stock 
for fast delivery 

CALL FOR SPECIAL PRICES 



COLLINS/ROCKWELL 
KWM-380 

Limited quantity priced lower 
than current dealer wholesale. 









■■■■ . • '■' 



Prices are increasing! 

PHONE TODAY. SAVE I 



Pnces, specifications, descriptions subject lo change without notice. 



Calif, residents please add sales tax. 

TSM&g&^ine • March, 1982 3 



INFO 



Manuscripts 

Gorith^tlons ifi the fomi qI mAnu- 
»crtpts wrifh «lm wings and/or pticto- 
Qfiph) pre welfXKTie and will be cofv 
aidttrttd Ipr possible publication. Wa 
can aasum* no f^sponsEbiltty for loss 
or damig« to any mateftar. Plaa^iv 
inclose a aiamped, salf-addressad 
Anvtiope with aach submls&lqn Pay- 
m«nl for tha use of eny unsohciied 
matarlal will be mada upon accep- 
tari<ie. All con Id but Ions shOLild be 6\- 
rectad to trie 73 editorial offlcaa. 
*'How to Writo lor 73*' guidelines are 
avallabia upon request. 

Editorial Offices: 

Pine Street 

PetertJorouQh NH 03458 

Pnoni^: $03.9243673, 924-3874 

Advdftising Offices: 

EJm Street 
P«i«ftK>fWBtt iVH 03456 

Circulation Offices: 

EJm Sireet 

Pflterborciugli HH 03456 

Phone: 6CH^924^7296 

Subscription Rates 

In tHfi UnMed Slates and Posseaakms. 
Ofm Year (12 isw^ S^OO 
Tmo Y««/s (24 issues) $38.00 
Three Veara ^ issues} S53 00 

Elsewhere: 

Canada— 127.00/1 year only, US, 
fyrrtji. Foreign surface mail— $35,00/1 
year only, US- funds. Foratgn air 
mall— *e2.0Q/t year only, U,S. funds. 

To subscribe, 

renew or change 

an address: 

Wrlle to 73 Magazine, SutmcripMon 
Department, PO Bo* 531, FannLn£^ 
dafe N¥ 11737, For fenewali and 
ctianqes o1 address, include Ifw «d- 
dr«^ l«J:>if kotn your mc^ lecenl 
lavue of 73. For gift subsi^ptJons, in- 
clyde fcw rmnm and address as well 
at tfwoe at Qlft reclptonta Postm^ter 
Svnd form #^79 to 73 Magaiif>t, Sub- 
sertptkon Safv«c«s, P.O. Box 931 . Fa/nv 
«nodaie.NY it737. 

Subscription 

problem or 

question: 

Wrkta to 73 Mmgaitne^ Sulm^nption 
Departmenl, PO Bov 93i, Farnilngdale 
NY I! 737. Rease Include an addre»9^ 
label 

73 M$g9ifnff (l&SN 0096^10) Js pub- 
(iihed monthly by 73, Inc., 60 Pme 
Street, Peterborough NH 034S8, Sec- 
ond claaa poaiage paid at Feterbor' 
ough NH 03456 and at addUtonal mail- 
Ing off leas. Copyright (c) 1961 by 73, 
!nc, AH rights reserved. No part of thl3 
publicaiiort may be feprJnied of oitier- 
h^Jse reproduced wiltiout written par^ 
mission from thh publlaHer. Microfilm 
Edition- University Microfilm, Ann 
Arbor Mi 48106, 



STILL MORE 
USABLE ANTENNA 
FOR YOUR 
MONEY . . . 
PLUS 30 Meters! 



Butternut's nev%f HF6V 
automatic bandswitching 
vertical lets you use the 
entire 2 6- foot radiator 

Uon 80/75, 40, 30- 20 and 
10 meters (full quarter- 
wave unloaded perfomn- 
ance on 15 nneters). No 
lossy traps. Butternut's 
exclusive Differential 

Reactance Tuning™ cir- 
cuitry uses rugged ce- 
ramic capacitors and 
large-dianneter self-sup- 
porting inductors for 
radiation efficiency and 
DX performance un- 
matched by conventional 
nnultiband designs of 
comparable height. 



Forcomptete information 
cor>cem»ng the HF6V & 
other Bunemut products 
see your dealer or write 
for our free catalog. 





BUTTERNUT 



GARY AIRPORT 

BOX 3S6E Rte. 2 

SAN MARCOS. TX 7S666 



R-X Noise Bridge 




Learn the truth about 
your antenna. 

Find its resonant 
frequency, 

^ Adjust it to your 
operating frequency quickly 
and easily. 

tf there ts on@ p]ac« in your station 
where you cannot risk uncertain 
results ii is in your antenna, 

Th© Paioitiar Engineers R-X Noise 
Briilge tells you if your antenna is 

resonant or not and, if it is not, 
whether it is too iong or too short. 
All this in one meastirement 
rsading. And it works just m W9JI 
with harn-foand-only receivers 3% 
with general coverage equtpment 
because it gives perfect null 
readings evef> when the antenna is 
not resonant, tt gives resistance and 
reactance readings on dipoles. 
Inverted Vees, quads, beams^ 
muUiband trap dipoles and 
verticals. No station is complete 
without this up-to-date instrument* 

Why work in the dark? Your SWR 
meter or your resistance noise 
bridge tells only half the story. Get 
the instrument that really works, 
the Palomar Engineers R-X Noise 
Bridge. Use it to check your 
antennas from 1 to 100 MHz. And 
use it in your shack to adjust 
resonant frequencies of both series 
atKi parallel tuned circuits. Works 
better than a dip meter and costs a 
lot less. Send for our free brochure. 





TTie |>rlce is $53.95 in the US. and Canada. 
Add £3.00 Shippin{}/Hafidling 
CaMornia reSFdents add sales fax. 

Fully guaranteed by the originator 
of the ^-X Noise Bridge. 

ORDER YOURS NOWl 



Palomar 



Box 455. Escondido. CA, 92025 
Phone: (714) 747-3343 



4 JSMagaiine • March J 982 



^ 



The Porta-Peafer — the Instant 
Communicator 

—quick and easy does it 

^ WA2BHB, AC2A. WA2UNN 



■ ii^'.f ^. F.i. * * ■ 



12 



Amateur Television's Stripper 

— a home-brew star ..,.„ VE3CYC 20 




mr. 82 



MA GAZIHE 



Home-Brew a TVRO Downconverter 

—works with last month's LNA 
-... WA4CVP. WA40SR 58 

TVRO Q & A 

—advice from WB0POP WB0POP 62 

Indian Hams Rejoice 

— import restrictions lifted , ,.Rama 64 




Polishing Kenwood's R-1000 

— 3 gem in the rough .K9EUI 34 

Peaking and Tweaking 
Surplus CB Boards 

— the untold story ...WB0NPN/8 38 

OSCAR Pathfinder 

ii^ — a colorful way to track the 

satellites ..WB6NQK 46 

Which TVRO Antenna Is Best? 

— Satellite Central, Part IV. .....Gibson 52 




Licensing for Americans Overseas 

-classes help, but our government doesn't 

The Masher 

^$on of The Amazing Audio Elixir 
, W5VSR 76 

Innovation or Consternation? 

— recent patents dealing with radio ...AK0Q 78 

Let s Go Shopping 

— baggir^g the used gear bonanza 

...WD4SKH 88 



Never Say Die— 6, Social Events — 61, Corrections— 104, New Products— 110, Letters— 111, RTTY Loop — 116, 
OSCAR Orbits-120, Ham Help-123, 145, Reader Service-130, DX-132, Contests-133, Awards-138, 
FunJ — 139, Review — 142, Propagation— 178 

Coven Harold Nelson's photo depjcts WD6NQK's OSCAR Pathfinder program (page 46) being used to track Russian satellite 
RS-6 (page 120). 



73 Magazine • March, 1982 5 



W2NSD/1 

KEVER SAY DIE 

editorial t>y W&yne Green 



MORSE AND THE DEMISED 
PLAIN LANGUAGE RULES 

The FCC would probably have 
been able to get amateurs to 
buy the proffered plain 
language revvrite of the ham 
regulations but for one major 
miscalculation. Sure, there were 
some aspects of the rewrite 
which were in need of repairs, 
bul the one disastrous flaw was 
so enormous in the eyes of 
amateurs that ft sank the whole 
project. This was the deletion of 
97.1, the Basis and Purpose of 
amateur radio. 

All amateurs, whether walk- 
ing around with an HT on the hip 
monitoring the local repeater or 
adding to the mess on 20 meters 
with fruitless calls in the 
pileups, are proud of the fun- 
damental reasons for the bx^ 
istence of our hobby. . .or ser- 
vice, as the government likes to 
call it. When the FCC tampered 
with those magic words, they 
brought us out of our corner 
fighting. 

Well. let*s take a look at the 
words.,. and the concepts in- 
volved. Let's think about them in 
terms of our own personal con- 
tribution to amateur radio and 
see how we measure up. Let's 
also mull over the place of 
Morse code In this realm, 

97.1(a) bids us to provide a 
noncommercial communica- 
tions service, particularly with 
respect to emergencies. Fine, 
Some of us do that on occasion. 



Others make a career out of It, 
Well, we don't need a half- 
million active message handlers 
either during or between 
emergencies. We do need 
enough traffic-handiing training 
so Ihal whatever amateurs hap- 
pen to be selected for an 
emergency situation by chance 
know what to do efficiently. 

There is a tendency to think of 
traffic handling in terms of the 
CW nets which pass around 
endless streams of make-work 
messages, racking up traffic- 
handling scores for Hsting in 
QSJ. It we are gotng to be more 
honest about this, we have to 
admit grudgingly that when the 
chips are down, the emergency 
communications for most situa- 
tions are handled on phone via 
two meters and repeaters.,, 
something few amateurs have 
had any real emergency experi- 
ence with. One of the results of 
this is a pathetically slow traffic 
flow, with high percentages of 
the time wasted in callsign ex- 
changes, the endless repeating 
of words spelled out letter by let- 
ter, and the jamming of transmis- 
sions by operators unfamiliar 
with emergency traffic handling* 

If you stop to think about it, 
we are years beyond the time 
when we should have estab- 
lished a nationwide automated 
traffic net on high-speed ASCII 
which would route and pass 
along messages without any op- 
erator being needed. The resis- 



CALL FOR ARTICLES 

Are you a RTTY, SSTV, or fast-scan TV enthusiast? Share 
your knowledge and enthusiasm with the rest of us by writing 
an article about your favorite mode. We are planning several 
special issues for later this year, so get cracking. Send your 
submissions to: Editor. 73 Magazine, Pine Street, Peter- 
borough NH 03458. 




tance, right from the beginning, 
of the traffic organizations to 
the use of RTTY has kept this 
part of ouf '^service" about 30 
years behind technology. A 
group of us developed and were 
using automated message-han- 
dling techniques in the late 
1940s, only to find a fierce resis- 
tance from the national relay 
organization lo any changes 
from CW. 

For emergency purposes, 
where two meters is the op- 
timum band for local com- 
munications, we need hand and 
mobile phone rigs, not Morse 
code. With all due respect, there 
are times when it is advanta- 
geous to have a working system 
which even a CSer can step in 
and use if needed. Trying to 
stick to code for such communi- 
cations is featherbedding. 

If we are ever going to set up 
any serious emergency traffic- 
handling system in this coun- 
try,,, or the world (why think 
small?). - Jt is going to have to 
be up4o-date. This means that 
we are going to have to think in 
terms of digital electronics and 
microcomputers, with automat- 
ic message pickup and relaying 
and with error-correcting codes 
which will ensure 100% copy at 
all times. 

Indeed, if we start working on 
the elements of such a system 
now» I believe that within five 
years amateur radio can have an 
emergency communications 
system of which we can be 
proud. Such a system, if it is to 



work when really needed, must 
be m everyday use. Only in this 
way can we encourage the in- 
vestment in eauipmenl and 
technology which is required 
. . .an investment by amateurs, 
not the government. 

You know, if the worst should 
happen, our country could well 
be up the creek if we don't have 
a comprehensive system. Tm 
talking about automatic polling 
of stations in a net by the net 
control, with all messages typed 
in on a pocket-si^ed compyter. 
Vm talking about relaying via 
repeaters, via satellites (ham 
and commercial), and via low- 
band links over any desired 
distances. 

One of the lastlhif^gs we need 
in an emergency is to have to de* 
pend on the handful of hams 
who are good sharp Morse code 
operators. You know as well as I 
that at leas! 90% oUhe hams to- 
day are not capable of copying 
code at a reasonable speed 
under emergency conditions. 
Who are we trying to fool? 

So much for 97. 1(a). . .though 
I will be writing more about our 
responsibility to catch up with 
technology for traffic handling 
and emergency nets. Let's look 
at 97.1(b) now* , .which has to 
do with the amateur contribyt- 
ing to the advancement of the 
state of the radio art. Well we've 
a good h 'Story of that* if you look 
back far enough. In recent times 
we have little of which to be 
proud. Admittedly a good part of 
the responsibflity for this lies 
with the FCOs restrictive regu- 
lations and inflexibility. But that 
isn't the whole story by any 
means. 

Let me ask this, .where 
does Morse code fit in any pic- 
ture of the advancement of the 
radio art? Other than harking 
back to the t>eginnin9s of radio 
communications - before ra- 
diotelephone was invented. . . 
code plays little part in modern 
communications. Advancing 
technology has to do these days 
with digital techniques, with 
satellites, with microwaves, 
with high-speed communica- 
tions, and many other possible 
new modes of communications. 
Revering our roots is one thing, 



$$ HOME-BREW CONTEST $% 

You can win a cash prize and receive fame and fortune by 
being a published author, aM for telling ys about your latest 
home-brew project. See the rules on page 6 of the February* 
1982, issue of 73 for the rest of the story. 



6 73Magazine • March. 1982 




BIG performance^ smaU size / smaller price! 



The TR-2500 is a compact 2 
meter FM handhetd transceiver 
featuring an LCD readout. 10 
channel memory, lithium battery 
memory back-upp memory scan, 
programmabie aytomatic band- 
scan, Hi/Lo power switch and 
builHn sub-tone encodef. 

TR-2600 FEATURES: 

• Extremely compact size and 
light weight 66 (2'5/6) W x 
168(6-5/8) H X40 (1-6/8) D, 
mm (inches), 540 g, (1.2 lbs) 
with Nl-Cd pack. 

• LCD digital frequency readout, 
with memory channel and 
function indication. 

• Ten channel memory, includes 
*'M0" memory for non-standard 
split frequencies. 

• Lithium battery memory back- 
up, built-in, (estimated 5 year 
life) saves memory when 
Nr-Cd pack discharged, 

• Memory scan, stops on busy 
channels, skips channels in 
which no data is stored, 

• UP/ DOWN manual scan in 
5 KHz steps. 

• Repeater feverse operation. 



CONVENIENT TOP CONTROLS 




2.5 W or 300 mW RF output, 

(HI/LOW power switch.) 

programmable automatic band 

scan allows upper and lower 

frequency limits and scan 

steps of 5 KHz and larger 

(5. 10 J 5, 20, 30 KHz.., etc) 

to be programmed. 

Built-in tuneable (with variable 

resistor) sub-tone encoder. 

Built-in 16 key autopatch 

encoder, 

SItde-lock battery pack. 

Keyboard frequency selection 

across full range. 

Extended frequency coverage: 

143.900 to 148.995 MHz rn 

5 KHz steps. 

Optional power source, MS-1 

mobile or ST-2 AC charger/ 




power supply allows operation 
while charging. (Automatic 
drop-in connections.) 

• High impact plastic case, 

• Battery status rndicatof. 

• Two lock switches for 
keyboard and transmit. 

STANDARD ACCESSORIES: 

• Flexible rubberized antenna 
with BNC connector. 

• 400 mAH heavy-duty NhCd 
battery pack 

• AC charger. 

OPTIONAL ACCESSORIES: 

• ST-2 Base stalion power 
supply and quick charger 
(approx. 1 hrj. 

• MS-1 13.8 VDC mobile stand/ 
charger/power supply 

• TU-1 Programmable "DIP 
switch" (CTCSS) encoder. 

• SMC-25 Speaker microphone. 

• LH-2 Deluxe top grain 
cowhide leather case. 

• P8-25 Extra NhCd battery 
pack, 400 mAH, heavy-duty. 

• BT-1 Battery case for AA 
manganese or alkaline cells 
(not Ni-Cd). 

• VB-2530 RF power amplifier 

• BH-2 Belt hook. 

• WS-1 Wrist strap. 

• EP-1 Earphone. 





40 W, IS memories/offset recall^ scan. 



priority, autopatch (DTMF) 



Kenwood's remarkable 
TR-7850 2 meter FM mobile 
transceiver provides alt the 
features you could desire, 
including a powerful 40 watts 
output. A 25 watt version, the 
TR 7800 ts also available. 

TR-7850 FEATURES: 

• 40 waltsoylput. with selectable 
high or low power operat*or>. 

• 15 multifunction memory 
channels, easily selectable 
w)th a rotary controL M1-Mt3 

memorize frequency ^^^ 
and offset ( 1 600 KHz ^^*^ 
or simplex) 



M14... memorize transmit 
and receive frequencies 
independently for non-standard 
offset. MO . . priority channel, 
with simplex ±600 KHz or 
non-standard offset operation. 
Internal battery back-up for 
memorres Requires four AA 
Ni-Cd batteries, (not 
supplied). 



Extended frequency 
coverage. 143 900-148 995 
MHz m 5 or 10 KHz steps. 
Priority alert. Beep alerts 
operator when signai 
appears on priority channel, 
Built-in autopatch encoder 
(DTMF) All 12 plus four 
additional DTMF signaling 
tones. (With simultaneous 
push of REV switch.J 
Autoscan of memories and 
entire band Scan resumes 
automatically. 
Fronl panel keyboard 
Compact size. 




pai#rln 



$ K &MWa 



m- 



'WMnt 



9m l-M THAiSJfcH 



.i^ivER ' Tf**T* 



- UP/DOWN manual scan of 
entire band and menxsries, 
using UP/DOWN microphone 
(supplied) 

• Repeater reverse switch 

• Separate digital displays for 
frequency and memory 
channel. 

• LED S/RF bar meter. 

• Tone switch. 

Matching accessories for 
fixed station operation: 

• KPS-12 power supply (for 
TR^7850) 

• KPS-7 power supply (for 
TR-7800) 





Compact mobile speaker 
Only 2-11/16 W x 2-1/2 H x 
2-1/8 D (inches) 
Handles 3 watts of audio 




^^n^ 



TRtO-KENWOOD COMMUNICATIONS 
1111 WesS Walnut. Compton. California 90220 



^ STAFF 



pyBLisHERmprron 
ixECMTi^rc VICE pn^iotitT 

ASSISTANT PUiLl$H£R^DrTOft 
Jfifl OtTray wsiiarH 

AS&OCtATE PUBLl£K£fimiR£CTOffl 

OF f^UiLlCATEONS 

EiSwiia fwtn^ WA 1 UFY 

MUtAaiiKI EDiTOH 

John BurACir 

ASCT. HANAaifiO EorroR 

aNT0mAL ASSISTANTS 
RicriArd Pfvtfiit 

coMTntBtm*«a EdnoRS 

^QH£\ Acii^rminr^ AG9V 

UnvKAh«i^W»2NEL 
ADUi^rSTIlATIVE ASStfTAMT 

ASSOCIATES 

i^ii oovwv piEn: 

Dlfrft Ingiim K4TVVJ 

JC4 KAM«t G3iZCZ 

Dr Mirc Uawr WAIAJPI 

Bii' P^^Htntth I^AeiTF 



IL 



PRODUCTION MANAmH^ 
PUitlCATrONS 

A&ST. PAOOUCTION 

MANAaEFLi/PU ■ L IC ATIONS 

Dvnnia Qirisiins«n 

Mif<ch«tf Muppnv 

ACVERTtSiNa QRAPHICS 

IMAN40EDS 

Bruct Hfldlrv 
J mo Prttlon 

Frinceii l«nron 

LIndA Drirw 

Sandra DuHotie 

Miimvw Halt 

Olinn* RUfli^n 

Pat r re la M«eKDwiiky,rAii«n 

TtieriiAOaltbQ 

6c oil PlilltiiirJ 

B«My smnn 

DtbtMAh Sionn 

lr«ne V«ll 

Judi Wimbi 

Oonma WahlinOh 
Ddvid Wo?m«k 

fiHQJOGRAPHY 

WUilim Hfiydolph 

Paul Oabicri 

&fy*n HaiimQ« 

Ti\afn4t V^ii4ni»uvo 

TVPESfTTWO 

Si^tt Bftdell 

D^bbkO Oavid^on 

iavff iv Jackaort 

Artrw Roceti^o 

KBlly Smim 

KArttfi Sit wait 

M4cha(B DttiBDChtri 



COIiiTflOLI.£ft 

Pvtar CeiT«ia 

EXECimVl AlStlTAMt 
ACCOUNTma liAHAGEII 

CiRClJUhTlDN MANAailt 
!p«^a ^utiriwia 

C1RCULAT10I4 

DcKti Dar 
•03^924.7296 

Fiylm* JOthnrtlOflt 

BULK SAi£S MANAOEJl 

AE^VEflTISING 

J<m Graf WlKy. Uyir 

N»ncv Ciampa, A««t Mg<r 

ROU K«n^ofi KAIQAV 

Cewfiaha layioi 



but making a fetish of it is 
something else. 

If we are going to live up to 
97,1{b), it Is about time that we 
shelved the code concept and 
encouraged amateurs to start 
building, experimenting, and pi- 
oneering new ideas. It is time we 
got behind the magazines push- 
ing this concept. It is time we 
got these ideas into our clubs 
and discussed them. 

I would love to print technical 
breakthrough arlicles as i did in 
past years. I still remember the 
BitI Ashby article on the Flying 
Nose Lock the Gostas arti- 
cles 00 double sideband, years 
ahead of his time only because 
amateurs failed to take the bait 
and run with it. . .the paramet- 
ric amplifier by Sam Harris, an 



invention which changed the 
long-range radar picture world- 
wide, 

97.1(c) is a **ryle" which is 
directed at the Commission, not 

at amateurs. Pity, for this is one 
of the most broken rules in our 
regulations. This one asks the 
FCC to encourage and improve 
the amateur service through 
rules which provide for the ad- 
vancing of skills in both com- 
munications and the technical 
phases of the art. We've never 
had it so bad. If we had had any 
real national organizationf It 
would have taken the FCC to 
court and sued in the name of 
the United States for several 
billion dollars. . .which Is what 
has been lost due to the restric- 
tive way the Commission has 



handled the amateur service 
. . .and totally ignored this rule. 

Indeed, our country has lost 
many billions just as a result of 
the inept handling of the 'incen- 
tive licensing'* proposals of 
1963. IHow much business has 
our country lost to Japan In 
television, radio, and other elec- 
tronics equipment in the last 
few years? We are at>out one 
million engineers and techni- 
cians t>ehind, today, as a result 
of that proposal— -as Tve t>eefed 
before. 

Let's move on to 97.1(d) in our 
search for some ray of hope for 
a need for code. This one has to 
do with our providing a reservoir 
of trained operators, techni- 

Contmued on page 118 



a 73 Magazine • March j 982 



Well I Can Dream, Can't I? 



by Bandel Linn K4PP 




iWANK^ For 

5H0PP»M<S? at Hot shot 



i2zr?iaJ£f£5s^ 




"We recognize your service to the community as a ham! Therefore, your bill is 
cut in half!" 



Reader Service for facing p^ge -^ 30^ 



HEATTI 
AND HAMS 

"PERFECT 
PARTNERS" 




Who bu[!ds the best Amateur Radio gear 
around? You doi Thousands of Hams attest to 
the reliable performance, specificatrons and long- 
term dependability of Heathkit Amateur equip- 
ment. Not to mention the thrill of airing a rig that 
you've built with your own hands. The more than 
200 Hams at Heath invite you to join the fun. 

For over ttiree decades, our unique 'We won t 
let you fa/r'phjiosophy has created a strong part- 
nership between Hams and Heath, the world's 
leading electronic kit manufacturer. Heath is com- 
mitted to designing equipment and accessories 
of the highest quality that will withstand the test 
of performance - OSO after QSO. 

Amateur Radio is an exciting* worthwhile hobby. 
Starting and pursuing (t with Heathkit equipment 
45 the best way to go. Our complete line can pro- 
vide everything you need, from a basic Code 
Practice Oscillator and self-study License Courses 
alt the way to a sophisticated station of operation 
with remote capabilily Pacesetter Amateur Radio 
enthusiasts are even using Heath'Zenith com- 
puters to design antennas, plot beam headings, 
track OSCAR and transmit RTTY. Heath and 
Hams, once again, are perfect partners'' \n a 
new adventure. 

See the complete Amateur Radio line in 
our latest catalog or visit your nearby 
Heathkit Electronic Center* 

Where Heathkit products are dispfayed.sotd and 
serviced. See your telephone directory white pages 
for the store r^ar you. 

•iM«afh Company ana Veniecrmoi^ogy Electronics CofporatJCii> 
aw wrtvoliy -owned su^s^iane^-cf Zeniin Radio Corpofstitm 
Tfi« Hftathitit Electronic Centers are operated &y Veritechrr}Dl4>gy 
Electronics C^rpd^alion 



Heathkit 




A HEATHKIT TOP-OF-THE-LINr STATlOHi T. SB-«44A Remote VFO 2- Sa'104A HF Trans- 
ceiver 3. SB'fi04 P5-it44 SSB Speaker and Power Supply 4» HDP- 242 VOX PTT Cardidd 
Oesli Mfke 5. S6-634 F^wc* Function Stalton Console 6. S8-614 CRT Station Monitof 7. 
HM-2t40 Ouai HF MTilimm&r S. SS-221 2k W linear Amplifier 9. Guarame^d Seif-siiKiy Course 
for Novic«. General aiK) Advanced Cl^ss Lieeming 10- SA-SOiO M^aiic Memofy Keyer tl^ H-e9 
AJUn-One Compiler T^rm+nai 12. H-25 High-Speed Dot Mairi* Line Prtnter 13* GU-1B^ ernef* 
gency'refndtfi Portable Powe' System 



UU P P ^ ATA I ^%f^ • ^^ ^^^ ^^^"^ ^®® ^^^ ^* *^® latest. colorCul 104-page Heathkit Catalog by writing: Heath Company. Dept Otl-874. 



Benton Harbor, Ml 49022 In Canada contact Heath Co . 1480 Dundaa Street E.. Mi^issauga. ONT L4X 2R7. 





u,^ 



^^^H ^^^^^^^^^^^1 



MWI 



''I e 



GttUEt 



The 



and \sMXi\ 



offer performance and versatility 
for tliose wlio demand the ultimate! 



TR7A Transceiver 

• CONTINUOUS FREQUENCY COVERAGE — 1,5 to 30 MHz full 
receive coverage. The optional AUX7 provides to 1 .5 MHz 
receive plus transmit coverage of 1 .8 to 30 MHz, for future 
Amateur bands. MARS. Embassy. Government or Commercial 
frequencies (proper authorization required)* 

• Full Passband Tuaing (FBI) enhances use of liigh rejection 
8-poIe crystal filters. 

Newf Bath 2.3 kHz ssb and SOD Hi cw crystal filters, and 9 
kHi a-m selectivity are standard, plus provisions for two 
additional filters. These 8-pole crystal filters in conjunction 
with careful mechanical /electrical design result in realizable 
ultimate rejection in excess of 100 dB. 

Newl The very effective NB7 Noise Blanker is now standard* 

New! Built in lightning protection avoids damage to solid-state 
components from lightning induced transients. 

New! Mic audio available on rear panel to facilitate phone patch 
connection. 

• State-of'the-art design combining solid-state PA, 
up-conversion* high-level double balanced tst mixer and 
frequency synthesis provided a no tune-up, broadband, high 
dynamic range transceiver. 



R7A Receiver 

• CONTINUOUS NO COMPROMISE to 30 MHz 
frequency coverage, 

• FuU passband tuning (FBT), 

Newl NB7A Noise Blanker supplied as standard. 

• State-of-the-Art features of the TH7A. plus added 
flexibility with a low noise 10 dB rf amplifier. 

Newl Standard ultimate selectivity choice include the 
supplied 2.3 kHz ssb and 500 Hz cw crystal filters, and 
9 kHz a-m selectivity. Capability for three accessory 
crystal filters plus the two supplied, including 300 Hz* 
1.8 kHz. 4 kHz. and 6 kHz. The 4 kHz filter, when used 
With the R7A s Synchro-Phase a-m detector, provides 
a-m reception with greater frequency response within a 
narrower bandwidth than conventional a-m detection, 
and sideband selection to minimize interference potential. 

• Front panel pushbutton control of rf preamp. a-m /ssb 
detector, speaker ON /OFF switch, i-f notch filter, 
reference-derived calibrator signal, three age release 
times (plus AGC OFF)* integral 1 50 MHz frequency 
counter /digital readout for external use. and Receiver 
Incremental Tuning (RIT), 



The 'Twins'' System 



• FREQUENCY FLEXIBILITY. The TR7A/H7A combination 
offers the operator, particularly the DX'er or Contester. fre- 
quency control agility not available in any other system, The 
"Twins" offer the only system capable of no-compromise 
DSR (Dual Simultaneous Receive). Most transceivers allow 
some external receiver control but the "Twlr^" provide 
Instant transfer of transmit frequency control to the R7A 
VFO. Ttie operator can listen to either or both receiver's 
audio, and instantly determine his transmitting frequency by 



appropriate use of the TR7A's RCT con^bDl {Receiver 
Controlled Transmit). DSR is implemented by mixing the two 
audio signals in the R7A 

• ALTERNATE ANTENNA CAPABILITY. The R7A's Antenna 
Power Sptitter enhances the DSR feature by allowing the use 
of an additional antenna (ALTERNATE) besides the MAIN 
antenna connected to the TR7A (the transmitting antenna). 
All possible splits between the two antennas and the two 
system receivers are possible. 




Specificvtiarm, avai^bihty am) pnces sub/ect to change without notice or obBg^* 

See your Drake dealer or write 
for additional Infdmiatiom 




CO^*'V'0 SCO J New RV75 Synthesized VFO 
Compatfble with TR5 and 7-Line Xcvts/Rcvts 

• frequency Synttiesiied for crystal -control led 
stalJiiity • VRTO fVariabk Rate Tuning Osdllator') 
adjusts tuning rate as fynction of tutiing speed. 

• Resolution to 10 Hz • Three pr&gnmma&le fixe^J 
frequencies for MARS, etc, • Split or Transcelve 
operation with main transceiver PTO or F?V75 



H, L. DRAKE COMPANY • 540 Richard street. M>amisburg, Ohio4534E« Phone t51 33 866-2421 • Teie>£28B-D17 



Patent pending 




i 



^"iUQ 





far a 




• I 



ive average 



I 



With the new TR5 



COMrNG SOON: 

RV75 Synthesized VFO 

featuring the Drake "VRTO" 

• Fr*qu«ncy Synthesited fior crystal -controJiea 
stabiUty ' VRTD (Variable Rate Tunini Os^tnator') 
sfJJusts tuning raie as f-jriCtion cf Uinrng speed- 
« Rjisolution to to H£ - Three program mabT« fixed 
trefjuencies for MARS. etc. • Spirt or Trinsceiva 
c^peraiion with main trans<siver PTO or BV75 




Patent pending 



versatility and value are spelled D-R-A-K-E . 



Dynamic 

RANGE 



Deli ABLE 

SERVICE 



The dynamic range of the TR5 is unexcelied by any transceiver in its ciass. The TRS's 
greater than dBm third order intercept point (85 dB two-tone dynamic range) at 20 
kHz spacing can be achieved only by the use of a passive diode-ring double balanced 
mixer Drake was the first to bring this technology to the Amateur market with a 
high-level mixer in the TR7, 

When you purchase a TR5. or any Drake product, you acquire a product of the latest 
production techniques, which provide reliable pei-formance. 

Yet with a product as sophisticated as one of today's transceivers, after-sales 
service is a must. Ask any Drake owner. Our Customer Service Department has a 
reputation second to none. 



IflLOWATT 
^ AMPLIFIER 



Drake is the only Amateur Radio manufacturer who offers a full complement of 
accessories to satisfy almost every desire the HF Amateur may have. This wide 
election allows any operator to assemble a station which nieets his needs, and 
assures compatible interfacing and styling instead of a desk full of equipment with 
a variety of soling and poor operation as a system. 

Everyone wants to be heardt The accessory L7S and its 3-5O0Z (1200 watts PEP 
input) and a decent antenna will do the trick. This rugged self-contained amplifier/ 
power supply will put the TR5 on an even footing with the best of them. 



The TR5 and all Drake Transceivers, are backed by the best in engineering. The TR5 
is the result of an extensive engineering effort, combining proven past techniques 
and ideas with new state of the art concepts. 

As a result the TR5 will not be superceded by a new model every six months. It 
represents a true radio communications value that will provide many years of 
operating enjoyment. 




NGINEERING 



your Drakt deafer 
or writ© for 

additional Information. 



Features, ava y and prijrts subjeet to cliang^ without notice or obllgstJon: 



R. L. DRAKE COMPANY 




DRAKE 



54D Richard St . Miamisburg. Ohio 45343. USA 
Phone! (51 3J 866-242 1 • Tete* 28S-01 7 



The Porta-Peater 
the Instant Communicator 

quick and easy does it 



Mike Strange WA2BHB 

PO Box 58 

Pine Hill N} 08021 



Bd Wo2nicki AC2A 
Lake Jr^nqu'dfty 
Andover Nf 07821 



Clark fishman WA2UNN 
Lake Trar^quitity 
Andover Nj 07821 




Photo A. Field Porta-P^^ hookup with FJ-227 and Tempo YHF-l. This Porta-Peater is housed in 
a minibox on a 19'' rack panel (original prototypel 

12 73 Magazine * March, 1982 



Emergency situations al- 
ways seem to happen 
where there is limited re- 
peater coverage available 
or limited HT range, or 
when no one's HT has a 
crystal frequency which 
matches anyone else's 
(sound familiar?). The Porta^ 
Peater^M solves these prob- 
lems and provides capabili- 
ty and versatility beyond 
any com merci ally-avail* 
able repeater package — 
and for a lot less money. 

The system is an audio- 
driven command and con- 
trol module which takes 
any two rigs and converts 
them into a QRP, frequen- 
cy-agile, VOX-d riven re- 
peater with CW IDer, hang, 
and cycle timers. All this 
with absolutely NO modifi- 
cations to any of the radios. 
All connections are made 
via the available audio in- 
put and output jacks on the 
radios. You can run any 
mode, any band, cross 
band, etc. Do whatever 
your heart desires! You are 
limited only by your imagi- 
nation and the FCC for 
Porta-Peater applications. 



A complete Porta-Peater 
should run you less than 
$100 for all new parts in- 
cluding an enclosure (but 
no printed circuit board). 

Photo A shows a Porta- 
Peater field repeater in ac- 
tion. Notice the simple in- 
stallation. This one is set up 
on two meters. 

Birth of Porta-Peater 

The idea for Porta-Peater 
came from AC2A's desire to 
be able to erect an instant 
repeater at hamfests on a 
frequency fitting most of 
the HTs in use that day 
Since one could never be 
sure who would be along on 
the day of a hamfest, there 
was no way of knowing 
whose rigs would be avail- 
able to build into a tempo- 
rary repeater. This meant 
no modifications could be 
made to anybody's unit. Al- 
so, we were too cheap to 
want to invest $600 in a 
fixed-frequency repeater 
for what basically was just 
playing around. 

Photo B shows the first 
Porta-Peater- It was a sim- 
ple control system with 
IDer capability but limited 
timer ability, It was set up 
at a local Philadelphia ham- 
fest using a Tempo VHF 
One-Plus, a Yaesu FT-227R, 
and two separate Larsen 5/8- 
wavelength antennas about 
fifty feet apart (one on the 
ground, the other about 10 
feet up). Both rigs were set 
to low-power output. Fan- 
tastic! Everybody liked it 
and used it. We switched 
frequencies, splits. You 
could do whatever you 
wanted, with limitations 
depending on what rigs you 
used, not the repeater con- 
trol. 

Passersby suggested us- 
ing split band/mode, etc, 
and its application to emer- 
gency usage. This thing was 
really more than just a toy. 
It had the makings of being 
the basis for an instant emer- 
gency repeater system, with 
super possibilities. With the 
Porta-Peater, you could put 



a repeater on the air as fast 
as you could hook up two 
audio cables and two an- 
tennas* 

Porta-Peater I was a 
hand-wired, non-reproduc- 
ible model with diode ma- 
trix IDer, Definitely not the 
stuff articles are made of. It 
was ugly, but it did work 
and work well Porta-Peater 
1! had a nice PCB layout 
with a new PROM CW IDer. 
tt looked good, worked 
lousy. Six months (part- 
time, with spurts of 
midnight-oil genius} were 
spent creating Porta-Peater 
III which looks good, works 
welt, and is capable of be- 
ing reproduced by other 
hams. Photos C and D show 
a boxed unit, and Photo E 
shows a rack-mount ver- 
sion. 

Theory of Operation 

The basic concept be- 
hind the Porta-Peater was 
the creation of a repeater 
by taking any two readily- 
available amateur radios. 
One rig acts strictly as a 
receiver and the other as a 
transmitter Fig. 1 is a 
schematic representation. 
One rig (any band/mode) re- 
ceives an incoming signal; it 
is taken off the external 
speaker jack and fed into 
the Porta-Peater. Here it is 
amplified, and the audio is 
used to trigger the other 
rig's transmitter (any band/ 
mode) line via the Porta- 
Peater VOX, Incoming au- 
dio also starts the time-out 
timer A separate internal 
timer controls the CW IDer 
cycle. Porta-Peater is an in- 
terface link between the 
audio output jack of one rig 
and the microphone jack of 
the other rig. 

If you use two 2-meter 
rigs, a duplexer is not neces- 
sary since separate TX and 
RX antennas work quite 
well with about 40 or so 
feet between them at QRP 
levels. The quality of the 
particular rigs in use (front 
end specs) determines indt- 
vidual antenna-spacing re- 
quirements. Also, since the 




Photo B. Inside view of first unit from Photo A. CW IDer 
takes up most of box. Control system is in front 



emergency usage of the 
Porta-Peater is based on the 
fact that you don't know in 
advance what bands on 
which you may be setting 
up a repeater (6, 2, 1-1/4, 3/4, 
etc), a carload of dup lexers 
in one's back seat generally 
is not appreciated by the 
family Also, it ain't cheap! 
The Porta-Peater would 
be extremely effective in 
hooking up a VHF link into 
a low-band rig command 
center via a repeater, with 
easy crossband communi- 
cations. Since the system is 
VOX driven, you could cre- 
ate muftiple-rig and repeat- 
er systems in any configura- 
tion needed. Just keep a 
supply of audio jumper ca- 
bles handy. 

Circuit Description 

The Porta-Peater circuit 



V 



LOCAL MIKE 



is composed of six basic 
functions: a local mike 
amp, VOX amplifier, VOX 
trigger, reset timer, ID timer, 
and a selectable four-mes- 
sage PROM CW IDer. All 
circuit symbols are on Figs. 
2 and 3. Audio from a re- 
ceiver source is fed into an 
input transformer (T1), 
which provides a voltage 
transformation of 5-to-1 to 
drive the LM 3900 amp (sec- 
tion U1 A), and the audio in- 
put of the transmitter. The 
LM3900 is a quad Norton 
current-mode amplifier* 
U1 A and U1 B form the VOX 
system. The VOX also can 
be triggered by closing the 
local PTT contact, which 
removes U1A pin 3 current 
bias and turns the VOX on. 
R2 and CI form the hang- 
timer components for VOX 
hold-in. 



CCMX 



flECfiV£lt 



AMHQ 



n 



f>0«lTA-P£ATER 



ftUOlO 

PTT 



TRAItSlllTTCA 



COAX 



^J 



Fig. 1. System layout shows how simply a portable system 
can be constructed. 

73 Magazine * March. 1982 13 






» vcc 



AtflMO 
t»LllS 



JkuOtO 
WHMT 



5 i AbJOlO 4*14002 

T*lfiH5F^HEn I20C ^, 





« 



LOCAL 

S(>EAKEfl 



UK. 
MIC- 



^': 






;:50Re 



jTT 




■*■ ¥tC 



AUQIO {XlTPur 
TO tbjs.*i«;u:ttfi? 






r 



-i- 



JOOP 



/^ 



r^ 



i 



'*VCC 






LOCAL 

PTT 

SWJTCH 



IN4D0? 



lD AUDtO 



SPST-I2V 
LPW CUFJWEUT 



VOLTS 
INPlfT 



1 




-VIA-- c vcc 



lOK|] 



vox 



SMQ 



/ff 



1^4002 



VOX 

RESET 
LIME 



fJME OUT 



VCC 



VT>, 



— ^^^ — 



t3 



LIHf 



Ul • LMJ900 

«LL CAP4CirQR£ ^V 






VCC 



>£BLE 



Q^Ji^iil 



I 




47ft pF 



C»2 
^4002 



vcc 



ftZS 



I 










ift4oa2 



2N2222 






fiL 



cufini 



4 VCC 




fff 



iflSOKEi 



POSITIVE 






IK4002 «foim 



n24 

sua 



HE&ATIVE 




IVI4I4S 



n 



^ - _,^ ^OUTPUT rRIG^EH-/ 

* "^TtJ '6* OH tDER ' 



/W 



130 «m 



vcc 



Fig. 2. Schematic of command and control logic for the Porta-Peater 



U1A output rs normally 
low, which defeats the 555 
timer, U2. The presence of 
an audio signal at UlA pin 2 
shifts pin 4 to Vcc and en- 
ables the timer. Ul B inverts 
the audio signal and pro- 



vides a negative pulse 
through C3 and triggers U2 
on, which is the 1-minute 
(adjustable via R9 and C7) 
time-out timer, and drives 
PTT relay RY1 on. Time-out 
timer U2 resets every time 



the VOX reset line goes low. 
D2 serves to isolate U2 
from spikes due to RYl 
operation. 

Q1 is a relay driver driven 
by the CW ID source. The 
emitter follower is held rea- 



sonably high between ID 
pulses by R23 and CIS. The 
5-minyte ID timer (adjust- 
able via R24 and CI 7) is 
keyed by the VOX but is not 
reset by the VOX. When the 
S-mJnute timer runs out, if 




Photo C. Front view of the third version unit with four se- 
lectable IDs. 

14 TSMagazlne • MarchJ9e2 




Photo D. Inside view of the sarne unit shown in Photo C 



HAL Puts MORE Behind The Buttons 



45-1200 Baud RTTY 
1-100 WPM Morse 



Code 



72 or 36 White 

Character Characters 

l^"*^ f Unshift 

2 Page Status / on 

Display Indicator / Space 

I on .Screen / (For Baudot) 



«'«" Half 

White ^ 

Characters ^ . ' 

/ UnshHt °"P'*'' < 

/ on Synchronous 

}r j Space Idle 

ml (For Baudot) f 'Diddle") 



toto 

TX/RX 

Control 




Atito All 3 RTTY j 

Four Internal M^rk-Hold shifts 

RTTY Demodulators (High or Low Tones) 

• HSgh Tones (U.S. Standard) , ^^ T..r,i„« i^ns^^i^,.. 

• Low Tones (lARU Standard) ^^° Tuning Indicators 

• 103 Modem (1070/1 270 HZ) ^.^ c™^ rTmin^ n^r 

• 202 Modem (1200/2200 HZ) On-Screen Tuning Bar 

Ext Scope Connections 

T2100 System;^ 



Audio or 

RS232 

Data 



Transmit ' 

and Receive 
With RTTY Loop Devices ' 

Audio Monitor 
^^ Audio For Either 

From ifiput or Output 

verofTape Signals 

Internal Speaker 
Plus External Output 



input Audio 

From 

Receiver of Tape 



• CT2100 Communications Terminal 

• KB2100 Keyboard 

• Video Monitor 

• Printer (300Bd Serial ASCII-MPI 86G) 



RM2100 Rack Adapter 
MSG2100 2000 Character 
"Brag Tape" ROM 



24 Line Display 
2 Pages of 72 
Character Lines 



Communtcatioiis TorminAl 



CT21CH} 



4 Pages of 36 
Character Lines 
Split Screen 
(with KB2100) 



CT21 



aw 



i, 



m 



9" TV Monitor 



KB2100 





5 




HAL COMMUNICATrONS CORP. 
Box 365 

Urbana, Illinois 61601 
217-367-7373 



^m 



the Porta-Peater is not in 
use, U1C inverts the falling 
pin 3 pulse and provides a 
positive trigger output to 
turn on the CW (Der, which 
in turn drives Q1 on and 
turns on the transmitter for 
the final ID as required by 
the FCC- 

The CW !Der is based on 
an 82S126 PROM, which is 
a 4'by-256 device. In the 
PROM, 1 bit is a dit and 
space, 3 bits a dash and let- 
ter space, and 7 hits a word 
space. The message is 
played back from memory 
by being sequentially ad- 
dressed by the 4020 binary 
counter driven by one half 
of the 4011 in an oscillator 
mode. The particular 256^bit 
message grouping is select- 
ed by switching pins 12, 11, 
10, or 9 of the 82S126 The 
output is combined with 
the clock signal in the re- 
maining NAND of 4011 and 
available as a tone at the 
10k pot The output is ad- 
justed to provide drive as 
needed. 

Burning the messages irh 
to the PROM is not particu- 
larly easy unless you are 
equipped to do rt properly. 
If you don't have a PROM 
programmer, it is best to 
buy a chip and have the 
supplier burn the memory. 
Any IDer will work with the 
Porta-Peater [i.e., diode ma- 
trix, or other PROM/ROM 
types) as long as an audio 
output signal and an exter- 
nal trtgger input line are 
available. The original 
model used a VHF Engi- 
neering kit. Alternatively, 



>#■ 



::*o>e 



T^liSeCIt L a- 



■^h 



thiggei? f *- 



■)f 






PUSH TO TEST 
it) LHAQLE 



22 K 
— WA^ 



•■lf-15 

VDC 

INPUT 



Stf 



Dsc £n«E 



*3V 



l€ 



CD4020 



I* 



»4 



19 



I 



I 



B2Sf2t 



¥^ 



i7t 



il 



rt 






i 



iff 



IN 



^^ Sf4P©S 




V-C3^ 



470 K 



\Ki% 



J- POT 



4 



.0* 



KEVER OUTPUT 






MPsesffi 



L 




IK 



JBK 



O 



o 



# 



auTPUT t& ^*^ 



fh 



PQT 



2mttt 




— W— 



!>.6K 



f\%. 3. Schematic of CW IDer. Any IDer can be used with the basic system shown in Fig. 2. 



you can build the system 
without any IDer at all and 
use voice ID. 

The circuit as designed 
uses an isolated single-pole 
relay for switching. Depend- 
ing on your radio, you may 
have to use an SPOT relay 
for electronics-switched ra- 
dios to move 12 volts from 
the RX to TX enable tines. 
For relay-switched rigs, 
simply use the SPST to com- 
plete the relay circuit in 
your radio. 

Construction 

The latest version of the 
Porta-Peater is mounted on 
two prmted circuit boards, 
a mother and a daughter 
board. The mother board is 
shown in Photo F. Most of 
our units used a hand-wired 
panel instead of a daughter 
board. The mother board 




Photo £. Rack-mount version of the Porta-Peater. 
16 73Magazme • March. 1982 



contains all of the com- 
mand, control, and ID func- 
tions. All signal I/O, ground, 
and power buses are 
brought out to a standard 
0.156-inch, 22-pin edge card 
connector. The daughter 
board interfaces to the 
mother board via the con- 
nector, or you can hand- 
wire the two boards 
together. 

The daughter board has 
the TX LED, audio input 
jack, PTT output jack, local 
mike jack^ ID-message-se- 
lect switch, and ID-test 
switch mounted on it. This 
approach makes for a de- 
sign that can be put in vari 
ous enclosures easily with 
out rewiring. Photo F shows 
how jumper wires were used 
instead of a daughter board. 

The selection of enclo- 



sure is a matter of personal 
choice. The only require- 
ment is that it be reason- 
ably rf tight. The last thing 
you need is rf floating 
around inside an audio-fre- 
quency-control system 

Cable Assembly 

Two interface cables are 
required to use the system. 
One is a shielded audio line 
and the other is a four-con- 
ductor microphone push- 
to-talk line. Since normally 
you will use the Porta-Peat- 
er physically close to the 
two rigs forming the repeat- 
er pair, a short convenient 
length is all that is needed. 
Two-foot lengths are a good 
starting point- 
Most newer transceivers 
use subminiature jacks for 
external speakers The jack 



Symptom 

1. Erratic time out 

2. Erratic ID timer 

3. Erratic VOX or 
distorted audio 



Possible Cayse 

1. Leaky tantalum 

2. Leaky tantalum 

3. LM3900— low gain 
at Vcc 



4. No ID 



5. Erratic ID 



4a. No clock 
4b, No count 
4c. No data 
4d. No audio 
4a. No trigger 

5, Poor voltage 
Regulation 



Fix 

1. C7 

2. Ct7 

3. LM3900,or 
remove protective in- 
put diode to raise 
Vcc by 0.8 V 

4a. 4011 
4b. 4020 
4c. 82S126 
4d. 4011 
4e. 2N2222, 
MPS6516 
6. LM309K 



Fig. 4. A troubleshooting chart of symploms, causes, and 
possible fixes. 

fteadef SenftG0 tor facing page *>* Tth^ 




Dual VFOs Give You Two Radios for the Price of One! 



Competitively priced, quality 
American design and construction 
by Cubic ... a leader for 3 dec- 
ades in defense and commerdal 
electronics 



Features: 



All band coverage induding WWV 
and the new WARC bands 

DUAL VFO's each provide com- 
plete band coverage. (Vou are not 
limited 10 a smgle memorized fre- 
quency) 

235 Watts input. SSB and CW on 
all frequencies 

F Passband Tuning not to be con- 
fined with ineffective *'iF shift '' 




9 



Utilizes an 8 pote filter which is 
continuously variable for either 
high pass or low pass. 

CW Crystal Fitter (optionaJ). 
400Hz 6-pole 

Unique Visual Display of 
Passband 

External Receive Antenna Jack 
allows separate transmit and 
receive antennas 

Tunable Notch RIter when com- 
bined with passband tuning, 
provides the ultimate In removing 
interference 

Fu»l or Semi CW Break-fn 



Selectable hard/soft keying 
makes the difference in pile up 

Continuously Variable AGC lets 
you hear the weak signal which 
would normally be masked by 
strong adjacent channel inter* 
ference 

Logrithmic Speech Processor 

AF. RF and IF Gain Controls to 
provide an infinite selection of 
receiver dynamics 

4 Function Meter reads "S" unrts 
in receive, and selects forward 



power (calibrated In watts PEP), 
reflected power, or ALC level in 
transmit 

Military Quality PC Boards of dou 
bfe sided, plated through glass 
epoxy malerial 

Modular Construction with PC 
boards and assemblies mtercon- 
nected by plug-in strip line and 
coaxial connectors Chassis and 
cabinet are of rugged steel con- 
struction 

Call or write for a Free Brochure 



I ;i 



CUBIC COMMUIMICATION 

305 Airport Road, Ocean side. CA 92054 (714) 757-7525 



Compfete System 103 




o 



r\ n\ 






III 




PSU-BA 
Rower Suppiy Speaker 



ASTRO 103 
Transceiver 



15002'A 

t500 Watt Lmear 

Amplifier 



ST^2B 
2kW Antenna Tur^r 



a) 



r 


BA7D0KJL 
□ tPOLE 

1 TEMPORAflY 
POll-EO' 

40' 
COAX 








+ > 


2 
















2' AUDEO 
JUMPER 






JUMPtH 






W 




RECEIVER 


PORTA- PEAT ER 


TRANSMpTTtn 


i COAX ^ 


C 


"> 








146 


5* 






M6 


.9* 





Ju 



^/BX OH 
GROUND 




w 



314 OUTPUT 
t46 94 



l4e 54 




00 MCTEfl l*ff>l/r 




UMK 



tADlO 



fig. 5. Layout faj shows a typica! 2m hookup, and(b) a 3-band input command center All in- 
puts show up on 146.94 out Mode has no effect on the system fia, CW, SSB, FMl 



on the audio input of the 
Porta-Peater is also sub- 
miniature- Therefore, make 
up or buy a shielded jumper 
with subminiature connec- 
tors at both ends. In order 
to cover more possibilities, 
you might want to purchase 
several connector convert- 
ers to change the subminia- 
tures to PL*55 or whatever 
you have. Remember, the 
cable must be shielded. 
The Porta-Peater uses a 



standard 4-pin, screw-on 
microphone plug Again, 
most new rigs use this type, 
also. It is important that 
you make up this cable with 
the proper pin assignments. 
If you know in advance 
With which rigs you most 
likely will be using the 
Porta-Peater, you can make 
up a couple of dedicated 
jumpers. Alternatively, a 
small minibox can be made 
with a terminal block inside 




Photo F. Populated printed circuit board with externaliy 
mounted IDer on right side. Final version was alt on one 
board. 

ia 73Maganne • March J982 



and the proper jumper as- 
signments made for the rig 
to be used. Fig 6 shows a 
possible design. This ap- 
proach permits fast and 
easy field changes. Again, 
use only shielded cable. 

Circuit Assembly 

Figs 2 and 3 show the en- 
tire circuit for Porta-Peater 
111. PCB construction is 
recommended but not re- 
quired. (A commercially- 
manufactured PCB is avail- 
able for purchase; write 
WA2BH B or AC2 A for infor- 
mation-) Any type of perf- 
board assembly is fine. Lay- 
out is not critical except for 
isolating the inputs and out- 
puts of the high-gain 
LM3900. Parts substitutions 
can be made except for the 
low-leakage tantalum ca- 
pacitors These must be 
used where specified be- 
cause otherwise the circuit 
performance will be de- 
graded or it wilt not work at 
a\ 



Alignment and Adjustment 

The adjustments of the 
audio gains on the Porta- 
Peater are set to the partic- 
ular rigs it is connected to. 
Simply hook up two rigs as 
per the schematic in Figs. 1, 
2, and i. Apply power and 
adjust for best audio Select 
your ID message, push to 



test, and you are finished. If 
things don't seem all peach- 
es and cream, perform trou- 
bleshooting procedures. 

Troubleshooting 

If your unit does not 
function, use the fail/cure 
list in Fig. 4 and you should 
be able to home in on the 
problem in a few minutes. 
(This list assumes that you 
have previously looked for 
broken connections and 
bad solder joints and taken 
corrective action.) Before 
taking apart your unit, be 
sure you have checked and 
tried the full range of ad- 
justments on all the pots for 
gain, output, and oscilla- 
tion on the Porta-Peater. 

Field Hookup 

In a field installation, all 
that is needed is two rigs 

and a 12-volt source to set 
up a Porta-Peater repeater. 
Remember, you can config- 
ure any setup you wish by 
proper interconnection of 
the audio output and mi- 
crophone PTT lines to the 
rigs in use. The Porta-Peater 
gives you the capability to 
set up a reasonably sophis- 
ticated communications 
network based simply on 
whatever random collec- 
tion of amateur rigs hap- 
pens to be available in any 
emergency situation. Fig. 5 
shows some configuration 

possibilities. 

For a typical 2-meter 
QRP repeater setup, follow 
these instructions: 

1) Select the rig to act as 
a receiver 

2) Set the desired input 
frequency on this unit. 

3) Run a jumper from the 
external-speaker jack of the 
receiver rig to the audio-in* 
put jack of the Porta-Peat- 
er. 

4) Connect the PTT-mi- 
crophone-output jack of 
the Porta-Peater to the mi- 
crophone-input jack of the 
rig selected as the transmit* 
ter. Make sure ail ground 
audio and switching lines 
are wired correctly; other- 
wise the system will not 
work or could damage the 



units. Set up the transmitter 
frequency. 

5) Apply +12 volts to all 
units. 

6) Set the receiver squelch 
to the desired trigger teveL 

7) Adjust the receiver vol- 
ume control (v^^hen receiv- 
ing a signal) to a level which 
doesn't overdrive the Porta- 
Peater and distort the trans- 
mitter signal {a quick on- 
the-air check is best; mon- 
itor with an HT). 

8} Turn the volume on the 
transmitter rig to low or off 
(volume, not power). 

9] Locate antennas for 
minimum interference and 
overload, (See Antenna Set- 
up HintsJ 
10) Operate and enjoy! 

Antenna Setup Hints 

If you want frequency 
agility and you are not us- 
ing a duplexer, all of your 
isolation comes from anten- 
na separation. Our standard 
setup uses two 50-foot 
lengths of RC^ coax and a 
pair of 10-foot poles. One 
pole is aluminum, the other 
is bamboo. The two poles 
are lashed together, with 
the bamboo on top. A ver- 
tical dipole is made from 
the RC-8 by turning down 
the braid 19 inches leaving 
the insulated center con- 
ductor as is. This forms a 
bazooka dipole for one an* 
tenna; the Larsen 5/8 wave- 
length is used for the other 
A 1/4 wavelength can be 
used, but in either case, 
ground-level mounting is 
employed. 

In our fiefd trials, it did 
not seem to matter which 
antenna was used for re- 
ceiving or transmitting. You 
probably will want to try 
the different combinations 
for yourself in case there is 
some incremental improve- 
ment for a particular loca- 
tion Under any circum- 
stances, the two antennas 
should be separated as far 
as possible or until desensi- 
tization ceases. ! often 
bring up the Porta-Peater 
before laying out the aoten- 
nas, then, while the rig is 

•^Stfo Usf of Advert isefs on paga 130 



madly squealing, walk the 
ground-level antenna away 
until the squealing stops. 

In severe space-limita- 
tion situations, we some* 
times put an attenuator in 
the receiver transmission 
line and eliminate desensi ti- 
zation by lessening receiver 
sensitivity. It is very easy to 
get radio coverage of a 
hamfest (i.e,, several acres) 
when a 10- to 20-dB pad is 
ahead of the receiver- 
Operating Notes 

One of the things dis- 
covered in using the Porta- 
Peater with various 2m rigs 
was how really poor many 
amateur and commercial 
transceivers are in terms of 
their rf tightness. Several in- 
stances occurred where we 
thought the Porta-Peater 
was not performing righf 
and was causing problems 
but found out that it was a 
manufactured rig which 
was at fault. Microphones 
With unshielded cables, no 
12-volt lead rf bypassing, 
and plastic cabinets or face 
plates all contributed to 
problems. In a high-density 
rf environment (like the 
Dayton Hamvention), a rig 
which is not truly rf tight 
will give a lousy perfor- 
mance. 

Therefore, if the Porta- 
Peater exhibits problems 
which could be contributed 
to rf leakage, check the rigs 
you are using first, A tight 
enclosure, with shielded 
and bypassed leads, will 
make a world of difference. 

Pocket Porta-Peater? 

The development and 
construction of this unit 
was really a challenge for 
us. Generally, it was fun 
[although WA2BHB seems 
to have less hair now than 
at the beginning of this proj- 
ect!). However since the 
Porta-Peater was designed, 
I com has, of course, come 
out with its new iC-2A syn- 
thesized HT. So, if we had a 
miniaturized Porta-Peater 
and two tC-2As, we literally 
could have a pocket-sized 





tnEB 




\UPliIT TO 
POfirA-PCATER 



WiNI'BOK 




OUTPUT 

PLUG 

TO RAQ(0 



/jV5/j£ i>£:rA/i 



MAKE PBOPEfl CONWECTIOUS TO CORRESPOND TO 
PINOUT OF RACHO MlCl^OPHONE PLUC IN USE 



Fig. 6. A jumper box will solve the problem of a fistful of 
audio cables. Use shielded box and cables only. 



repeater that was no less 
frequency agile! 

Well the Pocket Porta- 
Peater is in development. It 
uses a lower current drain 
IDer, advanced IC VOX sys- 
tem, is smaller in size, but it 
does cost more (unfortu- 
nately, some smaller parts 
cost more than their bigger 
brethren). However, if you 
don't need to carry a re- 
peater in your pocket, the 
present version represents 
the best bet 



Follow-U|i 

I will gladly answer any 
questions on the Porta- 
Peater, but you must in- 
clude an S AS E if you expect 
a response. Please remem- 
ber, Tm a ham, not an elec- 
tronics engineer, so the 
quality of answers must be 
gauged accordingly. 73s, 
and I hope you have as 
much fun with your Porta- 
Peater as we have had with 
ours.B 



q 


TT 


^^n 


!■ 


J 


Lh 


JufJ 


nM 


H 


r^n 


^^n 


nfi 


, i 


r ' V 1 1 


1 7« m 


' ^1 m M 


k' 


r. Wn 


1 T^T 


- 1 T n 



1-800-654-8850 

Out small miracle is simph this: call Senln's TOLL FREE 
mimk*r. and we'll delKiT !h<' fint*si qualrti cnstils nn lime-^ 
fnim tjve working d^xs lo mu weeks, plus our ^H-hour 
Emergenq Sen ice, • 

The miracle ^rdws ItUj^er when you exiiniine Senins quLilit) 
workman.ship Hiich cry^tiil in niaric of flawless materialh and 
hand crufled with slattMjf-ihe-art ttThnolo;^ to exceed 
MIL-Spec standards. _^^ ^ 

And when \mi consider that St^ntn' is 
slill a small, dependable company ^-- 
ou!-perfomiing ihe big one:^. our ^ 
small miracle takes^ on giant pnt- ^ 
portions. Fad is. most other 
companies cant work our miracle:!. 
big or small 



CrvstaJ Park. ChtckjLsha, Oklahoma 730 IN 



#^333 



Pka^ allow i:%irm lime for precisiion, I III and special Irt^qmrncks^. 



73 Magazine • MafchJ982 19 



/. Vaoder Ryd VE3CYC 
3B Aiidobon St 5. 
Hamilton, Ontario 
Canada 18! T/7 



Amateur Television's Stripper 



a home-brew star 



(Ed* Note: Fdr further information about this article, readers should consult the ''Corrections" section of this issue.) 



Of the many different 
ways in which radio 
amateurs participate in our 
wonderful hobby, amateur 
television is probably one 
of the least understood by 
the general ham popula- 
tion and virtually unheard 
of by the general public I 
am not referring to slow- 



scan TV, but to old- 
fashioned, regular fast-scan 
television. 

Since I was actively in- 
volved in TV broadcasting 
about twenty years ago, in 
the days of black and white, 
I knew of the limitations in- 
volved. We used to pump 
out 16 kW of visual rf and 



about 10 kW aural and 
were happy to be informed 
that some viewers 40 miles 
away could still actually 
see us, which was not 
always the case. You can 
see that I was always very 
skeptical of the concept of 
amateur television. What 
was the point of proving 





Photo A. The completed ATV convener. 

20 73 Magazine • March J 982 



that we could squirt a live 
picture a few blocks away? 
Big deal, right? 

Now I am here to tell you 
that I, and anyone thinking 
along the same lines, could 
not be farther from the 
truth. About five years ago, 
one of our local club 
members found out that I 
was trying to build my own 
TV camera and talked me 
into experimenting with 
some simple ATV equip- 
ment. After puttering 
around for a few weeks and 
optimizing a 6-element 
yagi, commercial TV conr 
verier, and a Va-Watt, 
6] 6- type free- running 
modulated oscillator, we 
actually managed to work 
over a path of thirteen 
miles, We were so en- 
thusiastic that we wrote ar- 
ticles to several club 
bulletin editors to mark this 
great local breakthrough. 
There was no turning back 
now, 1 proceeded to push 
ATV from then on by 
demonstrating at ham 




I 



clubs, hamfests, shopping 
malls, etc., and lecturing 
others on the pros and cons 
of ATV. 

1 have learned a great 
deal since that early begin- 
ning and, so, would like to 
pass on some helpful infor- 
mation to other hams who 
might want to follow in my 
footsteps. 

First of all ATV is not for 
everybody. I have seen 
many people come and go 
over the years. If you are 
not really that much in- 
terested in the workings of 
radio, from a scientific 
point of view, then forget it 
Even if you buy all your 
equipment ready-made and 
get involved with your local 
ATV gang, you would soon 
lose interest because all 
they ever talk about and 
show you are ATV parts, cir- 
cuits, theory, etc, until it 
comes out of your ears. 

There are times when no 
one will be on, and that's 
usually when you want to 
demonstrate to your friends 
that you own channel 13 Vi 
and can do the same as 
your local station, only bet- 
ter Other times, you may 
want to tune up your new 
preamp and find no one on; 
it can be frustrating. But 
there are times when 
another ATVer calls you on 



Fig. 7. ATV convener schematic. 



the land-line (or on 2 
meters) and tells you that 
the band (70 cm) is wide 
open because the UHF TV 
stations are coming in like 
gangbusters You will then 
drop whatever you are do- 
ing and get on the air right 
away, only to find out that 
all hell has broken loose on 
ATV — everybody and his 
brother seem to be coming 
in on a night like that. 

You find yourself looking 
at a lot of co-channel in- 
terference, sometimes three 
stations at once. You turn 
your beam like crazy trying 
to separate them, while ev- 
erybody is asking you via 2 
meters to switch your trans- 
mitter on as well. You go 
bananas trying to videotape 
and play back, make pic- 
tures with your Polaroid, 
and keep track with your 
log sheets while simulta- 
neously panning cameras, 
showing logos, etc. These 
openings occur more fre- 
quently than one might ex- 
pect depending a lot on 
your geographical location. 

Around the Great Lakes 
region, we have a lot of 
thermal inversions. During 
the warmer weather from 
early spring to late fall, I 
can work W3POS in Erie PA 
at least a few times a week, 
and we are 85 miles apart. 




NOTE THEL£TTEft a tUHCL'S^-i 



NOtf 

OLOCft MODULES 

HIVE COLORED 

PCrrjyioiMO 
PiNiri 



1*7 



« « • « 

BOTTOM VIEW 



2 4 « S 



Fig. 2, Double-balanced mixer hookup details. 



Last year, I worked W9ZIH 
in Chicago IL, which is 420 
miles away from me. 1 also 
have seen K9KLM and 
N9AB who are up to 440 
miles away from me. (See 
December, 1979, 73 Maga- 
zine Letters, p 226, or No- 
vember, 1979, AS Magazine 
for more details.) 

With my present setup, I 
can work stations within a 
50-mile radius quite com- 
fortably. I put out 50 Watts 
of rf on 439.25 MHz, with 
sound on the video carrier, 
into a compact skeleton- 
slot antenna. (See March, 
1969, CQ Magazine for 
more details.) I usually can 
see a 10-Watt station quite 
well, providing he uses a 
good antenna system and is 
not located at the bottom 
of a pit. 

In an attempt to see how 
low we could go, VE3QF in 



■I 



L<3 




% 



Li^ 



^ 


1 


ROLLED 
DOWH 











FDIL 



SOLOER 




Fig. 3. RC-174 coax prepara- 
tion and installation. 



Toronto, Ontario, reduced 
his power to 50 mW into a 
set of four 27-element yagis 
and his picture frame 
would still lock in at my TV 
set The picture quality was 
PVz (P5 being absolutely 
snow free) and we were 50 

73 Magazine • March, 1982 21 




Photo B. Inside view oi the converter showing PCB mounted on standoffs. 



i I 




i 



IN, 



470Ji 



TO I.F, 

AMPLEFlER 



raj 





Sx lOOOmF 

29V 



^ 




f/g. 6. 12-volt power supply. 



TO LF. 
AMPL^FlEFi 



(b) 



Fig. 4. Mixer installation 
details, (a) Double-balanced 
mixer, [b] UHF diode mixer. 



SIDE OF 
BOX 

SHORT / 

n wfi^e. '0. TUNED 

l^ STfilP LINE 



BNC 

CONNECTOR t 




^8 flUTOlWOTlVB H\HQ TERMINAL 
BENT OVER 50* AND SOLDERED 
TO FOIL 

Fig. 5. BNC connector 
mounting. 

miles apart. So, you see, 
with the converters, 
preamps, and antennas we 
use nowadays, ATV is really 
worthwhile. After all, a pic- 

22 73 Magazine • March, 1982 



ture is worth more than a 
thousand words. 

You, too, can do it, for it 
doesn't have to cost you an 
arm and a leg. If you are a 
newconner to this TV game, 
make sure that there is 
local interest; find at least 
one other ATV fanatic. You 
Will need at least one other 
person that you can count 
on for testing, adjusting, 
and fiddling with your 
video and audio equipment 
— it takes two to tango. J ust 
two stations can keep busy 
for days, pruning and tun- 
ing. And when you drop 
that sharply-tuned con- 
verter, everything is out of 
whack again and you are 
set for another night of fid- 
dling. When you've got a 
whole group on, you can 
take turns hamming it up 
making "Pink Rose Tea'' 
commercials, putting on 



wigs or crazy caps with 
badges, and showing all 
your empty 807s. 

As with any other mode 
of communication, the first 
thing to do is to be able to 
receive well enough. No 
point in playing around 
with old-fashioned UHF 
television converters, unless 
you are prepared to hang 
two or three preamps in 
cascade between it and the 
antenna. You can waste a 
lot of time this way and 
finally give up in disgust If 
you can get ahold of a 
varactor UH tuner from a 
late-model TV set, you 
might be better off, al- 
though you still need addi- 
tional amplification. Some 
of them will tune right 
down to 439,25 MHz and 
lower. 

Unfortunately, the out- 
put frequency will only cor- 



respond with your TV set's 
video i-f frequency, which 
means you have to modify. 
Besides that, you do not 
take advantage of your TV 
UHF tuner's gain and selec- 
tivity. You also could build 
an ATV converter from 
various kits that are adver- 
tised in some ham publica- 
tions, but my experience 
tells me that you will still 
need more amplification 
and selectivity. 

Among the best preamps 
that I have built over the 
years were the ones that 
used tuned lines. The prob- 
lem with them is that they 
are a bit tricky to make. 
You've got to be a combina- 
tion of plumber and sheet- 
metal worker and you 11 still 
end up with an amateur- 
istic-looking contraption. 

A couple of years ago 
[during a quiet ATV night), 
an idea came to me. Why 
couldn't I use stripline 
techniques instead of gas 
pipes and sheet copper? 
After all, they use it on rf 
power amplifiers for VHF 
and UHF. I decided to take 
one of my pet construction 
articles {see 1971 ARRL 
Radio Amateur's Hand- 
book, page 417}, of a 
432-MHz preamp, and con- 
vert the tuned-line dimen- 
sions to stripline, I ended up 
with a printed circuit board 
that was a two-dimensional 
copy of the original three- 
dimensional preamp. 

After 1 completed the 
new preamp, it took me a 
while to get things stabi- 
lized, but 1 got it working 
— surprisingly well, I might 
say. As a matter of fact, the 
results were so impressive 
that I supplied a number of 
ATVers in the area with 
similar preamps, I've made 
a few more since then, each 
time changing the dimen- 
sions a little bit; the objec- 
tive was to make it smaller 
and simpler. Eventually it 
evolved into a complete 
converter. 

The converter (Fig. 1) 
which will be described in 

Read&r Service tor facing page *^5^ 





t 



• 



■1 1 1 

A V ■ [ 


iiSJ 



i\ 






.HT^jutn.^^m 




SUPERIOR 
COMMERCIAL GRADE 
2-METER FM TRANSCEIVER 




I 



TOUCH-TONE 
PAD KIT INCLUDED 



OMPARE THESE FEATURES WITH ANY UNIT AT ANY PRICE 



. a MHZ FREQUENCY COVERAGE. INCLUDING CAP/MARS BUILT iN: Re- 
ceive and transmit 1 42.000 to 149.995 MHz in seieeiable steps of S of 1 kHl. 
ODMPARE' 

• SrZE: Unbeliev able! Only fi^^t oy ^i* Dy 9^". COWPARE" 
» MICROCOMPUTER CONTROL: All Ireqtiency control is earned oul by a 

micrtx;ofnputer 

- MUSICAL TONE ACCOMPANIES KEY80AFID ENTRIES: Wfvefi a Key m 
pressed, a bnef musical rone indicates positive entry mio the mtcooompuleji 
COMPAQ" 

• PUSHBUTTON FREQUEWY CONTROL FKOM MICROPHONE OR 
PANEL: Frequency is setect^ by btxtlons on the front panel or microp^iorie. 

- 8 CHANN EL MEMORYi Each mefTiory channel is fepfogrammable and stores 
Ihe trequency and offsel. Memofy is backed yp by a NtCAO batrery when 
power js removed 

• INSTANT MEMORY 1 RECALL By pressing a button on the microphone or 
front Danel, memory channel 1 may be accessed immediately 

- MEMORY SCAN: Memofycnannels may be continuously scanned for quick 
location of a busy or vacant frequency 

■ PROGRAMMABLE BAND SCAN: Any section otthe band may be scanned m 
K Steps nl 5 or 10' KH^, Scan limits are easily reprogrammed, 
■ - DISCRIMINATOR SCAN CONTROL (AZDEN EXCLUSIVE PATENTl: The 
I scanner stops Dy sensing the channel center, so the unit always Eands on the 
^L correct frequency. COMPARE this with other units that claim to scan in 5-kHz 
l^hleps! 

^^HREE SCAN MODES WfTH AUTO RESUME: "Sampling' mode pauses ai 
busy cnannels^ then resumes "Busy mode stoos at a bu^y channel then 

> resumes shojlly after fr&quency c^ea*B. "Vacant" imode slops ai a vacant 
channel ami resumes wnen signal appears^ H desired, auio resume may be 
prevented by pressing one button COMPARE] 

• REMOTABLE HEAD: The control head may be fcjcated as much as t5 feet 

haway trom the main unit using the opttoral ix>nnecting cabte COMPARE^ 

351 7 S,W 1 29th Terrace, Miami. Flortda 331 76 [ 
felephone (305) 233-3631 • Telex; 80-3356 
HOURS: 9 - 5 Monday thru Fnday 
' U.S, DISTRIBUTOR- DEALER INQUIRIES [NVfTED 



■ PL TONE OSCILLATOR BUILT IN: Frequency Is adjustable to access PL 
repealers. 

• MICROPHONE VOLUME/ FREO, CONTROL; Bolh (unctions may be 
adfusied from eiihef Ihe micfophone oi front panel 

• NON-STANDARD OFFSETS: Three accessory otfseis can be obtained few 
CAP/ MARS Of um:« ^' fej^eater splits CAP ar>d Air Force MARS splits are 
BUILT (N* COMP. 

• 25 WATTS OUTPUT: Atso5 watts tow power to conserve batteries m poflable 
use 

• GREEN FREQUENCY DISPU\Y: Ffequency numerals are green LEDs for 
siipenof i^tsJtMlity 

- RECEIVER OFFSET A channel lock switch allows monitDfirjg of Ihe repeater 
input frequency \>OMPABEi 

• SUPERIOR RECEtVER: Sensitivity is better than 058 uV for25-d8 quietjng 
and 0.1 9 uVforl 2'dB SI NAD. The squelch sensitivity is supertJ, requmng less 
than 0.1 uV to open, The receiver audio CifcuJts are designed (or maximum 
inteMsgibifity and fidelity. COMPARil 

• ILLUMINATED KEYBOARD: Keyboard backllghimg allows it to be seer at 
night 

• TRUE FM. NOT PHASE MODULATION; Transmitted audio quality Is op- 
timized by the same high standard of des«gn and construction as is found in Ihe 
receiver. The microphone amplifier and compression circuits offer intelligibility 
second to none 

• OTHER FEATURES: Dynamic microphone, buiH-ln speaker, mobile mounting 
bracket, external remote speaker jack (head and radio) and much, much more 
All cords, plugs fusest microphone hanger etc included Weight 6 lbs. 

• ACCESSORIES: CS-ECK t5'*oot mmole cable. CS-6R S-ampac power 
supply- CS-AS remote speaker, CS-TTK toychione* microphone kit 
(wired and tested) 



lATEUR-WHOLESALE ELECTRONICS order 




TOLL FREE 



3102 



CREDIT CARD HOLDERS MAY USE OUR TOLL FREE ORDERING NUMBER. 



this article is actually the 
seventh in the series, each 
one being an improved ver- 
sion of the former one. This 
one consists of tv^ro stages 
of ri amplification, one 
varactor-tuned oscillator, 
and one t-f amplifier. Also 
incorporated is a double 
balanced mixer (more 
about this later!). 

If you are not in the 
market for a complete con- 
verter, you might be in- 
terested in just copying the 
rf sections. Or. you might 
like to use the i-f [channel] 
amplifier separately be- 
tween your own converter 
and boob tube for another 6 
dB of gain. You also could 
use the oscillator as a self- 
contained unit to be used as 
an independent UHF signal 
source. 

I will now describe each 
section individually so that 
you can take out whatever 
section you might be in- 
terested in. Later on in this 
article we will put it all 
together and make a com- 
plete, tunable, high-gain 
ATV converter 

The Rf Section 

As I said earlier in this ar- 
ticle, you can find the 
theory on this two-stage 
preamp in the 1971 and 
older Handbooks. Although 
we now use stripline, it 
seems to work basically the 
same way. In some earlier 
attempts, I used feed- 
through capacitors and 
even used separators be- 
tween stages, as well as 
carefully-selected bias re- 
sistors- Even though I had 
the thing working, I didn't 
want to press my luck at 
that stage and try anything 
more radically different 
than what I had already 
done with the tuned-line 
{tubingHo-stripline conver- 
sion In more advanced 
models, we got rid of the 
feedthroughs [too expen- 
sive) and separators and 
even tried a whole range of 
replacement transistors. 
We finally settled on what 
we've got now; it seems to 



be the best cheapest, and 
easiest way to go. 

The rf amplifiers could 
be used as a one- or two- 
stage preamp. Both PCB 
layouts are provided so that 
you can take your pick. The 
one-stage job was carefully 
evaluated by Ralph 
W2RP0. using professional 
equipment The test results 
indicated a 15.3-dB gain at 
440 MHz, with a bandwidth 
of roughly 20 MHz between 
3-dB points. Noise figure 
was not measured but is 
assumed to be close to the 
1.7'dB mark, as the 
manufacturer of the 
MRF901 states. Even with 
the best modern TV UHF 
converters, a one-stage 
preamp like this one should 
make quite an improve- 
ment, at least another P 
unit; as we ATVers call it 
— maybe even two P units. 

The two-stage preamp 




fig. 7. ATV converter PCS layout 



(iJl)« JUMPEH. 
OOTTEO ONES ARE 
USED ONLY 4 5 

INDICATED IN TEXT. 

R20 
I OK 



ALL COMPONENTS AHQ JUMPERS ARE 
INSTALLED ^ROM THE NON-FQIL SIDE, 

EXCEPT JliMFERS TO EITHER THE DiODE 
OR OBM, WHICH ARE INSTALLED FROW THE 
FOIL SlOE (DOTTED LINES) 



rnr — I 



•V^A* 



BODY SIDE 



OF 



STOR 



VC-iD3 



^- /Rt 



C^^ 



t 



iJj 



Cl$ 



C2 









CI' 



( 



T 



IS 



F?8 



tr 



01 



% 



Ri 



'h. 



QZ 



^R4 



ia 



h/( 



sr 

1- 



-^b- 



10 



Ci7 



Rl4 . 



04 



RrS 



y^ 



f 

t4 
C5 



I \ 



r?t9 



c Ie 

JT 



-iH- C \ -}f— 




i\ +3: 



■^6 



R2t 



440MHI IN 
R§I74 
FROM ' " ^ 



TO IfiPiJT BMC 

cowwec^-B 



R7 



UuJ 



R2a 



( Jl 



T 




I2VDC 



^^ 



^^ e.ZV ZENER 

F 3 THE VIEWER, 

AhD F > FACING 



R6ir4 ^^ 



TO T V SET To k OUTPUT > qP! SNC CONNECTOR 

F/g. 8 ATsf zQny^ttQx component location. 



24 73 Magazine * March, 1 982 



The right design — for all the right 
reasons. In setting forth design pa- 
rameters for ARGOSY, Ten-Tec engi- 
neers pursued the goal of giving 
amateurs a rig with the right features 
at a price that stops the amateur 
radio price spiral. 

The result is a unique new trans* 
ceiver with selectable power 
levels (convertible from 10 
watts to 100 watts at the flick 
of a switch), a rig with the 
right bands (80 through 10 
meters including the new 30 
meter band), a rig with the 
right operational features 
plus the right options, and 
the right price for today's 
economy— just $549. 
Low power or high power, 
ARGOSY has it. Now you 
can enjoy the sport and 
challenge of QRPp 
operating, and, 
when you need it, 
the power to stand 
up to the crowds in 
QRM and poor 
band conditions. 
Just flip a switch to 
move from true 
QRPp power with 
the correct bias 
voltages to a full 
100 watt input 
New analog 
readout design. 
Fast, easy, reliable^ 
and efficient. The 
modern new 
readout on the 
ARGOSY is a 
mechanical de- 
sign that in- 
stantly gives you all significant figures 
of any frequency Right down to five 
figures {± 2 kHz). The band switch 
indicates the first two figures (MHz), 
the linear scale with lighted red bar- 
pointer indicates the third figure 
(hundreds) and the tuning knob skirt 
gives you the fourth and fifth figures 
(tens and units). Easy. And effi- 
cient—so battery operation is easily 
achieved. 

The right receiver features. Sen* 
sitivify of 0.3 fxV for 10 dB S+N/N. 
Selectivity: the standard 4-pole 
crystal filter has 2.5 kHz bandwidth 
and a 2.7:1 shape factor at 6/50 dB. 



Other cw and ssb filters are available 
as options, see below. I-f frequency 
is 9 MHz, i-f rejection 60 dB, Offset 
tuning is :t 3 kHz with a detent zero 
position in the center Built-in notch 
filter has a better than 50 dB rejec- 
tion notch, tunable from 200 Hz to 
3.5 kHz. An optional noise blanker of 

Here's a Concept 
You Haven't Seen 
In Amateur Radio 
For A Long Time 

Low Pric 





New TEN-TEC Arg©sy 



the i-f type has 50 dB blanking 
range. Built-in speaker is powered 
by low-distortion audio (less than 2% 
THD) 

The right transmitter features* Fre- 
quency coverage from 80 through 
10 meters, including the new 30 me- 
ter band, in nine 500 kHz segments 
(four segments for 10 meters), with 
approximately 40 kHz VFO overrun 
on each band edge. Convertible 
power: 100 or 10 watts input with 
100% duty cycle for up to 20 min- 



utes on all bands. S-function meter 
shows forward peak power on 
transmit, SWR, and received 
signal strength. PTT on ssb, full 
break-in on cw, PIN diode an- 
tenna switch. Built-in cw sidetone 
with variable pitch and volume. ALC 
control on "high'* power only where 
needed, with LED indicator. 
Automatic normal sideband 
selection plus reverse. Nor- 
mal 12 -14V dc operation 
plus ac operation with op- 
tional power supply. 
The right styling, the right 
size. Easy-to-use controls, 
fast-action push buttons, all 
located on raised front 
panel sections. New meter 
with lighted, easy-to-read 
scales. Rigid steel cha^is, 
molded front panel with 
matching aluminum top, 
bottom and back. 
Stainless steel tilt- 
up bail. And it's 
only 4" high by 
9¥2" wide by 12" 
deep (bail not ex- 
tended) to go any- 
where, fit any- 
where at home, in 
the field, car, plane 
or boat. 

The right acces- 
sories—all front- 
panel switchable. 
Model 220 2.4 kHz 
8-pole ssb filter $55; 
Model 218 L8 kHz 8 
pole ssb filter 
$55; Model 
217 50O Hz cw 
filter $55; 
Model 219 250 
Hz cw filter $55; Model 224 Audio 
cw filler $34; Model 223 Noise 
blanker $34; Model 226 internal Ca- 
librator $39: Model 1125 Dc circuit 
breaker $15; Model 225 117/230V 
ac power supply $129; Model 222 
mobile mount, $25; Model 1126 lin* 
ear switching kit, $15. 



Model 525 ARGOSY 



$549. 



Make the right choice, ARGOSY- 
for the right reasons and low price. 
See your TEN-TEC dealer or write. 



1pqn 



TEN -TEC, INC 

EViEftVlLLE. TENNESSEE 17163 



73Magaitne • March, 1962 2S 





B|if| f f!|r^ifp f |2|M^ - ■ ■ ■■fnm^ ' . ^^^'\ 



Photo C Foil side view of converter with input output power, and frequency control con- 
nections. 



will give about 40 to 50% 
more gain over the one- 
stage preamp. Therefore, 
you will have to decide 
whether it is worth the ef- 
fort—it will make a day vs. 
night difference on those 
old tube-type converters 
like they used to have years 
ago— i can vouch for that. 
I have dropped the 12 V 
down to about 62 V\ which 
improves stability and 



keeps the noise figure 
down. You might try a 
higher voltage for more 
gain if you wish by chang- 
ing the zener and dropping 
resistor values, but it will be 
trickier to tune up, especial- 
ly when you live in inter- 
mod alley. 

The Oscillator 

It IS not easy to make an 
oscillator work well with 



ALL COMPONE(S*TS 

OH NON FOIL SIDE ONLY 




BODY 



QUI 




JUMPER 






+ (>V iH 



Fig. 9. UHF oscittatof Fig. 10. UHF oscillator board 
board PCS layout component location. 

26 73Magazme • MarchJ982 



direct output in the 70-cm 
band. I had tried several 
schemes until 1 found this 
one. It originally had been 
developed by Tom O'Hara 
W60RG, and it's used ex- 
tensively in Tom's own 
products (PC Electronics). I 
have received Tom's per- 
mission to use his oscillator 
in this article. 



Besides the change to 
striptine, I also changed a 
few values of parts, nnainly 
to be more adaptable to 
other transistors (he uses 
the MPSH81) but also to 
keep the whole thing from 
radiating too much and get- 
ting into my scanner, etc. 
The two silver- mica 
capacitors, CI 9 and C20, 
are not always necessary 
with some transistors; the 
Sylvania ECC106 does a 
good job without them. 
These capacitors will lower 
the tuned frequency, and as 
a rule, the higher the value, 
the easier the oscillator 
starts and the less it drifts 
(try to keep the ratio about 
1:3). If you've ever worked 
with regenerative UHF 
receivers, you might recog- 
nize the principles of this 
oscillator. 



To preset the oscillator, it 
is best to set the 10k fre- 
quency control at mid 
range, ciip a lead from a fre- 
quency counter to the out- 
put end of the 47-Ohm resis- 
tor (R13) and ground, and 
tune trimmer C4 to read 372 
MHz for a 439.25-MHz vid- 
eo frequency in your area, 
providing your TV channel 
input would be channel 4. If 
you choose channel 3, your 
oscillator should be set at 
378 MHz, and for channel 5 
it should be 362 MHz, etc. 

The carrier frequencies 
of channels 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 
are 55,25, 61.25. 67.25. 
77.25, and 83,25 MHz, 
respectively. The sum of 
your chosen channel fre- 
quency and the oscillator 
frequency should be 439.25 
MHz in this case, and cor- 
respondingly different for 
other ATV frequencies, If 
you don't have a frequency 
counter, you could use your 
TV set tuned to channel 59 
or 60 and look for the sec- 
ond harmonic. The 1 k resis- 
tor (R8) might have to be 
lowered if the oscillator 
fails to start. 

1 have tried several types 
of low-power PNP silicon 
UHF transistors, and most 
of them oscillate readily in 
this circuit, However, some 
have a tendency to drift 
more than others. The drift 
is not objectionable 
though, as it has to drift at 
least a few MHz to affect 
the video, which is seldom 
the case. 

The l-f Amplifier 

The main reason for the 
amplifier was to overconne 
the conversion losses in the 
double-balanced or the 
diode mixers, which is 
about 6 to 7 dB. The T37-2 
toroid seems to be a better 
match than a T37-10 or 
T37-12 which I also have 
tried. The tuning is 
smoother and the tendency 
to oscillate has disap- 
peared. The wire size is not 
critical; I have used #24 to 
#30 wire with equal results. 

Readier Service for facing page *>'^5T— 






i 


20W 
J 


ToSsrf;>>- 


f'^^ 






< 




\ . 


/ 




X 


' V 


\ Q 


X 







V 



o 



'>'lfVV,l 



® 



i I 



^ ? 



DK200/DK210 

Electronic Keyers 



i 


■■ 




■ 


|kg| 


1 




CW is both communication and art. 
Sharpen your "fist" with Daiwa precisiofil 

DK210— L£.D. Speedmeter Reacts speed to 50 

WPM • Iambic opefation wlfh squeeze Key ♦ Auto- 
malia semi auiomatic, or tune modes • Dot-dash 
memory • Solid state keying • Weight Control: 

«dii.sfs doi-dash space ratio* Dimensions: 
50W t 62H X ISOD m/m • Rugged, all metal 
a bin el 

DK200— Sam© as DK210 without LED. speed- 
meter 

CNA2002 

Automatic Antenna Tuner 




StateHsf-lhe-an automatic antenna matching 
En under 46 seconds. 

CNA2O02 — Frequency range: Amateur bands 
3.5 - 30MHz. including new WARC banos • Power 
Rating: SSS^Eb kW PEP. CW-1 kW (50% dutyl 
AM-500 walls. SSTV. PTTY-500 watts flO min- 
utes) • Dummy Load: 50 watls continuous (100 
wstts/i mini." stalled • Two antenna outputs 
for unbatanced lines • Dimensions: 225W x 
90Hx 2750 m/m 



AF606K/AF406K 

All Mode Active Filters 




« 



Luxurious setectivity at an af Ifordable price! 

AF606IC— Innovative PLL Tone Decoder Cifcuitrv 
[QCKS onto the CW signal and reproduces it with m- 
credlbiec[aritv* Variable Notch Frequency; 3^"' 
3000Hz •CW Pass Band: 1 '■■■'" ^ " ' '''^ ' ' " '"^ • . 
• Lowpass and Highpass flltt^i n jy ^ui uA5^ui:t;t \\ ^ad 
reception • Built-in speaker • Dimensions: 
150Wx62Hxl50Om/m 

AK406K— Same as AF606K without PLL Tone 
Decoder • CW Pass Band: 1 70Hz., 1 40Hh.. 
1lOHz.8QHz 

CNW518/CNW418 
Manual Antenna Tuners 




Maximize station performance with high 
quality Daiwa tuners, 

CNW51 8— Frequency range: Amateur bands 
- 3 3 ' . ■ HzL Including new WARC bancfe • Power 
Rating: -SSB-Z5 kW PEP CW^I kW (50% duly) • 
Two an: outputs for unbalanced lines • Dh 

mensior^: 225W m 90H x 275D m m 

CNW413 {not shown^— Same specif k:al ions as 
CNW5 IS except Power Rating: SSB-500 watls 
PEP„ CW-2CX3 watts • Dimensions: 225W x 
90Hx245Dn^'^ 




S5S e Cor>grsat Partt Or . C«n|)»vlli«, Ohio 4^44S. Phomr 1-513-43^^X131 
CDHIilllltCATIOIfS E ^ c u 3rv« U 3 A^efiti ki^ thoie DAIWA prodiK:i& OeaJer tnqtiiry inviiHl 

weiTE OR CALL FOR MORE mFORMATfON AND THE 
LOG AVON OF YOUR NEAREST AUTHORIZED DEALER 



LA2030 

2 Meter Power Ampfifter 




Se Heard! Give your hand-hetd the boast it 
needs! 

LA5030— ^Sefectable power output low \\o 
w^its'j or H''-"'' iO watts) (afi modeJsl • Power 
Input; 1 50ni vv 300 mW (LA2030A), 300mW ^ 

eOOmW (LA2030B). T5 - 2.5 waits (LA2030C). 
Choose the model that^s right for you • Fsst act- 
ing protection circuitry • RF le^^ef indicator • BIMC 
input. SO-239 oulput • Compact size: 90W x 

42Hx121Dm/m 



CN520/CN540/CN550 

Cross Needle Meters 




Daiwa cross-needfe convenience m a compact 
case? Get SWR and Power readings in a single 
gJance, 

CN520— Frequency: U - 60 MHz • Fbwer rat- 
ing; 2 kW max * Sensitivity: 40 watts minimum 

• Accuracy: x10% at fuirscate • Dimensions; 
72Wx72Hic95Dm/m 

CN540— Frequency: 50 - tSOMf-^ * p^'w^ fat- 
ing : 200 watts max, • Sensrtivily : . .= . -^-^-^ 

• AoctJracy: Same as CN5^ • DimenLi.^,,^. 
Same as CN520 

CMS 50— Fr^u en cy: T 44 - " ~ " ' * -z* Power rat- 
ings: 200 waits max. • Sensjoviiy. 4 watts mini 
mum • Accurac -"~9 as CN520 • Dimen- 
^Ons: Same as O^ib^ij 




▲ 



AMATEUR RADIO INNOVATIONS 



This amplifier can be 
tuned up by hooking it to 
your TV set's unbalanced 
input t75-Ohm). On some 
older sets, you might have 
to go past the balun directly 
to the VHP tuner input Ap- 
ply power, clip a piece of 
wire to CT4, and tune for 
the best picture on the 
channel of your choice or 
the next one, if the channel 
is blank. That completes 
the tuning. 

The Miier 

When I started writing 
this article, the only mixer 
worth considering, in my 
opinion, was a double- 
balanced mixer (see The 
Radio Amateur's Handbook 
for details). The one I 
selected was the MCL-SBH 
(see Fig. 2) for no other 
reason than availability. 
There is no question about 
it They do a fine job in this 
circuit. But in small quan- 
tities they are rather expen- 
sive. 

So, just for you cheap- 
skates out there like myself, 
I included a makeshift mix- 
er, which consists of two 
parts: a home-wound rf 
choke and a small-signal 
diode. How cheap can you 
get? 

Despite its simplicity, 
this cheap mixer works very 
well The conversion losses 
seem at least equal to if not 
less than the double- 
balanced mixer, but it is 
slightly more prone to inter- 
mod {at least when you live 
within a mile of FM and TV 
stations as 1 do). Never* 
theless, it is a good substi- 
tute until you can get a dou- 
ble-ba lanced mixer — or 
you could use it permanent- 

ly. 

Construction and Tune-Up 

The printed circuit 
boards are made of single- 
sided CIO, 1 oz. copper- 
clad laminate. After you 
have obtained your board, 
either through your own ef- 
forts or otherwise, it is best 
to make sure that all parts 

aa 73 Magazine • March. 1982 





U.H.F PRE AMP 




C( 



BODY 
SlOE 



II 



■IP 



ALL PARTS ON 
NOM FOIL SlO£ only: 

J* JUMPER: 



Rl 

-41-r E — i*~ 






% 




#20'450iiKx 

IN RG174 
FROM A«T, 
CONN 



ft7 



D2 
JJI.6-2V 2£ 



E^R 



12 V ♦ 



- 6RN0. 



Fig. n. One-stage preamp board 
PCB layout 



Fig. 12. One-stage preamp board com- 
ponent location. 



have the proper hole sizes 
(i.e., #62 — resistors and 
capacitors; #60— MRF901 
transistors; #56 — trimmer 
capacitors; 1/16" — coax 
braiding, etc.). 

Place all trimmer 
capacitors and trimmer 
resistors in their respective 
positions. Some of these 
parts might not line up right 



away; you might have to 
bend the pins to fit them 

These parts must be flush 
with the board before 
soldering. 

Next, I would suggest 
that you install all the 
jumper wires. (Refer to the 
component location figures 
for positioning of all parts 
and jumpers.) Install all 



capacitors, chipping off ex- 
cess material around the 
leads as may be required to 
place them flush with the 
board. Then install the 
resistors, leaving the 12-V 
side of R7 and R8 detached. 
Make sure that these are 
flush as well, as shown in 
the photos. Always install 
them with their bodies 




C3 





ct 




ALL PARTS OH HQH FOIL 
SfDE ONLY. 



«»«tl4>MPER 





IR 



I 




BODY 

SIDE «j — . * 

^>k. CIO I '^TCfl 

R2I 




4 20*450 MHi 
IN RG 174 
FROM 
ANT. CONN. 



OUT 



Aci3^^6 



Rt2 





I 



RT 



. 02 

i» 6.2V ZENER 



12 V 



Fig. 13, Two-Stage preamp board 
PCB /ayout 



Fig. 14. Two-stage preamp board component 
location. 

Re&t^r Servtce for fa&f^g page r-^Bt-* 



KDK MAKES 2 METER FM 

SIMPLE AND EASY! 

KDK iNTRODUCES A NEW GENERATION OF 2 METER FM RADIOS. 

The sparkling 2 02 5 A MKII is loaded with new features! East of operation is the 



concept at KDK. 



TCM\^ 



iH3G*-i 



♦ "l. 



O A n 



BO/PWR 



Qff^N 



3_Ljvi/ 



KDKVHFFM 



FIVI' 



inwkU 



A^tm 






r^/>s 



iJiAJ^ 



NA/FrTTE 



VOi^-ShBQl. 



Pw-OOOE 



fVlESVlORV 






Q C 



K/llC 



SPECIAL! 

WINTER SALE! 



H 



»' 



Includes: 

Touch Tone^'Mfke (Reaay lo 
ORDER NOW DIRECT 



Features such as tgn channel memory in two banks of five each, a 
solid 25 waits of power, full MARS and CAP coverage from 143,000 Mhz 
to 148.995 Mhz, plus built in memory retention for up to one year . , . 
and much, much more makes this the radio of the year. If you have been 
waiting to move up to a new model, or have wished for a radio with 
"everything" ... KDK has itl 

•The ten channel memory is easily addressable and you have two banks 
of five channels each. You can even use both banks at once for odd splits. 

•Standard 600 hz shift up or down. Band scan or memory scan. Memory 
scan is easy^ There is also band scan with upper and lower limits you can 
choose yourself! 

• Built in nicads for the memory retention which has drain in nano-amps, 
not mjlli amps. The internal battery will hold the memory for up to one 
year! No other radio offers you this feature. 

• Fast and easy dialing. Full solid state dialing and you can choose from 
the front panel either a fast or slow dial rate. 

• No relays are used, only sofid state switching. This eliminates a troubEe 
spot many radios encounter, 

• KDK has also eliminated another trouble spot by completely hand 
wiring each radio. No internal plugs to become intermittant and no wire 
wraps either, just good solid wiring. 

ORDER NOW DIRECT 
I CALL TOLL FREE 

800-251-4141 

This number for ORDERS ONLYl 

Mail Order - COO - Bank Cards 

HOURS - 9i00 ' 5:00 CST Monday - Saturday 
Phone (615)865 7949 
Telex 80-8327 




• KDK gives you one of the hottest receivers you can find. By using UH 
(not VHF) dual gate MOS-FETs with electronic auto tuning for the RF 
amplifier and the first mixer, you have a combination of ultra sensitivity; 
and maximum quietness. 

•The audio output stage in the 202SA Mk II uses an integrated circuit 
which has internal protection against over-voltage and shorted output 
conditions. Plus it is a high audio output chip - just what you need in a 
noisy mobile situation. 

•The transmitter uses direct VCO varicap modulation lor true FM. Your 
transmitted audio sounds as it should; crisp, clear and natural 

• The power output stage of the 2025 A Mk II will not break down even 
with an infinite VSWR load, and uses heavy duty solid state antenna 
switching with a four stage low pass filter. All this gives you an exception- 
ally clean, spur free output. 

• KOK has included an adjustable sub audible tone circuit which can also 
be used for CTCSS or tone burst on transmit. Again, more features! 

•Size is 2 7/10" high -^ 7 1/8^' wide - 9 1/2" deep. 

•You can switch from 25 watts to 3 watts low power. 

•And, of course, the DC cable is included along with the microphone 
and mobile mounting bracket. 

Write for broehure - Dealer inquiries invfttdl 

Warranty information available at your dealer 

Company reserves the right to change specitications without notice- 

EKclustve US Distributor - Dealers WelcomBi 



MKBR 



ORDER DIRECT 

OR AT YOUR DEALER! 
Distributed by: 

KDK DISTRIBUTING CO., INC. 

617 SOUTH GALLATIN ROAD - MADISON.TN 37115 

Phone (g1 5)865-7349 



.* n.^5'->,- 



i/*""^. 





Photo D. Completed preamps in metal enclosures. 



toward the rf side and leads 
toward the ground side. 

Now install the tran- 
sistors and diodes. Observe 
proper pin connections on 
the transistors and polarity 
on the diodes. Use a small 
soldering iron on this job 
and don't apply too much 
heat as the copper foil may 
come loose. Never use a 
soldering gun on this kind 
of work— it might kill your 
transistors. 

Install the remaining 
parts (toroid coil, rf choke, 
double-balanced mixer), 
then the power leads, three 
wires to the tuning poten- 
tiometer, R20, and the input 
and output cables from the 
board to the connectors. 
Make sure that the inner 
leads of each RG-174 cable 
to the board are as short as 
physically possible. A neat 
way would be to fish the in- 
ner lead with a pointed ob- 
ject through the side of the 
braided shield. About 3/8" 
from the end, roll the braid- 
ed material to a smal ler size 
between your finger tips, 
and solder in the ground 
hole as indicated in Fig, 3. 

Normally, I would have 
included a couple of 
1 N9l4s back-to-back across 

30 TSMagazinB • MarchJ982 



the input for protection, but 
I skipped the idea, since it 
would just give you a false 
sense of security. Besides 
losing a little gain, I found it 
to be very ineffective when 
it comes to rf overload pro- 
tection. 

I have blown away a 
small fortune on replace- 
ment transistors in the pro- 
cess, despite the presence 
of the diodes. They even 
blew without any battery 
power hooked up every 
time I switched my 100-W 
linear on. 

After throwing away my 
home-brew antenna relay 
(made from a conventional 
relay) and replacing it with 
a proper coaxial relay, my 
problems were solved. At 
this frequency, you only 
need a few pfs of stray 
capacitance between the 
relay parts to pass enough 
energy to knock that front- 
end transistor from here to 
the moon and further while 
the diodes just sit there 
laugh in' at you. It doesn't 
seem to bother them. 

Depending on whether 
you go for the double- 
balanced mixer (DBM) or 
the diode mixer, you wilt 
have to make some minor 



changes accordingly. Refer- 
ring to Fig. 4(a), if you use 
the DBM, you will have to 
join C and D, hook R1 3 to E, 
and join C to F with a 
jumper wire as shown. 
Referring to Fig. 4(b), when 
using the diode mixer, join 
C and A with the mixer 
diode, D1, keeping the 
positive (banded) side on G, 
and hook R13 to B — that's 
all Make sure to install the 
DBM from the component 
side of the board, and 
solder all 8 pios to the ap- 
propriate traces and ground 
connections. Note: To pre- 
vent C14 from accidentally 
shorting against the DBM, it 
might help to keep some 
clearance between the mix- 
er module and the circuit 
board [about 1/16" will do). 

I have used several types 
of diodes (silicon and ger- 
manium) and most of them 
seem to work quite well. A 
1N82 UHF diode I tried 
seems to be a good choice. 
Hot-carrier diodes were 
disappointing in this circuit. 
You might try different ones 
yourself as most small- 
signal diodes work well in 
the GHz range, 

[n regard to the indepen- 
dent preamp boards (one or 



two stage), they should be 
installed in a metal box of 
some kind. I have used die- 
cast aluminum boxes for 
this purpose. The boards 
should be mounted away 
from the walls of the box as 
near to the center as possi- 
ble by using spacers. If the 
box is small enough, you 
could possibly solder it 
right onto the BNC connec- 
tors as I did (see Fig, 5 and 
Photo D). Use a 0.001 -/iF 
feedthrough capacitor to 
feed 12 V in. 

Preamp or Converter 
Alignment Procedure 

While I explained the 
alignment of the oscillator 
and i-f amplifier earlier in 
this article, I will now pro- 
ceed with explaining how to 
align the preamps and also 
the complete converter 
ai^sembly: 

1 1 Connect output to TV set, 
tune in your favorite i-f 
channel, and clip a length 
of wire to C14. Apply 12 V 
[Fig. 6, for example) to sup- 
ply line and tune C5 for 
maximum on TV set. 

2) Set R21, R22, C1,C2, and 
C3 to mid-range. 

3) Tune TV to a low UHF 
channel that has a program 
on. Connect UHF TV anten- 
na input to CIO, R4, or Q2's 
input by spot-soldering a 
wire onto one of these 
spots. Connect a UHF 
antenna to antenna input 
on preamp or converter 
board. Hook a 12-V supply 
to R7 and ground. 

4) Peak up CI , C2, and slow- 
ly turn R21 counterclock- 
wise until a point of max- 
imum gain is reached. If 
R21 is turned too far, the 
stage will break into oscilla- 
tion; it should be kept just 
below this point. 

5) Disconnect wire as in- 
stalled in step 3, hook UHF 
TV's antenna to output of 
2nd rf amplifier (con nee ting 
point to either D1 or SBL1, 
whichever is applicable), 
and peak up in the follow- 
ing order: C3, CI, C2, R22, 
and R2r 

Reader Service for facing page t^ 15r* 




• 




Food for thought. 

Our new Universal Tone Encoder lends its versatility 
to all ta?;tes. The menu includes all CTCSS, as well 
as Burst Tones, Touch Tones, and Test Tones. No 
counter or test equipment required to set frequency- 
just dial it in. While traveling, use it on your Amateur 
transceiver to access tone operated systems, or in 
your service van to check out your customers' re- 
peaters; also, as a piece of test equipment to modulate 
your Service Monitor or signal generator. It can even 
operate off an internal nine volt battery, and is available 
for one day delivery , backed by our one year warranty. 



• All lones in Group A and Group B are included. 

• Output level flat to within 1 Jdb over entire range selected 

• Separate level adjust pots and output connections for each 
tone Group. 

- Immune to RF 

• Powered by 6-30vdc. unregulated at 8 ma. 

• Lov^ impedance, low disionion, adju^^table sinew ave 
output. 5v peak*to-peak 

• Instant start-up. 

• Off position for no tone uisipuL 

• Reverse polarity protection built-in. 



Group A 








67,0 XZ 


91.5 ZZ 


llg.82B 


156.7 5A 


71.9 XA 


(M.RZA 


123.0 3Z 


162.2 5B 


74.4 WA 


97.4 ZB 


127.3 3A 


167.9 6Z 


77.0 XB 


KDO IZ 


L3l.a3B 


173.8 6A 


79,7 SP 


un.s [A 


136 5 4Z 


179 9 6B 


fi2.5 YZ 


107.2 IB 


14L3 4A 


186.2 7Z 


85 4 YA 


I10.9 2Z 


146,2 4B 


192. g 7A 


fiSSYB 


114 J 2A 

1 


I5L4 5Z 


203-5 Ml 



• Frequency accuracy, ± .1 Hz maximum - 4(fC to + 85**C 

• Frequencies to 250 Hz available on jjpecial order 

• Continuous tone 

Group B 



TESTTONES.- 


TOUCH-TONES: 


BURST TONES: ' 


600 


697 iim 


1600 1850 2150 2400 


1000 


770 1336 


1650 1900 2200 2450 


1500 


852 r4T? 


1700 1950 2250 2500 


2175 


94J 1633 


1750 2000 2300 2550 i 


2805 




1800 2100 2350 



• Frequcney accuracy; ± 1 Hi maximum - 40°C to + 85*C 

• Tone length approximately 3t)0 ms. May be lengthened, 
shonened or eliminated by changing value of resistor 

Model TE-64 S79.95 




COMMUMCATIONS SPBC/AUS7S 

426 West Tafl Avenue, Oriinge, California 92667 
(800) 854-0547/ Caltfomia: (714) 998-3021 



^T=-i 




6) Repeat step 5 a few times 
until everything tunes 
smoothly. Be careful to 
keep R21 and R22 below 
the oscillating points. By 
now, you should notice 
quite an increase in gain on 
the UHF channel. 

7] Tune oscillator as de- 
scribed under ''The Oscilla- 
tor" by applying 1 2 V to R8, 

8) Solder R7 and R8to12-V 
line. 

9] Peak up complete con- 
verter once more, step-by- 
step, to a distant ATV signal 
source. 

10) After you close up your 
box or whatever metal 
housing you decide to use, 
you will have to touch up 
the adjustment a little to 
allow for detuning caused 
by the metal shield. If your 
box is the kind with slots in 
it, you could reach some 
trimmers with a narrow tun- 
ing tool, and after turning 
the shield half a turn, do the 
same with the remaining 
trimmers. In other cases 
you might accomplish this 
feat by using a temporary 
cover made from a tin can 
with some holes punched in 
it 

By now you should be 
able to pick up ATV sta- 
tions 40 to 50 miles away, 
and hand out P4 picture 
reports, while others 
wonder how you do it; they 
only get a P2 picture or 
nothing at alL If you've got 
money to burn, you might 
want to use a $20 transistor 
in the front end with a 
0.9-dB noise figure, but I 
wonder if you'll notice 
much difference. 

Some Afterthoughts 

If you run out of range on 
the 5k trimpots (R21 and 
R22), you could extend 
them by using higher values 
for R3 and R6. This might be 
necessary with spme odd- 
ball transistors but if you 
stick with the types I men- 
tioned, you should have no 
problems. If R3 and R6 
prove to be too high, you 
can lower their values, but 
don't go below 220 Ohms. 

32 73 Magazine * MarchJ982 



You won't have enough 
isolation between the trim- 
pots and the rf-carrying 
parts of the transistor bases. 

If you are interested in a 
wider range of coverage 
such as 427-444 MHz, it 
would be better to stagger- 
tune the stages a bit— 439 
MHz on the first rf stage 
and 434 MHz on the second 
stage for instance; this a!so 
will improve stability. 

If you pick up signals 
that shouldn't be there 
while your box is closed, 
you might have to resort to 
a bandpass filter; there are 
some good designs in the 
Handbook, etc. I am work- 
ing on one now that uses 
stripline techniques similar 
to the ones in this article, If 
successful, you might see it 
some day. 

In regard to the varactor 
diode tuning arrangement, 
some suitable diodes can 
be found in surplus varac- 
tor TV tuners. Varactor 
diodes do not change 
capacitance in a linear 
response to a varying 
voltage, so don't expect 
your tuning arc to be linear 
with the oscillator frequen- 
cy. The arrangement used 
here seems adequate, but 
you could alter the value of 
the tuning potentiometer, 
R20, and add series 
resistance to make the dial 
more linear. This, of course, 
will change with the kind of 
diode used. For instance, 
when R20 is 3k instead of 
TOk and you put a 6,8k 
resistor in series with the 
pot's ground teg and 
ground, your dial will cover 
about 6 MHz over its total 
arc (see Fig, 3). 

You could make up a sec- 
ond board just for the 
oscillator to be used as 
signal sources. By carefully 
tuning, I managed to go as 
high as 500 MHz and as low 
as 350 MHz. When tuned to 
439.25 MHz, it acts as a fair- 
ly stable low-power signal 
source ideal for tuning up 
UHF preamps. 

My future plans include 
the development of a 



similar setup as described 
in this article, but for higher 
frequencies such as 900 and 
1296 MHz. I am also 
presently working on a UHF 
TV exciter, intermediate 
amplifier, and linear 
amplifier, all solid state and 
stripline, of course! 

I must thank the many 
Canadian and American 
ATVers who switched on 
their TV transmitters 



endlessly for long periods 
of time (which is hard on 
the tubes and transistors 
with small heat sinks and no 
blowers) just for me to tune 
up and try a newly-made 
preamp. And for their en- 
couragement for me to 
write this article. Special 
thanks in this regard go to: 
VE3EIV, VE3CJP, VE3EYR, 
W3P0S. W2RPO, and 
W2PBU.B 



Parts List for Converter and Preamp Boards: 

C1-4— .6-to-5.5-pF film trimmers (Phillips 010EA 5E) note #1 
C5— 22-pF film trimmer {Phillips 010EA 20e) 
C6-14— 0.001-pF ceramic disc capacitors^ 1/4" lead spacing 
C15-18— O.OI^mF ceramic disc capacftors, 5/16" lead spacing 
C19— 5-pF silver mica (NPO) 3/16" lead spacing or axial leads, see 
note #2 

C20— 1.5-pF silver mica (NPO) 3/16" lead spacing or axial leads, see 
note #2 

R1-8— l.k-Ohm, 1/4 W 
R9— 100k, 1/4 W 
RIO— 470 Ohm, 1/4 W 
R11„27k, 1/4 W 
R12— 10k, 1/4 W 
R13— 47 Ohm, 1/4 W 
R14— 330 Ohm, 1/4 W 
R15,16""2.2k, 1MW 
R17-100Ohm1/4W 
R18,19--4.7k, 1/4 W 

R20— 10k volume contro] (linear) Radio Shack #271-1715 or 
equivalent 

R2r22""5k trimpots. Jim Pak #e50P5K (Radio Shack #271*335, 10k, 
as a possible substitute only; requires one additional hole In board) 
D1 * * — 1 N82 or equivalent high-speed, low-power UHF diode, or bet- 
ter 

D2— 6.2-V 1 W zener diode (1N4735), Radio Shack #276-561 
D3^Vaficap diode ±15 pF at 4 V (MV2205, MV2105, CGE-95, or 
equivalent 

Q1,2— MRF901 transistors or equivalent NPN silicon UHF types 
Q3— MPSHei, ECG106 or equivalent PNP silicon UHF types 
Q4— 2N2222 

Rfc— approximately 0.1 to 0.1 5 ^H (Cambion #2960-21-03-00) or wind 
your own: 10 turns #28 close-wound on 1/3" form or 1/2 W 100k 
resistor 

Mixer*— Doubie-balanced mixer MCL-S8L-1 (made by Mini Circuits 

Lab, 262S E. 14th. St., Brooklyn NY 11235; see 78 Handbook, page 

306 for equivalents) 

LI— 5 turns of smafi gauge hook-up wire or #24 enamel wire on 

Amidon tomid T37-2 

L2— 3 turns same as LI 

Miscellaneous parts: RG-174 coax cable, two BNC connectors, 

SPST mini toggle switch, LED, knob, hardware to mount board, and 

cabinet 

^OnJy needed when not using diode mixer 

**Only needed when not using double-baianced mtxer (SBL-I) 

Note#1;Tfanscap#24PX005 from Mouser Electronics couid be used 

instead although you have to re-drl |] some holes. Similarly, Transcap 

#24PX020 could be substituted for C5. 

Note #2: Plastic-film-type capacitors or even ceramics (NPO types) 

could be used as substitutes for the more costly sliver mica types. 

Lower values such as 1 pF and 3 pF have aiso been used suo^ 

cessfully. 

All circuit boards, parts, built-up boards, and complete units are 
available from Spectrum Electronics. For price list and ordering in- 
formation, write to PO Box 4166 Station D, Hamilton, Ontario, 
Canada LBV 4L5. 

Rsacfer Service for facmg p^ge t^331-^ 






-M HaiidheldJM Transceiver 

!|™^ AUTOPATCH • KsybM"" """s » ' «« 

r&X" So Iff --- ^- " - 

SSTs'SS S- S -- - ... - " 

TBUEFM • ^^'f ^^^iJ TUNING • "f =''»''' "™'°'''''' 
TOGGED ISMWam^^^^io^^m ^^"^-^ 

?V!.v tor 12 dB SINAO ,^_^_ 

CTiUnARO ACCESSORIES •Hg^^^j^^ antenna, earphone. 
«xwn8 ""'»• ^ll^l'lj^q. Deluxe leather case, mobile dc 

Sptiomwl SS&^^^-"^ ''^ 

chafOi^cord.exiemaispea»«5r 



Uyy^4yf^CTU!^EH 



^ZOEftJ J^ ^'^^ ^^''^ ^ ,^^, p FL ECTRONICS. INC 



jftPANPIEZOCOUm 



^thi' 



356 Icii-f^e 



,ciOD' -^^^^02 



Bob Ro^hrig K9EUI 
314 5. Harrison Street 
BaOvia IL 60570 



Polishing Kenwood's R-1000 



a gem in the rough 



This is not intended to be 
a product-report type 
of article. There are a few 
improvements that can be 
made to the R-1000 with a 
little effort and some are 
mentioned in the advertis- 
ing hterature. I will say that 
I think the R-1000 is an out- 
standing receiver that has 



excellent stability, sensi- 
tivity, and ease of opera- 
tion. Following are some 
comments on the suggested 
changes. 

The R-1000 comes sup- 
plied with three i-f filters: 12 
kHz, 6 kHz, and 27 kHz. 
The advertising literature 
mentions that the filters 




y 



CONNECTOR 13- 



AGA 2> — -^ 



AGO f> 



\ W-BLi^ 



OR-W 



O 



CONNECTOn 3 ( 






i w-^ 










4 



S3B 



i 

1 *-VEL 



□ Q 



SwrTCH 

FROWT 



/ 



USB 4>- 



GFAT 



/ 



LSB &> 



I BLU 



-a a a 



AM 9> 



r 



J 



RED YEL BRN VI 

^ ^^ . 



I 



I 



SSB 6> 



I Off 



AhlW 



AMN 



LiSB 



LSB 



,^GHHECJOR 4^- 



I w 



TO NOfSE 
BLANKER 
SWUCH 



TO LAMP 

CPRCUIT 



t&HH 



BOi 



= — o 



BK 



//7 



f/g. 1. Original mode switching for the R-WOO, Switch at 
bottom is BRICHT/DIM display control. 

34 73 Magazine • March, 1982 



can be switched to use the 6 
kHz for AM WIDE and the 
2.7'kHz filter for AM NAR- 
ROW. This is not difficult 
as the filters are diode- 
switched and there are no 
critical circuits involved. 
Actually, all filters can be 
used, as will be shown. 

Kenwood goofed on the 
age time-constant switch- 
ing. In fact, both the 
schematic supplied with 
the receiver as well as the 
one in the service manual 
fail to show the age 
switching as it is actually 
wired. The problem is that 
the fast age is used in the 
SSB mode and the slow age 
is used in the AM mode, just 
the reverse of the way it 
should be. Further thinking 
resulted in wanting the age 
switched separately from 
the mode. It is sometimes 
desirable to switch to fast 
age when using an SSB re- 
ceiver for RTTY. 

When using the R-1000 
below 2 MHz, I encoun- 
tered a lot of broadcast sig- 
nals where they didn't be- 
long. This is due to the fact 
that a single bandpass filter 
is used ahead of the rf am- 
plifier for the 200-kHz-tc^l- 
MHz range, and a second 
one is used for the l-to-2- 
MHz range. This allows 
both harmonics as welt as 
intermod products to be 



present. Also, while the 
1000"Ohm input is probably 
better for the random-type 
wire antenna most likely to 
be used when tuning this 
range, it is probably still 
quite far from what the an- 
tenna impedance reaily is. 
Now for what to do about 
these items: 

Fig. 1 shows the actual 
wiring of the switches as 
traced tn my receiver. In the 
AM mode, 9 volts is 
switched to the appropriate 
i-f filter switching diode to 
activate the appropriate 
filter. In the SSB mode, the 
2,7-kHz filter is turned on 
via SSB gate diodes, 
D51,52. The AM detector is 
selected by the normally- 
closed contacts on the SSB 
switches. When either AM 
switch is depressed, ACA 
and ACB are connected 
together, resulting in the 
longer time constant. 

Fig. 2 shows some addi- 
tional circuitry found in the 
service manual that did not 
appear in the schematic 
supplied with the receiver. 
In the AMW mode, Q47 is 
turned on, which grounds 
the negative end of CI 58. 
This extends the low-fre- 
quency response for hi-fi 
quality. (It is possible that 
the earlier R-TOOOs did not 
have this circuit, explaining 
why it was not in the man- 



uaL [f this is the case, the 
pin numbers shown for con- 
nector 4 nnay not be as 
shown in my drawings, but 
the wire colors are probably 
the same.) 

Some comment on the 
display is due at this point. I 
feel that the bright display 
is too bright. Also, the dis- 
play and lamps are bound 
to last longer if operated in 
the dim mode, especially if 
you leave the time dis- 
played when not using the 
receiver. Thus, ! decided to 
use the BRIGHT-DIM 
switch to switch the age 
time constant. 

Removing the lamp wires 
from the switch and taping 
them up leaves the display 
in the dim mode. (By the 
way, you will have to re- 
move the front panel to 
make the wiring changes. 
This is done by removing 
both the top and bottom 
sections of the receiver 
case. Then remove the 
%nobs. The bandswitch and 
tone knobs have hex 
screws; the others pull off. 
Remove the two screws 
holding the analog frequen- 
cy dial knob. Then the 
panel screws can be re- 
moved. The mode switch is 
held on the front panel with 
two screws,) 

Fig. 3 shows the change 
in the switch wiring I made 
in my R-1000. Rewiring the 
switches as shown not only 
allows use of the 2.7-kHz 
filter on AM, but also allows 
use of all three filters in both 
modes. This is possible due 
to the mechanical construc- 
tion of the 4-section mode 
switch. It is possible to 
release all the buttons by 
pressing one in only as far 
as necessary to release one 
that is latched. It is also 
possible to have more than 
one depressed at a time. 
With all switches released, 
the receiver is in AM with 
the 2.7-kHz filter selected. 
(The 2.7-kHz filter is now 
switched directly with 9 
volts instead of via the SSB 
gate diodes.) AMW and 
AMN are the same as be- 



fore. When either USB or 
LSB is depressed, both AM 
switches are released, re- 
suiting in the 2.7'kHz filter 
being selected. If you desire 
wider bandwidth in SSB, 
press either LSB or USB and 
at the same time press AMN 
for 6 kHz or AMW for 12 
kHz. Pressing another but- 
ton will release both 
latched switches. 

The ACA and ACB leads 
are wired to the normally- 
open contacts of the dim- 
mer switch. Now, fast age 
occurs with the switch 
released and slow when the 
switch is depressed. The 
strap across the common 
terminals is left alone. The 
red and black wires that go 
to the center switch ter- 
minals are removed and 
soldered together so the red 
lead going to the noise 
blanker switch is still 
grounded. 

It occurred to me that 
with the 12-kHz filter in the 
receiver, an FM detector 
could be added for those 
who want to listen to the 
FM activity on the high end 
of 10 meters. A simple 565 
PLL circuit can be added to 
provide this; however, it 
would be necessary to add 
a switch somewhere and al- 
so dig into the main circuit 
board itself to switch the 
audio. 

For those wanting a little 
better selectivity for RTTY, 
it is possible to obtain a 
13-kHz filter from Murata. 
It will be necessary to re- 
move the main receiver 
board to change filters 
(probably best to change 
the 12-kHz one). 

Low-frequency perfor- 
mance of the R-1000 can be 
improved with an outboard 
tuner. The tuner can be 
used with a whip, wire, or 
coaxially-fed antenna It 
will perform impedance 
transformation from 50 
Ohms to 1000 Ohms. A 
whip or short wire (most any 
ham antenna used as a sin- 
gle wire looks short at these 
frequencies) looks like a 
capacitive load. This type 



F 



^s^sm^afrfmsssssss^ 



y^i} 



m 



cia5 

50 V 




CI 5ft 

lOV 



0*17 



•: 




mz7 

47X 



C OWN EC TOR 4 



■^ > 



W H IT€ 



AMW 



SWITCH 



47K 



/f7 



Fig. 2. Additional circuit on Q28 shown in service manuai 
This extends low-frequency response on AM wide. 




CONNtCTtt 



AMW I > 



i W-ERH 




333 3> 



1I«-V 



A«N 2>- 



ifi-fi 



_■ i 




OOHi^ECim A' 1 



SWITCH 
FHQNT 



USB 4> 



I GRAY 



6^ <t\<t 

•a </ O' 



Lsa 5>- 



i SLU 



O <3 O 



AM g>- 



GRh 



J 



HED YEL SRN VI 



AhflW 2> 



UV 



A,M« 



AMN 



USB 



LSB 



SSB 8 > 



J 1>R 



tlOT USED 



I 



CONWECTOH t^ ^ 



BK- 



/73 



ACB I > 



I DB-W 



AG A 2> 



a 



I W-flLU^ 



1 



i: 



i 



Fig. 3. Mod Hied mode switching to provide fast and stow age. 



of antenna is best con- 
nected right to the ''high" 
end of the tuned circuit. 
Fig. 4 shows a suggested 
tuner. 

While my tuner includes 
several coils for three fre- 
quency ranges, 1 only show 
one here. You may wish to 
use ferrite rods or slug- 
tuned coils, but the link- 
winding turns should re- 
main about the same. If 
your antenna has a high 
capacity to ground, the 



high frequency end will not 
extend as far as you may 
wish. This may be cured by 
adding about 100 to 200 pF 
in series with the wire an- 
tenna input on the higher 
frequency range. Some val- 
ues are shown in Table 1, 

Going down in frequen- 
cy, the sensitivity rapidly 
drops off below 200 kHz. 
(The specs say 200 kHz is 
the bottom end of the use- 
ful range.) Above this fre- 
quency the sensitivity runs 



pSquency Range 


^^ LI 


L2 (turns) 


■rap (turnf 


1-2 MHz 


40 (iH 


20 


^ d 


0:5-1 MHz 


150^H 


20 


' 1 


200 500 kHz 


1 mH 


30 


^ 1 


80-200 kHz 


6rnH 


40 


1 



7a6/e 1. Approxinnate values for R-1000 antenna tuner. 

73 Magazine • March, 1982 35 



1900 - 2500 MHZ KITS 



SI9.9S 



V 




Sf9.9S 



Y^ 



P&Wii SOPHY Kit 
Sf9.9S 




PX. BOARd 
PM-MIUiB AHd 
SOLMRPiOWiP 

3 MJff9aF TiAnes, 

I HPPi&PES 

& CmPCAPS'lAi^l* 

8 iESiSTQRS 

♦ PiEPSiMiP cons, 

to MfP CAP. 






SOPPiy CABiHiTS 

rimtt r**H 7 ttr ,.,, , it, ft 

MA^i^PAcrmiP 

CASie SETS 

t§fr. fitft ML $th ti 





33 WASHEf^S 
32 SPACERS 

1 3f&OTR0P 

2 Hi/TS 

1 i^PVCP/PE 

2 $'i0PCAPS 

; mmHTimBAit 
! vcoffSfEcra/t 

/ ftUTAKPiOlT 



P/SCaUMES 

^ r* t,. „„,.„■■„».■, fin 

ft0 fit rt*.^.*.*.. .itm 

KffiMfwi rtrs i4» M§t it M»ttt 





f PX, S04MP 

f POWER TRAPSE, 

f St 71 ADJUSTABLE 

RECytATOR 

t FifiE TUHtHC POL 

wnaswiTC^ 

COARSE mmMs pot 

RffOSS 

'E^COMftECTORS 
* POWER PiOPES 
/ RfCfiOi(E 
J MESiSTORS 
3 PiSR CAPS. 

r fooompCAP. 

f pppTMfm rmciE 
swncM 

f lEPWtTifHQlPER 



f 

2 
3 



MAIL ORDERS 
ADD $5,00 FOR SHIPPING AND HANDLING. TRIONYX IND. INC. 
INDIANA RESIDENTS ADD 4% SALES T A K. fi21d COFFMAN RD. 

INDlANAPOUSi IND. 
46268 *^ itM 
{317) 291-7280 
[317) 291-2995 





about 1.2 fiV. At 150 kHz, 
sensitivity is down 16 dB, 
and aMOO kHz it is down 37 
dB. 

Being a low-frequency 
addict, I wondered if the 
low-frequency range could 
be extended. I felt that the 
filter consisting of LI, L2, 
L3, C7, and C8 was the limit- 
ing area. Connecting the 
signal generator to the junc- 
tion of L4 and C9 confirmed 
this. It looked worthwhile 
to bypass the fitter compo- 
nents, and this can be done 
without removing the cir- 
curt board if you are 
careful. 

Cut the anode lead of D1 
close to the board. Then cut 



the lead of C8 that connects 
to L3. Cut this lead close to 
the body of the capacitor 

Strap the anode of Dl to 
this wire that went to the 
capacitor. Now the sensitiv- 
ity is 2 yN at 1 50 kHz and 3 
^V at 100 kHz At 50 kHz. 
the sensitivity is 20 j^V, 
where it originally was 
18000 hV! This modifica- 
tion does not seem to in- 
crease the broadcast inter- 
ference noticeably. In ei- 
ther case, an external tuner 
is needed if you are near 
any broadcast stations. 

Kenwood sells a kit for 
operating the R-100Q on 12 
volts dc. Why this is not in- 
cluded in the receiver is 








^AMTEHNA 
INPUT 




F/g. 4. Antenna tLrner \Df the R-1000{2 MHz and fower). CI is 
a dual broadcast variable, about 730 pF, 

36 73 Magazine • March, 1982 



anybody's guess, but this 
feature can be easily add- 
ed. There is no reason that a 
connector is needed on the 
power supply board A pair 
of wires for the +12 and 
ground connections can 
just be soldered directly to 
the board. The power sup- 
ply board is easily removed 
by unsoldering the wires 
from the power transform- 
er. There is a blank plate on 
the rear panel of the receiv- 
er where the dc power con- 
nector is intended to go A 
connector of your choice 
can be installed here, I 
recommend fusing the dc 
input with a 1-Amp, slow- 
blow fuse. 

The receiver cannot be 
powered by nicad batteries 
for very long as the current 
is typically around 700 mA, 
It draws 25 mA with the re- 
ceiver off- Having the dis- 
play on DIM reduces the 
drain by about 20 mA 
Looking at the voltage read- 
ings on the drawing reveals 
that the audio output stage 
draws about 140 mA. It is 
evident that this stage (Q28) 
is inefficient because the 
heat sink runs quite warm. 

I don't believe that there 
is a better device that is pin- 
for-pin compatible, but it 
still may be worth investi- 
gating replacing Q2a with 
something else. Also, if ex- 
tended battery operation is 
anticipated, it might be 
smart to switch the displays 
with a momentary push- 
button switch. I estimate 
the displays draw 60 to 100 
mA. 

I did a quick check on the 
audio-frequency response 
(in the SSB mode) to see 
how bad it might be for 
RTTY, It is desirable, of 
course, to have a flat re- 
sponse at the mark and 
space frequencies. 1 origi* 
nally thought that the bfo 
frequencies could be 
changed to favor RTTY op- 
eration so I did adjust the 
trimmers to move the bfo 
frequencies further from 
455 kHz. They wound up at 
a maxiiTium of 1700 Hz 



above and below 455 kHz. 
With the bfo readjusted like 
this, the response, relative to 
2125 Hz, is -0.5 dB at 2295 
Hz. -1 dB at 1550 Hz, and 
^1.5 dB at 2975 Hz. I con- 
sider this pretty good. The 
high-frequency response is 
better at the speaker output 
than at the record output, 
which was a surprise. 

1 hope 1 have not painted 
a dim picture of the R-1000. 
I think a lot of thought was 
put into the design. An engi- 
neer who designs equip- 
ment for the military told 
me that the basic rf design 
(synthesizer and upconvert- 
er front end with a high- 
frequency i-f) is the way 
most of the new precision 
communication receivers 
are designrd It is a fine 
choice for hams and SWLs 
alike.B 

Author's Note 

Between the time I originally 
submitted thts article and when 
1 received the proof copy* more 
experiments were done on the 
R-1000 receiver. There have 
tjeen a lot of complaints about 
the age lime constant being too 
long. I agree and therefore 
changed mine so the time con- 
stant compares with that of the 
820 transceiver. To decrease the 
"fast" age time constant, re- 
move capacitor C217. To de- 
crease the "slow" age time con- 
stant, either replace Cl38 with a 
1 .5-uF capacitor or install a 2-uF 
capacitor in series with the AGA 
or AGB lead at the switch. Note 
that the present C138 is polar* 
i^ed. so if you use a polarized 
capacitor, connect it correctly* 

To improve the high frequen- 
cy response in the SSB mode for 
better RTTY characteristics, 
change C159 from .047 uF to 
.015 uF. Thts Will not noticeably 
change anything by ear, but will 
produce mark and space tones 
of equal amplitude. 

R-1000 receivers with serial 
numbers D09OO1 or higher have 
a jumper plug which will permit 
use of the 2 J- or S-kHz filters in 
the AM mode- If you want to t>a 
able to use any of the three fil- 
lers in either SSB or AM mode, 
my previous swilch wiring modi- 
fications still apply. 

Thanks to Ken WB9FRV for 
suggestions and help with the 
additional changes. 

R&ader Seryice tor tgcing page ^ t5-^ 



A microthin, synthesized, 
programmable, sub-audible 
tone encoder that fits inside 
the ICOM IC-2AT. 



Need we say more? 



.^1* 



J i >• 




H B041 



sNi- 



l9 



^ 1 ^r*^ I 



Z5M. 



"S ^1 f 





COMMUNICATIONS 
SPECIALISTS 

426 West Taft Avenue, Orange. CA 92667 
800/854-0547 California: 714/998-3021 




-K 



Rohm W. fay WBQNPN/8 
6202 Ukota Drive 
Cmdnnatf OH 45243 



Peaking and Tweaking 
Surplus CB Boards 

the untold story 



The closing of Hy-Gain's 
electronic assembly op- 
erations in early 1978 cre- 
ated a stock of readily- 
available surplus parts for 
the amateur who was will- 
ing to convert a CB printed- 
ci re u it-board assembly to 
lO-meter operation These 
were PLL-type boards which 
require only two or three 
crystals for frequency gen- 
eration, Several articles 
have appeared during the 
ensuing time describing the 
methods to use in convert- 
ing to 10 meters. The most 
common method is simple 
crystal replacement, al- 
though some authors have 
opted for vco retuning. 

The purpose of this arti- 
cle is to supplement this in- 
formation with details 
which will describe the vari- 
ous boards used, and to 
provide correct alignment 
procedures. 

There were five different 
models of board assemblies 
using PLL circuitry which 
may have made their way 
into the surplus market. 
Four of these were manu- 
factured in Japan and 
have these identifying part 
numbers: PTBM027AOX, 
PTBM036AOX, PTBM- 
038COX, and PTBM- 
051A0X etched into the 
foil of the board. The fifth, 

38 73 Magazine • March. 1962 



manufactured by Hy-Cain 
itself, has the number 
7500% etched in the foil 
and the Hy-Gain name silk- 
screened on the component 
side. This board, while very 
similar to the circuit used in 
the Japanese boards, was 
destined for use in the man- 
ual-switched radios and the 
remote-controlled model 
27T6 microprocessor radio- 
it contains mostly US tran- 
sistors and ICs. 

The Japanese-manufac- 
tured boards were used in 
model series 680, 2680, and 
2700, along with some of 
the base stations. Table 1 
gives component types, 
symbolism, and oscillator 
frequencies for boards 
which were used in these se- 
ries. 

For those who have con- 
verted factory-assembled 

transceivers, there may be 
an X or an A following the 

model number on the serial 
plate. These were identifi- 
cations used to indicate 
various levels of FCC type 
acceptance, and don't have 
any bearing on amateur 
work. There may be various 
component differences 
which were required to 
meet tightened FCC emis- 
sion requirements, but for 
the most part they have no 



effect upon the ultimate 
function of the unit. 

Table 2 gives the same in- 
formation for the remaining 
models of the 2700 series, 
and Table 3 covers the 
750096 Hy-Ga in-designed 
board. 

Alignment instructions 
for each series will be listed 
separately due to changes 
in component identifica- 
tion and function, There is, 
however, little variation 
from one board to another. 
As in all alignment proce- 
dures, there is interaction 
between successive sec- 
tions, so go back and forth 
for maximum performance. 
The most critical alignment 
in the transmitter section 
concerns the three final 
coils. Follow directions 
carefully, and a power out- 
put holding within ±0.5 W 
can be obtained over the 
40"channel spread permit- 
ted by the PLL. 

There can be significant 
differences, from one board 
to another, in maximum 
power output—which is a 
function of the final ampli- 
fier transistor. Ranges will 
be between 3.5 W and 7.0 
W. Component designa- 
tions are silk-screened on 
the component side of the 
board. 



Since several methods of 
conversion have "been used, 
the alignment instructions 
are written for the original 
frequencies If you have 
converted the board al- 
ready, the relationship be- 
tween the original frequerv 
cies and the converted fre- 
quencies will be obvious. 
Note.* Most of the com- 
ponents in the vco circuit 
have been covered with 
hot-melt wax to prevent 
movement This should not 
be disturbed as component 
placement is critical to 
maintaining performance 
of the circuit. 

Transmitter Alignment 
PTBM027AOX 

This board uses a three- 
crystal scheme. Q105 is a 
9.51-MHz oscillator, Q109 
is the 5.9453-MHz offset os- 
cillator, and Q117 is a 
6,4005-MHz reference os- 
cillator 

Step T — Oscillator Frequen- 
cy Check 

Q105 collector should 
show 9.5 MHz. Change val- 
ues of C118 (nominal 47 pF) 
andC119(nominaM0pF)to 
correct frequency, Q109 
collector should show 
5.9435 MHz. Change value 
of CI 30 (82 pF) to correct 
frequency. Q117 should in- 
dicate 6,4005 MHz, and 



C178 (39 pF) can be 
changed if necessary. 

Step 2— Vco Alignment 

Place the channel-selec- 
tor switch in position 1. Us- 
ing a high-impedance VOM 
connected between TP8 
{R114) and ground, adjust 
T101 for 1.5 volts. Change 
channel switch to position 
40 and the voltage shoufd 
read 4.0 volts. 

Step 3 — Pre-Adjustment 

Using a wattmeter or swr 
meter showing relative 
power output and a dummy 
load, turn L1 10 clockwise 
until it reaches bottom 
(don't over do it!). Torn 
LI 06 clockwise until power 
output is about 2 Watts. 

Step 4^Rf Alignment 

Set the channel-selector 
switch to position 1. Tune 
tin order) LI 03, LI 04, T102. 
and T103 for maximum rf 
power output. Turn LI 06 
further clockwise if neces- 
sary to keep power at about 
2 W. Change the channel- 
selector switch to position 
40 — power output should 
be within 0,25 W of position 
1. Repeat the above proce- 
dure until this condition ts 
met This tuning sequence 
is shaping the bandpass of 
the rf circuit, which is 
capable of almost flat re- 
sponse across the channels 
if properly tuned. 

Step 5 — Final Circuit Ad- 
iustment 

This is the most critical 
step in obtaining maximum 
power output and in main- 
tafntng the fiat power re- 
sponse across the channels. 
With the channel switch in 
position 1, adjust LI 09 for 
maximum output, and then 
L110 for maximum. Repeat 
the adjustments, Switch to 
position 40 and verify that 
power output remains with- 
in 0.5 W. If not, LI 09 often 
has two positions for reso- 
nance, and normally the 
lower position is correct. 
Find the second position 
and repeat the adjustments 
of both coils. If this has no 
effect turn L110 clockwise 
one-half turn and repeak 



Component and 


Function 


Q115 


1st mixer 


Designation 




2SC7108 




Q101 


vco 


2SC1359B 




M PS3704 




Q116 


2nd mixer 


Q102 


PLL mixer 


2SC7t0 




2SC710D 




2SC829C 




2SC829 




2SC839 




2SC839 




Q117 


Ref oscillator* 


Q103 


Buffer 


2SC710D 




2SC710 




Q11S 


1st l-f 


2SC829 




2SC710 




230839 




2SC829C 




Q104 


Buffer 


2SC839 




2SC710D 




Q119 


2nd i-f 


2SC829 




2SC710 




2SC839 




2SCB29C 




Q105 


Oscillator* 


2SC839 




2SC710D 




Q120 


Squelch 


2SC829 




2SC327Y 


switch 


2SC839 




2SC828 




Q106 


AVR (Automatic 


2SC945 




2SC1318Q 


Voftage Regulator) 


Q121 

^^ ^^^ ^^^b ^^ ^^^ ^^k 


Range boost 


Q107 


Xmit switch 


2SC372 




1 2SA719Q 




2SCS2SPQ 




Q108 


Buffer 


2SC945 




2SC1359B 




Q122 


Xmit audio 


2SC1047 




2SC372 


ale 


Q109 


Offset oscfftator* 


2SC828PQ 




2SC710D 




2SC945 




QUO 


Xmit mixer 


Q125(36AOXon y) 


Noise b anker 


2SC710D 




2SC900U 


gate 


MPS3704 




Q126{36AOXonly) 


Noise blanker 


Q111 


Pre-d river 


2SC900U 


amp 


2SC1215 




tC101 


PLL custom 


2SC16B7 






chip 


2SC1688 




IC102 


Audio amp 


Q112 


Driver 


TA7205P 




2SC 1760-3 




BA521 




2SC1957 








0113 


Rf power amp 






2SC1306 




* Values: 




2SC1678 






36AOX, 


2SC1816 




27AOX 


38COX 


Q114 


Rf amp 


Q105 9.51 MH2 


11.8066 MHz 


2SC784 




Q109 5.945 MHz 10.695 MHz | 


2SC1D47B 




Q117 6.4 MHz 


10.24 MHz 


2SC1359 




IC101 01A 


01 A 



Table 7. Components and functions for the 27AOX, 36AOX, and 38COX. 



the final circuit by readjust- 
ment of L109. Repeat as 
necessary. 

Lastly, adjust L106 for 
maximum output, Repeak 
LI 09, and then L1 10 slight- 
ly, as required. Check chan- 
nel 40 for power output 
within the 0.5-W specifica- 
tion. 

5fep 6 — Modulation Adjust- 
ment 

Using a scope or other 
modulation indicator con- 
nected to the antenna ter- 
minal (dummy load still at- 
tached), adjust RV102 for 



correct modulation. If a 
calibrated, modulated sig- 
nal generator is available, 
put 20 mV at about 1 kHz 
into the mike input and ad- 
just for slightly under 100% 
modulation, 

5fep 7—Rf/S-Meter Adjust- 
ment 

The board was fabricated 
for use with an rf/S-meter. A 
suitable meter can be con- 
nected between point 6B 
and ground. Adjust RV104 
(20k pot) to calibrate meter 
to the power output indi- 
cated on the wattmeter. 



Receiver Alignment 

This board has circuitry 
for ani functions which can 
be made operational by 
connecting point 39 on the 
PCB to ground. Do this prior 
to receiver alignment 

Step 1 — Vco A lignment 

The vco circuitry is com- 
mon to both transmit and 
receive functions of the 
transceiver, and was cov- 
ered in the oscillator- 
frequency check in the 
transmitter-alignment sec- 
tion. 

73 Magazine * March, 1982 39 



Step 2 ^Circuit Alignment 

Use the rf/S-meter previ- 
ously installed, an audio 
VOM connected to the 
speaker terminals, or a 
scope to monitor align- 
ment Set a frequency gen- 
erator, or a very attenuated 
transmitter, to a mid- 
frequency (27 205 MHz if 
still unconverted) and very 
low output to avoid age ac- 
tion. Adjust, in order, L115, 
T104, T105, L1 12, T106, 
T107, T108, and T109 for 
maximum output. The fre- 
quency generator should 
have tow- level modulation 
if using audio output as the 
indicator. Since adjust- 
ments interact, repeat sev* 
eral times to obtain maxi- 
mum sensitivity. If using a 
calibrated generator, check 
sensitivity at each band 
edge Sensitivity should be 
less than 1 uV. 

Step J — Squelch Circuit Ad* 

justment 

Turn to maximum the ex- 
ternal pot being used for 
squelch control and adjust 
RV101 so that an S9 signal 
just breaks the squelch If 
you are using a calibrated 
generator input a 50-uV sig- 
nal at the antenna terminal 
and adjust for squelch 
break. 

Step 4 — S-Meter Adjust- 
ment 

Using the same signal 
level as step 3, adjust 
meter* calibration pot 
RV103 for S9 indication. 

This completes the align- 
ment for the PTBMO- 
27AOX boaid- 

Transmitler Alignment 

PTBMOSbAOX and 
fTBMOlSCOX 

Step 1 — Oscillator-Frequerh 
cy Check 

These boards use a three- 
crystal frequency scheme. 
Q105 is an 118066-MHz 
oscillator, and C118 (39 pF) 
and C119 (12 pF) may be 
changed to adjust frequen- 
cy. Offset oscillator Q109 
operates at 10,695 MHz, 
and CI 27 (56 pF) is used for 
frequency adjustment, 

40 73 Magazine • March, 1982 



Q117 is the 10.24-MHz 
reference oscillator, and 
CI 78 (56 pF) is used to ad- 
just frequency. 

Step 2— Vco Adjusttnent 

Connect a VOM to TP8 
{R114) and adjust T101 for 
1.5 V with the channef-se- 
lector switch in position 1. 
Switch to position 40. and 
the voltage should be 4,5 V. 

Step 3 — Pre-Ad justment 

Using a wattmeter or swr 
meter showing relative 
power output and a dummy 
load, turn L1 10 clockwise 
until it reaches bottom 
Turn L106 clockwise until 
power output is about 2 W, 
Step 4—Rf Alignment 

Set the channet-selector 
switch to position 1. Tune 
(in order Till. LI 03, LI 04, 
T102, and T103, for maxi- 
mum output. Turn LI 06 fur- 
ther clockwise if necessary 
to keep power at about 2 
Watts. Change the channel 
switch to position 40 — the 
power output should be 
within 0.25 W of position 1. 
Repeat the above proce- 
dure until this condition is 
met. This process is shaping 
the bandpass of the rf cir- 
cuit and it is capable of al- 
most flat response across 
the channels. 

Step 5 — Final Circuit Ad- 
iustment 

Use the same procedure 
as in Step 5 for the 27AOX 
board- 
Step 6 — Modulation Adjust- 
ment 

Use the same procedure 
as in Step 6 for the 27AOX 
board. 

Step 7— Rf/S-Mefer Adjust- 
ment 

Use the same connection 
and adjustment procedures 
as on the 27AOX board. 

Receiver Alignment 

The boards were de- 
signed with an an I function 
which can be made opera- 
tional by connecting point 
29 on the PCB to ground; 
this should be done prior to 
receiver alignment 
Step 1 — Vco Alignment 

The vco circuit is com- 
mon to both transmit and 



receive functions of the 
transceiver, and was cov- 
ered in the oscillator-fre- 
quency check in the trans- 
mitter-alignment section. 
Step 2 ^Circuit Alignment 

Use the rf/S-meter, an 
audio VOM connected to 
the speaker terminals, or a 
scope to monitor align- 
ment. Set a frequency gen- 
erator, or a very attenuated 
transceiver, to a mid-fre- 
quency and very low out- 
put to avoid age action. Ad- 
just, in order, T104, T105, 
L112. T106, T108. and T109 
for maximum output. The 
frequency generator should 
have low-level modulation 
if using audio output as the 
indicator Since adjust- 
ments interact repeat sev- 
eral times to obtain maxK 
mum sensitivity, decreasing 
the generator output if nee- 
essary If a generator is 
used, check the sensitivity 
at both hand ends, which 
should be less than 1 uV. 
Step 3--* Squelch Adjust* 
ment 

Use the same procedure 
as with the 27AOX board. 
Step 4 — S-Meter Adjust- 
ment 

Using the same signal 
level as in step 3, adjust 
meter-calibration pot 
RV103 for S9 indication. 

This completes align- 
ment of the 36AOX and 
3aAOX boards, 



Transmitter Alignment 
PTftMOSlAOX 

Step 1 — Osciltator-Frequen- 
cy Check 

This board uses a two- 
crystal frequency scheme 
in conjunction with the par- 
ticular PLL circuitry used in 
the design. Ql is a 
10.2*MHz reference oscilla- 
tor for the PLL and injects a 
signal into the second re- 
ceiver mixer, Q10. This sig- 
nal is fed into PLL I CI 
where it is divided by 1024, 
A 10 695-MHz signal is gen- 
erated and mixed with the 
above in 1C3. 

Q1 should show a fre- 
quency of 10.24 MHz. Ad- 



just TCI [adjacent to XI) for 
correct frequency. The mix- 
er oscillator (10.24 MHz) as 
measured at pin 1 of IC3 
can be adjusted by chang- 
ing the value of C25 (4 pFJ. 

Step 2— Vco Adjustment 

Connect a VOM to TP8 
and adjust LI to obtain 1.5 
V with the channel switch in 
position 1. Switch to posi- 
tion 40, and the voltage 
should be 3.6 V. 

Step J— Pre-Adjustment 

Using a wattmeter or swr 
meter shov^ing relative 
power and a dummy load, 
turn LI 2 clockwise until it 
reaches bottom. Turn L7 
clockwise until power out- 
put is about 2 W, 

Step 4 — Ri Afignment 

Set the channel-selector 
switch to position 1. Tune 
(in order} T1, L2, T2, L5, T3, 
and T4 for maximum power 
output. Turn L7 further 
clockwise if necessary to 
keep power at or about 2 
W. Change the switch to 
position 40, and power out- 
put should remain constant 
within about 0.25 W, Repeat 
the above procedures until 
this condition is met. This 
procedure is shaping the 
bandpass of the rf circuit, 
and it is capable of almost 
flat response across the 
band. 

Step 5 — Final Circuit Ad- 
justment 

This is the most critical 
adjustment to obtain maxi- 
mum power output and 
maintain the flat power re- 
sponse across the band. 
With the selector switch in 
position 20, adjust L11 for 
maximum power output 
and then LI 2 for a higher 
maximum. Repeat the ad- 
justments. Switch succes- 
sively to channel 1 and 40 
to verify that power output 
remains within 0.5 W of that 
obtained in position 20 If it 
does not, return to position 
20, turn LI 2 a quarter turn 
clockwise, readjust L11 for 
maximum output and re- 
check position 1 and 40. 
Last adjust L7 for maxi- 
mum output Repeak L11 



When it comes to 

AMATEUR 
RADIO QSL'S . 




it's the 

ONLY BOOK! 

US or Foreign Listings 



1982 





Here they are! Tfie latest edltloni, Worrd- 
famout. Radio Amateur Caiibooks, the 
most reipected and compfcte listing of 
riaio amaieurs, Usts cafJs, license classes, 
address Information. Loaded with special 
features such as call chan9es, prefixes of 
the world, standard time charts, world- 
wide QSL Jjureaus, and more. The U.S. 
Edition features over 400,000 listings, 
with over 70^000 changes from last 
year. The Foreign Ed*t<on has over 
370,000 listings, over 60,000 changes. 
Place youf order for the new 19B2 Radio 
Amateur Callbooks, available now* 

EacFi Shipping TotJl 






SI 3.95 $3.05 S22.O0 
$17.95 $3.05 $21.00 



Order t>oth books at the same time for 
$39 ^95 including shipping. 

Order from your dealer or directly from 
the publisher. Ail direct orders add shipping 
charge. Foreign residents add $4.55 for 
shipping, imno^s residents add 5% sales tax. 

SPECIAL LIMITED OFFER! 
\ Amateur Radio 

Einblem Patch 
Qnly $2.50 postpaid 



Pegasus on blue field, red lettering. 3" wide 
n 3" high. Great on Jackets and cap*. 

ORDER TOOAY? 




Ilbook 



fUmO AMATEUR 

OOK IMC, 

^^*^ Oept, B 

^9)ii^^ 925 Sherwood Drtve 

^^ Uke Bluff, IL 60O44, USA 



*.^61: 



DAI WA Communications 

Essentials 



Simultaneous SWR/Forward SWR & POWER METERS 
& Reflected Power Readingi 



Tolerance: ± 10% full scale 
Inpul/oulput Impedance: 50 Ohms 
Cofinecfors; S0239 



Model CN 620B (New 2 Kw Seale) Model CN-720B ( New 2 Kw Scale) 



irl 



Frequency Range: 1 ,8— 150 MHz Frequency Range; 1.d— 150 MHz 

SWR Detection Sensitivity: 5 Watts mm. SWR Detection Sensitivity: 5 Watts mia 

Power 3 Ranges (Forward. 20/200/2000 Watts) Power 3 Ranges (Fomard, 20/200/2000 Wattsf 

(Reflected, 4^40/400 Watts) (Reflected. 4/40/400 Watts) 

Dimensions: 165 x 75 x 97 mm: Dimensions: ISO x 120 x 130 mm; 

as X 3 X 4 In. 7 X 475 x 5 in. 

Model CN 630 

Frequency Range: 140—460 MHz 
SWR Dete^*^'"'^ Sensitlvrty: 5 Watta min, 
'^ 1 1 ICZ 4^^ t Power 2 Roisy as (Fonjvard, 20/200 Watts> 

,L^.»m ihM E^B ■ (Rpf'^-ted, 4/40 Watts) 

Dimensjons: 180 x 6^ .. .20 mm; 
7.12 X 3.37 X 4,75 ia 



Automatic Antenna Tuner 
Model CNA-1001 



Fi^quency Range: 3.5—30 MHz 

(WARC & Amateur Bands Only) 

Power Rating; 500 Watts PEP 

Internal Dummy Load: 50 Watts/ 

1 Minute 

Impedance Matching: 15-250 Ohims 

to 50 Ohms Resistive 

Input Power Reqi for Aulomatic' 

^unen 1, 5 or 10 Watts (Set by rear 

■banel switch) 

^une-up Time: 45 Secor\4s Max. 
Power Requirement: 13.8 VDC;.2 Amp 




Coaxial 
Switche! 



Power Ratmg: 2.5 kW PEP, IkW CW 

impedance: 50 Ohms 

Insertion Loss: Less tfian .2dB 

VSWR:1;1.2 

Maximum Frequency: 500 MHz 



Isolation; Better than 50 dB at 300 MHz; 

better inan 45 dB at 450 MHz; 

adjacent terminal 
Unused temnlnals grounded 
Connectors: 80-239 



4 Position/ 
Wlodel CS-401 




2 Position/ 
fyiodel C&201 



Exclusive USA agent 
for tt^ese units; 
irx|UJrfes invited. 

Write lor fitarature. 

i^3m 





BELL 

19070 REYES AVE ■ P.O. BOX 5825 
COMPTON. CAUFORNtA 90224 

Phone {213) 537-5200 



t^S&& LfSt of Adv0ftissrs on ffsgis ^3Q 



73MagazinB ■ March. 1982 41 



and LI 2 slightlv for max- 
imum output. Recheck 
channels 1 and 40. 
Step 6 — Modulation Adjust- 

ment 

Using a scope connected 
to the antenna terminal 
(dummy load still attached) 
or other modulation in- 
dicator, adjust RV2 for just 
under 100% modulation. If 
a calibrated, modulated sig- 
nal generator is available, 
put 20 mV at about 1 kHz 
into the mic input and ad- 
just for the correct modula- 
tion leveL 
Step7-Rf/S-Meter 

The board was fabricated 
for use with an rf/S-meter, A 
suitable meter can be con- 
nected between point 68 
and ground. Adjust RV2 
(near L12) to calibrate the 
meter to the power level in- 
dicated on the wattmeter. 

Receiver Alignment 

This board has circuitry 
for an anl and noise-blanker 
function. The anl can be 
made operational by con- 
necting points 31 and 41 on 
the PCB. When these points 
are not connected, the 
noise-blanker circuit is 
operational. A switch can 
be installed for easy func- 
tion selection, and the anl 
should be engaged prior to 
alignment. 

Step 1 — Circuit Alignment 

Use the rf/S*meter, an 
audio VOM connected to 
the speaker terminals, or a 
scope to monitor align- 
ment Set a frequency gen- 
erator or a very attenuated 
transmitter to a mid- 
frequency and very low 
output to avoid age action. 
Adjust, in order, T5, T6, LI 4, 
T7, T8, and T10 for max- 
imum output. The frequen- 
cy generator should have 
low-level modulation if us- 
ing audio output as the in- 
dicator Since adjustments 
interact, repeat several 
times to obtain maximum 

sensitivity and< if using a 
calibrated generator, check 

the sensitivity at each band 
edge. Sensitivity should be 
less than 1 uV. 

42 73 Magazine * March, 1982 



Component and 

Desfgnation 



01 



02 



Q3 



04 



05 



06 



07 



2SC710 

2SC71Q 

2SC1687 

2SC1750 
2SC1846 
2SC2036 

2SC1306 
2SC1678 
2SCt974 
2SC2075 

2SC1318 

2SA719 
2SA720 



Function 

10.24-MHz oscinalof 

Buffer 

Rf preniriver 

Rf driver 



Q10 



2nd WiXBf 



Oil 



2SC710 
2SCB29 
2SCS39 

2SC710 
250329 



Isl if 



Q12 



2nd if 



Q13 



Rf power amp 



Q14 



2SC710 
2SC829 

2SC372 

2SCa28 

2SC945 

\ 

2SA564 

2SA719 

2SA720 



Audio switch 



ALC 



AVR (Automatic 
Voltage Regolalor) 
Xmit switch 



Q15 



ALC 



Q22 



2SC900 

2SC945 

2SC900 



Dc switch 



08 


Rf amp 


2SC710 




2SC460 




2SC1047 




09 


1st mixer 


2SG710 




2SC1359 





IC1 


Custom PLL 02 


IC2 


Vco/mjxer/buffer 


TA7310P 




IC3 


Xmit osc/mixer 


TA7310P 




JC4 


Audio amp 


BA521 





Table 2. Components and functions ior theSlAOX. 



Step 2 — Squelch Circuit Ad- 
iustment 

Turn the external pot be- 
ing used for squelch control 
to maximum and adjust 
RV1 (adjacent to T8) so that 
an S9 signal just breaks the 
squelch. If a calibrated gen- 
erator is being used, input a 
50-uV signal at the antenna 
terminal and adjust for 
squelch break. 
Step 3 — S-Meter Adjust- 
ment 

Using the same signal 
level as Step 2, adjust 
meter-calibration pot RV3 
(adjacent to TTO) for S9 in- 
dication. 

This completes align- 
ment of the 51AOX board. 

This board was made to 

use an LED channel display* 
A special channel-selector 
switch with an extra section 
of contacts protruding from 
the top side was mounted 
to the board. Another PCB 
assembly (PTSW023AOX) 
was connected to the top of 
the switch and contained 
the LED drivers. The LEDs 



were mounted on board as* 
sembly PTLD015A0X and 
interconnected to the driv- 
er board with flat ribbon 
cable. Each board con- 
nected to the identical let- 
tered holes on the other 
board, Driver board 
PTSW023AOX hofe 1 is 
connected to main PCB 
ground and hole 2 to ter- 
minal 9 on the main PCB. 

Hy-Cain produced two 
radios that had all of the 
functional controls in the 
microphone, the main chas- 
sis assemblies of which 
could be mounted in the 
trunk or under the car seat. 
This not only facilitated 
ease of operation but, by re- 
moving the microphone, 
prevented theft. 

Modet 2679 

The transceiver used con- 
ventional PLL circuitry con- 
tained on the 36AOX board 
which was connected to an 
auxiliary control board 
mounted above it on the 
metal chassis. The control 
board has 750070 etched on 
the foil side, and 878928 



silk-screened on the com- 
ponent side. The rear of the 
chassis contains a large 
16- contact connector 
which was used to inter- 
connect with the micro- 
phone through a specially- 
made cord. 

The microphone was 
black with two seven-seg- 
ment red LEDs used for 
channel indicators and red 
(transmit) and green (re* 
cerve) diodes located one 
on either side of a silver- 
handled toggle switch. 
There are commercially- 
available service manuals 
which will illustrate the in- 
terconnection of the two 
PCBs and the microphone. 

Since the transceiver 
uses the same main PCB for 
transmit and receiver func- 
tions, the radio can be con- 
verted in the same manner 
as a switch-selected chan- 
nel unit One word of cau- 
tion — the mike cord was 
prone to failure. Buy two. 

Model 271b 

This radio was known as 
the Hy-Gain 16 and was a 



WORLD TIME 
WATCH 

the first microprocessor watch 
made especially for hams 



The HAM-1 functions include local time, 
worirf time, (G.M.T. tooj count-up and 
count down chronometer, day, month, 
date, a^arm and hourly chime* lt*s ideal 
for log-keeping, DX time conversion ar^d 
10 minute I.D. timing. The HAM-1 fea- 
tures a high contrast Seiko display and 
solar cell battery assist. Battery hfe is 
better than 4 years. The HAM-1 Is wat^r 
resistant to 20 meters, the case is 1CX)% 
Sdlid stainless steel and the crystal is 
scratch resistant mineral glass. The HAM- 
1 is rugged and durable and has a 1 year 
lA/arranty. 

2 METER AMPLIFIER 




24 hr. timer 

micropracessor 
water reststatit 

solar assist 

New Low Price 
-$59.95 




• 2 Watts In, 10 Watts Out • V.S.W,R. 
Protected •Can be Used for F.M. & S.S. 
B, ♦ Led Status Indicators • Low Loss 
SO-239 Connectors ♦Current Drain Less 
Than 2,5A at 13.8 V.DX, • Massive 
Heatsink •Built In T/R Switch 

TEMPO St UPGRADE KITS 
$39.95 

Upgrade your early Tempo S-1 to cur- 
rent Production Specifications, kits 
include: •450 M.A.H. Battery Pack 

• New Case Assembly • All New Es- 
cutcheons ♦ Spkr./Mic. Jack w/Dust 
Cap • New Earphone & Jack • P.C.B. 
and Parts for Easy I nsta Elation • Detailed 
instruction Manual • For Radios With Si 
Without T,T- Pad. 

Other Accessories Available: 

Spkr/Mic. Designed for S-Ts. , . $24.95 

Heavy Duty Belt Clip 7.50 

Flex Antenna 6.00 

To Order Call or Write to; 

ADVANCED COMMUNICATIONS 

INTERNATIONAL 

241 1 Lincoln Avenue 

Bfilmont, CA. 94002 U.S.A. 

^448 1415) 595-3949 

Add $3.00 per order for shipping St 
handling, California residents add 6% 
sales tax. Visa, Master Charge eccepted. 




RADJO STATIONS COMMON? NOT THIS KIND is a history of communica- 
ttons commencmg Vfiih the first visual systems, terminating in a brief 
description of the electronics fitted in the modern rrerchant ship, and 
centered around the largest marine radio station in Canada. Haiffax Radio 
VCS. As a member of the Royai Canadian Navy, Metro Goidwyn Mayer Inc., 
AirSemces Branch Department of Transport, Gyj^SLim Transportation Ltd., 
RoyaJ Canadian Mounted Police, and Canadian Coast Guard, Mr. Roscoe 
has enjoyed twenty five years as a radio operator, He operates Amateur 
Radio Station VEIBC and is an active member of Society of Wireless 
Pioneers, Veteran Wireless Operators Association, Canadian Amateur 
Radio Federation, Nova Scotia Amateur Radio Association, Kings County 
Amat&ur Radio Ctub^ Amencan Radio Relay League and WorldShipSociety, 
Anyone with an i nterest in Amateur Radio, Slnjp Radio Stations, Commerciai 
Radio Operating, Te^eg^aphy^ Aircraft. Ships, or Nova Scotia, should J^nd 
thts book Interesting and informative. Resi«rv0 your copy now. Send no 
money at this time. You will b« notiliiK) of the shipping date, and will be 
billed at the t t^me. 

S,G. Roscoe, Box 1, 5He S, R.R,#5, Armdale, Nova Scotta, 
Canada B3L 4JB, (902) 868-2343. ^ 95 



New Automatic Antenna Tuner 

AutoTrack AT 2500 



I 




Power Capabilily: 2500 W PER 

Frequency Range: Continuous 3.0 to 30 
MHz (ineluding WARC Bands). 

Impedance Match mg; 10 ohms to 300 
ohms to 50 ohms resistive. 

Direct Reading SWR Meter; 1 :1 to infinity. 

Direct Reading Power Meter: Two meter 
scales from W to 250 W and W to 2500 
W; front panel switch selects FWD or 
Reflected Fower (illuminated panel meters). 

Power meter disptays BMS witfi con- 
tinuous carrier and autcmatically displays 
PEAK when driven wltli SSB signal. 



Dealer 

Inquiries 

Invited 

.^308 



Tune-up time not affected by power level;] 
can be as low as 1 W (5-10 W preferred). 

Power requirements are 115/230 VAC 5060] 
Hz, 10 W operatin9/5 W standby; or 13.5 
VDC, 1 A operating/.5A standby. 

Antenna tuner packaged in cabinet 17"W 
X 53/4 ''H X 14"D (Front panel handles orj 
rack mount optional at extra cost.) 

Write for literature. 



specif icatior^ subject to change wlthotit notice. 



JJ, 



iller Division 



BELL INDUSTRIES 

iaO70 REYES AVE. ■ P.O. BOX 5B25 
COMFTON, CALIFORNIA 90224 

Phone (213) 537-5200 



►^See Usr of Acf¥srUs^fS on p^ge 130 



73 Magazine * March J962 43 



state*of-the-art advance- 
ment over the remote- 
control led 2679. It was 
completely designed by Hy- 
Cain and was the first re- 
mote-microprocessor- 
controlted radio manufac- 
tured. The main PCB used 
could be operated with a 
conventional 40-channel 
switch or interconnected 
with a logic-control board 
to accept serial data from 
the microprocessor located 
in the microphone. 

The transceiver featured 
40-channel operation, two 
frequency memories, an 
emergency switch to over- 
ride all functions and go to 
channel 9, PA function, a 
switchable noise blanker, 
and a clock. 

The heart of the system 
was a National Semicon- 
ductor microprocessor 
which was bonded to the 
microphone PCB, National 
Semi manufactured this 
board. It has been adver- 
tised for sale for use of the 
clock only. Identification 
on the lower left corner of 
the foil side is MA6008-C. 
The trimmer cap, IC, and 



crystal and associated com- 
ponents on the foil side are 
the clock Look at the crys- 
tal frequency carefully if 
you have one of the 
boards--it's a TV crystal 
adjusted by the cap to give 
nearly correct time Much 
less expensive than using a 
special crystal running at 
exactly 3600 kHz. 

All functions were ac- 
tivated by depressing the 
appropriate keys, with the 
channels slewing up or 
down, and the squelch and 
volume controlled by 
T6-step control circuits. 

In addition to the 
microphone board, the in- 
terface board (750097 on 
foil side and 879499 on 
component side) and the 
main PCB (750096 on foil 
side and 879709 on compo- 
nent side) were intercon- 
nected to form the func- 
tional unit. 

Since the main PCB can 
be made operational with a 
conventional channel-se- 
lector switch as used on 
other models, the following 
alignment procedure is pro- 
vided. Should you be able 



to locate all of the com- 
ponents necessary to con- 
struct a complete unit, cor>* 
suit commercially-avail- 
able service manuals for 
connections. 

Transmitter Alignment 

879709 

This board uses a three- 
crystal frequency scheme. 
Q105 is an 11.8066-MHz 
oscillator which is tripled to 
function with the vco. Off* 
set oscillator Q109 runs at 
10.695 MHz, and PLL refer- 
ence oscillator Q117 is at 
10.24 MHz. 
Step 1 — Vco Adjustment 

Connect a high-imped- 
ance VOM to TP8 (R114) 
and adjust T101 for 1.5 V in- 
dicated when set to chan- 
nel one. Collector of QlOB 
should give a frequency 
reading of 37.66 MHz at this 
time. 
Step 2— Pre-adiustment 

Using a wattmeter or swr 
meter showing relative 
power output and a dummy 
load, turn L1 10 maximum 
clockwise and L106 clock- 
wise until power output is 
approximately 2 Watts. 



Component and 


Function 


Q113 


Rf power amp 


Designation 




fvtf=(F472 








Q114 


Rf amp 






MPS6514 




Q101 


vco 


Q113 


1st rec mixer 


MPS3704 




MPS6514 




Q102 


PLL mixer 


0116 


2ncl rec mlxef 


MPS6514 




MPS6513 




Q103 


Buffer 


Q117 


Ref osernalof, 10.24 MHz 


MPS6513 




MPS6513 




Q104 


Butter 


Q118 


1st i^f 


MPS6513 




MPSe514 




Q105 


11. 806-MHz oscillator 


Q119 


2nd if 


MPS6513 




MPS5172 




O106 


AVR (Automat c 


Q120 


Squelch 


MPS3704 


Voltage Regulator) 


MPS5172 




0107 


Xmit switch 


Q121 


Range boost 


MPS3702 




MPS6514 




Q108 


Buffer 


Q122 


Xmt audio ALC 


MPS6513 




MPS6513 




Q109 


10.695 MHz offset 


Q125 


Nolse-bfanker gate 


MPS6513 


oscillator 


2N50a8 




QltO 


Xmft mixer 


Q1^ 


Nois@*blanker amp 


MPS6513 




zNSosa 




Q111 


Pre^l river 


iC101 


PLL 


MPSa513 




MM4aui 




Q112 


Driver 


IC102 


Audio amp 


MPSU02 

r 




TA7205P 





Table 3. Components and functions for the 750096. 
44 73Magazine • MarchJ982 



Step 3 — Rf Alignment 

Place in operation on 
channel 1 and adjust T111, 
L103, L104. T102, and T103. 
in order, for maximunn pow- 
er output- Reduce output 
by turning L106 clockwise if 
necessarv to remain at no 
nnore than 2 W. Repeat sev- 
eral times if necessary to 
obtain maximum power 
output. Switch to position 
40 and verify that power 
output is within 0,25 W of 
the position 1 reading. 
Step 4 — Final Circuit Align- 
ment 

Follow the instructions in 
Step 5 for board 27AOX. 

Step 5 ~ Modulation Adjust- 
ment 

Using a scope or other 
modulation indicator con- 
nee ted to the antenna ter- 
minal, adjust RV102 for cor- 
rect modulation. If a cali- 
brated, modulated signal 
generator is available, con- 
nect to point 22 on the main 
PCB and set for 20 mV at 
about 1 kHz, and adjust for 
just under 100% modula- 
tion. 
StepB—Rf/S-Meter 

An rf/S-meter can be used 
with this board by connect- 
ing between point 6B and 
l^round on the main PCB. 
Adjust RV104 to calibrate 
the meter to the power in- 
dicated on the wattmeter. 

This completes the 
transmitter alignment 

Receiver Alignment 

Step 1 — Vco Alignment 

The vco circuitry is com- 
mon to both transmitter 
and receiver and was cov- 
ered in the oscillator- 
frequency check during 
transmitter alignment. 
Step 2 — Circuit Alignment 

Connect an audio VOM 
to the speaker terminals or 
a high-impedance VOM to 
point 6B (or use the rf/S- 
meter installed previously) 
and ground. Using a fre- 
quency generator or a very 
attenuated transmitter set 
for a mid-channel, adjust^ in 
order. T104, T105, L1 12, 
T106. T107, T108, and T109 
for maximum audio output 



Repeat the adjustments as 
necessary. 

Step 3 — Squelch Adjust* 
ment 

The squelch-adjustment 
circuitry was located on the 
control interface board. To 
make the squelch circuit 
functional, connect the 
wiper pin of a 10k pot to 
PCB point 7 and a 20k 
resistor in series between 
one of the pot TR pins and 
point 11 on the PCB. Last 
connect a 10k pot (which 
will be the squelch control) 
between point 7 and 
ground. 

Turn the 10k pot com- 
pletely clockwise and ad- 
just the 20k pot (squelch 
calibrate) so that an 59 
signal just breaks squelch. 
If a calibrated signal gener- 
ator is available, input 50 
uV at the antenna terminal 
and adjust for squelch 
break. 

This completes align- 
ment of the receiver por- 
tion of the board. 



Should any of the boards 
fail to align properly, start 
troubleshooting from the 
front end of the receiver or 
transmitter sections to lo- 
cate the trouble. Since 
these boards were in vari- 
ous stages of manufacture 
when operations ceased, 
they should be inspected 
carefully for damaged com- 
ponents or solder bridges. 

In some models, the 
detector is a 1N4148 diode 
(usually found after the 2nd 
i-f amp Q119) and it is sub- 
ject to infant mortality due 
to solder heat during assem- 
bly. If it is replaced, leave it 
standing up in the air on 
long leads and heat sink 
between the board and 
diode body. 

That is the list of boards 
which many hams have 
converted. They are very 
well designed items, and if 
in proper condition and 
alignment should give very 
good service for a number 
of yearsJi 



PLESSEY- AVANTEK 



5ii&1fi RF Atnphnmr 
SLtttll RF Atnrillflttr 
SLI61I AF A«ti|iihHt?r 

SLltJl ACC Cm 
St1«<?? Af AmpVOC 



PLt^ssiv JNTtcwATeo cjRxurrs 

J.M 1L*t;fi J<K* pifi/ACC Amp" 
1.<I5. SLliJi* ilwlifmude Del 
J.gS SLIfeJ^ AM t>tfi/AQC Amp 
n.n St 1 A| b VOC A D /S Fdetone 
% 07 St,!&jo Al^ Aflii^ 
1, r; SLUjr AF Amp 



6, IT 
41. g? 

3.72 



SLIb^u E>t>ublc Bal Mod 

5L16V0 Xtal Main I Ckl 
SLfeSOa IF Amp Del 
SL6«40 FM Rcvf W An>p«.4l 
SL«£&0 FM rtfivr VI Q A J. 3* 



fc-7i 



AVANTEK GPD SERIES AMPLIFIERS 

11 N dB Gtfift 5 ^^ti %1HZ. 
CIRCUIT aOAftBS FOB €PD ^QQ SERiES A^iPS &2.oj» « 



AMATEUR 

MICROWAVE DOWNCONVERTER 

CO\rPl.ET£ ASSEilflLED READY TO IN&TAU. NOT A iCiT 

SPECIAL $179.95 

ISCLUO.NC SHIPPING .0. P.S.I vtS* *™ ..,A5TERt*RD ACCEPTED 




i«- dB SVSTCU QAiN 
TUNtS 2.1 ChJ 141 I* CHi. 
Pft£AMPLIFIEfi 20' dB CAIH 



% dB HF 



OUTPUT TUNES TV CHAM*ltLS t TO 6 



CHLiflHJt r.i tuAKCE 75 Oft ]M!)<I QKM5 
FTJLt YEAR WAHRAJ^TY 
PtkFO(i%^AHCt CUAfeANTEED OR 
VOUIt ^DKEV fLEFUNDED 



CALL (804) 489-2156 



447 



ELECTRONIC HOBBY INNOVATIONS 

7510 GRANBV STREET SUITE 207 KORFOLK , tftROlNlA 23505 




THE RTTY ANSWER 



|RLPiK~WO 



TimifcHOLC 



NUlUK 




>l«l«ll • 



Ht ¥ I NaW 





i 

% 



THINKING OF RTTY?? 
APPLE TRS . . . HEATH . . , DEDICATED SYSTEM? SOFTWARt/ 
IfslTERFACE? PERFORMANCE? PRICE? We know you have questions 
check our answers. Call today for information on our terminal units! 



700 TAYLOR RD. 
iOLUMBUa OHIO 43230 
(614) 864-2464 
VISA OH wlASTER CHARGE ACCEPTED 

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 



Thomas C fohnson WBSNQK 
3628 A Court 
Oxnard CA 9J033 



OSCAR Pathfinder 

a colorful way to track the satellites 



After purchasing my 
shiny New Apple II 
Plus last year, I went search- 
ing through my stacks of 
old 73 Magazines for some 
good programs to run on it 
To my amazement, there 
was an annoying tack of ar- 
ticles on this machine. (Hey, 
Apple owners what 
gives?) There were a lot of 
programs for other 
machines, but 1 didn't feel 
like going through the has- 
sle of translating them 
Besides, I wanted to use the 
graphics capability of the 
Apple, and the programs I 
found were not suitable for 
graphics. So I decided that 
a good way to get familiar 
with the machine and to of- 



fer something to other Ap- 
ple hams would be to write 
my own program. Since 1 
have always had a lingering 
interest in the OSCAR satel- 
lites, an OSCAR satellite 
tracking program became 
my objective. 

The features I wanted my 
program to have were: 

1) A graphics routine to 
display in real time the posi- 
tion of the satellite being 
tracked on a scale map of 
the US along with a si- 
multaneous display of 
azimuth and elevation 
figures for an antenna 
array. 

2) A routine to display a 
list of the azimuth and el- 
evation figures for the orbit 



3) The equatorial cross- 
ing data for each of the or- 
bits on the day selected. 

4] A routine to display a 
list of the latitude and 
longitude of the satellite for 
each minute of the orbit. 

Besides computing or- 
bital data for OSCAR 
satellites, I wanted the 
capability to compute or- 
bital data for any circular 
orbit satellite. Building on 
the basic ideas and re- 
search of the authors 1 have 
mentioned in the ref- 
erences, I came up with 
OSCAR Pathfinder 

Although the basics of 
the program came 
straightforwardly, there 
were two major obstacles 1 




had to overcome before it 
would operate in the Apple. 
The first and most difficult 
to solve stemmed from the 
way the Apple memory is 
organized [see Fig 1), As 
you can see, Hi-Res screen 
buffer 1 is located from 
8192 to 16383. Hi-Res 
screen buffer 2 is located 
piggyback to that from 
16384 to 24525. Basic pro- 
grams start loading into 
memory at location 2048, 
filling up memory from 
there the way water fills a 
glass, LOMEM floats up 
through memory with the 
loading program like a cork 
floats up with the water. 
When the program is fully 
loaded, LOMEM is at the 
end of the program. Now, if 
the program is longer than 
6K bytes, the end of the pro- 
gram extends up into and 
possibly beyond the screen 
buffers. 

In the case of OSCAR 
Pathfinder, which is api- 
proximately 1 3K-bytes 
long, 7K of the program 
overlaps Hi-Res screen buf- 
fer 1. When the command 
HGR is encountered in the 
program, the buffer is 
cleared and POOf.' — the 
last 7K of OSCAR 
Pathfinder goes off to the 
bit bucket. 

Since the Hi-Res screens 
cannot be moved to an- 
other location in memory 
(at least as far as I know), 
the program must therefore 
be made to occupy another 
non-conflicting portion of 



46 73 Magazine * March, 1982 



memory With 48K of mem- 
ory available, there is lots 
of room to use between the 
end of Hi-Res screen buffer 
1 and DOS. 

Ahah, but to get the pro- 
gram up there that was 
the problem! Since LOMTM 
and HIMEM affect only the 
limits of variable and array 
space, it wouldn't help to 
move them around. After a 
lot of PEE King. POKEing, 
hair pulling, and studying of 
the Apple manuals, I dis- 
covered the fact that the 
Apple uses software point- 
ers to indicate the begin- 
ning and ending of BASIC 
programs in memory, along 
with other various pointers, 
all located in page Zero. 
Locations 103 and 104 
($67, $68) make up the 
pointer to the program's 
beginning address. 

After a little experiment- 
ing, I discovered that by 
changing the contents of 

this pointer I could control 
the location at which the 
BASIC programs start load- 
ing. Success/ Now by typing 
the command "POKE 
104.64:POKE 103,0:POKE 
16384,0", I set the address 
of the beginning of a BASIC 
program to 16384, immedi- 
ately following Hi-Res 
screen buffer 1. Since Hi- 
Res screen 2 is not used at 
all in OSCAR Pathfinder, I 
didn't have to worry about 
it causing any problems, 
OSCAR Pathfinder could 
then be loaded into memo- 
ry and would reside from 
16384 on up, with plenty of 
room left available for 
variables and arrays be- 
tween the end of the pro- 
gram (LOMEM) and DOS 
(HIMEM). 

This memory shuffling is 
accomplished by the small 
program. OSCAR START- 
ER, which appears in Listing 
1 OSCAR STARTER will 
then cause the mam pro- 
gram (Listing 2] to load from 
the disk and run. 

The second major prob- 
lem encountered was how 
to get an accurate scale 
map into the screen buffer 



ftStJB trwrr 






mii$X ttlKO 



i**W>1i*4<!0 



C4)^ i^cpoo 



mn tana 




aat^iT itwr 



34H3Z tdfOO 

, .SDH J* fc«eo 

<n(z» tCHM 
***** icno 



^ vim fCK» 



S^¥ Kiaifr 



£S«I 



4024 



.iH wiaQ 



Fig. I, 48K Apple It Plus memQiy organisation. 



for the program to plot on. I 
had two options that I knew 
of. One was to obtain one 
of those fancy sophisticat- 
ed graphics digitizer 
tablets— which costs lots of 
bucks. The other was to do 
it by software — which costs 
lots of hours- Since I had 
lots more hours to burn 
than bucks, 1 chose the lat- 
ter method. I decided that 
by using tots of HPLOT in- 
structions, I could draw the 
necessary map. 

The map I chose to put 
into memory was a Merca- 
tor projection because the 
latitude and longitude lines 
were straight, easing the 
math requirements to plot 
coordinates. In order to ob- 
tain the X, Y coordinates for 
the HPLOT commands, I 
traced the map on some 
graph paper which had a 
sufficient number of verti- 
cal and horizontal lines to 
provide reasonable resolu- 
tion for the map Then by 
numbering the vertical lines 
from to 279 and the hori- 
zontal lines from to 1 59, 1 
was able to come up with 
the X,Y coordinates of all 
the major features of the 
map. (Believe me, that's a 
lot of dots!) 

The resulting program is 
given in Listing 3. Since its 



length extends into Hi*Res 
screen buffer 1, either the 
same relocation method 
used to run OSCAR Path- 
finder may be used or one 
could split the program in 
half and draw the map in 
two steps. Running the pro- 
gram results in a map of 
the US, Mexico, and Can- 
ada with latitude and longi- 
tude lines for every 10 de- 
grees, To save this map for 
later use by OSCAR Path- 
finder, first enter and run 
the program in Listing 3. 
Then use the BSAVE com- 
mand to save the map on 
disk as a binary file. Use 
the file name "MAPI." OS- 
CAR Pathfinder will load 
the map as needed. 

Operation 

As you might already 
have deduced, OSCAR 
Pathfinder was originated 
on a 4aK Apple il Ptus ma* 
chine with a single disk 
drive. When run, OSCAR 
Pathfinder first sets up vari- 
ables, arrays, and formu- 
las. Then it asks you for the 
data necessary for compu- 
tation. The program com- 



putes the data for the orbit 
you select and then offers 
a choice of display modes. 

The first information to 
be entered is the position 
of the station in longitude 
and latitude, in the range 
of -180 to 180 degrees 
and —90 to 90 degrees, 
with east longitude and 
south latitude entered as 
negative numbers. The 
data is checked to be sure 
it is in the proper range. 
Next, OSCAR Pathfinder 
asks the user for the date of 
the orbit to be computed. 
This is entered in six digits, 
two each for day, month, 
and year. The program 
checks the entry for prop- 
er range. Then the day of 
the week for the date en- 
tered is requested, to be 
used later In determining 
the mode of operation for 
the satellite, 

OSCAR Pathfinder then 
requests the name of the 
satellite and, if it is not an 
OSCAR satellite, it then re- 
quests the orbital pa- 
rameters for that satellite. 
The program asks for the 
northbound equatorial 





SO VTA* 1^1 PWtMT '^MSCfifk IN^TtwiHEEM IH 4flK APft-ESOFT- 
:jO VTAB »2» Pf*l*fT r*Bf lO^-^SIKE DOE 3-2.1- 



Listing 1. 

73 Magazine • March. 1982 



47 



.-■X ^_ .=. . 



Listing 2. 



10 

20 

30 

4o 
50 
60 
.70 
8<> 
«0 

■SOfO 

3&5 

,^is 

320 
^00 

510 

EEK. 

520 

!I30 

5*0 

lOOO 

lOlO 



REH 
RCrt 
REM 
REH 
RErt 
REM 

RSI 

VTAB 
VtAP 
VTflfl 
MTftB 

VTAB 
BDTD 
RSH 

NOME 
<21B1> 

VTAB 

pqtfE 

OHe.RR 
REM 



tt4»At4t«*tt*tttt«tt 

1 a 

* OSCAR PftTl-FlNCfEH 4 



BY 
T . d . JdHNSOM 
— WB&HQK — 

NOV I ?a 



t 
I 



tt*t*ttttfei>*l>tttll 

3S,40i POKE 34»0s HQPie 



I re)?T I ^IMT CHRt. t + TfNnnriNCtltP"! 



III 

12: 
14i 

IB: 
5*0 

: FLASH 
+ PEEI^ 



HTAB 

HTAS 
HTAB 

NTAB 



12i 

19i 
15: 



PRINT 
F'RINT 

Pfij;m 

PRINT 
PRINT 

PRINT 



□SCAR PATHF INKS'* 



"T,C,JCM-tWSOW" 
"NDV 19SO?' 



I VTfifl 1^1 HTA© 3; PRINT -EHRPH It 
C^j;!?! t 2?kA.: hJOHJ-lAL 



20: NTflB 5: PRINT "HIT ANV 
DEFINE CONST AJMTE 



KEY TD CONTINUE. 



S PEEK (2i*2U'" (N LlNi "S P 



GET G*! PRINT G*! 



13 m L7.ri52? . Ifl:?. ( 1 ^ 53> »RCX I J , 35* 



1S3SL7H;3> 
J*<lnLXi9t 



125iL:1{U5J = 



• tIttfL3if*> * l**iL7it5li = 146 

= l37:L1taO> = iSacLXUlk - 133iL 

t23ii.Xilfc> = 130; List 17 J = 1 ISiLTC t 



liXl!?) t. i:sOiL%<i:SJ - 123? Lie 1 4> 
18 » = 113:LX(WJ = ll3,iL!ill9> -^ JlOiL^(2a$ - lOfl 

ia4^ 4.7- tSU ■= t05fL'v5^22J = 103sL7.t23) = KM>:1^3if'24} = 97:Lr.<25y = 95!LX(2£i-) = 9ZS 
L%(27J ^ B9;LXi:aaj = aijLl!lc2*?l - filtLKCJOi^ - 91^k!!li^3ll • 7B<L1ta2) '^!SrL»!t53) - 

72:LSC3*> = 69jLJi<35l =66 .......... 

lOSO LXtliJ = t2:L.'if57> e a5?iLX[34JS k 5^1 L.'K Ci^^ » 52?LK[4Ci) ■ 49H.5i^*l> • *5:U5(T 
42! = *2:LX<*3* = 38iL7. (44J = 3:^il,'Ai4^y = 27:LXt47> = 25£jLX(4SJ = lB:LidM9J = 14 

jt^sSOi - lptL'4T5U = SiUHOSi * <* 

H>?<J D» ^ CUR* {*) 

lOSO Dl» = ''SU''3l>2* = "rtC'iOS* = "nJ"jD4» = "'WE-jDS* = "TH^'eDA.* =f "FR"j1}7* = -SA 



idf^q Fit * l»57oe:fE3 ■ 5, 
- lJl.i2sR7 = 3SfS7sRe i 



;|'JOO Ml*- = 
t i 1 DEP 



l4l59iR3 

■■ 1440 
iH3* = *' 

fMH «X / 



» 4,7l34tft* * b.2&r^lFa * S7*Z9d^5pfc = .0l7*5tR"* 



1130 
J 1*0 
1130 
2000 
2O20 
20*0 

2OA0 
2070 



DEF 

oer 

DEF 
REM 
POKE 

vras 

HOrlE 

VTflB 



■BfEh2* = "fl 
FN ASNEKS = 

F-N AE:S[S) " ■ftfN (X / SDR t 

FN flWOC! = - ATM < X3 * 1.5706 
FN CPU? = (NT ?X i 1^ * .5) / 
FN rtDE>tA> = INT ( (A / ^2 - INT 
GSCAR PATHFINDER MAIN ROUTINE 
33,4l>c POKE 34,0:- HOME : TEXT : 



<URP>":M4* = " i:EXP>"!rt3* = '^J" 
SOR f - )! * )f + n J 

-KtX+l)>*l. 3707? 



(A 



/ 2)} t B + .05* • SGN £A / 2J 



PFTIMT D*;''NOf10NC+lTD^ 



I* 3-nAB t1: 

:£4^ 1 1 Hotat 



[MUER5E I PRINT "ITSCflW P^^THF i NPEH " J NCRMfiiL 



KH Pf?lNT TflB< 12>-STflTICIW LDCfVT lON^r VTAB 111 PRINT TftB< 12} 



2oeo 



IF S»f2J 



ISO PR S0<2> 



IBQ THEN VTftB i3t PRlNT 



ZOeO VTAB 13: HTAB 5: INPUT "L0NGJTlil>E i+ DEB M, - DEG EJ j "jA*: IF A* = '"• THEN 
ZOSO 

Ptd 40Jtt BQ1Q 
2iO0 y^TAB 15: 

( *0>r GDlfQ 2lCiO 



HTAB fit INPUT "LflUrUDE (+E*;p N^ -DgG $} t "t**! J*^ ** 



THEN 21 



iA*iz IF BDd) 



90 OR SDU) < - 90 THEM VTAB 15: PfliW'f 3F*L' 



^l^bO SD(1) 
S^pO REM 



= ED<1> • R6jSBi!2> = SD [3i 

BET SAT QATA 



• RA 



AX = VAL 



22 lO HOME 

2220 VTAB .12.* 

2230 VTAB 14: 

2240 VTAP 14: 

3;?!5tt TF UT» = 

y^inO DT ^ VAL 
2270 
2230 

2310 

Dfit^ < }■ D** 

laS tot PRINT 

235li NOnF t 

P«1NT " 



OF 



PRtNt TflPf 3J"'WHflT IS THE DATE 

PRINT TAB( lOVDATEi (WlDDVVl 
HTAP 24: INPUT DT* 
"" THEN 2230 

t rrtBi (DT*,:j^2>>i Jf ht < o dr dt 

< left* mT*.2JJi IF AK > 12 OR A^K 
t 'V ♦ MIErt 1DT»,J,2? 



THE 

1 ' 



GflBIT DESIRED' 



>. 3 3 THEN 2230 
< ■& THeN 2330 
+ 'V" * RIBHT* 



DTf = LEFT* £DT*,2> 
fOKE 3**11 HOI1E 

V1*^t» lEt HTfl& Tit INPUT "WHAT DAY DF THE WEEK 
DA* = LEFI* £At,2J: IF »fl* < > Dl« AND ^ft* 
AND DA* <. ;- Db* AMD DA* < 

TABC 4 J "DAY NaT RECOGNIZED": FDR 
VTAS B) HTAB 7i PRINT "'^ftfWE DF SATELLITE DESIRED:" 



(tJT*v2> 



IS THAT';:*"jA* 

> D2»- AND DA* ■■ > D3* AND 
D^« AND DA* < > D/* I NUN l4I3nJT i f VT 
1 TO 3000: NEKT : GOTO 2290 

VTAB 9: HTAB ?: 
QSCAiR 7"; VTAB: 1 



5i HTAB 12: 
23iy VtflB 



PRINT "2] OSCAR B": VTAB 17s HTAB 12: PlFflMT ^53 . .CTHEft*' 
m NTA© 12: PRINT -4^ HLITT": VTAB S: HTAB 3*; INPUT '"';B* 



2340 IF 
BJSiO IF 

.7= GOTO 
23i0 IF 



VAL 
G* = 

2.T9<:j 
u* •= 



(C*) 



1 



] " THEN 



OR VAL tdtJ 
QS-i = 7: OS* = 



^'2" 



D53i 



SiDq* 



* THEN ?330 
^DSCAR y-iALT = 

"DDrnR B'lAl. T - 



'flOiPeR - U4,'?45flNC - ipl 



THEN END 



THEN 
t GOTO 2390 
2370 IF G* = "4^ 
GOSUB 13000 
B = INT (Re / PER + .5)1 REM 
C = [PER / RBJ t 360 % Ri: REM 
D - FN )fM:a(R7 / tH7 + ALT J > : REM 

Din flpis, e>,gsPt5* int (per + -5jj 
£131506 aoc** j^d^B 4iOw>t ea^ufi sopo 

GOSUB 6.5O0 

Vise 2J» f>ftihlT TfiSI ?ll "WHICH DRB I T-Pt SELECT BY REF 

VtAB 2,tl HTAi :5St fNPUT A» 

IF A* = "" THEN 2430 
AG - VAL SA*): IF AS ^ D OR AG < Cj THEN 2460 

POKE 3^4*11 HOME 

VIA* 5i PlftJNI TABt 5|-'NtM COMPUTING ORBITAL DATA FOft 
ORBIT * "sAFCOjAGJ [ " ON " ; DT* 
lOi PRINT TABf 12) "PLEASE STAND BV . . . " 
i4t FOR 1 " I TD 40f PRINT ■'-"n ME3(T 



54?iPFR = K>7,7'?slND = 99,9 



23B^ 

2390 

2*00 

2*10 

2*2(? 

2430 

2440 

J4SO 

;!4feO 

24 70 

24B0 

2490 

2300 

B< 5) OS*;" 

2510 VTAB 



DHB1T3 PER DAV 

PRECESSION i RAD) 
SAT HORIZON iRAD> 



■ It 



2520 

PRIMT 

2:»i> 

2550 

25hW 

3570 

23eo 



VTAB 
VTA19 
"OUT 



'ORei lAU DATA COMPUTED FDR 



VTAa ?i Pf*INT tA 



VTAB 2i>i HTAB a: 



IM I NOTES OF THE OR&IT. 



tSt HIAB 3: PRINT 

OF "; INT tPER + .5) 
G09JB 7O00 

POKE 34, H TEXT ; HOUE 
POKE 3* .a 

TESfT : HOME i VTAB 3l PRINT TABI 5)^ "THESE DISPLAY HODES ARE AVAILABLE:" 
VTAB B: HTAB 5.: PRINT " 1 J REAL TIME GRAPHICS": PRINT TABt 5V21 HIGH SPEE 



VTAB 5; PRINT TAB* 5>-PfiBITPa. DAT|fi* NOW riOHPUTED" 



TE POINT DATA" I PRINT 
2505 VTAB 13: HTAB 5 
"Jl RESTART PROGRAM"; 
2590 VTAB ISi PRINT 
E 'ESC' KEY. HITTING 
24<>& VtAft 24 J PRINT 
2610 G = VAL (B*>j IF 




PRINT TABi 




TABl g.J"53 ORBITS FOR CUfmENT DAY- 
PRINT "6 3 COflFUTE DATA FOR ANOTHER DRBTT 

PRINT TABE 5) "G] QUIT'^ 

ANY CHOICE MAY 6£ A&OtttED AT AMY riMg &Y HITTINS TK 

ANY KEY WHEN A ROUTINE IE COMPLETED MILL ACCESS THE l-ffiMJ* " 

T^Bt 30J"YPLIR CHOICe'^"!:: SET 13*1 PRINT S* 
E < 1 OR G > S THEN 2i$C)0 



2620 ON G GOTO 4000,3000,3400^3*00,3*50*24*0,2630*36^40 

2630 CLEAR : GOTO tOOO 

2640 EMQ 

2650 GOeUB 6SOO: GOTO 2600 

30OQ REIt HIGH SPEED GRAPH TCS 

3010 HGfi I HOME : HCOLOR^ 3 

30 IS PRINT CHP* (4>"8LDAD MAP 1" 

3020 POKE S4,li NOME 

3030 IF FB*^ = t THEN 3070 

5035 POKE - 16303,0 

3040 VTAB 10^ HTAB 3* FLA^H i PRJNT "THE SATELLITE DOES NOT PASS": VTAB lis HTA 

B 5: PRINT "UITHIN THE BOUNDS OF THE HAP^ " t NUUHAL 1 VTflS 12| PRINT TAB I 5> "TO 

DISPLAY TihC HAP ALDMF TVPE" "Fl^" 

3<150 SET G*r IF S* ^ "M" THEN HOME * POKE - l63C>4,0:i VTAB 24: PRINT TAB ( 1 i 

t "NEXT CHOlCe?":: GET G*: PRINT G* 

3CJ40 GOTO 2560 

HjJflE 3 POKE - 16304,0 

aOSUO "^POOr GOSUB 9500: GDSUB lOOOO 

VTAB 21: PRINT Tfl^i ?lCS«r' ORBIT * "|flFUSflGM" tlOBE 



3O70 

3O50 
3O90 

31 OO 



IF TR = 



FLASH i PRINT 



THEN HTAS 3t Pi^lNT OSf|E 
L i; WrlNT "THIS ORBIT": GOTO 3320 
31 iO GOSUB 1O500 

VTAB 22: PRINT "HIT SPACE BAR WHEN READY TO START" 



NOT 



'I MO* 
IN RANGE 



NORMA 



PRINT "HIT 'ESC FOft PlENU, " f 
HTA^ 2Qj GET It*; PRINT G* ; : 

CHRt f32V THEN 3140 
HTAB iB CALL - ©6^: VTAB 22 j 

■"fliSlHlJTHi ■ 

= ASC2J TO LSC&3 



NpLQT KS^VS TO «C:i(0, I) ,rtCX(t| 1> 



t, f^RlNT T*i 
32»fi FOP J 



CHR* i;75j CHR* <7>f 



3120 

3150 VTAB 24; 

31 40 VTAB 24 1 

31 So IF G» 

31^ VTAB 22 s 

B jOs PRINT 

^2^ FDR J 

324& 

3220 T = SSPj:0,|)i eCH30& 12TJOO:T* = 

AR 22 i HTAB S: PRIKT " "i VTA& 

VTAB 22: HTAB 2S: PRINT 
= 1 TO 2rKB = PEEK" \ - 

60 

3290 

S-SOP 

33! TO 

3315 

3320 

3400 

34 lO 

3*20 

34 V3 IF TR = 

NORMAL : VTAB 
:5»4C1 VTAB 4: 

VTAB tSj PRINT 
VTAB ^t FOR I 
POKE 34,6 
3«&0 L - 6 
349h;» PDf* 1 = AS<:^> TO LS<2J 

l,=^L*l;TFL> =22 THEN 3550 
T = S3P<i>^l}i fldBUfi 13500= A7 = FN 



IF G« = CHW* 4271 THEN 2350 



HTflB Jf PRINT -TIMEi"! VTAB 22; HTA 



LEFT* (T*,5? : A2 = FN 
;>2l HTAB 2^! PRINT " 
A2 
I63a4>: pOltE - 1 6:561 »i>( 



DPISSPi*, l> t RSJi VT 
"i VTAB 221 HTABi tJ 



IP KB 



153 THEN 25 



NEKT 

PRINT 

NEXT 

VTAB 25i HTA0 l^j PRINT "TIR = "jTRj" NlN. ■ 

VTAB 24: HTAB 20 ^ BET Il*t GQTO 2!SSO 

REM DISPLAY flJ/EL 

POKE 34^2: HOflE i T^XT 

VTAB 3: PRINT TABi| 53 0S*f" ORBIT tt "( AF l<i, ASM " ON ■' i DT* 

O THeN VTAB 12: HTAB S: FLASH : PRINT "SATELLHE NUT IN RANGE, 
14: PRINT TAB! Ell "ND ANTENNA DATA AVAILABLE.''? GOTO 3540 
PRINT TABI B> '-ANTENNA D1REC1 ION DATA : " 



3450 
3460 
3*7Cr 



"TinE<7ULU> AZIMUTH 

■ 1 TO *t>l PRINT "-"iJ NEXT 



ELEVATIDN- 



3SO0 

3310 

R5) 

3S40 
3551> 



DP£SSP<*,lt % R5>:EL = FN DPtS$Pt5,I) t 



VTAB Li PRINI T*i TAB ( 16>iAZ( TAB ( 32J;EL 
N£XT 
VTAB 
VTAB 
(27> 



356U HUME 
360(> FiEH 
iilO POKE 
0« '*|DT* 
3i620 
36 3Q 



24: HTAB 20: 0^1 ^%i 
23: PRINT TABJi lOr 

THEN 2il0 
:L = /: QUID 3510 

IlLSPLAY 3BP'3 
^4,^4 TEJtT i HOME : 



HI T ANY KEY 



TD caNT.-(* GET G*, PRINT G*: IF G* = 



VTAB 3: PRINT TAB t at OS*;" ORBIT # "jAF(0,AGli 



S640 
3630 
3*iOi 

3670 
36aQ 

:^d>90 

3700 
3710 



T = AF(1.,AG>: EOSUB 12500iLl = FN DP1AFf2*AB? • R51 
VTAB 41 PRINT -UMt OF eOK:-iT*j" EQX tLpN Wr'?Ll 

THE SUBSAT. POINTS FOR THIS ORBIT Afl£: " 



VTAB 
VTAB 
VTAB 
VTAB 

POKE 
FOR 1 ^ 

L = L ^■ 1 
VTAB S33 



3: 
6? 

8: 

:s*. 



PRINT 

PRINT " TIME 

PRINI ■' CAFTEf? £Q)(» 

FOR T = 1 TO 40: PRINT " 

8?L tt e 

i TO INT CPER * .5> 

: IF L '< 22 THEN 3730 
JtTAft tOs PRINT -KJT ANY 



TIME 

*U1C> 



Lflt 



U?N" 



NE)i,T 



3720 
3730 

R5> 
37*0: 
2 

3750 
3760- 
37 70 
3990 
4000 

40ia 

4020 

4030 
4035 
4O40 
B 5i: 



CHR* {2 7) THEN 2S60 
L = lO: HOnE 
T = SSPEO, i) : GOSUB 



KLV (D tONT."^t Oer ©In PR.INT e*; IF G* = 



12500: LI = FN DPiSSP{l,l> * R5 J : L2 = FN DPf SSP<2, 1 ) * 



VTA» H PHI NT Iji HTAB 163 PRINT T*l I HTAB 26: PR1«T LI;: HTAB 33s PRINT L 



NEXT 
VTAB 



"*[ HTAB ;za; GET 0*i FtKKE :S4ji'i HOMt j (30T0 :;£6i0 



qoTO :z6lo 
END 



REAL I THE GRAPHICS 
HOME t hCOlOR" 3 
CHR* M^'BLOAD MAP 



1" 



REN 

HqiR ! 

PRINT 

POKE 34,1: HOME 

IF FBX = I THEN 407O 

POKE - 16303,0 

VTAB lOs HTAB ?ji Fl- A5M t PRINT "TMiE SflrCLLlTC DQE!! WQl PASS": 
PRINT "hMTKIN THE SQUNDtS OF THt IHAP. ": MORHAL : VTAB 12: PftiNT 
DISPLAV THE MAP ALOWe TYPE M*"* 
40SO GET G*i IF G* = "M" THEN HOME 

GET B*i PRINT B* 



TAB( 5-i"TO 



6 POKE - I6304*CK VTAB 24 l PRINT TAB < r5> 



■^MEXT 

404Q 

4070 

4000 

40^0 

4100 

L 

4U0 

4120 

S>" 

4 1 30 

4140 

4150 

41AO 



'tMG* 

IN RANae 



D GRAPHICS": PRINT TAB ( 5) "32 ANTENNA AI/EL DATA-s PRINT TABI 5? "41 SUBBATELLT 



CHOICE'^"; 
60 tq ^56^^ 

HOME : POKE - 16304,0 

I3CSUB 9000f [iD3UB 9S0Ol dOb'UB 1 OOOU 

VTAB- 211 PRINT TABE 7 JOS*;" ORBIT * ";AFtO.AG*;" MODE 
IF TR = THEN HTAB ^i PRINT OS*M FLASH i PRINT " NtJl 
PfiINT "THIS OReiT^'j aOTO 4140 
i^SUB 10500 
T = AS<nE QQSUB 12:K>0[ VTAft 22l PRINT ^'HIT SPACt eAR HH^N TlME^ "' e T»t 

VTAB 23: PRINT "HIT 'ESC FOR MENU," 

VTAB 2*1 HTAB 2<:n GET G*i IF Q* * CHR* CS7) THEN 3550 

IF 9* *■ > 01-*** C32) THEN 4l40 

VTAB 22i HTAB 1: PRINT SPC{ 40) : VTAB 22: PRINT '^TIME^UTO 

ELEVATION"; PO*:"E 3*^22 



NURMA 



(AO 



AZIMUTH 



crossing (EQX) data for the 
reference orbit for the date 
selected earNer, This data is 
entered as [1) orbit nunnber, 
(2) EQX time of day in the 
format HHMMSS, and (3) 
the EQX longitude with the 
west longitude being 
positive. 

48 73 Magazine • March, 1982 



The program then com- 
putes the equatorial cross- 
ing data for each of the or- 
bits for that date. The de- 
sired orbit number is select- 
ed from the list presented 
by entering the reference 
number associated with it. 
The program then begins its 



major number-crunching 
routines, generating 
latitudes, longitudes, bear- 
ings, and ranges for sub- 
satellite points (SSP) in one 
minute intervals for the or- 
bit, and computing eleva- 
tion to the satellite for each 
minute the satellite is 



within range (above the 
horizon). 

The computing time for 
SSP data is approximately 
1 A seconds for each minute 
of the orbit. For example, if 
the orbit is 100 minutes 
long, it would take about 2 



4170 FCR I = AS<2> TD LSt2J:T = 5SP<0, I) 
FN DPtSSP<;4,I> * fl3J:EL = FN DPCSBP^S,!) 
161 f a; I TH@f ^JjEL 

4ia0 TC -^ LStaJ ' li UTflS 24: HTAB i2s 
41^0 IF TC = O THEN 4310 
4Z£>0 HPLDT )fS^ YS TO MC7. (O, I ) , MCTt ( I ^ I > 
= L TO 2309:KB = PEEK < 



■ GU5UB 
« R5): 



125003 T* = 
HOME : VTflB 



LEFT* (T*,SJTflZ = 

23: PRIWT T%; TAB H 



PftthIT "^TIME TO LDSs ■ | TCj 



*2B0 

2S60 
43^0 
4300 
4310 
4320 

5010 
5QKO 
5OS0 
S04O 
5050 
504.0 

ao70 

50B0 
SO^ 
5100 
5110 
9120 
&OO0 
6010 
&020 

rtH040 
AOSO 



FOR J 



- 1£)3S4)^: PC3KE - 16:S^^B.0: IF KB = 135 THEN 



PBJMT CHft* <?)» Clifi* ^^l 

NEXT 

VTfiiB 24; HTflB 2Q= E3ET Qti QaTD 2350 

REM FIMD GSCAH HODEg 

IF LEFT* fOS*,5> < > -OSCflP" THEM MQ* = "N/fl"» RETIJPN 



IF 
IF 
if 
IF 
rF 



FN 
FN 

DA* 



= a Ti«M ^oao 



= O THEN HO* = 

■I t THST^ no* B 

THEN flO* = no* 

THEN flO* - IM* 



ffl« 

M3* 
+ H3* 



n2* 

H2* 



nODfACI 

= D*12> 
= P«C4) 
HElUfiN 

IF DA* = D2* OR DA* = D5* THEN ftO* 
IF 0A« ^ Dl* DR l>#V* - D7* THEN NO* 
IF 0A« ' D3* OH DA* = ttA* THEN HQ* 
IF DA* = D4* THEN HO* = n4* 
RE TLJRN 

flfifl CUHf UTE ALL OReiTS FOR DAV 
F = 1 
FOR 1 = O TO 
FOf? J = TD 

PW J + 1 SDTD 6O50,*O70!i61CM> 
W^iJ, I> = AEilJ) + F i 1 
NEXT 

A070 AF (Jj n = A^U>' * PCtt t i 

AOeO IF AFtJ^l* > RB THEN AF U , I I = AF(J,IS - RS 
NEJCT 
AF<J,I| ^ AE(J> It C t 1 



2 



+ M5* 



6100 
6tlO 
6120 
A130 
6140 
6150 
61^0 
650O 
6510 

6530 
&S4Q 
A^3&0 
£»5&0 
6370 

iseo 

a^lO 
6620 
6630 



R4 
»7 



THEN 
YHEN 



fiFlJj IJ = AFtJ,!) - 



AF^J,)» ■ AFCJ^tl ~ 



- R? THEN «=^CJfilJ = ^iF(J,H * R4 



FDR DAY 



TAm i>QS*j" ORBITS FOFr " f DT* 



IF AFtJ, n 

IF AFtJ* n 

IF AFfJjiJ 

NE)(T 

Me3?T 

ftElTUrtM ,,,...,:: 

flEH LIST bRE-tTS 

HOME 

VTAB 3t f*ftlNT 

VTAB 4: PRINT 

VTftB 5? FQR J 

PC>KE 34, 3: L = 

FOR I = O TO B 
L - L * If IF L > 22 THEN 6*30 
T = AF I i , I > : GtlSOfi I 2S00 
LD = FN DP^AFt2, 13 » R5) 

VTfltp t : PfTIMT li TAO< 'SjjiflF'COt tJ| 

NEMT 

RETURN 

VTAfi 23 1 HTAB lOi PRINT "HtT ANY hlWV 



RA 
H4 



"REF tt 

' I TO 
3 



ORBIT* 
40; PRiWt 



TIME EQX 



EQXfCtEG hi} 



TflB[ I'^l-iTij tjapt ^DrLO 



TD CONT* LTSTlNG»-ii BET B*: PHINT E* 



f t MOflE I L " !3i (JOTa t.S7D 



7000 
7010 
7020 
7O30 
7040 
7050 
70*0 
7070 

7oeo 

70^?0 

ftoo 
7 no 

7120 



I AX = 0iL7, = OsFSY. = O 



R£rt ttmPlitE EiUBBArELLlTE DATA 
11 = IMC t R6iT = AF(1,AG>:EQI( = AFt2,ABJi 

f^Oft 1 * I TD TNT IFWR ► . !S> 
SSPtOjI) = T + I: IF SSP^O^lJ > Rfi THEN SSP40, 1> = SaP<0,lJ - 
SSP<l,It = FN ASNH SIN. Mil t SIN )1R4 t I / PER> J 
Bft = COS tR4 * 1 / PER> / COS fSSFU,l>> 

IF BA 1^ 1 ZOi BA V - 1 TlOiM ^^{;;?f n >" (.2S * l l R^J * £QXt 
33^(2,^ 1> = FN ADSfBA> * C . 25 • I t R&J + EQM 

IF SSPC2, 1*^ > |?4 OP SSP{2, n > R2 THEN SSP(2^tJ = 3SP*2, IJ - 

IF SSPC:?, t» < "- R? THEN <iSPf2»|J « SSf^lS.lJ + R* 
H = ALT + HViM = SI>r^] - SS|!^^2, U* IF N < - Rj THEN N = N 

IF N > R2 THEN N = N - R4 
SSP£3ti> - FN ACS t SIN <SDUS) * SIW [SSP(|*T»» f- CDS tSDOil 



RS 



IKITO 70dO 



R4 



KA 



COS <SS 



R2 
C^SftSpini^sTB 



CQE <SDtJ[i> * 



P^I, IM t CCS lHi> 

7130 IF SSP<3, 1) < THEN SSP(3,I) = SBf*(3,Ili + 

71*0 tA = SIN iSSFn»J>> - f SIN t^Qi;!^^ * COS 

SIN tSSP(3, TJliTC = TA / TB 

7t50 IF TS: C - 1 THEN TC '^ - . 9999^fVfV^ 

71 &0 IF TC > 1 THEN TC " p 9999*7997? 

7l7Ct SBPf4,II = FN ACS(TC>J IF 5L3W m> = - 1 

7 ISO IF as? O.I J C = D AKD AX - O THEN AS U i 

7190 IF 53P<3,1J > D ANP L^ = O AND AS - - a 

X = 1 

IF SSP(3,Jt < ^ Ti THEN EBP t!^, 1 > - Rl - AThf £ IH I SIN (SSFCj^t*** 7 *H t 

fSSPC3,Ilk - R7)} 
IF 1 = 1 THEN 72^0 

* , lS7t*5 AND SSPU, 1 - i> < .15705 AWO SGN 



T^4CN SSP<4,I) = R4 - SSPt4^I.i 
= SSP(OpI> jftSCSJ - i:A7. = I 
T MEN LS f 1 J - SSP C O, I > E LS ! 2* = 



I:L 



7ZOO 

COS 
72 lO 
7220 

THEN 
7ZiO 
THEN 
7Z40 
TJ-IEN 
7250 

the:n 

7270 
72QO 
73'JCi 
730t» 
BOOO 
BOtO 



I> > 



J> 



t.O£^4S AND SliN 



= 1.0i45 AND esf (1,1 - 
1.064?i AMD SSPfi.l - IS < = t ,0645 AHD S6N 



1570S BWD 



SSP (1,1 



n 



^15705 AMD Styj 



5B6 THEN FB'ji = 1 



IP SSPll, 
VA = I 
IF SSPU,IJ 

■yft » 1 

IF SSP 1 1,1 J 
VB = I - 1 

IF SSP 1 1 ^ 1 > 
Vfi - 1 - 1 
OTAB IB; MTAp 11: PRINT I 
NEXT 
rn * LSCIJ - AS(1> 
IF aSP<2,YA> < 3-7571 AND SSPit2,VBJ 
RETURN 

Ren INPUT REF ORBIT DATA 

MOHE : VTAB 5? IfTAB 5: PRINT OS*! "' WEFEREMCE DRPH' DATA 
I PfilPlT "FTDP -|PT» 

a02Ci VTAB tOj: HTAE 5: PRINT ' gNTER ORBIT NO* t JtXXXKJ s 
28^ thPUT ""jA*: IF U-CN tA»|i > 5 THEN Q030 
BO-JS tF A* = *- THEN a020 
8O30 AE(0> '- WAL J1A*> 
Q040 VTAO I2f HTAB 5: PRINT 
IHPLTT "'fA*: iF L£tJ (A*) < 
B043 IF A* = "" TfEN B040 

i Rltai-lt* tA*,2n > 59 Ott l/AL 
{ HID* fA*,3:,2>J > S9 DW VAL 
{ LEFT* (iVty 2) ) < O OP WAl ( 
TI-EN ao4& 

GOSUO 1200O:AECtJ • T 
BO^KJ yTAB 14j NTAB 5: PRINT ''ENTER ESX LOr*GITIJg£ : 

IMMJT -"jA*; tF A* = " ' TH&N 9090 
BlOO IF U£1Sl {A*> > 5 THEN a09O 
ailO IF VAL <A*t > ISO OR VAL CA*1 < - IBO THEN B090 



i 3SP <2tt} * 

l^SP (2^ I * t 

(sspra, UJ 
taspi2, IH 



= 1 



■ENTER EQV TinE;<UTC> 
> 6 tH6^ B04O 



r NNriK&!: 



Bir>i5t> I F 

miyO IF 
fl07O IF 
A*p3,S>> 
B080 T* = 



VAL 
VflU 
VAL 
> 59 
A*; 



t RIGHT* rA*f27> < 
( mo* fA*,3,.2J» < 

LEFT* (A*«3) 1 > 23 



VTAB 7; HTAtJ 14 



■i VTAS lO: HTflP 



VTAB 12: HT AS ISBt 



O THEN ©040 
O THEN 8040 

WID VAL 1 nio* f 



-1 VTAS 14: HTAB iHs 



BIZO 
BI30 
70O0 
*?0l0 
9O20 
9O30 
9O40 
^fOSO 
9**0 
9O70 
^Q&O 
90^90 
910O 
fli lO 
9120 
<?ilo 
9140 



AEr2> = VAd- (A4i t R6 

RETURN 

REM COnPUTE RANI^ CIRCLE 
Tm ' t> * P t .2 

FPR J » O TO SaO STEP 10 
ic: => I « R6 

RC = COS iK^ « DD + BDfl) 
fiD = SIN <KJ 1 IM> + SDiSJ 
A * INT CHC tFE;j*,aMDaRpiR5 

IF A '^ 9 THEN A = 9 

IF A > hi THEN A = 61 

QOSlK ilOOO 
nCSKI, I / lO) 

IF RCXU^I / 
/ 



RClt < I ^ I 



= INT IK + .SVsRCTKtO, 
{0» > 1^7^ rh£N RCICtl,! 

< O THEN RCXM,! d 
> IS'V TI«W RdlfO^I 

< O THEN RCr. (O. I / 



io> 

|0> 



IF 
IF 
IF^ 

IF 
IF 



IF 
IF 
IF 
IF 



9150 
^1*0 
9306 
9310 
9530 
9S30 
9540 
9550 

lOooo 
10010 

IO030 

0120 

10040 
I0050 
lOO&O 
100 70 
IDO&J 
J0090 
lOiOO 

10110 

10120 
1013O 
1050O 
iO510 
tt>5iu 
10S30 
tt«40 
iO550 
10400 
10*10 

ioa:;jci 

10A30 
10640 
10650 
I066O 
106^5 
1O670 
106B0 
10690 
I0700 
1O710 
10720 
1073O 
t0740 
t075O 
10r*rO 
10770 
10780 
J 0790 

loeoo 
lomo 
ioe2o 

10530 

lioco 
11010 
11020 
iloso 

11500 
ilTi20 
1 13. JO 
11340 
1200G 
IZOIO 

12030 
12040 
i20SO 

izoto. 

1^:500 

l^SlO 

12520 

i2530 

1?340 

^ i t &0) I 

12350 Tl« 

123&,0 

12570 

123B0 

121390 

l^^EkOO 

12610 

12i30 

13000' 

130 10 

19i 



IF 

If RC1K<0»1 

IF RCIfO, 1 

NE)fT 
Return 

REN PLOT RAUGE CIRCLE 
HPLOT RCX«1,0) ,RC'iitO,0{i 
= I TO 35 
TD ftCTH I, I :t ^RCXIlO, 1 > 



I / lOJ = V 
10> = O 
lO) = O 



FOR I 

MPLfIT 

NEXT 

HPLOT 

RETURN 
REM FLUT PATH 
IF NDT FBX THEN 
FOR 1 =. VA TO VB 

= SSP (2, 1 1 * R5sA 



TO RC%tl,O>>«C%<0,O^ 



RETURN 




INT (^iPiljI) i RS 



5): IF A < 9 OR A > 61 THEN 1 



GDSUB 
IF k; ^ 



NEXT 
f^TOftN 

REM COMPUTE 
A = BDtlJ * R5 

DB(2> 

DB<4) 

REM 

FOR 
A * 



1 1 000 
DP at > Z79 THEN 10120 
AHl> Y = O IhEN HPLDT 3( , Y TO 31 
279 AND ¥ = O THEN FFLOT Jf, ¥ TO 
279 IHEN ffl^-LOt )(,V - 1 lU XpY *■ 
O THEN HPLDT X, ¥ - I TO X,Y + L 
O THEN HPl.aT )f - 1,Y TO X • l,Y 

K - l,Y TO JC * 1,V TO K^V 1 



1, V 



4 

X - 
I TD 
TO K 
TO t 



TQ *».¥ ♦: 

ifcV TO y^ Y 



la fiOTO 10120 

+ It SOTO 101 ZO 



.Y 



UV: 



fi CiOTD 10120 
GOTO 10120 

BO TO xo%:io 



TO 1, V + 1 



SEARIMB LINES 
:0 = SDfZJi t R5 
n-zy*^ - »> / 
( \ ATN ( (279 
t If ATN (XS / 
« 4 ATM tKS / 



w t AtN 

= leo - 

u ma * 

= 36,0 - 
COMPLITE XV POINTS FDR BEARING LINES 
I = AE{2) TO LSC2> 
JNl CSS*M I I i^ * i^'ft *■ 



VSl t * Rth 
- XSJ / (157 
[ 15V . Y^M ] 

•iB>> • R5J 



( JCiOO; Its = K; VS - V 






» R5t 



o »: aspt2,i) 

IF KP > 279 

ncx<o,T) = 

H&J^T 

Rt'TLJfiN 
BNG = SEP 44, T* 



■ SM IP 
» RSe BOSUB llOoOtJfP 
OR XP ^, O THEN 10670 
V 



A ^ 

= X 



f Oft A 



ifcl THtN Hj£.?0 



XP:rtCK(l^T> = 



BNG 

BHG 
BNB 
BNB 



MC;!1K^ 1 J 

ncx<o, i> 

IF BNB ■ 

f^V. { 1 f I 1 

ncA n , I ) 

IF END 

ncxto, n 



DB4 41i 
OBCll 
lJBi2» 
DBi3> 
DBt n 
=! YS • 
=^ KS - 

= vo 

- vs - 

IBO 



$ R5 
OR B«G < 
ANn BNQ < 
ANO bMti < 
AND BMB < 



= DB<] ) THEN MCXn, J^ = 

= DBCJ) THEN nCHljll 
= DB^4? THEN MCXIO, I'l 



Oj BQTD 10720 

- ::;7*i eoTO io?so 

= 1591 iSOrO 10760 
= Ot BOTD lOBIO 



IF BNt^ > ^70 
HCX 1 1 , I i = VB 

ncx ( 1 * 1 1 = y^ 



THEN 1)0740 

TAN CSSP<4,I>1 
tVS t ( TAN (R4 
TNFN iO770 
' H-27^ - XSi t i 

- ^ *279 - y.S} * i 
THEN 10HOO 

* < (1H9 - VSi t I 

- i (159 - VSJ i i 
THE^N 1003O 

* fXS « { TAN 

- i;)C^ t { TAN 



+ )tS: GOTO lOCfcO 

- SSP (4 ,mni GOTO 106&0 

TAW CSSP(4,1J -niJIS: GOTO 
TAN (Rl - BSP14»im>i GOTO 

TAN tt^ - 5SPJ:4,I>n»: GOTD 
TAN {5^«4, Ik - R2MH GidTQ 



10660 

lO&bO 
lO^sAO 



<SSP(4,I> -R3>>>i GOTO 10660 
(R:$ - SBF'{4«1> M in tiUTG 10£^>O 

fitJI CON^Ei^T LOM-LAI TO XjY 

>i = 220 - MO - 60? t 2.2353J 
Y = L3;(A - 7> 

Re TURN 

RErt CQWVtRT RADIANS TO DEGREES 
LI =»= LI * R3 
L2 = L2 « R5 

RETURN 

REM TIJ^ nOWU^RSJPN 

R^n aiHNn^e to Kxifjc.xx 



n =^ VAL I 

T2 = VAL t 
T3 = VAL ( 
T = Tl + TZ 
T * INT n 

RETURN 

R&1 

RjEH 
Tl * 
T2 = 



*T*,2>> 



LEFT* 

ttlD* (T*,3^2J> 

RIGHT* {T*, 2J ) 

* TS 

» 100 + .5) / 



niN> 

* 60 

100 



TIME CDNVERStOw: 
4X5«>;X,XX: TB HMtH^SJ 
INT (T / &01 
IMT ifJ/iyO- INT 



* 



{T / 



T3 = 



IF 
IF 
IF 
IF 
IF 
IF 



INT tiiiJ 
* 60 * ,5* 
■ Btn* til} 

Ti ^ 



/ 60 - INT <T 



601) t 
/ 605) 



*0l 
« 60) 



INT ( tt / nbO - INT n 



{T2>!T3* = STR* fT3Ti 



T24 = STR* 
O THEN Tl* = "OO-' 
LEN (Tl*J = I THEN tl* « "O" + Tl* 
TZ « O THEN r2* = "OO^' 

LEM (T2*> = 1 THEN T2* = "O" * T?* 
T3 = THEN T3* = "DO" 

LEN i;T3*1 • 1 THEM 13* = ^O** + T3* 
: Trill * "i" + T2* + ":" + T3* 
■RETUfiN 

REn INPUT M-TERNATE SATELLITE DATA 
HOHE t VTAB 10: PRINT "NAME OF SATELLITE:* 
INPUT "";«*; At = LEFT* IA*,7>jD&|i ■« A» 



130Z0 
13030 
13040 
1^30 
13O60! 
13065 
THEN 



IF LEN tA•^ > 
VTAIS 15* tWPUT 
^AL ^A*> 
14: INPUT " 
VAL <A*> 
20; HTAB 5? 



7 Tl-CN OS* = A* ♦ 
"SAT^ ALT. (STATUTE 



RIGHT* 
MILES) : 



';A*: IF 



'*: VTAfct It't HTAii 



",7 - LEN f A*I > 
A* = "" THEN IjOjO 



ALT ■ 

VTAB 

INC = 

VTAB 

13010 



SATELLITE INCLINATION IN PEG. i"|A*: IV A* = 



THEM I3^35t* 



INPUT "IS ALL tlAIA CORRECT?"' J A* : IF LEFT* iA*,l> = 



J307O PER = 

13080 oas: = 



tR4 < SOR 
Os RETURN 



i< (ALT + R7^ 



3> / 95600> > / *0 



minutes and 20 seconds to 
compute all the satellite 
data. {Try doing it in that 
time on your calculator!) 

Display Menu 

Finally, with all data 
computed, the program 



goes into the display mode, 
starting out with the display 
menu offering the choice of 
(1) real-time graphics, (2) 
high speed graphics, (3} azi- 
muth-elevation list, (4) SSP 
data list, (5) orbits for the 
day, (6) compute data for 
another one of the orbits of 



the day, (7) start the pro- 
gram over, and [8) quit. If, 
while any of the display 
routines is running it be- 
comes necessary to access 
the display menu again, 
pressing the ESC key will 
accomplish this. This allows 
one to jump around the dis- 



play modes without having 
to wait for each one to 
finish. 

If the real-time graphics 
choice is selected, the com- 
puter loads the map from 
the disk into the Hi-Res 
screen buffer 1 . Then, if the 
satellite path is within the 

73Magazine • March, 1982 49 



Listing 3. 



f«j 



REH 
REM 

f?EM 

REM 
REPl 
R£n 
REM 



tttliatttt*lS4l9*ttt 
« t 

f US l-tfiP BENERATOP « 
t t 

» BV T.C. JOHNSON t 
• t 

t KI&^^MSlc :»: 

> t 

t NOV tgso • 
• t 

tiiiattftt«i«ii»tttt 




lO 

20 
50 
40 

BO 
^O 
i?5 

97 

lOO HOME i HGfi : HCULUft^ St HT»^|^DT Q,tt Itl 2?9,0 m 279,159 TO O, 159 TO 0,i> 

(iO MPLDT 75,55 TO 75, 5i TO 7t,57 TQ 7t,5B TO T7,5^ TD 77, 4i TO 76,67 TO 7JU^72 

TO 73^,73 TP 75,74 TO 76, 7tS TO 7*, SO TO 77,61 Tt} 77.9:4 TO SO^^S TO BO.B* TO s::,« 

TO B4^94 T£] n«,<^^ fO Vlj,!?? Tp '73,1:0:' TD '?E3, I02 rO lda,l(^S ro 112,105 TO 112,104 
1^0 J-IPLai rO 123,111 Itl 124,110 TO_L24,|09 lO 127,109 TO 135,11*? TO 13Tb,ll9 ID 

i:S^«115TD t3F7i,ll4 TO 137,113.TD 14-3,10*? TO 149^109 TO l'!**?,.!!?? TO 15?, 1 la TC? J5 
3,111 TO 1S4,111 TD 154,110 TD 153,109 TO 154, lOB TD 155. lOB TO 156,107 
130 HPLtrl TO 160*lft7 TD 163^109 TQ 165,109 TQ 166, K^ TO 167«lMe Tq 1481, 1C9 TO 

I6e, 110 TO i6^»iii ixi iA^,ii2 tu i60»ti3 to ite^us to i7j,ne rq 171,119 tb t7 

5,121 TD 174,121 TO t73,l20 TO 174^ U* TO 174,1 LB TO 173,117 TO 174^116 

HO HPLOT TD 174,11.2 TD 174,110 TO 172,104 TD 173,103 TO 173,102 TB 177, I0l3 TO 

177,99 to l7a,VS TB 1B0,9S TO 1B4+94 TO 1B4,B9 TO tB3^BB TD J S3, 37 TO l^ii^iii. W 

ta!i,B3 TO lS7,aS TQ 10&^^7 TO lHH,a<;i TTt ^B9.E)iii TO i^O^ff 
150 MPLDT TD 192,79 TO I92,?a tU lV?j?i IQ 197,75 TQ 19^*74 TO 19t,7'Z TO 1V9, & 
* TO 704, A7 TD 204,66 TO 203,b5 TO 203,A1 TO 202, AO TD 202,59 TO 199,39 tSJ i*>^*^ 

5 TU IBitft*^ Tti 1Q3,7^> TO t01#72 TO 177, 7? TO 1 77, 73^ 

iitO HPLOT TO 17i,74 TD lta.77 ITO li>a,74 TD 169,73 TD 169, 70 TO lie,ft9 tt} 1*7,7 

TD 1,^,70 Tp tAB,6a TO 16B,67 TO ib7],hb TO 147, tS TQ l6A,Aa TO 165, A4 TO Jt^Jji 
4 Tp IMr^S TO T43t66 TD 167,66 TO lib?, 67 TD 160, fe^ 

tT^Jft HPLQT TO ihO^JO TO lfil,71 TO l^l^T^ TO 139,76 TO 158,76 TO 150^72 TO 157»7 

1 tiJ tSB,70 TO 159,67 TD 159,65 TD 160^64 TO 162,6:3 TO 16S, iJrJ TQ I6a>^| Tp ISg',* 
i to t1^^6D to 137*60 TD 157,39 TO 150>50 

IBO <*^LQT ro ia(i),3* TO ia:t^6i,i to IB?, 61 TO 131^61 TO 150,59 TD I62,5t tfil lfr6*5 

6 TD 157,55 TO 156,54 TD 155,54 TD 154^55 TO 153,55 TO ISS**3 TP 60,33 lO BOk37 
TD ^l,5i TP 77^56 TO 76,55 

190 HPLQT 93,102 TO 93, 1«7 TO 94^100 TD 94,109 ID 95,110 TO 96, llO TO 97V,IT1 TO 

9S,111 TO 90, 1 13 TO 97,114 TO 96,114 TD 96,115 TO 9e, 1 1:6 TO 9*. 1 IJ^ TO UIO, 1 IT T 
101,117 TO 103,119 TO 103,120 TD 102,121 TQ lOJ, 12T. 
200 MPLOt TO 104,122 TO ICJli, i;2!S TD I OS, 124 TO 106, 124 TO 107, 125 TO 107,126 TO 

106,126 TO 109, 125 TO 109,124 TD 105, 120 TO 105, 119 TO 103, 117 TO 103*116 tP lO 
2,116 TD 102,113 TO 101 » 112 TO 100,112 TO lorj,iiJ TO 99,||| TD 9^?, HO 
210 HPLQT TO 98,109 TD 97,109 TD 97, Kt^ 

220 HPLOT TU 97,105 TD 9i?, I05 Tp lOO, iO*> TD 103, 113 TQ 10?,11& TD 109,117 TO i 
O^tiift TO IC^O, M9 TO 109,120 TO J 10* ITO ?□ IIB^lX» fQ llB, 1J4 TO 119,135 TO 119^ 
154, TO 120, t57 Tp 123,137 TO 124,136 TO 126,130 TO 129,141 TO 130), 141 
730 HPLQT TQ 131,142 TO 132,^142 TO 133,143 TO 140,143 TD 141.142 TD 143*142 TO 

147,146 TO 14^,146 TO 150,143 TO 152,140 TD 153,149 TO 157,149: HPLOT 167,149 T 
O 167,144 TO 165,144 TD 164,143 TD 157^143 TO 156,142 TO 155.142 TD 155,141 
2<K> HPLOT TD 157,139 TO 157,137 TO 153*137 TO 153^134 TD 159,13:3 TO 15*,130 TO 

153,130 TO 150,133 TO 150,135 TD 140,137 TD 144, tT7 TP 144,150 tCI l-^i, 133 TO 14 
5, J 37 TP 140.136 TO 130.13* TP I3B*133 TO l3*l, 127 TD ISfS^, 11*? 

230 HPLDT 167»126 TD 175,126 ID 177,123 TD 179, 12B TD 181, 130 TD 186,132 TD 1 B7 
,132 TO 137,133 TO IBO, 133 TO 100,132 TO 170,130 TO 170,120 TO 170,127 TO [64»l2 
9 TO 164,120 TD I6^tl26t HPLQT l90,lSi lU 191,153 TO 192,134 TO 196,134 
260 HPLDT TO 1*?6,135 TD 193,135 TO 199^136 TO 200,136 TO 200,137 TO 195^137 TD 

195,130 TO 194,139 TO 193,139 TD 1*72, I3B TD 190, 13B TD 109,137 TO ie7»l37 TO IS 

S^136 TO 191,13* TO 191^13?* TP 1 'JO, 1^4 TO lB9pl3A 

370 HPLOT 176,137 ID 132,137 TO 132,130 TO 179,130 

260 rf^OT 153,56 TD 154,56 TO 156,54 TO 159^,34 TO 1S^+ 5ti 1Q 160^53 TD 162,55 TQ 

162,56 TO 164,56 TD 1^*4,57 Tp l*3„aia TO 165,62 TO 160,62 TO 169,63 TO 17 1,63 TD 

175^,4.4 ta 17S,64 TD 174,65 TO 174,60 TO I73466 
290 i-*=-LOT TO 171.66 TO t7|^7o TO t70, 71 TQ 170, 72a HPLOT l69,75 TD 170,74 TO 1 
76, 74 1 W*LDT 177,7 1 TO 1 7134 70 TD lB.Sf70i HPLDT 1B9,65 TO 1B9,64 TO 194,40 TO |93 
t60 TD 304+49 TO- 20B, 4S ID 209, 30 TD 213,50 TO 214.49 tO 2:^0,50 

300 Hf-LOt 2i^^*54 TP 2<i4f34 TO 205,53 TD 206,53 TD 209, S3 TH 210,33 TP^I<>,S5 TD 
^0*»3A TQ 309,61 TD 210,60 TO 211, 60 TO 212,61 TO ;^95^^1 TO ^13,4*4 11^:513,63 TO 

211.65 TD 211,62 TO 210,62 
310 HPLDT 216,64 TO 217,64 TO 217,62 TD 210*61 TO 2t'?i60 TO 219,65 TO ?i 9,64 TO 

213^65 TD 217,66 TO 215,66 TO 213,60 TD 21l,6S TO ;:iO,6fl TO 20^.69 TO ?iH?,71 TO 

206,71 TO 206,6B TO 2O7,60 TO 209,*i7 tO 2Q9,*4 TD 207,66 ID S05, 66 
320 HPLDT 210,51 TO 212,51 TO 213*52 TO 2l3,S2i lir'LOt 213, S3 TD 216,53 
ISSkk HPLDT 7S,35 TO 7T^5a TO 77,34 TO 73,34 TD 72,51 TO 71,51 TO 71*5Cf TO 49,5*1' 
TO 69.4^ TO 4.^, 4^1 TO 67,46 TO 67,4? TO 73,47 TD 73,49 TO 74, 50 TO 75, Si TO 77, 5i 

TO ?7,33 TO ©0,53 
^Mt HPLDT 79,32 TD 70,51 TO 76,51 TO 76,13*? TXJ 7Si<* TO 79,413 TO 74,47 TQ 71,47 
TO 71,43 TO 60,43 TO 60,42 TO 63,^7 TO 64,:57 TO 64^36 TD 61,33 TO 61^.:^ TO 59^30 

TO 39.31 TO" S/,31 TO 36,50 
3'BO HPLDT TQ 56,29 TO 55,20 TD 55,27 TO 54, 7A Tp 5^^215 To !5S,21 tp :s4,22 tP ^:i 
,22 TD 52,15 TO 52.10 TB SO, lA TO 46, lO TD 45, 13 TP 43^13 TU 42,13 TO 42,12 TO 4 
J, II TO 40*11 TO 39,12 Tp 36, 12 

3^ WPLDI TO 37, 10 TO 33, lO TD 33, II TO 31,11 TO 3tJ, lO 

JTO HPLDT 76,75 TD 105,75? HPLOT 05, 75 tO aS^BTl tO 97, 95 TD 97, lOO TO 96,101* H 
PLOT 9B,75 TO 90,92 TO 97,92 TO 97,9:4i HPLOT 9l,7S TP 91,6^ ID <i^2, 6& TD 92,63 TO 

9tiiiS TO 91*53i HI'LDT ?e,i2 Tp ?9.i.S TO B4.63 TQ S5,62 TO 91,62 
366 Hf^LDT *3,S4 TQ 9^,3S TO 94,56 ID 94, 3B TO 95,39 TO 95,59 TO 96,60 TO 97,60 
TQ 97^64 TO 99,64 TO 99,66 TO 100,66 TO K.nJ,6B TO t01,67 TD 105,67 TO 105.70 TD 
125,70 TO 125, B9 TO 123,09 TO 123,104 TD 116, 1 "^4 
390 HPLDT 110 70 TO t 1«„ lOSi HPLOT 9'>f,afl TO t*2,&9 FO |4;<!,'M ^lj 104,91: HPLOT 1 



'fMf TO 120, 66< HPLOT 420;S^ TO 120,75* tVUW J2i:},62 TO >37,62i HPLDT l30,72 Tip 

133,72 TO 114^73 rt| 13Sf73t l-IPLOT 1^,61 TO 14>J,01 
400 HPLOT 123,91 TQ 129,91 TO 129,94 TD 130,95. TD I3r0, 96 TD 1 3 1, 97 TO 134,9^ TPT 

135,90 TO 143,90: HPLOT 130,73 TD 149,71: HPLDT 1 4a* 79 TO l?lli, ^'-^ 
4 10 HPLOT 137,53 TO 137,64 TO 136,64 TO 136,65 TO 13^, TS fO 139, 76 TO 139,79 tU 

140iBO TO 14(9.02 TO 14^^04 TO 145^*90 TJ3 l4:i*»?9 IP 143,103 TD 144,107: Tp l4^, li-"^ 
s yifuii 14a. 106 

41& HPLDT 14:3, 100 Tp ISO, HWJ 
420 HPLOT 149,60 TD 140, iO TO 140.62 TQ 147,62 TO 147,63. TO l4f>*M TP 146,65 TD 

147,66 TD 147,67 TO 148,^60 TQ 149,63 TD 149,71 TO 151,73 TO 151*77 TO 150. 73 TD 

lSO,H2 ID l^*S7 TD 154, BB 
430 HPLUt TO lrt4.91 TQ! 152,^^3 fP 1 S2'/'»i TO l:S<>, -^ TO ltii.i.l02 TO 149,103 TO l*'i 
,105 TD 153, lOS TQ I33, 107 tp 1*34, toO 
440 HPLDT 152,74 TO 150,74 TO 150,B5 TD 157,06 TD 157,07 TO 136, flU ID IQ6, B9 TD 

ltl^.09i l4P1.aT 160,75 TD 160,75 TD 164,75. TO 164»B3 TO 163, S4 10 161^05 TO l6l , B 

7 TQ iae,»7 

450 NPLOT 152^93 TO t73^'*3 lO l.;4.96 IP I ?6, *6 TO 170,93: HPLDT 15^,95 lO 1iti7^9 

8 TD 156,99 TD 156,107 TO ISS, 107 10 ISB, 105 TD 1 63, l<ffi TO 163.106 TO 16*, lO* TO 
169,107 TD 170,107 TO 17|,1<\6 

460 ' HPLOT 162,95 TO 162,97 TO 163,97 TO 163,100 TO 164,101 TD i*.4, 102 TO 163,10 

3 TD 163,105: HPLOT 170,92 TO (60,94 TD 163,96 TO 169.97 TD 1t9.99 TO 170,99 TD 
17s, 1 02 

470 Hf^LQT 175,75 TD IB6,75 TO 106,01 TO 174.B! TP 174, /61 H^'LDt 165,34 TO 166,H 

4 TO 167,35 TQ 1AB,B3 TO 170,H3 TO 1 7 1 ^ E*,"? TO 173, SI TQ 175,31 TO 175.33 TQ tf^^^ 

3 TD 177,62 TD 173,33 TO 179,33 TD 183,37 

4eO >*PlDT 167,90 TO 160,09 TD 169,39 TD 169*07 TO T#«y,66 ID 170*S8 TD 174, BB TO 
174,37 TD 175,37 TD 1 ??h, B6 tD 17fi, ft.lt HPLOT 190,66 TO 190,73 TO 139.74 TO Itl*** 7 

6 TO IBB, 70 TD 137,77 

4^. hPluI JV3,fc6 ID I*? 1,7^ TP 194. 7;;? TO j^4,66t H*T_OT 1¥W, 75 TO 194,75 TD 194,7 

7 to 193,76: HPLQI ltf4,e;?To |64,64 TU lia;S,63 TO 1311.37 

500 HPLDT 142,10 TD 142, t4 TQ 145, l5 TO 145.15 TO 146,16 TO 146, 20 TO 1|47,^ Jtjt 
147,?3 TO 14B,23 TO 149,22 TD 153,22 TO 133,23 TO i33.33 TD J»S,27 TO 160,27 TO 
16*1 30 TD 170^30 TO 1 Tit, 39 

SIC MTLOT W 171,40 TO 172.40 TO t72.41 TO 175*42 TQ 173,43 TO 174,44 TD 176,4 

4 TD 176,45 TQ 17?,^43 TQ 177, 3«3 TQ 176|37 TO I7*i,33 TQ 175^32 TO 176,31 lO ITS,?: 
1 TO 101,29 TO 1B3,2A TD 162,21 

520 HPLOT TO 101, 20 TQ 161,19 TO 173*17 TO 300, lOi HPLDT 199, JO ItJ 1**, l3 TO 2 

&f,15 TO 201,16 TO 204,17 TO 2Ci6, 16 TD 209, lO TO 2tO, 10 TO 213,13 TQ 213,17 TD 2 

15,1^ TO 216,20 TO 216,25 TO 215,26 TO 313,27 

530 hPLOi TD 317,27 rp 216,23 TQ 216,29 TO 219,30 

560 HPLDT 106,14 TQ 106,16 TO 107*16 TO 100.15 TO i09, 15 TD 109,14 TO ilOjl4 TO 

111,13 TD 113,13 TD 111,13 TO 109^12 TD 1O0, 13 TD 107*13 TO 107, M 
570 rt=LOT 125,19 TD 125,24 TO 124i.25 TO 123.24 TO 127, 20 TD 126,19 
580 HPLDT 120*^38 TO 120,39 TO t29,39 TO 1 30. 40 TO 1:^0,42 TD 133,45 TO 133,47 TD 

134,40 TD 135*47 TD 134*47 TO 134*46 TP 1^4.43 TQ 132,43 TD 132,42 TO 131,42 TD 

I ji,39 ro 129, 3i7 
590 HPLDT 133,36 TO 135,36 TD 137,36 TO 137.41 

13a,4B TD 138,^44 TD 136,41 TD 135,4 1 TO US, 41 

132,37 
600 ^«=LDT 100,9 TO 100,6 TO 173,6 TD 178,5 TO 179,5 TO 1I30.4 TD l60*0 TO 191, 
TO 193,2 TO 194,2 TD 194,4 TO 195,5 TO i9fl,5 TO 1 90,* TO 1^7.7 TD 197,3 TO 190^0 

713 193!, 10 
61 b WLOT 221;', 30 to 222,30 TQ 222,31 TQ 224,31 TO 225,32 TO 224*33 TO 222^33 TO 

221,34 TD 221.35 TD 220,35 TD 220,36 TD 221,36 TD 222*35 TO 223,3a TO 224,34 TO 

226,34 TD 226,35 TO 227,36 TO 229,36 
62& Ifln.OT TO 22V»41 TO 226,42 TpJ?;?8y43 TO 227^44 TO 223.44 TO 222^45 Tti ^1^,4 
7 TO 221,47 TD 220,4S FQ 220,49 
630 HFLOT 221,37 TO 331,57 TO 231^53 TD 4?30+3B TO 22^,3,"* 10 231,39 TD 233,57 TO 

233,59 TD 234^60 TO 235.39 TO 235,56 ID 234,57 TQ 234^55 TD 233,55 TO 235,53 TO 

235*54 TO 233,52 TO 234/31 TO 234, 50 
640 I#*IDT to 230,5i:> TD 2.^0,49 TO 223,49 TO 223,47 TD 229,46 TO 229,45 TD 220, 4 

5 TO 226,47 TO 226,48 TD 225,49 TO 225p.50 TO 224, SJ TO 223,31 TU 223,52 TO 222,5 
3 TO 223,54 TO 23 1^155 TP 22^1,37 

650 f#*kPT 242,, i> fO 244,2 10 244,3 TD 245,3 TO 243,4 TO 246,5 TO 24i, 6 TO 347, S 

TD 249,3 TD 250,6 TD 253,6 TO 252,7 TO 25:T, 7 TD 233,9 TD 354,9 TO 2:!i<l,l,0 TO 231, 

LO TO 252.9 

6=fri> HPL.pT to 232^7 TO 2^ S, fi, TD 253,2 TO 254,2 TD 255^0 

6.70 HF'LOt ^1f,9 TO 26,9 TO 27,3 TO 27,7 TO 25,7 TO 25,6 TO 24,5 TD 23»S TO 2t,7 

to 23,^9 TO 21,9 TO 21,10 TD 19,10 TD 18,12 TO 16,12 TO 16,13 TO 13, t3 TO J4,l^ T 

O 15,11 

630 HPLDT TO 14, TO TD 34^,0 TD 16,4 fo 17,6 TO J9,5 TO 17,4 TO 13,* TQ $3,3 TO 

13,7 TD 13,6 TO 12*9 TD IZ.tO TO Il,t<^ TO It, J 2 TO 9, t2 TD S, 13 TQ 6,14 TQ lO, 14 

TO 10,15 
690 HPLDT TO 9,1* TO ^,^9 TO 3,30 TO 5,21 TQ 0,23 

7W HPLOT iSBtl^O TP ISe, 151 TQ 159,152 TQ 160,152 TO J60, 153 TD 161,153 TD 162 
,J*54 TD 162, ISS fO 16^^155 TO 164,156 TO 164,157 TD 165,157 TO 166,150 TO 166*15 
9 TQ 175,159 TO 176,150 TO 177,159 TO 180,159 
7 10 HPLOT TO I BO. 150 TD 179, ISO TO IVS, lS7 TO 177,157 TQ 176,136 TD 174,130 TD 

173,150 TO 172.139 TO 17i,|?ia TD 1 70*. 136 TQ 166,156. TO 166,155 TD 166,153 TD 16 
7^ |!i;2 ID 167, 15b 



TO 137*42 TD 139,44 10 139,45 TD 
ID 133,39 TO 134,33 TO 133,37 TD 



HPLDT 143,9 TO I4%,4S TO J44,5 TO 144*4 In 147*1 TO 1.^6,0 
FDR I * I 9, 02*333* TQ 270 STEP 22.33294 
FDR J = TD 159 STEP 5 
HPLOT I, J 

NKX T 
KIEJKT 



720 

1000 

1005 

tOio 

1020 

1O30 Vt2) = 49(Vi3^ a Ol*V<4> ' 106: V (5) 

1040 FOR I *i 1 TQ a 

ltt4itS FDR J = O TO 279 STEP 5 

1030 HF^LQt J.Vfll 

1053 l«3(T 

106O NEXT 



133tVMl - 10 



bounds of the map, it draws 
the satellite path and range 
circle and displays the sat- 
ellite name, orbit nunnber, 
and mode of operation. The 
computer then requests the 
operator to press the space 
bar when the actual time of 
day matches that displayed 
on the screen (which is the 
time of Acquisition Of 
Signal — AOS). When that is 
done, the computer begins 
its real-time display proce- 
dure, during which it dis- 
plays the current satellite 
position along the path, 
with a bearing line from the 
station to the current SSP, 
the time of day, the time re- 



maining until Loss Of Signal 
(LOS), and current antenna 
azimuth and elevation 
figures. The computer up- 
dates all this information 
every minute until LOS. 

If the high-speed graph- 
ics routine is. selected, the 
computer performs basical- 
ly the same operations as 
the real'time routine except 
that the speed of the up- 
dating is increased, 

If the choice is made to 
display antenna direction 
data, then the Apple dis- 
plays the azimuth, eleva- 
tion, and associated time of 
day for each minute the sat- 
ellite is in range. 



The choice to display SSP 
data displays the time after 
EQX, time of day, and 
longitude and latitude of 
each SSP for each minute of 
the orbit. 

The choice to display all 
orbits will display the same 
list of data for all the orbits 
for the day selected. 

If you choose to com- 
pute another orbit, the pro- 
gram retains all satellite pa- 
rameters and displays the 
orbit list, allowing the oper- 
ator to select another one 
of the orbits for that day. 

Choosing to restart clears 
all variables and starts the 



program over from the 
beginning. 

Finally, a choice to quit 
will do just that stopping 
the program immediately. 

Program Structure 

This program is con- 
structed of fifteen separate 
software modules, each 
with a specific job M indi- 
cated below. 

1000 initiates all vari- 
ables, arrays, constants, 
and functions. 
2000-4000 Main routine. 
5000 Determines the 
mode of operation for OS- 
CAR 7 or 8. (OSCAR 7 is now 
out of operation, of course.) 



50 73Magazine • March, 1982 



1) SubpotRt latitude 

LAT ^ arcsintsin(inc)'sm(360T/PERH 

T^time after EQX 

PER = period time 
2} Subpoint longitude (Eartli rotation is 251) 

LON =. arccos [( cqs(360T/PER ) \ ^ j 25T> + Leqx 1 

l\ COS(LAT) / J 

Leqjc ^ longitude at EQX 

3) Distance Tronn station to subpornt 

DIST = arccos[{sin(A)sin(B) + cos(A)cos(B))cos(L)] 
A = LAT of first point (station) ( + 90 ' to - 90 °> 
B = LAT of second point (SSP) ( + 90 Mo - 90 ') 
L = LON of first potnf - LON of second pomt 
DIST units is in great circle arc degrees radians 

4) Bearing from station to subpoint 

BNG = arccos I" sm(B) - sin(A)cos(DIST } ] 

L cos(A)sm(DiST) J 

If L in formuia 3 was negative then the tjearing =360* - BNG 

5) Elevation to satellite 



ELEV = 90-afctan f ^ ^ ^g,S^^. . 1 



H = Earth radius + satellite altitude 

6) Distance to satellite 

RNG= r HxcQS(piST>-3957] 
L cos(90 - ELEV) J 
RNG is in statute miles 

7) AOS^LOS range (horizofi of satellite) 

D == arccos 



R = Earth radius (3957 miles): D js m great circle degrees 

/ 2tt X \/ / my \ \ /60 

V ^ \ 9 56x10- / / 



8) PER time = f 2tt 



PER is in minutes 
9) Precession of Earth per orbit = (PER x .25) " ( -^ 

10> Orbits per day = 1440/PER 

Fig. 2. Formulas, 



360 



440mi 



n / 



= 25 



6000 Lists the orbits and 
EQX data for all orbits of 
the day. 

7000 Computes SSP data. 
This is the main math rou- 
tine. It computes the time 
of day for each point, 
stored in array SSP(0,l); lati- 
tude, stored in SSP (1J); 
longitude, stored in SSP 
(2J); distance from station 
to subsatelfite point, stored 
in SSP(3,I); and true bearing 
from station to subsatellite 
point, stored in SSP{4J) for 
each minute of the orbit It 
checks to see if the satellite 
is in range and, if it is, it 
computes the elevation, 
stored in SSP(5,t), and sets 
up pointers to AOS and LOS 
time "I'Mn the arrays corre- 
sponds to the time in mir>' 
utes after EQX, The subrou- 
tine also checks to see if the 
satellite path will take Jt 
within the bounds of the 
map and, if it does, it sets 
up pointers to when it en- 



ters and leaves the map 
bounds (YA and YB). Finally, 
it computes the time in min- 
utes that the satellite is in 
range. 

8000 Used to input refer- 
ence orbit data: orbit num- 
ber, time of day of EQX, 
and EQX longitude. 
9000 Computes X,Y coor- 
dinates for the range circle 
to be displayed on the map. 
9500 Draws the range cir- 
cle on the map. 
10000 Draws the satellite 
path on the map. 
10500 Computes X,Y 
coordinates for drawing 
bearing lines from station 
location to each SSP 
Stored in MC%(OJ) and 

Mc%nj)- 

11000 Converts longitude 
and latitude figures to X 
and Y coordinates. 
12000 Converts time in 
the form of hours, minutes, 
and seconds to the form of 
minutes after midnight. 



SD(1 testation latitude 

SI3(2) = station longitude 

RC%(1,36) range circle plotting points; RC%(0,X) = Y coordinate; 

RC%(1 ,X) = X coordinate 
AE(0) = orbit#; AE(1) = time of EQX; AE(2) = EQX longitude 
AF(2,B) data for orbits for the day requested 

ARO,X) = orbit#; AF(1.X) = time of EQX; AF(2,X) = EQX longitucTe 

B = no. of orbits per day 
SSP(5,PER) = subsatellite point data for orbit 

SSP(O.X) = ttme of day; SSP(T,X) = LAT; SSPt2,X) = longtltude; 
SSP(3,X) = distance 

SSP{4,X) = azimutti; SSP(5,X) - elevation 

PER = saleJllte orbital period In minutes 

X — denotes each minute of orbit 

Latitude & longitude are in radians 

Distance is in great circle radians 

Azimuth and elevation is in radians 
L%(53) map latitude to Y coordinate-conversion constants 
MC%(1,63)^sateHite path pfottmg points 

MC%(0,X» " X coordinates 

MC%(1.X) = Y coordinates 
D1$ to D7$ = days of week Dl$=^ "SU '; 02$ = "MO"; eta 
M1$ to M5$ = OSCAR operating modes 
AS(1) = lime of acquisition of signal (UTQ; AS<2) = time after EQX{mm) 

for AOS 
LS(1)=^time of toss of signal (UTC); LS(2) = time after EQX(min) 

for LOS 
TR = time in range (LS(2) - AS(2)) 
AG - selected orbit 
R1- 1.5708; R2=^ 3.14159; R3 = 4.7124; R4- 6.2832; R5^ 57,296: 

R6 = .01746: R7 = 3957; R8 = 1440; R9 = 1 1 1 .12 
MO$ = OSCAR mode of operation —made up of Mi$ to M5$ 
DAS = day of week 
DT$ = date of orbit (MMIDDPfY) 
0S% = satellite selected 
OSS = satellite name 
ALT = satellite altitude In statute mtles 
INC = satellite orbit inclination (in radians) 
= satellite precession degrees per orbit (m radians) 
D = satellite horizon (in great circle radians) 
D$ = control (D for DOS) 



Fig. 3. Variables, arrays, 
Pathfinder. 



and Lonbtant^ used in OSCAR 



12500 Converts time in 
the form of minutes after 
midnight to hours, minutes, 
and seconds. 

13000 Accepts data need- 
ed to compute orbit data 
for satellites other than 
OSCAR. Satellite altitude. 
inclination, and name must 
be entered. 

The formulas used tn 
these routines are detailed 
in Fig. 2. The major arrays 
and variables being used 
are detailed in Fig 3. 

Have Fun! 

I hope you can make 
some use of this program as 
I have. I have been using it 
regularly to predict OSCAR 
positions and I've also used 
some of the techniques in 
other programs. 



If you really want to get 
OSCAR Pathfinder running 
with the least amount of ef- 
fort, you can send me $15 
and lit ship you a disk with 
everything on it ready for 
turnkey operation. If you 
have any questions that I 
haven't answered here, 
send me an SASE and I'll 
see if I can help you out. 
Have funiB 

Rdterences 

1. "Track OSCAR Witti Your 
SR'52;' Art Burke W61X, 73 Mag- 
azine^ November, 1977. 

2. '^Track OSCAR 8." Kazimierz 
J. Deskur K2ZR0; 73 Magazine, 
November, 1977. 

3. "Tracker — Ttie Ultimate 
OSCAR Frnder;' Bruce Nazarian 
WD8DRK. 73 Magazme, Janu- 
ary. 1981. 

4. 'Orbits and Revolutions/" 
NASA Facts, NASA. 

73 Magazine • MarcriJ9B2 51 



Stephen Gibson 
PO Box J838e 
Holivwood CA 90038 



Which TVRO Antenna Is Best? 

Satellite Central^ part IV 



In the past few months, 
Tve received dozens of 
tetters fronn hams wanting 
to know which antenna is 



best. Since its easy to get 
stung, you must know what 
to ask for and, in many cas- 
es, to demand! 



The SI 00 Rec6iverl 
December*s maiF was heavy, mostly due to my mention of the 
$100 receiver design by Rex Roads. WeU. Rex rs busy creaning 
up the drawings and we have a complete construction article 
planned for tale spring. In the meantime, start lookmg for a site 
fof your S100 dish. We've got one of those coming, loo. 




Let's cover the kinds of 
antennas you'll likely find in 
TVRO service and then 
move on to selection tactics 
in my next article. All things 
considered, you need about 
40 dB antenna gain at 4 GHz 
for domestic birds, with 
more gain necessary as you 
move off the prime cover- 
age footprints. 

The situation is aggravat- 
ed by the need to shield the 



P/7fM£ FOCUS 




SIGNAL 



Slt^NAL 



fig. 1. The prime-focus design uses a parabolic reflector to corjceritrate the signal from the 
satellite into a small area known as the focus point. The accuracy of the dish surface to a true 
parabolic curve governs the size of the focus point and placement of the feedhorn. 

52 73 Magazine • March, 1982 



antenna from noise on a 
sides except the main lobe, 
Down in the dc bands, 
antenna side-lobe response 
is usually something you ig- 
nore unless you want max- 
imum efficiency or enjoy 
climbing the tower to prune 
beam elements! You must 
pay attention to this prob- 
lem m TVRO work because 
the signals you want are well 
below the terrestrial noise 
floor in the vicinity of the 
antenna. Typical signal lev- 
els are 30 dB below the sur- 
rounding notse. It's like try- 
ing to hear a normal conver- 
sation in a room full of peo- 
ple shouting at you! More 
gain won't help. 

The solution is to build a 
dish reflector large enough 
to produce a very narrow 
beamwidth. Then use some 
plumbing in the form of a 
feedhorn to channel the sig- 
nal to a shielded monopole 
antenna probe. Several 
antenna designs can be 
used. All of them work, but 
you must study them 

carefully. 



A Tempting Menu of Dishes 

The prime-focus design 
seen in Fig 1 is by far the 
most popular TVRO anten- 
na today. The surface is 
formed into a parabolic 
curve so that the reflected 

signal travels the same dis- 
tance to the focus point 
where it enters the feedhorn 
opening. The distance from 
the reflector to the focus 
point is referred to as the 
focal length. The formula 
for a parabola is available 
out of many trig or caicuiat- 
or instruction books. It is 
easy to apply the formula to 
a wood or masonite 
template and to build a 
working dish from wood and 
window-screen material in a 
few evenings. Prime-focus 
dishes are simple to build, 
and they may have very 
good side-lobe properties if 
you are careful with con- 
struction and feed selection. 

Next, we have the Casse- 
grain, or two-reflector, dish 
seen in Fig. 2. Most commer- 
cial satellite stations use this 
design because overall effi- 
ciency can be improved by 
additional contouring of the 
hyperbolic subref lector and, 
in some cases, modifying 
the curve of the main reflec- 
tor. Cassegrains can have 
very good directivity and 
may, with very special de- 
sign, achieve low side-lobe 
response as well as greater 
gain than equivalent-sized 
prime-focus models. This 
slight advantage is due in 
part to the longer focal 
length and reduced area 
presented to the feed. 

Building a Cassegrain 
may be harder because you 
now have two reflectors that 
must be in perfect align- 
ment before the signal can 
reach the feed. That is, the 
focus point of the main re- 
flector {parabolic] must co- 
incide with the back focus 
point of the subreflector 
(hyperbolic) As a rule, Cas- 
segrain subreflector sizes 
are between 10 and 20 per- 
cent of the diameter of the 
main reflector, but the main 
reflector must be larger than 



CaSSes/?jS//V FOCUS 



riio 




SWItAL 



-^SUB-REFLfCTOft 



SIGNAL 




fig. 2. The Cd^s^egrain or twin-reflector design offers increased efficiency, but there are limits. 
As a rule, Cassegrains must be larger than ten feet before you can derive any benefit because 
the subreflector blocks a significant portion of the signal from ever reaching the dish. 



SPHERiCAL 




SIGMJ^L A 



FEED a 



FEED A 



St€MAL, e 




fig. 3. Carve out a piece from a very large metal ball and you have the spherical antenna. It is 
possible to receive several satellites at once using separate feeds or you can simply mount the 
feed and LNA on a tripod and move it from satellite to sateUite. 



REFLECTORyNORhi 



PUtABOLA 




SIGNAL 



i^ijm* 



FtgD 




¥ig. 4. The horn/reflector antenna is just a segment of a parabola fed by a very long horn. It has 
been in use for many years by A. T. & J. and other terrestrial microwave users. This design is 
considered by many as the ideal solution to high gain and low side-lobe response. 



ten feet before you can 
derive any benefit. So the 
subreflector presents a real 
problem since it blocks a 
significant portion of the 



signal from ever reaching 
the dish! This phenomenon 
is known as aperture 
blockage and is the one fac- 
tor that keeps the Cassegrain 



from becoming popular in 
dish sizes below 4 meters. 

Perhaps the most interest- 
ing style in use today is the 
spherical antenna. The late 

73 Magazine * March, 1982 53 



OFFSET FEED 



PARABOL 



FFED 




S1GKAL 



ELLIPSE 



Fig. 5. The offset feed dish is 
similar to the Cassegrain in 
the two-reflector configura- 
tion, though single-reflector 
versions are also used. Side- 
lobe response is greatly im- 
proved because of a lack of 
aperture blockage. 

Oliver Swan developed a 
practical approach to this 
design. The spherical holds 
the unique advantage of be- 
ing able to receive several 
satellites at once — but sep- 
arate feeds are required, as 
shown in Fig. 3. It is possible 
to place a spherical so that it 
can see almost a 40-degree 
arc of the Clarke belt. Then 
you simply move the feed in 
an arc to move from satel- 
lite to satellite. 

The spherical looks al- 
most like a flat plate or a 
very long focal length pa- 
rabola. Mere inches keep ei- 
ther statement from being 
true. Despite the hassle of 
poor side-lobe response, the 
spherical offers an easy way 
for the home constructor to 

get his antenna built at mini- 
mum cost. Instead of using a 
parabolic curved template, 
one simpiy uses a wire 
stretched from some distant 
radius point to adjust and 
check accuracy. 

Ma Befl, on the other 
hand, has a lot of experience 
with 4-GHz signals. Her 
horn/ref lector, or Hogg horn 
[named after one of the in- 
ventorsX is shown in Fig. 4. 
This design embodies high 
gain and excellent side-lobe 
response. It's just about the 
only style that will work in a 
rnetropolitan area where in- 
terference is rampant, Un- 
fortunately, the Hogg is a 
beast to mount! A typical 
4.5-meter-aperture unit may 
have an overall length of 34 

54 73 Magazine • March. 1982 




Fig. 6. Nearly ideal reflector surfaces are possible when 
flame-spraying is applied to fiberglass dishes. Care must 
be used in the coating as well as curing time for the resin 
to ensure that the dish wilt follow the proper curve within 
1/8 inch. 



feet Your backyard has got 
to be very large or else the 
barbecue must go! 

Another design used in 
commercial applications is 
the offset parabolic seen in 
Fig. 5. The feedhorn does 
not get in the way of the sig- 
nals, thus improving the gain 
and reducing side lobes. The 
modified torus is finding use 
in cable TV and military in- 
stallations where several 
signals may be needed 
with about equal efficiency. 
Each design has its own 
unique advantage and price 
tag! 

What Materials Work 
For Dishes? 

just about any reflective 
surface will work, but some 
obvious concern can devel- 
op when you look at a fiber- 
glass dish. Some designs use 
mesh or sheet-metal reflec- 
tors imbedded in the fiber- 
glass. Others may use a 
metal film applied by a 
technique known as flame- 
spraying— as seen in Fig, 6. 
Flame-spray may improve 
the accuracy of the dish ge- 
ometry, but there is no easy 
way to know how well the 
coating was applied. It's 
easy to get sloppy. I've test- 
ed dishes where large sec- 
tions had no reflective prop- 
erties at all! 



On the other hand, a dish 
constructed of mesh screen 
may not follow a parabolic 
or spherical curve over the 
entire surface. This is espe- 
cially true of window-screen 
designs. The mesh bends 
easily and must be applied 
in flat sections. Despite the 
claims of many manufactur- 
ers, a flat section cannot 
possibly work as well as one 
which follows a parabolic or 
spherical curve. Why, then, 
do some mesh dishes work? 
The secret is simply in the 
number of sections used. 
More sections come closer 
to the overall desired curve, 
interestingly enough, gain 
loss is not the big problem 
with window-screen designs. 
Using fewer sections affects 
the side-lobe response of 
the dish more than it does 
the gain I 

How big can the holes in 
the mesh be? Good ques- 
tion. Logically, they must be 
big enough to appear as a re- 
flective surface to the wave- 
fronts. If we go back to the 
books, we can think of the 
holes as waveguides beyond 
cutoff and simply make 
them progressively smaller 
until microwaves don't slip 
through. The bottom line is 
about 1/8- inch-diameter 
holes. Anything larger does 
not reflect nearly as well. 



Solid spun-metal dishes 
are by far the best. Their ac- 
curacy and reflective prop- 
erties outweigh their un- 
wieldiness. The only catch is 
that large spun dishes are 
nearly impossible to find. 
The surplus market top-ends 
at the ten-foot mark. 

The next best bet in ma- 
terials is metal petals. 
They reflect just as well as 
anything else, but you must 
use care during assembly or 
they may not accurately fol- 
low the dish curve. Bending, 
twisting, and sweating are 
normal occurrences when 
you try to put one of these 
types together! 

What About Feedhorns? 

Fig. 7 shows some typical 
feedhorns. Their primary 
purpose is to efficiently cou- 
ple most of the signal 
bouncing off the reflector 
into the LNA. But therein 
lies the problem and per- 
haps the first place you may 
want to try to improve basic 
TVRO-antenna design. You 
see, the feedhorn, tike the 

dish, has its own sensitivity 
pattern, too. Like any anten- 
na, they are most sensitive 
on axis, tapering off at the 
sides. The key to feed effi- 
ciency is in the taper. Re- 
member, we want to receive 
a Signal that is well below 
the terrestrial noise floor. 
And the feed overshoot seen 
in Fig. 8 would indeed inter- 
cept the noise we want to 
reject. 

So what do you do if all 
feeds overshoot? The trick is 
in finding a happy medium 
of gain and efficiency versus 
noise intrusion. Let's assume 
for the moment that the 
feed is designed to taper off 
sensitivity so that the edges 
of the main dish reflector 
just intercept the 10-dB 
points on the feed pattern. 
Visualize the situation 
where the feed is most sensi- 
tive to signals bouncing off 
the center of the reflector, 
but less sensitive to signals 
at the edges. This problem 
has kept feed designers 
working in the wild quest for 
the ideal curve seen in Fig. 




F££i) OVERSHOOT 



IDE4L 




F£EO 




f\^ 7. Feeds may take on various shapes, but their sole pur* 
pose is to properly illuminate the dish. I had a chance to test 
several of the feedhorns sold today. My spectrum analyzer 
showed a drastic difference in gain and efficiency on my par- 
ticular dish, so feed matching to the dish is important 



9 — one that tapers off like a 
steep ledge rather than a 
rolling hilL 

Perhaps the most interest- 
ing outcome from recent 
feed design advances has 
been the radical departure 
from the classic flared 
waveguide approach. Look 



at any dish and you will real- 
ize that because the dish is 
circular, the wavefront re- 
flected into the feed will be 
also! So ''circular-to-wave- 
guide" transitions in feed 
are becoming the rule rather 
than the exception. 

This deviation from the 



Fig. 8. Better efficiency 
achieved by a broader feed 
beam w/// only cause over- 
shoot and increase intercept- 
ed terrestrial noise. The best 
compromise is about a 10-dB 
drop at the edge of the dish 
A metal shroud around the 
rim of the dish can block 
some noise seen by the feed, 

classic rectangular feed can 
boost overall antenna effi- 
ciency to nearly 60 percent. 
Is that ail? Higher efficiency 
is possible and, in fact, with- 
in reach if you can make 
better use of the surface 
near the edge of the dish. 
The two-reflector, or modi- 



Fig, a Typical feed-pattern 
sensitivity just covers the 
dish at the 10-dB points. This 
means that the dish is less ef- 
ficient at the edges. Nearly 
100 percent antenna efficierh 
cy would be possible if you 
could achieve the ideal 
curve and still eliminate 
feed-phase taper, aperture 
blockage, and reflector- 
surface errors. 

fied Cassegrain. design is a 
step in that direction. But 
the problems of proper 
amplitude illumination and 
equal phase paths over an 
unobstructed reflector aper- 
ture are still there. For the 
moment, it appears that 
matching a feed to a dish is 
like fitting a round peg in a 
square hole. A hammer 
won't help! ■ 





UNIVERSAL COMMUNICATIONS 

A Division of Innovative Labs, Inc, 

P.O. Box 339 
Arlington, Texas 76004^339 

$749.95 $699.95 

Lots of 1 Lots of 10 

NOT A KIT! 





At last, an inexpensive, 

state-of-the-art 
satellite TV receiver 

MODEL DL-2000 

• Fully tunable audio with AFC 
\ • Channel scan feature standard 

' ^ • Remote control option available 

• Jack for external signal metering 
• LED bar readout indicates video quality 
• Front panel selection of video polarity 
• Built*in RF modulator and video output driver 
• High quality construction, attractive packaging 
Local oscillator leakage minimized special mixer design 



Accessories include: 

• LNAs ($650 and up) 

• Power supplies for LNAs 

• Feedhorns and antennas 



Accessories Include LNAs (S5^ imJ up), power supplies Fof LNAs, fe6dr>ofns and antennas. 

TERMS: COD, Money Order. Bank Cards 

HOURS: 8:30-4:30 CDST; MON-FRI <817) 265-0391 INFORMATION 

Our product may be copied, but the performance is never equatied.p q BOX 339 ARLINGTON 

VjUNIVERSAL COMMUNICATIONS ^ ^««"^^ ^ J 



73Magazine • March. 1982 55 



«■» 



APPLIED INVENTION 

THrC SOURCE FtJft SOLIO Sr*fC I srATE-OF^THi-ART 



GaAs FETS by Mitsubishi 

VHf tl^ou^ 1 a GHz 
NEW MQF'UOO.Sia 00 fO.SSdB NF a[ 144 MHz!) 
PRFCES MO F- 1 4D€ 4 2SK27 J} £ 1 9 25 

EFF. Ih/aS MGF't402 i5SK2r4^ta4 00 

141212SK2?51 TESTED and GUARANTEED IMF ar A GKe 
aciB'SeS 50 0.9dS.S56.76 1 Ode'S45 50 
t4C3 (2SK2-7i| jlinax'^dOGHx - Super Low Noise ainp^ 

t97 00 ■ Jiei,7S' NF sorted - chU for daca 
1801 (2$K37»k MSOmW ImMr PO at 1 0GHzf-S54 25 



Microwave Modules 

MITSUBISHI X BAND Hybrid lnlaoral«d CircuftE wEtK 

Dielflclfic Resonator (0 t2MHz*'C! GaAs FET Oscillators 

FO'lOlOX- tOiGHz. 15mwo(Jl.UERlOOF|arv9e sa? 75 

FO-l^tOY'll &0f 1 2,0 GHi.UER 1^0 Flange 537 75 

FOUPl 1 KF H#terrsd/nfl receive*. 10 468 GHz LO 

Sllottky mmer high or low injecTion S34 25 
Ai ^ncrfgias rtMieflbk i i&Q WHz; ^scilLalQfs can be 
Cjplically FM'd with |R <9uggeai LD27 i t»tow| 
X'Barid Hor^ a/ilBrwifl ilSdB UERtOCi'WR190 Frangei S16 00 



PLESSEY £4GHz Gunr dloiJ* modules call or wmte 



Components 

viTHAMO^ 7000 Mkcrowove Ratefl caps 1o^ brpa3s.ccHj<}Jir5g 

7eCH]P7G0a 1 1-1 7GHf 7B00P7Q04 1 3 ■ 2 6GHz 

7SOOP7CJD1 ?e-4 2QHE 5 (Qf 15.00 



VOLTHOHfCS ullFET rrnnijaTuTe m>cfowave variable caps 
CP2 - 0.1 to ?.5pl CPIO- O.S to9.Dpf $3.l9a&. 



SOLDER-IM DISK CAPACITORS i& VHF-UHF byfjasstfig 
HMC JF series 100. 22fl. 470 6a0pf TO lor $2 50 



OPTOELECTRONICS ham MlT&UBESHl aiid SIEMENS 

MITSUBISHI LASER D[0OE$ 3mW aE 630 nm CW 

MLJOOl , 30mA Hwe^lroJd tiyitt m rrtonilor S200.ea. 

SIEMEJ43: 0^271 riigh Bniciency jR IfD. 1& mW £0 75 
BPW'34 r^t.. j^rge sr#fl PIN {iffSeclw S3 00 



THERMOELECTRfC HEAT PUMPS lof loimperilijr'e tc^tr^^ 
MELCOR FRIQ1CH1PS S21 - %3& CaH for daia. 



MIMIMUW ORDER S& 00. 

ADO POSTAGE * HANOUNG 

S3 SO on Mdduf&s iLfPSj $2 50 dn ol:n*r ilenis 

N Y STATE RESIDENTS ADD 0% SALES TAX 

SENR S A E E FOR CATALOG 



R.D.Z nOUTE21 HILLSDALE, NY 
Stfl 32S 3911 



12529 



SATELLITE 
TV SYSTEMS 

MECHANICAL 

AND 

ELECTRICAL 

ACCESSORIES 

Complete Systems, Antennas, 

Receivers, LNA's & Accessories 

CALL US TODAY! 




T-H, 



CALL, OR WRITE FOR OUR 
LATEST BROCHURE AND 
PRICES. 



901-795-4504 



^109 



TENNESSEE ELECTRONICS 

P.O.BOX 181108 

MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE 381 18 



Star Vie 



Systems 



k 



H&R COMMUNICATIONS, INC. 

Route 3, Box 1 03G - Pocahontas, Arkansas 72455 



Introduces the 

MODEL 12K 
SYSTE 





KIT CONTAINS 

•12' Antenna 
•AZ/EL Mount 
•24 Channel flecetver 
•120^ LNA 
•F©ed Horn 



A complete eetellite 
receiving system that you 
can assemble yourself as a 
weekend project. 

Why spend $7,000 to 
$10,000, Why pay someone 
else to install it» Do it 
yourself in a week-end and 

onIy $2,400.00 

UPS 
SHIFPABLE 

•All IVIisceJlaneous Cable 
and Connectors Needed 
•Everything Vou l^teed 
•No Special Tools Needed 
•Complete Antenna Weight Only 1 25 Pounds 




See Your Local Star View Dealer or Call 

800-643-0102 or 501-647-2291 

Dealer InciuEries Invited 



'86 




The Luly ANTENNA 
and POLARIZER 

Completely portable Antenna, comes fully assembled (folds like 
an unbrella and is not a kit). 



The PolarizeT is an electronic rotator, which 
can change polarities with a ftick of a 
switch (no moving parts). Eliminates weight, 

twisting cables, freeze 
ups, and down time. 



*^53 



For More information 
Write To: 



LULY TGLECOMMUNICATIONS CORP. 

P.O. Box 2311, San Bernardino, California 92406 

(714)888-7525 

Dealer and Disnibutor inqulnes Welcome 




56 73 Magazine • March, 1982 



<^/PARABOLIC DISH 

NO WARP, CHIP, OR DELAMINATION 

■ ALL-STEEL, ONE-PIECE 

■ ACCURATELY MACHINED 

■ 8'4Vi " OVERALL DIAMETER 
WITH MOUNTING RING 

Write for quantity discount 



DAKOTA MICROWAVE 

P.O, BOX 27002 
OOtDEN VALLEY, MN 55411 




F.O.B, 
MINNEAPOLIS MN 



^ 



SATELLITE TV SYSTEMS 

''tCJMPARli OUttQUALlTV. PKItES AND StRVItt!' 



PARABOLIC DISHES 
POLAR MOUNTS 
DEMO TKAILEKS 

wt:sicK:K 

WASHBURN 
KLM 

AVANTiiK 
UARDINLR 



MGTORJZATION SYSTEMS 
LNA HOLDERS 
ALUMINUM HORNS 

ALLIANCE 

ATV 

CABLE & CONNECTORS 

SWITCHES & HARDWARli 



CALL. WRITtlOR k^ FOR OUR LATEST BROCHURL AND PRICtLS. 



ausun c, lewis 

K4UCC 

■yOt -784-2 191 



LEWIS CONSTRUCTION CO. 

PX), BOX |[)0 1^452 

HUMUOi.DT, TN.3M41 



IN BUSINESS AT THIS LOCATION SJlMCL 1%4*' 




Quantity discount price structures availabte upon 
request for dealers. Dealerships, botli domestic 
and foreign available in many areas. For furtlier 
information, please contact John Michaels, Sales 
IVtanager, Telephone hours: Monday thru Thurs- 
day, 10-4. 



ELECTRONICS ^^^ 

4558 Auburn Bivd,, Sacramento, CA 95841 

{916)452-0193 



SMP 2300 MHz 

Now Order Tolf Free! 
1-800-368-3028 






iotot 



-M 



QfS 



TU-8— 44,95, Deiuste Tunable PS. Very 
smooth tunmg MiL SPEC pot. 3-12V. 

Compiete, 



UCC-1~35.00. DowncoFiverter KiL 

2100-2500 MH2. QuaJiiy board and 
components. 



SMC-2— 50.00. Deluxe downconverter 
Kit With high gain RF transistor and 
temperatLjre compensation. 



RFA-1— 44.95* 2 Stage BF preamp. 

Selective flfter, 16 db net gain, 



Large SA3E brings catalog of kits and 

\)^Tts and the 2300 MHz story. 



Aif pnces posrpatd tn U.S. 
VISA and MC accepted 
In Virginia, Aiaska and Hawaii 
Gail 703-255-2918. 



^376 



SMP 



Superior Microwave Prcxlucts^ Inc. 

P.O. Box 1241 

Vienna, Virginia 22180 






u-^ 



.u. 



it 




ti 



ucthg ifid Wo4i^] ^600^ Sert^Ifftfef^eb^ieri New dtlfeyi^ an 

Pr OCT positive ofa new generation in satellite receiver techndiogyt-^-|-; 
the successful integration of the niost sought after high perforrnancechaTaic- i 
4-1- teristics and ease of operation capabilities- Attractively packagedH Affordably 



\- 



.[ i \ r \' i '-r-t+- 



jioncapaDianes- rtitraciiveiy pacxage 



$ee it today and ^xp^^rir^ui^cA^et^iic'epSTf^txTidir^k itiake^ 



;-{]^ FULL FREQUENCY tunable audio 



4 Reception 3700 to 4200 MHi 1 

The Model 760d Satellite Receivteri: Systetii Pacttacje cbmcS vk/itH ifSantentt^i 

Mixer (Down^Conveirtor),- 100' of RG59-U cable and 



— I 



41 



tt ^H? Simplified channel tuning 

' '* Improved video sensitivity~J-f — 



inounted linage Reject Mix 

b - i t t J 




with j:Oiiripct bm iiisldk(iL-.!j_. IJIT ^nr: 



t 



rpcp 





+ 



i I j.:U4.i.,i_.L4j....U-iX-U...ij i i 



950 Benida Ave, Simnyvale^ CM9m6'i4m73(f25m k?4i 



^■t 



i-ia 



WORDFmSnft 



il--f f-j-J 



i 



SEE YOUR GILLASPIE & ASSOCIATES DEALER TODAYJ^ 

— ^ ' '' '—^^^ — "i — ^ Ij— ^ r -^ 



■ T ^ I ill I »imiw 



t^See List of Adv&nisers on page 130 



73 Magazine • MarcriJ982 57 



Home-Brew a 
TVRO Downconverter 

works with last month^s LNA 



I Ridmrd Christian WA4CVP 
Rte. 7. Box 209W 
Creola AL 36525 



If you liked our low-noise 
amplifier article in the 
February, 1982, issue of 73 
riob^s Own LNA'l you will 
love our no-alignment 
downconverter 

This downconverter can 
be built by an average tech- 
nician and the parts are 

readily available. The local 



S,E (MHch} MitcheH, Ir. WA40SR 
PO Box 97 J 
Mobih AL J660r 



oscillator [LO] and the mix- 
er are commercial units 
manufactured by Magnum 
Microwave Corporation of 
Sunnyvale, California. The 
design features a dc block 
for feeding power to your 
LNA, and it can be built for 
less than $225. With this 
downconverter, an LNA, 
and a good antenna, you 



can receive noise-free pic- 
tures from the satellites. 

The converter takes the 
3.7-tcHl.2-GHz signal from 
the LNA and converts it to a 
70-MHz i-f signal The de- 
sign features single conver- 
sion for simplicity and ease 
of duplication. The local 
oscillator is voltage-tuned, 
and there is no alignment 
required. You put the parts 
on the board, mount it in 
the box, power it up, and 
watch the birds! How sim- 
ple can you get? 



liWA-llO 



mMik-tto 



TU tit* 




1-F mn 

»TCI BAUD P^ASS RLTER/AMP 
70 4iH< 



TUMIhtC VOLTAOt 
TO ISV 



♦19V 






roTufl 



/h 



) 



/ lOOOpF 
{ FEED THRU 






■4 TUNIING VOLTAGE TO t»&WNCQNVCRTf R 



^TtQHAL fimmG Ci/rcuit 



APPROM SfiOmA. MAX 
nOmA F'Cff DQ'^MtyCQNVEflTEiR 



fig. 1, Satellite downconvertef schematic, * = ch/p or disc ceramic. 

73Magazme • March J982 



Circuit Description 

Refer to the schematic. 
Fig. 1, and to the PC-board 
layout and parts placement 
overlay for the following 
discussion. The complete 
downconverter is con- 
structed on a 2'' by 4" 
teflon PC board, 1/32" 
thick. Impedance matching 
is achieved by using micro- 
strip transmission lines To 
supply dc power for the 
LNA, a dc block is tncorpch 
rated on the board This lets 
the coax from the LNA sup* 
ply the LNA's required op- 
erating power. The dc feed 
is accomplished very stm- 
ply by supplying the + 1 8 to 
+ 22 volts that powers the 
downconverter to the rf in- 
put through an rf choke. 
The dc side of the choke is 
bypassed for rf with a 
lOOOpF chip capacitor. 



Sf^ALL LOOP 
IN LEAP 



1. 



z 



p. C. 
TRACE 



f^$0 



VTO OR MJXER 



J 



Fig. 2. Mixer and vto had 
bending and soldenng in- 
struct ions. 



The 4-CHz input is ac- 
coupled through a 10-pF 
chip cacpacitor to a 
!4-wave, 50-Ohm transmis- 
sion line going to the rf port 
of the mixer. Local oscilla- 
tor injection to the mixer is 
also via a VI -wave, 500hm 
transmission line for imped- 
ance matching. The i-f 
port of the mixer is ac- 
coupled to the first 
MWA-110 for approximate- 
ly 14 dB of i"f gain, and then 
to the second MWA-110 for 
an additional 14 dB of i-f 
gain. The output of the 
downconverter feeds the 
70-MHz bandpass filter in 
our home-brew receiver. 

Construction 

The first step in con- 
structing the downconvert- 
er is to drill the T by A'' 
minrbox using the drilling 
guide shown in Fig. 3. The 
bare PC board can also be 
used as a drilling template. 
Use Vi" standoffs to mount 
the board in the box. We 
used a type~N connector for 
the rf connection from the 
LNA. You also can use an 
SMA connector in place of 
the type-N with equally 
good results. BNC or type-F 
connectors are adequate 
for the LO tuning voltage 
and 70-MHz i-f out. 

Next, install the two 
MWA-110 i-f amplifier ICs 
on the printed-circuit board. 
Be sure that they are flat 
against the ground-plane 
side of the PC board. Sotder 
the tabs on the 110s to the 
ground plane, cut the leads 
to 1/8^ bend them flat 
against the PC board, and 
solder. Now install the mix- 
er and local-oscillator mod- 
ules. Be sure that the 



PC BOARDS 

Etched and drilled tef- 
lon printed circuit boards 
for the downconverter are 
available for $27.00, plus 
$1.50 for handling and 
postage, from Mart- 
comm. Inc., PO Box 74, 
Mobile A L 36601. 



ground prns are in the cor- 
rect holes on the PC board, 
or you will wind up with 
some expensive but useless 
tr inket$. 

Caution: Do not cut the 
pins on the modules. Bend 
the pins in a small loop over 
to the PC board and solder. 
(See Fig. 2.) Solder the pins 
to the PC-board trace usirjg 
as little solder as possible. 
Install and solder the six 
feedthrough jumpers, using 
pieces of cut-off resistor 
leads, and solder on both 
sides of the board. Now in- 
stall the rest of the com- 
ponents, except for the 
3.3-uH choke. 

After construction is 
complete, check for solder 
bridges. Temporarily con- 
nect the +18 to +22 volts 
to the dc input of the volt- 
age regulator. Measure the 
output voltage to see that 
the voltage regulator is 
working. The output should 
be +15 volts. Measure the 
voltage drop across the 



^ 1/4" 



H/t* 



J 1 



5/e" 



3 i/A" 



I 1/8* 



^^s- 



^^i^ 



fLF, 




I TUNE VOLTS 



:^ 




+ VOC 
100 OpF 

FEEDTHRU 



i/e' 




I-F 



9/16 " 



I 13/16 



7 

5/r 



-9/16 



H 



3 5/e' 



4" 



Fig. 3. Drilling template for T' hy 4'' minibox. 



910-Ohm resistors; it should 
be 2 to 3 volts. If it's not 
within the range, then you 
probably have a bad 
MWA-110 (we have found 
several). If the voltage drop 
measures OK, remove pow- 
er and discharge the elec- 
trolytic capacitors. Now in- 
stall the 3.3-uH choke. This 
completes the PC-board as- 
sembly. The next step is to 
install it in the minibox. 

Depending upon the type 
of rf connector used, N or 



SMA, it may be necessary 
to solder extension leads to 
the PC-board pads to reach 
the connectors. Be sure that 
when the extension leads go 
through the PC board they 
do not short out to the 
ground-plane side, Solder 
the four leads (three from 
the connectors and one 
from the 1000-pF feed- 
through capacitor) to the 
appropriate points on the 
PC board as shown by the 
parts overlay. 




Fig. 4(al Foil side view of board. 




MWAMO 



Ti '^ ^ 



lOOOpF 



rooopF 






p -plOOOpF 



' j<j^ -'IkiMJ^' 




iaif, .V. 'i 1 ■ 1 ' " aI- 



TUNING V 





OUT 



f^'\ ■'■-KT-K- :i:r'.'^~r-;-««C=_*v:- 



I8-22VDC 



* JUMPER TOP TO BOTTOM SOLDER 

Fig. 4[bl Parts placement foil side view. 

73 Magazine ' MarchJ9S2 59 



Checkout 

If your antenna and LNA 
have been completed, yoo 
will be able to check your 
system through the i-f out- 



put of the downconverter. 
With your LNA and down- 
converter connected to 
your antenna, apply power 
Connect the output of the 
downconverter to the an- 



Quantity 

1 

1 

1 
2 
3 
2 
1 
1 
1 

2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 



Parts List 
Description 

MC24T mixer module (Magnum Microwave) 
Va2T'2 local oscillator module (Magnum Micro- 
wave) 

10-pF chip capacitor 
1000-pF chip capacitors 
50-pF disc ceramic capacitors 
.01 disc ceramic capacitors 
1-uF, 35-V tantalum capacitor 
100-uF, 35-V electrolytic capacitor 
1000-pF feedthrough capacitor {mounted on 
minibox) 

910'Ohm, Vj-Watt resistors 
lOk'Ohm, 10-turn pot (optional tuning circuit) 
3.3'UH choke 
MWA 110 ICs 
7815 voltage regulator 
2" by 4'' minibox 
Rf connectors, hardware, etc. 



The Magnum Microwave MC24T mixer module, the V82T-2 
local osciHator module, the MWA-HOs, chip capacitors, and 
the rf connectors are available from Cliff Jones at Alaska 
Microv^rave, 4335 East Fifth Street, Anchorage AK 99504, 
(907)-33S-0340^ a regular 73 Magazine advertiser. 



tenna ternninals of a con- 
ventional color-TV receiver, 
with the TV tuned to any 
unused low channel be- 
tween 2 and 5. If possible, 
connect a voltmeter to the 
age fine on the TV set tuner. 
The age voltage can give a 
very useful indication of 
proper aiming and adjust- 
ment of your satellite TV 
antenna. 

With the optional tuning 
circuit [Fig. 1) connected to 
the tuning voltage input of 
the downconverter, tran- 
sponder 1 tuning voltage will 
be about 4 volts. To tune 
transponder 24, you will 
need about 12 volts. You 
should be able to tune in 



most transponders over the 
4-tCH-12-volt range. Also, you 
should get an indication of 
video on the color-TV set 
when a transponder is tuned 
in. The video will be of very 
poor quality since the satel- 
lite signal is frequency 
modulated while the con- 
ventional terrestrial TV sig- 
nal is amplitude modulat- 
ed. You should still be able 
to recognize the pictures, 
however. Sync will be very 
critical and you probably 
won't be able to sync on all 
transponders;. 

That's it! The rest of your 
TVRO receiveris cheap and 
simple, as we will show you 
in future articles. ■ 



L 



Acknowledgments 

We would like to thank the staff at Magnum Microwave for 
running tests on our prototype downconverter. The measured 
down-conversion gain was 21 dB with 4GHz input At 
-20-dBm and "40-dBm input, the second harmonic of the 
70-MHz if was -25dBcand -50 dBc, respectively. Magnum 
also confirmed our discovery that the MWA-1 10 wiii oscillate 
if not properly grounded. The above specs were furnished to 
us by Magnum Microwave and are quoted with their permission, 



WOULD YOU BUY A SATELLITE ANTENNA 

SIGHT UNSEEN? 
ONLY FROM HASTINGS ANTENNA CO.! 

WE NOW CAN OFFER YOU THE BEST 
10 FT. (3.0M) ANTENNA ALSO. 

Our 3 Meter Antenno has oil the features you want: 

• Cosse Grain Feed System using a Chaparral Super Spherfcot Feed Horn ond Spun 
Hyperbolic Sub-Reflector. 

« 24 Petals (Aluminum ,060 Gauge Va Hard) Baked on White Finish Both Sides. 

• Polar Mount with Programmable Offset for True Trocking. (It's not a True Polar if it 
doesn't hove this feature)^ 

• Engineered for High Strength and Light Weight, cutting your Freight Cost Drastically, 

• Added Security for your LNA and Down Converter. 

• Low Cost with Dealer Oriented Pricing - Call or Write* 

• Suggested Retail Price $1595.00. 

The Bottom Line, We'll Pay the Freight on all One Lot Price Orders in the Continental USA. 
Free Freight Subject to Change. 



HASTINGS ANTENNA CO.-INC. 

(402) 463-3598 
Hastings, Nebr, 68901 



1^ ta 



60 73 Magazine * March, 1982 



Enjoy Satellite TV Now 







Better than Cable TV— Over 200 TV and radio 
services Why waste money' Learn the whole 
story and tDuiid a video system the family can 
enjoy No commercials FREE movies sports 
and Vegas shows— worldwide cryslaf clear 
reception connecis (o any TV set Btg (8x11 \n ] 
book loaded with details photos, plans kits — 
TELLS EVeRVTHING! Saristactioa Gyarameed, 

Send S7.95 TODAY" Add S2 00 iQr Kl cla^a rair mailj Of call 
our 2^ hour COD rush order line |3I)5J 862-5068. 

GLOBAL ELECTRONICS. 

P.O. Box 219-H, Maitiand, Florida 32751 



1.1 Iff ITf A SA TELLirm 



SATELLITE TVRO 

RECEIVER COOKBOOK 

* Butld a good. soJid undersiandtng 
of satellite receiver technology 

' St«f) bv ^ep guide of each stage 
■ Complete theory- schematics, and 
consifMCtJon details 

TVRO RECEIVER KfT 

* Pre assemWed. tested RF section. 

* No complex alignment or special 
lest gear raqutred. 

* Ultra- low cost/high performance. 

* Designed from cookbook circurts^ 



«9.95 
$159.9& 



w w ^ w 



* » V «< 1^ t «- 



Cookbook 

Cookbook plus Kit 



S^rvd to: 

NORTH COAST MICROWAVE 

PO Bom 5663. Cteve , Ohio 44101 



^ 107 



$399 



COMPLETE 
RECtlViNC 
SVSTEH 
• OiMH MMrmMMM 

•'.■"■ * 
Ji$T ritUSIIfff: i^ I 11 

noi itvtf ) viiitft of IP- 

fltt4 l^ifflnpttloi Qi • 
Utttus * Rtciltin * Lov 
W^/m Uipllflitt * soirtfi 

• Sinlcn * iqilpatit • 
■■iifactims • IkI ■on. 




OtMM tvBO 

0Oit »oom Off ^otrcft 



Ouf Dook takK ir)€ miiste/1' out &f me sopr^KticatBd tedinotog? 
of yteiiite transmFsgon and mm^on Ti>ts vDiumefeiMiesefm 3ll 
tti€ fss&ndal icfmwiec^f ni#t nsv t« ii^tmaid and uritt snow 
^u how east n is to tMW i 90 cnan nei reception 9t%im\ so tfiat 
fou can enjoY ^rsr run moi^K. Wmn films, las Vegas Enter 
tamment )m sports, and mucn more EveiWing Deing telecast 
In the wohd coutd bf vours at a twht of a kfiob' 



P.O. Box 2561, D«p|. A'3. Oplrpy BfidCh. FL 33444 

Send $9.95 pKus S2.50 shipping & handling 
or call our 2^ hr G.O.D. order line (305) B45-4447 

Name 

Addfe^S 



r? 



MICROWAVE ANTENNAS 

PARAQOLIC *NTEIHNAS FOR S^Tfi '^fC£P 

TION. POi»T TO PO>NT, Oft UK:nOi^Av£ A.T.¥. 
WORK 

II FOOT OtSH trtm (Tipod moiMil 

for toed (Xrirrt 
^0LJhAHQ1|MT kx uTioiTi t v 
JJOTOWZED POUM JJO^If T 

gifvjiTtoimomn' 



N 



taacijo 

St2i<MKI 



tFOOTCHSH 
FlXiDTOWE«(POUNT 

TowEn TOP Az-eL mquiit 


llfiO.OO 
i420JXI 


*_FOOT DISH uses »Am« moLinti 

&5 6 r Dot dish 
1 HI POD MOUNT iOK roolliHl 


1170.00 


54 INCH DiSli rT>o>ijnriTDcamD^« ttipHjd 


teo.DC 



ALL REFLECTORS MADE OF MtJM rMPREG 

MATED FiaERGLASS, ALL HARDWARE TREATED 

POFI CORROSION RESISTANCE. 

FEEDPOINT FOR MOST FREQUENCIES AVAlt- 

ABLE ON REQUEST 

SHIPPING BV UPS OR MOTOR FREIGHT ALLOV^ 6 

WEEKS FOR DELfVERy 

CALL FOFL M OR E I N FO [206} 92240% 1 . B #m I o 9 pm 

mountaJn Tirrie. 

PfllCE SUBJECT TO CHANGE DUE TO MATERIAL 

COSTS 



V 



NORDLUND & ASSOCIATES / 



790 MEND I PLACE, KUNA IQAHO ft3A34 ^ 337 
JOHN F. MOflDlUND KATHAF *^ . 



PRESENTS 

SCEPTOR^S MODEL 300 
Sateliite receiver with downconverter 

and new 
SAT TRAC meter circuit 
*FuMy tunable *Tune— scan 
'Inverted video *Tunable audio 
•power supplies 'Remote controJ 




Complete Systems AvaHablel 
DBALERS and DiSTRtBUTORS 

on Q^.AOi^ NEEDED! 

P.O. BOJC 425 ^111 

808 1st Avenue 

Rock Rapids, lowa51246 (712)472-2213 



Satellite TV 



FOR THE HOME 
Sick of Network TV? 

Our r«c0(ver leis you 9«t 
over 75 channels of leie- 
viSfon directly from earth- 
orbiting ctdie TV satfif- 
Utea' HBO. ShowtifTw. su- 
per stations sports ami 
rr^ovi^s worldwide 



We don't just 
sell inlorination! 
We Manulacture 
Hardware! 




From offshore oil r^gs, 
data links to hotets 
arvd backyard mstai- 
Sations. wo wrote the 
booh Constantly up- 
dated, our 44 Pag* 
rectinical information book and catalog gives you all 
\ the facts IneKpensive dishes, f€reds, teiern- 

■\' etry software, kits and more Recom- 

mended reading by NASA, The Office 
of Consumer Affairs and quality com- 
pames HHe Rock weil/Coi li ns Send 
$7 95 today] ^^^^ ^^309 

24-hrt. C.O.D. Houtn* 

* SPACECOAST 

RESEARCH CORPORATION 
P O Box 442'D. Altamonle SpgS, FL 32701 




SOCIAL EVENTS 



PHILADELPHIA PA 
MAR 7 

The Penn Wirefess Associa- 
tion, Inc., will hold Its Tradefest 
'82 on Sunday, March 7, 1982, at 
the National Guard Armory, 
Southampton Road and Roose- 
veit Boulevard {Rte 1). 2 miles 
south of exit 28 on the Penn- 
sylvania Turnpike, Philadelphia 
PA. General admission Is $3.00 
and a 6'x8' seller's space is 
$5.00 (bfing table) with an addi- 
tionat $3.00 for a power connec- 
tion (limited number). There will 
be prizes, displays, refresh- 

^See Lmt 0i Aifv^f users on pege i^ 



ments, rest areas, and surprfs- 
es, TaINn on 146.1 15A715 and 
.52. For additional information, 

contact Mark J. Pierson KB3NE, 
PO Box 734, Langhorne PA 
19047. 

EAST HARTFORD CT 
MAR 11 

The Hartford County Amateur 
Radio Association will hold its 
annual auction of used equip- 
ment on March 11, 1982, atj;3fl 
pm at t he Veterans Memorial, 
Sunset Ridge Road, East Hart- 
ford CT. Refreshments will be 
served. 



MERRIMACK NH 
MAR 13 

The Interstate Repeater 
Socrety, Inc.. will hold its annual 
hamfest and flea tnarket on Sal- 
urday, March 13, 1982. from 9:00 
am until 4:00 pm at the Merri- 
mack Hilton Hotel, Merrimack 
NH. Admission is $1.00 and ta- 
bles are $10.00. Features will in- 
clude commercial vendors, priz- 
es during the day, and a dinner 
dance with live music and enter- 
tainment TalK-in on 146.25/.85 
and 146,52, For further Infor- 
mation, contact Ken Scares 
N1BAD at PO Box 94, Nashua 
NH 03061 oron.25/.85, 

MIDLAND TX 
MAR 13-U 

The Midland Amateur Radio 
Club will hold its annual 



swapfest on Saturday, March 
13. 1982, from 8:00 am until 6:00 
pm, and on Sunday. March 14, 
from 8:00 am until 3:00 pm. at 
the Midland County Exhibit 
Building east of Midland TX on 
the north side of Highway 80. 
Registration \s $5,00 in advance 
or $6.00 at the door. An addi- 
tional $3.00 will be charged for 
each table. There will be door 
priEes. Talk- in on 146,15/146.76 
and 146.01/146.61. For more in- 
formation, write the Midland 
Amateur Radio Club, Box 4401, 
Midland TX 79704, 

LAFAYETTE LA 
MAR 13-14 

The Acadiana Amateur Radio 
Association will sponsor the 

Confmued on page 104 
73 Magazine • March J982 §1 



TVRO Q & A 

advice from WBOPOP 



Ken Rae WBQFOP 
737 South Ctarkson 
Denver CO 80906 

I want to build a TVRO. 
What is the first step? 

Most people get started 
by acquiring an antenna. 
You can buy a commercial 
antenna or you can build 
your own dish. If you buy, 
plan on spending $1000 or 
more. Building your own is 
cbeapfer, but it can take 
considerable time and en- 
ergy. Plans are available 
from several sources, but 
don't expect to get a world 
of information from a $10 
brochure. It takes a lot 
of research and study since 
there is no one source for 
all the information you 
need. 

How can / get a picture for 
the lowest possible cost? 

If you are not concerned 
about the quality of the pic- 
ture, then all you Ml need is 
an antenna, a low-noise am- 
plifier (LNA), a mixer, and a 
conventional television re- 
ceiver. With just these com- 
ponents you'll be able to 
say that'' I received satellite 
TV/' Since the TV receiver 
acts 4s a slope detector, the 
video will not be clear or sta- 
ble, but this low-cost ap- 
proach will get you started. 
What about kits? 

Kits are available for 
each part of an Earth termi- 
nal, but the best way to de- 

62 73 Magazine * March, 1982 



scribe this part of the indus- 
try is "buyer beware/' Try 
to find someone who has 
successfully completed the 
kit before you take the 
plunge. 

What size dish do t need? 

The size of antenna de- 
pends on the quality of the 
LN A, the strength of the sat- 
ellite "footprint" in your lo- 
cation, and the desired sig- 
nal-to-noise ratio. You can 
get watchable video from 
an eight-foot dish, but the 
10-foot dish seems to be the 
industry standard for home 
TVROs, 

Why are lO-foot antennas so 
popular? 

A lOToot dish is usually 
the minimum size that is 
practical for receiving good 
quality pictures in most lo- 
cations in the US. You can 
use a smaller antenna, but 
the need for a better quality 
UNA may boost the overall 
cost higher than what you 
would spend for a lO-foot 
system. 

What is the smallest dish I 
could use? 

If you are willing to settle 
for audio only, a four-foot 
diameter antenna suppos- 
edly works. A six-foot an- 
tenna might give you a faint 
video image if everything 
else is perfect. 

How much should a 10-foot 
dish weigh? 



At one extreme there is 
an umbrella-type antenna 
that weighs only 22 pounds. 
On the other end of the 
scale there are heavy-duty 
antennas that weigh half a 
ton or more. The average 
weight of a fiberglass or 
spun-aluminum dish is in 
the neighborhood of 200 
pounds. 



Should I get a spherical or 
parabolic antenna? 

The parabolic is my 
choice because it's versa- 
tile. You can sweep the an- 
tenna across the sky, mak- 
ing it easy to change to a new 
satellite. The spherical is a 
good antenna from a con- 
struction viewpoint. Unfor- 
tunately, changing satel- 
lites involves moving the 
feedhorn, which is usually 
six to eight feet above the 
ground. 

Sonieone told me that I 
should build a spherical 
dish because ii exhibits 
more gain than a parabolic 
antenna. Is this true? 

The gain of spherical an- 
tennas is indeed greater be- 
cause the dish has a flatter 
surface. However, the flat 
curvature means that the 
spherical will pick up more 
unwanted noise. The para- 
bolic has slightly less gain 
but more noise immunity. 
You must consider both 
noise and gain character- 



istics when choosing an 
antenna. 

How can / tell if a dish is a 
parabolic or spherical? 

A parabolic dish will tend 
to look flatter as your eye 
moves toward the edge. 
The spherical antenna has a 
constant curve, rounded all 
the way to the rim. 

/ found a surplus dish. How 
can I tell if it is too deep or 
too fiat? 

You want to check the fo- 
cal-distance- to-diameter ra- 
tio, F/D. You can find the 
focal point by using the 
equation DX D/n6X HL 
where D is the diameter and 
H is the depth. The F/D 
should be between 0.35 and 
0.55 with 0.4 being about 
best. Ratios out of this 
range will not have the op- 
timum noise versus gain 
characteristics. 

/ have found a dish but 
it has some dents and 
holes. Will that affect the 
performance? 

A 10-foot dish has ap- 
proximately 78 square feet 
of reflective surface area, 
.so a few imperfections 
won't cause a problem. You 
probably can afford to lose 
as much as 5% of the sur- 
face area. 

fiow smooth does the sur- 
face of the dish have to be? 
The accuracy of the an- 
tenna should be plus or 



minus a siitteenth of an 
inch of the parabolic curve 
if you expect a reasonable 
level of gain. 

/ am trying to choose be- 
tween buying a 10- foot dish 
made for TVRO work and a 
surplus 16-foot antenna. 
The price is about the same; 
wouldn^t the 16- footer be a 
better deal? 

It depends upon their 
quality. Often a surplus 
dish that was not designed 
for use with 4-GHz signals 
will be inferior to a smaller, 
better constructed antenna. 
Check the surface accuracy 
of both antennas. Anything 
more than an average inac- 
curacy of an eighth of an 
inch means that gain will be 
adversely affected. If the 
big dish meets the require- 
ments for 4-CHz operation, 
then by all means grab it 
How important tS the stfuc- 
tural strength of a antenna? 

A dish that can stand on 
its own rim and still hold 
the parabolic shape within 
an eighth of an inch is not 
likely to be harmed by 
weather. Anything weaker 
is questionable, 

The area I live in has a lot of 
wind. What can I do to 
avoid losing my antenna? 

To avoid having an air- 
borne dish, 1 fastened a 
cable around the rim and 
attached it to a deadman 
anchor, 

Screen antennas seem easy 
to build. How large can the 
holes in the mesh be? 

A quarter-inch hole is 
about the largest gap you 
can have without dm appre- 
ciable amount of the signal 
feeding through. An eighth 
of an inch is a good choice. 
Window screen can be 
used, but it does have a lot 
of wind resistance. 

Is it necessary to solder 
every joint in a screen 
reflector? 

If the sections of mesh or 
screen overlap each other 
by at least one wavelength 
[approximately three inch- 
es^the seams will not cause 
a dead spot. If there is not 
enough overlap, there 

i^See List of Advertisers on page 130 



shoufd be some sort of elec- 
trical bonding. 
What do trees and shrubs do 
to the satellite TV signal? 

Foliage acts as a sponge 
that absorbs microwave sig- 
nals, and it generates noise 
that will be picked up by 
the antenna. Trees and 
shrubs have a destructive 
effect and should be avoid- 
ed when you choose a site 
for the antenna. 

What effect do rain and 
snow have? 

Precipitation doesn't 
seem to have much effect 
on a 4'CHz signal — perhaps 
half of a dB at most. If the 
moisture gets inside of the 
electronics, there can be 
significant attenuation. 
Powdered snow can pile up 
in a dish without causing a 
problem. But if the snow 
melts and ref reezes, the sur- 
face of the dish can be dis- 
torted, causing the signal 
strength to drop. You 
should keep your antenna 
clear of ice and snow. 

My neighbors complain 
about the appearance of my 
TVRO antenna. Can I cover 
the dish without adversely 
affecting the signal? 

A thin covering of plastic 
or fiberglass can be used 
without too much signal at- 
tenuation. Avoid a covering 
made from wood or other 
material that contains 

moisture. 

Will my dish work inside a 

barn or garage? 

Yes, you can keep the an- 
tenna inside. Of course, the 
building will attenuate the 
signal. The exact amount of 
the loss depends on the 
type of building; it can be 
anywhere from two to six 
dB of attenuation. 
/ bought a used metal dish 
and want to paint it. Any 
suggestions? 

Aluminum antennas can 
be painted with a good 
grade of latex house paint 
intended for house siding. 
Be sure to use a light color. 
Painting the dish black will 
result in the antenna ab- 
sorbing heat, stressing the 
dish and changing the 




/ used readily-available materials to build this simple, yet ef- 
fective, mount for my satellite TV antenna. 



shape. The texture of the 
surface should be dull and 
flat, not shiny, since we 
want the light to be dif- 
fused instead of reflected 
towards the LNA. Follow 
the same guidelines for 
painting a wooden or fiber- 
glass antenna. 
How far above ground 



should I mount my dish? 

The rule of thumb for 
dish installation suggests 
that the lowest edge of the 
dish should be located two 
or three feet above the 
ground. Setting the antenna 
directly on the earth will in- 
crease the amount of noise 
that enters the system. ■ 





TELEVISION 

SYSTEM 

WE WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD!! 

Complete Systems, Antennas, 
Receivers, LNA's & Accessories 
CALL US TODAY! -320 

812-238-1456 



hoosier 
electronics 



"Nation's Largest Total Communications Distributor 
RO. BOX 3300 • TERRE HAUTE, INDIANA 47803 



73 Magazine * March J 982 63 



Mfss K. Rama 
Post BoK 725 
MadrBS-600 006 
fndia 



Indian Hams Rejoice 

import restrictions lifted 



Indian hams have 
achieved a breakthrough 
in their efforts to solve their 
problems of lack of equip- 
ment. The manufacture of 
communications equip- 
ment in India is the monop- 
oly of the public sector 
(government-owned in- 
dustries), which is itself lag- 
ging so much in production 
that it is unable to fuDy 
meet even the needs of the 
governmental users. 

For several years, the Fed- 
eration of Amateur Radio 
Societies of India had been 
making representations to 
the government requesting 
relaxation of import con- 
trols without much success. 
The improvement in the for- 
eign exchange position 
enabled the government to 
make concessions to cer- 
tain users — among them 
scientists and profession- 
als—who were allowed to 
import equipment valued 
at up to 10,000 rupees 
(about $1200 US) for their 
personal use. M.V. Chauhan 

64 73 Magazine • March, 1962 



VU2MV, Hon. General Sec- 
retary of the Federation, 
saw an analogy between 
the scientists and the hams. 
He convinced the Elec- 
tronics Commission that 
the extension of similar 
privileges to amateurs was 
the only solution to the 
equipment problem. 

Disaster can sometimes 
have a beneficial fallout. 
The communications link 
set up at Morvi by our hams 
(led by Saad Ali VU2ST, 
president of the Federation, 
)immy Mistry VU2I], and 
Vasant Bhat VU2RX) after a 
bursting dam had killed an 
estimated 30;000 in the 
span of a few hours cleared 
any lurking doubts in the 
mind of the governnfient 
about the utiiity of ham 
radio to the nation. 

Relentless representa- 
tions to the various minis- 
tries by the Hon. General 
Secretary Chauhan and 
President Saad Ali finally 
resulted in the inclusion of 



radio amateurs in the cate- 
gory of scientists, and they 
were allowed the privilege 
of importing, under Open 
General License, testequip- 
ment worth up to 10,000 
rupees in a year. There were 
more representations, and 
the momentous decision 
was announced which per- 
mitted the import of ''ama- 
teur radio communications 
equipment, including kits, 
accessories (including an- 
tenna rotator motors, feed- 
lines, standing wave ratio 
bridge), instruments, spares, 
and components'' up to 
10,000 rupees in a year, 
without the need for a for- 
mal license. 

The Federation of Ama- 
teur Radio Societies of India 
is today a tower of strength 
to the Amateur Radio Ser- 
vice in India. Its QSL 
bureau handles the bulk of 
incoming and outgoing 
cards. Radio, the monthly 
journal of the Federation, 
edited by M.V. Chauhan 
VU2MV, is read by virtually 



every ham and SWL. The 
ARRL Handbook and other 
books have been import- 
ed and sold at a low price. 
A guide to amateur radio 
in India by Saad Ali has 
been published. The Feder- 
ation'3 efforts have led to 
a breakthrough in making 
equipment available to In^ 
dian hams. 

The Federation is not rest- 
ing on its laurels. M.V. 
Chauhan is continuing his 
efforts to have the 
manufacture of ham equip- 
ment thrown open to 
private industry, so that 
equipment can be made 
available to the less af- 
fluent ham for prices ex- 
pressed in hundreds of 
rupees rather than in 
thousands, which is the 
case with imported equip- 
ment. He believes another 
breakthrough is on the way, 
which will help amateur 
radio in India to become 
the hobby of the common 
man and not a monopoly of 
the affluent. ■ 



STAND ALOHE VIDEO BOARD SCT-100 



AiM-200 

UNIVEflSAL CONV£fiTER 
ASCII - BAUDOT - MORSE 



AMATEUR RADID TEUTYPI APPUCATIDNS 

Her BUf ipp[it;a1#[is. ids SCTIOO {lerjirili t-hc radJQ aniJteEir la gel "DJf-llie^tr" jl 
mifiijmim emt. Us BD mi. flAUDQT iTi1erfei:e i:tnnKls direclty Co mesi FSK l^rminil 
unJlB. a [id wtuin not in use, ii ntav tie jwiich^ la ASt^U rnCHfa lor ju willt a haine 
Gomii^ier. lit BJIUtl0T mode 1)ie SCT-IQD i^ixmi stmI rran^mhs a ^ liil ctdt 
comp^tliile Willi niHlfl M if sImMsr TBletypes (TM]. 

CO HIP Ul En TEAM IN AL APPLICATIONS 

The S€I-I1B Has Deiui iionfijiiireci inf irfkfld IIS8 i^llh ary mini er miErO'DorijivtBr 
tyEtem IfaudFiig i i-erial nSE^II InlerlJiBe. Hhjs inclint-aa st^ftd siane Dfiention wiEh enl'y 
an BMltrnsI IZ.B VAC IranstDfiiKr. or dlT^ci inscntun inta any SIDD tainiiaiilitfi tarH' 
cane. 



* TTV s(ieB4 MFivertflr 

> In1f!rl3ns!; BAIIDQT Tetelvufi* 1ci ASGH canpu^r 

* IntBfSSnes ASCII [Jimmh la BAUDOT 1df RTTT 

* Ijonverls be1w«en TTY and Mofsa 
■ Mi^f^B Ciidi: Trainir 



XITPM 



.-•^■t* 



#**.;■*» 



•«;'s 



SCT 100 VIMO SOMD J^ESEM/TEST 

SCT-tDDVtDfOSOARDKIT 

SKMtW K£YS{IARQ TFAMINAL AS$I£M/TEST 

SKT 100 KEYB0AHO TERMINAl m 



1 89.00 
4W.DG 
aMOO 



OTHCB ItllEK f (to DUCTS: 

UtlT-UflUnlvenaEiJiti 

Traiucflivrr 



1^108 



$23900 



- XITEK 

p. O. B&x 2952 

Oarland, Ten as 75041 

1214} 34d'2490 




VlsCbm Power Aitipifl0l|f 



Dri¥e 
Levef 



1 50-200 mw 



Output 
Power 



25W 



1.5W 



30-25W 



1.5W 



t.5W 



2W'5W 



2W-5W 



2W-SW 



low 



2SW 



25W 



Model 
Nyml>er 



2C025-200 mW 



2C025-2W 



45-50W 



80-90W 



>30W 



>50W 



>100W 



100W 



100W 



100W 



2C05D-2W 



2C100-2/25 



2C025-2W 



2C05D-2W 



2C100-2/25 



2C1 00-1 0/25 



2C100-2/25 



aC1 00- 10/25 










^"h^l^ ^ ;'fea|ter^^. aa^f " ' irlbde^tq, 25W ;fm>-, 
blteieif SsW ^ i^u caa u^ thM tO: dr 1^0 a 

tt^mh smpm X^H-out power; (s^fechefrt). 
Eaqb ji|pd0l: has b franf ,p^net-swit€*i tq let 
^yfeiO go "barefc>Ot-' tor^Q^^ 
;i.E.D: indicator to ^h^w the mo<ie ^ii're^ 
k\; Fuff 10 MHz bari^Wic^th gives you vir- 
tuaily unchangetf power across the entire 
2-nneter band. Htgti efficiertcy design hioSs, 
down generated heal low mput VSWR 
saves battery dram by yqur radio's final 
amp; Use thp^harj ;to- see vi high VoCoril 
Power Amplffter give^ you trie powef^vOiii 
you'd likefrdm the power that you now have. 

Power Poetef '^ Mobile AmiilffieryCh&rip^ 

-r~ Simply ply g[ in your Jcom !C-2A(T} a^i^ 
you have a 25W Synthesized mobile rig — 
take it put Bgafln; all cb^i^ged artd re^dy, 
when you want hahd-heid op^ratton. Ac- 
cepts any fC-2A version. De live r$ 253^ RF^ 
oytput, 2y2W audio wjth 4" speaker to 
overcome road noise Charge pocHet 
accepts all Icom battery packs, has inde- 
pendent charging switGh, indicator, UiC 
preamp makes Pqw^r Pocket compatibte; 
with any mobile microphone and. yyljh 
foom speaker/mic. , : ^ ^ T ; ,, 

5/ftHT Gatn Antenna boosts reception while , 
giving your hand-hetd full quieting out of j 
spots yop're nearly dead in with a rubber 
duck: provides excellent improvement. Onl^y 
8" telescoped. 47" extended. Better ftifi^ 
1.5:1 ySWR: BNC connector. ^ . "" I 

Sprfng-ioad&d 1(4 w^\^B ^nt^ftm ahd 4" 
stutjtiy duck also ^vaifBble. Sea your favoriw 
amateur radio dorter. 




PRODUCTS CORPpRATIQN 

^ Eaj&t Raiatihe Road 
PmspecX l^elghts, 1L§CK)?0 :^^ 

(il2) 45^h^56 " 



9(7 



-.^y. 



ipom ^ind 10~2A dik trademarks o| scorrt-An^icrtc* Ittc 



m 



■/. 






Hl-Q BALUN 




O^. 



HI 



-0 



For dipoles, yagis. inverted 
vees & doublets 
Replaces cenier msutalor 

'Puis power m antenna 

■Broadbanded :j-40 MHz 

■Small. Itgniweight and 
weathecproot 

'1 1 Irnpedance falio t- ■;<•.: . 

■ For full legaf power and rnore < \ - ..,, 
Helps eliminate TVi j-.- 

■ With SO 239 connectof ^^; .■ 

$10.95 *' 'inmg^ 

Hl-Q ANTENNA 
CENTER INSULATOR 

Small, rugged. Iightweigtii. 
weatherproof 

Replaces center insuiaior 

Handles lulE (egal powej 
dind moie 

$5.95 ^'^^"^ SO 239 connector 

HI*Q ANTENNA 
END INSULATORS 

Rjgged, lightweight injec- 
tion molded of top quality 
matefial, with high djelec- 

trie quail ties and excellent 
weatherabjiity. End insula- 
tors are constmcted ip a 
spkal unending fashion to 
pemiit winding of loading 
coils or partial winding for 
tuned traps, 
May bfj uS6d lor 
pCuy wtre- strain insuiaJors 
^End or cenler insula I ors ior 
aniennas 

• Cons! ruction o( antenna ioad".' 
mg coilg. or mLiiiiDarid Uaps 





S4.95 




MODEL 


BANDS LENGTH 


PRICE WETM 


WITH Hl-Q 

CENTER 

INSULATOR 


D-80 


90.75 


130 


$28.95 


$24.95 


0-40 


40,15 


m 


25.95 


21.95 


D20 


20 


33 


24.95 


20.95 


D-15 


15 


^? 


53.95 


19.95 


D10 


10 


16 


22.95 


18 95 


Shd'Tttntd dlpoltt 








SD-ao 


807S 


90 


3195 


27.95 


SD40 


40 


45 


26.95 


24.96 


pirfiM dipd 


«i 








PD-eoio 


80,40,20,10, 15 


130 


39,B5 


35.95 


PD'4010 


40,20JO;15 


66 


33.95 


29.95 


PD8040 


80,40,15 


130 


35.95 


31.95 


PD4020 


40,20,15 


66 


29.96 


25.96 


Dt|i4lt fhiinentrs - oniif, aame as included m SD modela 


580 


B075 






S11.95pr 


S^40 


40 






510.95 pr 



A 1 1 antennas are complete with a Hl-Q Baiun or HhQ 
Antenna Center insulator, No. 14 ar^tenna wire, cor^ 
amic insulators, 100 nyJon antenna support rope (SD 
models only 50) rated for full legaJ power. Antennas 
may be used as an inverted V and may aliso be used 
by MARSorSWLs. 

Anienna acces&oiies — available with antenna ortfers 
Nylon guy rope 450# test 1 00 leet S3.4Q 

Ceramic JDogbone Type) antenna insulators .70 pr 
SO'239 coax connectors ,55 

All prices are postpaid USA 46 
Available at your favorite dealer or order direct from 



^Fa^a Dealer Inquiries Invited 

Gorden 
Engineering 

BOX 21305 B, SOUTH EUCLID, OHIO 44121 



*^Se«- List of Advertisers on page 130 



73 Magazine • MarchJ982 65 




^4ia 



WE*RE ROLIN 
IN CRYSTALS! 

2 Meter Crystals — $3.95 each 
(10 or More — S3. 50 each) 

Quick Deliveiy 



We Stock Crystals For; 

Clegg Drake (com 

Kenwood Midland Regency 

Standard Wlbon Yaesu 

Lafayette Tempo VHF Eng 



Rolin Distributors 

P.O- Box 436 Department 7 
Dunelten, N,J.088l2 

201-469-1219 



(Custom Ci^sLai Orders Accepted,) Precision Cut Land MobHes AvailabLe 



QRZ Wr«, W2's and W3*8... 

LOOKING FOR AEA PRODUCTS 
THE NORTHEAST? 



LOOK TO RADIOS UNLIMITED... 
NEW JERSEY'S FASTEST GROWING 



HAM STORE! 

Get youf hands on AEA's great Keyers 
and Isopoie antennas at Radios Unlimited. 
You can leach ys easily via the Jersey 
Turnptke. and when yoti gel here you can 
TRY BEFORE YOU BUY at our m store 
operalrng position Yes? P*ck out any AEA 
keyer. (or any other equiprnerrl from our 




MM'1 MorseMatic^'^ memory Heyer wMh 
I wo micorcomputefs and 37 tan I asllc tea- 
lures including up to 2000 characters of 
memory pfus virtually every capability of all 
the other keyers & 1 rainers listed below . , . 

ca a tor s uper- io w pride ■ 



huge stock ot ham gear |, and try before 
you buy! We don't mearia litlleo(*-Jheair 
dtddiling wt!h the keyer we tel you PUT 
IT ON THE AIR AND HAVE A QSO really 
check it out under YOUR Kind o' operating 
conditions ihen decide. We know AEA, 
arid we know you'll select one ot these: 



CK-1 Contest Keyer with 500 character 
memory, soft message partilfonlng. auto 
matic senal number, andrnuch, much more, 

cafi for sup&t low price ^ 

IWK-I Morse Keyer with selectable dot & 
dash memory full weighting, calibrated 

speed, bug mode and more, , 

vati for super 'to^prfce^ 

KT'1 Keyer Trainer with all the features ot 
the MK-1 above and 1 he IVITI below 

c^il for ^up^r- low prtce ' 
MT»1 Morse Trainer for pulling up that code 
speed the easy way with automat fc speed 
increase, five fetter or random word length 
and more, more, more . .,,.,,,,...,.. 

caii for super-low prtcef 



i^V 



%%S '■'HE EXCITING ISOPOLES THAT ARE 
V BOOMING OUT THOSE INCREDIBLE 



■ ^ VHF SIGNALS WITH MAXIMUM GAIN 
ATTAINABLE, ZERO 



DEGREE RADIATION 
ANGLE AND 1.4:1 
SWR ACROSS THE 
ENTIRE BAND! ^^ 



Isopofe T44 
tsopole 220 
tsC^le 144 juntor 
tsopote 220 junior 



C&H for 

super tow 

price* 



Fmd ihem all at Radios Ur^hmiied. plus a hu^ collection of nt m all 

maior manufacturers a big selection of used equipment bargains, atl you It ever 
need in books, accessories, oficrating aids, coa^, connectors ar^d parts plus a 
modem sen/ice department dedicated to keeping you on the air. It's like a perpetual 
flea markets For di reel (ons, cat I 
t20lt469-4&99. 



^lOS 




FIND AEA 

AT 



1760 EASTON AVENUE, SOMERSET, NJ 08873 • (201)469-4599 



QUALITY parts at 
DISCOUNT PRICES! 



FULLY AUTOMATIC RECORD CHANGER 






/ 



BILL SIZE aW*iER 

e.s.R. Kipet ciqa 

CERWK CMTRIDGr 

CLE/PflySE LEVtft 
AIX.1- TftACKlNG FOftCt 



RtCOCa OWNGER DOES NOfT r^CUUDE fiASE 0« A,C. 

S15.00 EACH 4 fof $9000 



OOftp.. 



4PDT RELAY 

$1.70 EACH 

• P,»- - .. - r-^ mix *T ifit **: ■ 



MINI 
BUZZERS 

i)^to 3 v«iii 7Stea 

WITH Wl^E L£AO^ 

llj^ lo 3 «Hti 754 «3 
WITH fit* lFIV41Nl>^S 



^ 3 to 7 vC»lt> 
WITH P\H TEV^imLS 

75c each 



JOYSTICK 

-" = ""■ ^SION 
Dt-vlCE.. t. 

&« COfTES 
PCTT5-.,.„ 

$4.75««cli 



RFl/EMI RLTER 

F",*i 'Wi.Tk 5E 
Stf1»«SStOl 

hated; 5 l**»i 
750 VAT 

S3. 50 each 



SPECIAL 



MITSUMI 

MOOEl UIS-AS5f 
IVARACTCR UHF TUMER 

S25.00e3Ct\ 
10 for S 2 20.00 



10O0 MFD 35 VOLT 
2 FOR St 00 



FLAT LEVER 
MINI'TOGaLE 

SJ>Dt IDN-OM) 

ft do £ACII 

10 for saso 
loe tor trs.Qo 



^, SEND FOR NEW 1982 
'^*o.' 40 PAGE CATALOG f»® 



COMPUTER 

GRADE 
CAPACITOR 

1700 mid. 150 VDC S20C 

3 l/:i'' D]A •^ k i/k*' HIGH 

3,600 mid. fOBi^ 

40VDC $1-00 

1 J/J4" UJA. K 5^' Ml 

6.400 mfd. ' 

60VDC $2.50 

(2.000 mfd. 40 VDC l54Qfi 

2" OIA X h l/<«" HIGH 

118,000 mfd. 75 VDC S4.00 

I 7 1/2" niA X U uafnTTTTH' 
20,000 mfd. 25 VDC 



h|Ji.. X 21 



H[ CMS 2. 00 



22.000 mtd.lSVDC 

2 t/£*N!r,H $2.00 



|£" UIA 



22,000 mtd.40VDC 
2" DIA. X 5^' HIGH £3 00 



15.000 mfd.75 VDC S450 



L.E.D.s 

STAHOARD JUMBO 
DIFFUSED 

HEO EQ FOR SL 50 (' 

Gn£EN 10 ¥m i7.m 
ye L LOW 19 rm ^7.m 

FLASHER LED y^ 
S VOLT OPtBATlON 
JUMBO SPZf 

■J \t.M ^1.7iJ 

bl POLAR LED 

.' FOP ;■[ , ^11 

SUB MINI LED 

<V— 

20 mA It 17Sv 

}i] fOH SI.OD 

UVJANTITY FRJCE*^ AVAJLAl^LLl 



45, 000 mfd. 25 VDC 

r D1A. J< ii" HIGH $3 50 
72.000 mfij IS VDC 

"' M (/i. ■' ii-' Mi.,-^ ^ -5Q 

CLiWlsS to r IT C***Cirofl:5 50e«i 



SUPER SMALL 
PHOTO-FLASH 

17Qjy|fD 330 VOLT 
» H' K '^^ ' 

2 for $1.50 
10 for 57.00 



|CAIiNONxLRA-3^i: 
CONNECTOR 

T PKOf JG 

SiOO EACH 
^0 for 51<^ 00 



750 MPO 330 V 
PHOTO FLASH 

Id FOR Si 1.00 



BLACK LIGHT 

(liLTRAVtOLET} 

T — 



"* — I 



i".e. t FSTSBi $2.50tij»ehl 



* j^ primaries 



2' OIA. I't-JVDC 
BUZZER SPECIAL! 
50Ceac^ ^&, y^ 
10 tor 14J00 TTf ^/ 



2'' ALLIGATOR CLIPS 

7 ciips iof St.OO^ 

too dtp* tiff Si2jOO 
dip& for $50 00 



TRANSFORMER! 

120 vott 



& VOLTS it 150 m* 
f2 V C.T 11 SOOmA *J SO 
16 5 V at 3 AMPS $6 50 
la ^OLTS *r t AMP lA SO 
75 ^ VCT «i 2 e AMP 15^ 



TAAMSlSTOn 

S2 SO EA 



ALL CLCaROflKS CORP. 



905 S- Vermont Ave. 
PO BOK 20406 
ios Angeles. Catif . 90006 
t2l3)360-8(M)0 

Mon, ^ Fri, Saturday 
9AM'5PM lOAM 3PM 






^20 



66 73Magaime * March, 1982 




16 
MODELS 



MFJ-941C 300 Watt Versa Tuner II 

Has SWR/Wattmeter, Antenna Switch, Balun. Matches everything 1.8-30 MHz: 
random wires, verticals, mobile whips, beams, balanced lines, coax lines. 




, vees, 




Fastest selling MFJ tuner . . . t}ecause it tias 
Itie most wanted leattiies at \tte tiest pnce 

Hatches evervtiiinj] from 1.S-30MIU: dipoles. 
inverted vnt^. idndom tines, verticals. motHle 
whtps. beams, tiaianced and coax lines. 

Run up to 300 watts RF power @^tQul 

SWfl and dual raiqe wattmeter f300 & 30 
watts full scale, lorward/rel:- ' ' iKiwer) Sensi 
twe meter measures SWR to S watts 

MFJ-900 VERSA TUNER 




^ff^ 




MFJ-900 



®o©i M4 



95 

( + $4) 



Matches coax, random wires 1 8 30 MHz 
Handles up to 20Q watts output; etfick^nt air 

wound inducior gives more watts out 5>«2x6'' 
Use any transcetver, sokd state or tube. 
Operate all bands m^ one antenna. 

2 OTHER 20DW MODELS: 
MFJ-901. $54.95 | + S4^. like 900 tjul mckides 

4 1 balun lor use witt) balanced lines, 
Mf^J^ieOTO. S34.S5 ( + S4), tor random wires 

only Great fof apartment, motel, camping, opera 

tiofi, Tunes 1 30 MHz, 

MFJ-984 VERSA TUNER IV 



MFJ-984 




Up to 3 KW PEP and ft matches any feedllne. 
1.6-30 MHz. coa^t. balanced or random. 

10 amp RF ammeter assures max. power at 
mm SWR f^WH/Wattmeter. for,/ret„ 2000/200W 
IS position dyal inductor, ceramic switch 
7 pQS. an! switch 250 pf 5KV cap. 5x1 4k 14" 
30O waft dummy load. 4:1 territe balun, 
3 MORE 3 KW MODELS: MFJ 981. $20d.95 
( + S1fJ). like 984 Jess am. switch, ammeier, 
MFJ-9B2, S209.9S ( + 510). like 984 less am 
meter. SWR^Wanmeter MFJ'9eO, S1 79.55 
r + $10). like 982 less ant. switch 



Flgjiible antenna switch selects 2 C03)« lines, 
dirBc! D^ rhrough tun€f. random wtre/balanced line, 
or tuner bypass ^or fJummy loa{l 

12 position efficient airwound inductor lor 
lower losses, more «atts out 

Buni^in 4:1 balun tor bafancei^ Ime^ IDOOV 
capacitor spacing. 

Works wrtb 3N ^oiid State or tube ngs 

Easy Id use, anywhere, Mi^a'^ur^^ S»2}<6 V has 

MFJ-9498 VERSA TUNER II 

MFJ-949B 




MFJ*s best 300 watt Versa Tuner II. 

Matches everything tram 1.6 30 W[i, coax, 
randoms, balanced lines, up to 300W output. 
solid state or tubes 

Tones out SWR on dipoles, vees, long wires, 
verticals, whips, beams, qiiails. 

Built-in 4:1 balun, jQOW . 50 ohm dummy Iced 
SWR meter and 2 range wattmeter (300W & 30W). 

6 position antenna switeti on front panel. 12 
position a»r-wound ir^docior: coax cormectors, btnct- 
ing posts, bl^k and t>eige case 1 0x3x7 '. 

MFJ-989 VERSA TUNER V 




MFJ-989 



$ 



319 



95 

( + StQ| 



Hew smaller siie matches new smaller rigs — 
only 10-3/4WX4 U2Hx14 /^SD" 

3 KW PEP, 250 pf 6KV caps. Matches coax. 
balanced lines, random wires 1 8 30 MHz. 

Roller inductor, 3 digit turns counter plus spin- 
m\ knoh tor precise inductance control to gei 
that SWR down. 

Built-m 300 watt, 5D ohm dummy load. 

Built-in 4:1 ferrite balun. 

Built in lighted 27i meter reads SWR plus foi 
wardyretJected power 2 ranges (ZOO & 2000Wj 

6 position ani. switch, Al. cabinet. ?ill bail 



Ham Radio's tnosi popular 
antBnna iuner. Improved^ ioo^ 




SO 239 connectofs. Sway binding posts. Im 
ished m eqqshell while wth walnut grtifned sides 
4 Other 300W Models: MFJ940B, S79.9S 
\^%4y like 941 C less balun. MFJ-945, S79.95 
( + S41, like 94 tc less antenna swrtch MFJ-944. 
S79.t5 ( + S4|. like 945. less SWR/Wattmfitei. 
MFJ-943. $69.95 I + $4). like 944. le'^s antenna 
switch Oplior^l molHle bracket lor 941 C. 94DR^ 
945 944 $3 00. 

MFJ-962 VERSA TUNER tit 



MFJ-962 




Run yp lo 1.5 KW PEP, match any feed line 
from 1 8 30 ViHi. 

BuiiMn SWR/Wallmeter has 2000 and 200 
watt ranges, forwafd and reflected 

6 position antenna switch handles 2 toa^c lines, 
direct 01 through luner. plus wire and balanced 
lines 

4:1 balun. 250 pi 6KV cap 1? pos inductor 
Ceramic swrtcnes Bfack cabinet panef 

AKOTHER 1,5 KW MODEL: MN9&T. $179.95 
( + SIO). Similar but tess SWR/Watimeler 



To ord*r or for your n«ar«st dma\»r 

: CAU TOLL FREE ^^ 
800-647-1800 



For tech tnio,. order or repa»r staiii^, or calls 
outside continental US and inside Miss . call 
601 323 5869 

• AH MFJ products uncowiionallv guaranteed for 
nne y^^r (except as noted). 

• products ordered trom MFJ are returnable within 
30 days for full refund (less shipping). 

• Add shipping & handling charges in amounts 
shown in parentheses. 



Write for FREE catalog, over 80 products 

ENTERPRISES, 

INCORPORATED 



MFJ 



Bon 494, Mississippi Stale, MS 39782 



'See^ Ltst of Adverttsers 0/1 psge 130 



73Magaztne • fw^arch. 1982 67 



Harry A. Schooh KA3B/DA2AL 

PSC Box 2713 

APO New York 09109 



Licensing for 
Americans Overseas 

classes help, but our government doesn't 



In an earlier issue of 73 
Magazine, Wayne Green 
mentioned that he would 
like to hear what the ama- 
teur radio community was 
doing to get more people 
into the classrooms and on 
the air. At first, I thought of 
sending a letter to 73 Maga- 
zine describing our current 
situation here in West Ger- 
many involving military 
personnel in regard to li- 
censing classes. After pon- 
dering the idea for a few 
days, 1 decided that an arti- 
cle would be more appro- 
priate. 

The no t-yet- licensed 
American civilian or mili- 
tary person abroad will, in 
many cases, encounter 
some problems that are 
unique, to say the least But 
being a ham in the military 
has many advantages, such 
as the opportunity to oper- 
ate from various countries 
of the world with reciprocal 
licensing. Unfortunately, 
getting that US license once 
an individual has been sent 
to a far corner of the world 
IS sometimes difficult. But 
for those who are interested 
in obtaining their ticket, 
there is hope. Thanks to a 

ea 73 Magazine • March, 1982 



crop of dedicated and hard- 
working hams scattered 
throughout worldwide mili- 
tary installations, amateur 
radio licensing classes are a 
reality, 

Before I tell you about 
amateur radio classes and 
the people who teach them, 
let's take a look at why 
these individuals who aren't 
licensed desire their ticket. 
Actually, their reasons are 
no different than anyone 
else's. Basically speaking, 
they have a genuine interest 
in amateur radio. However, 
there are some underlying 
reasons which motivate 
these prospective hams. 

First of all, it is a fact that 
a large number of newly li- 
censed hams in the United 
States were once active on 
11 meters. West Germany, 
like other countries in West- 
ern Europe, has a personal 
communications band on 
27 MHz, Quite a few Ameri- 
cans come to Germany with 
their CB gear only to dis- 
cover, to their dismay, that 
it's just as bad or even 
worse than back home. 
There are fewer channels, 
lower allowable output 



powers, monthly licensing 
fees, and severe overcrowd- 
ing on the airwaves. Also, 
there is a language barrier 
because many 11-meter 
operators speak little or no 
English. It is a very disheart- 
ening situation, to say the 
least. Therefore, they have 
three options available. 
One, pack up the radio in its 
box and place it in the 
closet; two, stick it out on 
the band; or three, get an 
amateur license and talk to 
the world. I don't have to 
tell you that many choose 
option number three. 

Secondly, many military 
members are met with the 
misfortune of having to 
serve at remote installa- 
tions in places that you and 
I never thought existed. 
However, someone has to 
do it. In this case, amateur 
radio is a tremendous boost 
for one's morale. 

And finally, there are 
those individuals who want 
the license only to talk with 
the family back home. 1 
have run across several 
people whose parents were 
licensed but never did force 
the radio or electronics on 



them when they were grow- 
ing up. Now they have the 
motivation and time they 
need to get that ticket. 
Besides saving on phone 
bills, writing letters, and 
waiting in line at the local 
MARS station, getting the li- 
cense would please the 
heck out of Mom and Dad. 

Although the reasons I 
have stated for military per- 
sonnel and their families 
wanting an amateur license 
are generalizations, they 
are real. They are the sparks 
that ignite the fire. . .moti- 
vation is the key. 

Once an individual has 
decided that he would like 
to pursue amateur radio as 
a hobby, his next step is to 
locate a licensed ham in the 
area for more information. 
Most larger military instal- 
lations have active amateur 
radio clubs, but this is not 
always the case. Therefore, 
a check with the local 
MARS station is a good 
idea. If there isn't someone 
working there who is li- 
censed, they will usually 
refer you to someone who 
is. What happens next? 
Well, if the military installa- 



r 1 

ICOPVRTTY, ASCII! 

\ and Morse 
■ from the palm 

of your hand. 



ULRE '■■ ^ 




Have vou waited to get into 
code reading until you found 
out what this latest fad was 
about? You can stop waiting, 
because its no longer a fad. 

Amateurs everywhere 
are tossing the gigantic 
clanking monsters of yester- 
year that once performed 
the job of reading 
radioteletvpe, They are trad- 
ing them in for state-of-the- 
art code-reading devices 
that are incredibiy smail, 
noiseiess if desired and in- 
finiteiy more versatile than 
their antique predecessors. 

Kantronlcs, the leader in 
code-reading development, 
has just introduced the latest 
and most-advanced break- 
through in the copying of 
Morse code, radioteletype 
and ASCII computer langu- 
age. 

The Karrtronlcs Mittr- 
Reader reads all three types 
of code, dispiays code speed, 
keeps a 24-hour clock, acts as 
a radioteJetype demodulator 
and reads all of its decoded 
information out on a travel- 
ing display of 10 easy-to-read 
characters, it is so compact 
that it fits in a hand-held, 
caiculator-size enclosure. 

At $289,95, the Mitii-Read- 
er outperforms anything 
within another S400 of its 
price range. 

Call or visit your Authoriz- 
ed Kantronics Dealer now to 
find out what the latest in 
technology has done to 
codeTeading. 



I Kantronics 

(913)842-7745 

1202 E. 23rd Street 
Lawrence, Kansas 66044 



I 

J 



MFJ RF NOISE BRIDGE 

Lets you adjust your antenna quickly for maxi- 
mum performance. Measure resonant frequency, 
radiation resistance and reactance. Exclusive range 
extender and ex panded capacitance range gives 
you much extended measuring range. 

• Exclusive range extender • Ex panded 
capacitance range * Series Bridge 




This MFJ-2(I2 RF No*se Bridge lets you quickly 
adjust your singie or multiband dipole, inverted 
Vee, beam, verticai, mobile whip or random 
system tor maximum pedormance. 

Tells resonant fraqyency and whether to shorten 
or lengthen your antenna tor minimum SWR over 
any portion of a band. 

MFJ's exclysive range extender, expanded ca 
pacitance range (±150 pf) gives unparalieled im 
pedance measurements, 1 to 100 MHz. Simple to 
use. Comprehensive computer proven manuai. 

Warts with any receiver or Iransceiwer. SO 239 
connectors. 2x3x4 inches. 9 volt battery. 

Other uses: tune transmatch; adjust tuned clr 
cults; measure inductance, RF impedance of amp[i 
(JeJ^5, baluns, transformers; electrical length, velo 
city factor, impedance of co3k; synthesize RF im- 
pedances with transmatch and dummy load. 



Lacue Likes You . . . 
and you'll like Lacue! 

WmE AND CABLE 

RG-2t3 ' 27tyir 

RG-e^U foam ^5% shield - - -23.54/(1 

RG-8X foam. 95** shiehd-— — ^--i^- — ■ -1 U/h 

RG'SeC/U mi.i spec:.—" - 11t/t( 

RG-59 mil 5pec;---^^-^-^^"— — -^^ - 94'f^ 

HC^ 1 1 ......:i_i*_';;.^.-^....„ t9t/fi 

4^0 otim i3ddEr ^me lOO fl fo»----— HO 25 

a ConduGtoT RotOT Cat>S6 - \5HU 

UQ^. SlrandetJ Coppef <&Ofi muftipr^S) 7t/t1 

12 Ga Solid Gopperweld (50 fl muHiplts)'""'""— -7-t^fl 
14 Ga. SoHd Coppe/wetd iSO (f. muiTipies)'-""—— — —Sti'll 
fllGa Solid Alufninym (5011. miJlUples)-— — "— —Sc/d 

ANTEMKA ACCESSORIES 

CetafTtic Insulators .■a-.v.;-..;.,^;^^ 4&t ea. 

Amphenol Pl-259 ■—"■• -7&iea. 

Van Gorden ...Balun 57 50 

Center losul ■" S" 60 

W2AU Balufi4 1 or 1 t— — -iTa^S 

B^V^'Traps^OlhtglQ" ^2b SSperpair 

B&W Traps BO tnru it^-^"-^-— — S25 65 per pair 

HYGAfN— Corr^pjeie EIhe on sale. Call fqr big dis- 
count price. 

BOTORS 

COETAltnVlSTER 

COE HAM 4'— "■■—■".; — ■'-'^" 

CDE CD 45 ■■■■■■ 

CDE AFI 22 - - I *8 95 

ALSO AVAIiABLE 

Cijstigiaf! Hy-Gafn TePen. Bencher. Butlernul. Regency. 
Wmi Prodacis Larson. Q4W. Hustter. Shure. ARRL Bifct 
Ca^itjook. Afi>eco. Sams Publications. Rohn, Vibrppiex. 
Ham Key. Vpciom. Daiwa. ancf many more. 

C0ii or wriie tor ffyer 
Pfices subject (o change wilhou( hdl<ce. 
Hou<s Mpn -Sat lOAM— 6Pf^ Tues 4 Ffi hi 9PM 
Telephone: fei4) 536-5500 



i '■ ■ q v^ V ■ n^ i_^T 



-tS2£8.00 
-I16£95 
-t 89 55 



LACUE CXIMMLIMCATKJNS n^ECTROMCS 

Jotuvjlowii, PA 15902 




,^lA•;\l'| ■f'.*'!^ 



^4 




Orrfer from MFJ and try it - no Dbhgation. it 
not delighted, return it within 30 days for a refund 
{less sh;pp!ng!. This bridge is unconditionaii v 
g uaranteed for one year 

To order, simply call us toll free 300-647 1800 
and charge it on your VISA or IVIasterCharge or 
maif us a check or money order for $59,95 plus 
$4.00 for shippmg and handfing for MFJ 202. 

Put this MFJ Hofse Bridge ta woric improving 
your antenna. Order from MFJ or see dealer. 



CALL TOLL FREE . . . 800-647-1800 



Call 601-323-5869 for technicai information, or 
der/repair status. Also call 601 323-5869 outside 
continental USA and in Mississippi. 1^47 

MB I ENTERPRISES, 

IWll^V INCORPORATED 

Box 494, Mrssissippi State, MS 39762 




communications 
equipment 

from damage caused 

by high-voltage 
transients entenng 
the antenna system 



These transients usually are caused by 
atmospheric static discharges or nearby 
Hghtning strikes. 

The new Mpdei 1549 Surge Shunt can be 
used with both receivers and transceivers 
having up to 200 watts output. 
Convenient UHF type coaxial connections 
are supplied. Price is $24.95 

The arrester pill" element has a long 
life, but can be easily and economically 
replaced sf necessary. 



Credit- Card buyers ——-^ jS' 
may call toll free {g^ 

1-B00-543-5613 tSl 



tit*^*^^ 



OTf 



f-ii 






iSES^-. 




DRAKE 



^Sse if St of Advertisers on page 130 



In Ohio, or for 

information call: 
V51 3-966 2421 

R. L DRAKE COMPANY 

540 Richard Street, Miamisburg , Ohio 45342 

iNSTITUTIDiyAL AND DEALER INQUIflfES imHiO 

73 Magazine * March, 1982 69 




tion itself and the surround- 
ing community is saturated 
with a large number of 
Americans, chances are 
that some sort of licensing 
program exists. For the 
smaller installations, it's a 
somewhat different situa- 
tion There may be only one 
or two active hams, but in 
the spirit of amateur radio, 
they will undoubtedly be 
helpful and outgoing. One 
interesting point I should 
bring up here is that the 
Stars & Stripes bookstores 
overseas are usually stocked 
with the ARRL license 
manuals, Radio Amateur's 
Handbooks, and the latest 
copies of 73 Magazine. 
Therefore, individualized 
study, reinforced with the 
tutoring and supervision of 
an Elmer, will usually reap 
good results. Individual 
study of a subject which is 
diversified and foreign to 
most people, such as ama- 
teur radio, is a major under- 
taking that requires consid- 
erable motivation and de- 
termination when no other 
help is available. 

The military life-style can 
be more demanding than its 
civilian counterpart, and 
because of this, not every 
ham has the time for the in- 
dividualized tutoring of an 
aspiring student. It's a sad 
fact of life. However, there 
are some hams who care 
enough to make time and 
are doing a great job of get* 
ting the newcomers started 
What follows is one of 
many such success stories 
that are taking place in 
West Cermanv where an 
overwhelming number of 
American military and civil- 
ian personnel and their fam- 
ilies live and work. 

A Ham Who Cares 

Hahn Air Base is located 
about 50 miles west of 
Wiesbaden, I arrived there 
on orders from Uncle Sam 
back in March of 1979. Be- 
fore I even processed into 
my squadron, I dropped by 
the MARS station in hopes 
of locating another ham. 

70 TSMagaztne • Marcti, 1982 



The military operator on 
duty there directed me to 
Steve Hutchtns, who was 
acting as a contact point for 
the hams. Steve was one of 
those individuals like my- 
self who first started out 
with CB radio. He was first 
licensed in 1977 as a Nov- 
ice, WD6BKA Shortly 
thereafter, Steve upgraded 
to General and received the 
reciprocal call, DA2HS. 
During that first meeting we 
had together, he gave me 
the full rundown. There 
were 10 hams stationed at 
the base, but no formal 
club to speak of. One of 
those hams, Floyd Bixler 
WD8DUP/DA1 VF, was 
teaching an amateur code 
and theory class every Sun- 
day for several of the per- 
sonnel stationed here. 
Floyd had to cancel his 
classes due to other com- 
mitments, but only after 
everyone had successfully 
passed the Novice examina- 
tions. 

At this point, Steve took 
over the reins and put the 
word out through various 
channels that an amateur 
radio code and theory class 
would be starting. Steve 
was well qualified to teach 
due to his excellent working 
knowledge of electronics, 
something he never learned 
in school, but on his own in 
his spare time. Assisting 
Steve in the classroom was 
Bob Haggart, who was very 
knowledgeable in the radio 
and TV repair field and at 
that time was a Novice with 
the call KA3CSE Steve also 
enlisted my help to teach 
propagation and regulations 
and substitute for him when 
it was impossible for him to 
be at class. Steve carefully 
planned the learning ses- 
sions so that the conclusion 
of the three-month class 
would occur just when the 
FCC was due to arrive. 

The FCC travels to West 
Germany twice a year in 
order for American military 
and civilians to test for their 
amateur and commercial 
radio licenses. Steve's plan 



was to get everyone a Nov- 
ice ticket at the end of the 
first month; then he could 
teach them the additional 
theory needed to pass the 
Technician exam. 

A Novice license is of lit- 
tle or no value in some 
countries under current re- 
ciprocal agreements, but 
since Germany recognizes 
the interim permit issued by 
the FCC as being a valid li- 
cense, when a Novice ham 
with a callsign upgrades, he 
is immediately eligible to 
apply for a reciprocal Ger- 
man license without wait- 
ing 6 to 8 weeks for a call- 
sign and license from the 
FCC. But the pressure is 
really on to pass the exams, 
because if an individual 
fails this attempt at the ex- 
amination, it is six long 
months before there is an- 
other chance to test This is 
one of those unique prob- 
lems that the American 
citizen abroad encounters. 
Many students of amateur 
radio lose their interest and 
bail out because of this un- 
fortunate situation. More 
on this later, 

Steve's first class had its 
share of students who 
dropped out for various 
reasons. Those who hung in 
there and worked hard 
upgraded to Technician or 
General. This is the only 
reward that a teacher can 
receive, and the majority of 
his students rewarded Steve 
generously. 

An interesting point to 
bring up here is that the stu- 
dent of amateur radio in 
Germany has it a tittle bit 
rougher than the student 
back home. The reason is 
that everyone's aim is to 
achieve at least the Techni- 
cian-class license because 
it gives more operating free- 
dom under the German re- 
ciprocal agreement. There- 
fore, not only does the stu- 
dent have to be familiar 
with the US regulations for 
the test, but also with the 
German regulations if a re- 
ciprocal license is desired. 
When it comes to frequen- 



cy allocations and author- 
ized emissions, things can 
get very confusing, even for 
the old-timer. 

Steve has no magic for- 
mula for teaching or re- 
cruiting people into ama* 
teur radio. Patience and 

determination are the vir- 
tues that produce results. 
Steve is not a one-man 
show or Super Elmer. He 

regularly invites other hams 
rn the area to help him 
teach classes. Their exper- 
ience in the areas of ham 
radio in which they special- 
ize is a great asset in help- 
ing the students learn and 
hold their interest. 

Along with teaching 
code and theory. Steve has 
been putting much time 
and effort into the Air Force 
MARS program, which pro- 
vides valuable training for 
new licensees How he finds 
time to enjoy his rag-chew- 
ing, DXing, building, and 
troubleshooting is beyond 
me Besides all of this, dur- 
ing 1980 he still managed to 
obtain his amateur Extra 
license (KN6C); his Second 
Class Radiotelephone li- 
cense, and another stripe to 
wear on his sleeve. What 
more is there to say? 

What Determines Success 

You are probably asking 
yourselves, what's the big 
deal about four people get- 
ting their Novice tickets? 
Actually, I am trying to 
make a point. The diction- 
ary defines success as "a 
degree or measure of suc- 
ceeding, a favorable termi- 
nation of a venture/' For 
some strange reason, many 
amateur radio classes never 
materialize because some- 
one determines that not 
enough people are interest- 
ed. Baloney! The success of 
a class or study group is not 
dependent on its size but 
on the basis that something 
constructive has been ac- 
complished An amateur 
radio class does not have to 
be congested with so many 
bodies that a "Standing 
Room Only" sign is hanging 




"BRAND NEW" 

CHAMPION MESSAGE 
MEMORY KEYER 

Model TE-292 

$125.95 



Features: 

1 Steie^ot-we-Art-CMOS Orcuifry 

• Choice of Message Srofage 
'A. Six 50 charactef messages 
- 6: Twef¥e 25 charesct^r messages 
*C 27 combtrtstions of message 
C. programmtng. 

I R&cords at any speed- pfays at any sp 

tM'&moTY Qperanng LED 

» iJ^& for daiiy QSO or contests 



eed 



PLUS: 



Seff-corrtpiettng dof^ and d^sh&s 

Both dot ^rtd dash m&mory 

iambic Keying wifh any squeeze paddie 

5' 50 w p.m 

Speed, vofume. tone, tune and ^Afeight conirots 

Sidetone and speaker 

Low current dram CMOS battery operation— portable 

Rear panel Jack for au^ritary power 

Deluxe quaaer^mchfacks for keytng anfj output 

K&ys grid block and so! id rtgs 

WfRED AND TESTED fULLY GUARANTEED— LESS 

BATTEf^Y 



^ 89.95 



Features: 



Model TE-284 



'State-otthe-Art CMOS Ci(cuiUy 
' Three choices of Message Storage 
'A. Two (50 character each} 

message storage 
• B, Four (25 character each) 

message storage 
'C One 50 character and 
two 55 character message 
storage 
Records at at^y speed- pfays at 
ar^y speed 

' Merr^ory operating LED 
' Use for daily OSO or contests 



PLUS: 




• Seit completing dots and dashes 

• Both dot and dash merrrory 

• iamf)ic Keying with any SQuee^^ paddfe 

• 5-50 w.p.m 

9 Speed, volume, tone, tune and weight controis 

9 Sidelong and speaker 

*Low current dram CMOS lyattery operation— portable 

m Deluxe quarter inch facks for keying a nd oufpu t 

• Keys grid bfock ^nd soijd rigs 

• WIRED AND. TESTED FULLY GUARANTEEa^LESS 
BATTERY 




MESSAGE 
MEMORY KEYER 



TE201 



Featyrsv 



9 Adv^ncea CMOS mes^^g^ mt^mofy 

• T-A/o {50 ch^f eac^J message 
storage 

m Repeat luftction 

mRecofi^s. at any spee^ — plays bacff 
at any sjse-eC 

• Longer message apdc^i^- 
E-^3mple sena CO CO CO Ox de 
WB2YJM \fiiB2yjlyt iK ^ then pf&v 
second m9s^3ge on contacr—de 
WB2YJM QSlHY. t^-Y'5r79 579 ^aw 
P&ol K 

• USf tof dattv 0S0& or conlesJ& 



$75.95 



PLUa: 

• Sl3fe of rh^ ^{f CMOS hey^r 
mSeit compfei^ng cJofs .^nd d^%r>&s 

• 6of*^ <iQt ana da^n m^morv 
mismbic keyifyg tfftfi anv SQi^^eie 

pid0iip 

• 5 50 wptv 

• Speed vQiume tcn^. ryrre arxd 
•A^igtM controls 

• S{i^9irjfte ^r\d Svp^skef 

• Low CL/r^fifif ^f^m CMOSs tjattery: 
opefsfioo — pori^t)!^ 

mDf!fufE QijaNe-r incff i'0'tk!i (pf *:ev 
>/7g ^ncr Output: 

• Keys gftO txotil^ and sr>iid ^tsie f/gi 
9]MRiD AND JESTED ULLU 




Model # T£ 1 44 

$65.95 



Featuresr Deluxe CMOS 

Electronic K eyer 

I St&t€"OfJheart CMOS ctfcudry 
I Sell cornpSeting dots and dashes. 

> Bott^ dot sind dash memory 

► lAMBiC keyrng with any squeeze paddle 
5-50 wpm 



Speed, weight, torje, votume tune controls & stdetorfe and 

speaker 

Semi-autofnstic "bug' operation & straight keying— rear 

panel switch 

iO'^-currenl drsir\ CMOS battery operation — portabie 

Deluxe Quarter inch r^cks tor keytng and output 

Keys gmd block and solid state ngs 

V\/tred 9f^d tested— fully guatanieed-ie^s battery 



MODEL TE133- sartie as TE144 witt^ ^gt and tone control mternai. less semr 
autok eytn g. $55 . 95 

MODEL TE122 - same as TE133 leJ^s wgl. tune, solict state keying $45.95 

AT YOUR DEALER OR SEND CHECK OR MONEY ORDER. 
Plus $2.O0 S;H NY Res add tax 




RAC 



ELECTRONICS. INC 
1106 RAND BLDG. 
BUFFALO NY 14203 



t^ 76 



MFJ KEYERS 

Uses Curtis 8044 IC. Iambic 
operation, dot-dast) memo- 
ries, weight control, solid 
state keying. RF proof. 




P^'J&lSf^ 



/ST 







The MFJ-4Ga Deluxe Eiectranic Keyer sends 
iamtjic, automatic, semi automatic, manual. Use 
squeeze, single lever or straight key. 

SpEEdmeter lets you read speed to 100 WPM, 

Socket for external Curtis memory, random 
code generator, kevboafd. Optional cabie, S4.95. 

Iambic operation with squeeze key. Dot dash 
msertion. Semi-aiftomatic ''hug'' operatiop pro 
vides automatic dots and manuai dashes. 

Dot'dash memory, seff-compJeting dots and 
dashes, jafn-prool spacing, instant start. RF proof. 

Solid-state keying: gnd biock, solid state xmtrs. 

Front panel controls: iinear speed, weight, 
tone, volume, tunction switch, 8 to 50 WPIVI, 

Weighl control adjusts dot-dash space ratio; 
makes your signal distinctive to penetrate ORM. 

Tone control. Speaker. Ideal for ctassroom. 

Function swttch selects otf, on, semi automatic/ 
manual, tune. Tjne keys transmitter for tuning. 

Uses 4 C'Cells. 2,5 mm lack tor power (6-9 
VDC). Optional AC adapter MFJ'1305, $9.95. 

Eggshell white, walnut sides, 8x2x6 inches, 

MFJ-406, $69.95, like 40B less speedmeter. 



'49 



95 



mm 










' ' " ' ■■II II 




Hew MFJ-401 Ecorto Keyer II gives you a 
reliable, lull teature_ economy keyer for squeeze, 
smgle lever or straight key. 

Has sidefone, speaker, volume, speed, internal 
weight and tone controls. Sends iambic, auto- 
matic, semi-automatic, manual. Tune function. 
Dot dash memories. 8 50 WPM. "On " LEO. Use 
9V battery, 6 9 VDC, or 110 VAC with optional 
AC adapter. MFJ 1305. $9.95. 4x2x3V2V 

Reliable solid slate keying. Keys virtually all 
solid state or tube type transmitters. 




$ 



64 



95 



►'Se^ List of Advertisers on page 130 



MFJ-405 Econo Keyef IL Same as MFJ-401 

hut has built-in single paddle with adjustable 
t ravel. Also jack foi external paddle. 4xgx3Vg" . 

Optional: Bencher iambic Paddle, S42.95; 
1 10VAC adapter, MFJ 13Q5. $9.95. Free catalog . 

Order from MFJ and try it. I! not delighted, 
return within 30 days for refund (less shipping). 
One year imconriitional guarantee. 
Order yours today- Call toll free aD0-647-18l]Q. 

Charge VISA, MC. Or mail check, money order. 
Add $4.00 each for shipping and handling. 



CALL TOLL FREE . . . 800-647-18Q0 



Call 601 323-5869 ior technical information, or 
der/repair status. Also call 601 323 5869 out- 
stde co ntinen tal USA and in Mississippi, ^d? 

UB I ENTERPRISES, 

Iwir V INCORPORATED 

\^ Box 494. Mississippi State, MS 39762^ 
73 Magazine • Marcti, 1982 71 



at the door. This is utter 
nonsense! Many are denied 
entry into our great hobby 
due to such primitive think- 
ing As I suggested before, 
individual study should be 
avoided where possible. 
Classroom study with sup- 
plemental home study is 
the way it should be done. 
If every radio club across 
America started some sort 
of training program, no 
matter how big or how 
small, we would be in a lot 
better shape. 

All radio clubs across the 
country should get into 
gear as quickly as possible 
and drum up constructive 
and educational amateur 
radio classes. Look where it 
has taken the lapanese! It 
certainly hasn't hurt them. 
Here in West Germany, 
hams serving with the Air 
Force are doing their part. 
Classes are regularly held at 
Ramstein, Sembach, Hahn, 
Zweibrucken, Rhein Main, 
and in the Spangdahlem 



and Bitburg areas. I am not 
familiar with what the ama- 
teurs in the Army in West 
Germany are doing regard- 
ing amateur radio classes in 
their communities, but 
judging from their numbers, 
they must itso be active 
with classes. Perhaps some- 
one would like to write a 
follow-up and let us know 
what they are doing also. 

FCC Policies: Hurting the 
Growth of Amateur Radio 

As I mentioned earlier, 
the FCC travels twice a year 
to Germany, once in the 
spring and once in the fall 
This certainly is not often 
enough! Now there is talk 
of no visits by FCC exam- 
iners due to the cost of 
travel, etc. They have got to 
be kidding! The US gov- 
ernment gives millions of 
dollars away to countries 
who have stabbed us in the 
back and continue to do so, 
yet they can't seem to allot 
a few thousand dollars a 



year for examiners to test 
Americans abroad. The US. 
military and civilians who 
are serving overseas de- 
fending our great country 
deserve some considera- 
tion. Perhaps the FCC could 
institute some type of sys- 
tem similar to the Condi- 
tional licensing program 
that existed some years 
back. Or else they should 
consider traveling overseas 
more often. Amateur radio 
operators perform a public 
service with emergency 
communications and en- 
hance international good- 
will. If these policies remain 
in effect an extended peri- 
od of time, the growth of 
amateur radio will resem- 
ble a centipede with sore 
feet . yes, that slowl 

It would be much more 
comforting to know that 
the FCC was working with 
us and not against us, But. 
like other government 
agencies, the FCC is a 
strange animal with its own 



behavioral patterns. Until 
we find out what their last 
minute decision-making 
will bring forth, we are grit- 
ting our teeth and rolling 
with the punches. 

This article was prepared 
in order to illustrate the 
present situation concern- 
ing Americans abroad. Ama- 
teur radio is sought as a 
hobby and/or morale boost- 
er by many because of 
those unique motivation 
factors. Secondly, licensing 
classes are reality, thanks to 
those who care enough to 
give of their time, And, to 
repeat what was written 
earlier, the success of a 
class or study group is not 
dependent on its size but 
on the basis that something 
constructive is to be ac- 
complished Think about it. 
And finally, current FCC 
policies are hurting the 
growth of amateur radio 
with no reversing trend in 
sight that's the bottom 
line.B 




^BA reader: 

' A NAME YOU SHOULD KNOW 

What does MBA mean? It stands for Morse-Baudot and ASCII 
What does the MBA Reader do? The RO model (reader only) uses 
a 32 character alphanumeric vacuum fluorescent display and 
takes cw or tty audio from a receiver or tape recorder and visual ly 
presents it on the display. 

The copy moves from right to left across the screen, much like 
the Times Square reader board. Is the AEA mode! MBA Reader 
different from other readers? It certainly is! It is the first to give the 
user 32 characters of copy (without a CRT), up to five words at one 
time. It can copy cw up to 99 wpm and Baudot at 60-67-75 and 1 00 
wpm. Speeds in the ASCII mode are 110 and hand typed 300 
baud. The expanded display allows easy copy even during high speed reception. 

The AEA model MBA has an exclusive automatic speed tracking feature. If you are copying a signal at 
3-5 wpm and tune to a new signal at 90 wpm, the M BA catches the increased speed without loss of copy. 
The MBA Reader allows a visual display of your fist and improves your code proficiency. It is compact 
in size, and has an easily read vacuum fluorescent display. 

The Reader operates from an external 12 VDC source. This allows for portable/mobile or fixed 
operation. 

r Check the AEA model MBA Reader at your favorite dealer and see all the features in this new 
equipment. If your dealer cannot supply you, contact ^ pi^l « 

Advanced Electronic Applications, Inc. ^^ ■■ ^^ Brings VOU the 

#%Breaktnrouahl 




I 



\ 




I P.O. Box 2160. Lynnwood. WA 98036 Call 206/775-7373 
I Prices and specifications subject to change without notice or obtigalion " ^ 




72 73 Magazine • March, 1982 



Satellite Antennas 

by 

P.B, Radio Service 

1950 E. Park Row • Arlington, TX 76010 

120 degree low noise amplifier 





CHAPARRAL 
Super Feed 
feed horn 



87.00 



Avantek 

Choice 495.00 

DEXCEL 



IVlHz MICROWAVE 
DOWNCONVERTERS 



DOWNCONVERTER 

Assembled. 



$28.50 

$48.50 



2300 MHz 
ANTENNA 



b d « -v 4 ■ 



» * t * 



F *- • I < 



$25.00 



2300 MHz 

I \ I I - 4 * * » 

POWER SUPPLY 

Assembled $35.00 

SATELLITE TV EARTH STATION 

• 24 Channel Receiver 

• 10' Antenna 

• Dexcel 120" UNA 
Call for details and price 

Also A¥ailable: Commercial System with 
Bogner Antenna .......-.-*... $169-00 




/ 



WITH BOX 
FOR DOWN' 
CONVERTER 

$27.50 



PB RADIO SERVICE 

1950 E. PARK ROW • ARLINGTON, TX 76010 



^4<M 



CALL ORDER DEPT. TOLL FREE 

(800)433-5169 



fi 





FOR INFORMATION CALL 

(817)460-7071 



MFJ VLF 
CONVERTER 

Receive 10-500 KHz on 
Ham rig or SWL receiver. 

79 




$ 



95 



Piug this MFJ VLF Converter between your 
antenna and Ham transceiver of SWL receiver 
and tune \f\t VLF 10 500 KHz band 

Hear wealter, snip-to-^hore CW traffic. RTTY. 
//WVB. navigation beacons, 1750 meter iro 
jicense band, European broadcast, and m&fe- 

MFJ-332 Ham version converts tO-SOO KHz 
10 28 010 to 28,500 MHz. Also adds standard 
broadcast twnd Of^ 28.5 to 29J MHz. MFJ 331 
SWL vers^Oli converts to 4,010 to 4.500 MH2. 

Read frequency dircttty on your receiver 
(ignoie MHz) 

Low noise amplifier, 6 pfife lowpass filter, 
double balanced mixer crystal oscillator gtves 
very sensitive and stable, BC8 interference free 
stgnals. 

Ofi/otl-Bypass swilcli. LED for power SO 239 
cQ^x connectors- 3x4x1 inches. Black, ^^sheil 
while aluminum cabinet 9 18 VDC or 110 VAC 
wrtli optiona? AC adapter. MFJ-1312, $9,95, 

VLF/MW/SWL Antenna Tuner 

Greatly Improves lOKHz to 
30 MHz reception. 



$P095 



69 




This MFJ-955 VLF/MW/SWL preselecting 
antenna tuner greatly improves reception of 
10KH? thru 30 MHz signals, especially those 
t>elow 2 MHz. 

Lets you peak desked sigrtals while rejecting 
interterence. Reduces overload, background 
noise, crossmodulation. and intermodulation, 
VL.r signals come roaring in. 

Switch between two antennas and two re- 
ceivers. Bypass position connects antenna di 
redly to receiver, 5Vzx2x3 inches. Black, egg 
shell white aluminum cabinet 




*79 



95 



•See Ltsi of Advertti^fs on p^ge f3Q 



MFJ-10ZO Tuned Indoor Active Antenna. 
Can often e>cceed recepnon of outside longwire. 
Covers 300 KHz to 30 MHz_ H^ telescopir^g an- 
tenna Minimizes intennod, provides RF select ivi 
ty. reduces noise. Also use as preselector 

Ortter from MFJ and try il. If not delighted, 
relurn withm 30 days tor refund (fess shipping). 

One year oncondttional guarantee. 

Enjoy VLF, Order yours today. See dealer or 
call MFJ loll tree 800-647-1800 Charge VISA. 
MC Of mail check, money order. Add $4 00 
each for shipping and handling 



CALL TOLL FREE . . . 800647U00 



Calt 601 323 5869 for technical information, or- 
def/repair status Atso can 601-323 5fi69 out 
side coftfmenfal USA and in Mississtppt *^<r 

lUIEr I ENTERPRISES, 

IWirV INCORPORATED 

Box 494. Mississippi State. MS 39762i 
73 Magazine • March. 1982 73 



13^ 




^efieciten^ 








«f« 



'<Uic TitUt 







Spectrum now makes 2 lines of Repeateis—the 
world famous 'Super Deluxe* SCR1000/4000, and our 
new Low Cost line of SCR77 Repeaters, 

The New SCR77 15 Wt Repeaters maintain the qual- 
ity of design, components and constmction which 
have made Spectrum gear famous throughout the 
world for years. However, all of the **bells & 
whistfes" which you may not need or want have 
been eliminated— af a large cost savmgs to you! The 
SCR77 is a real ^workhorse" basic machine de- 
signed for those who want excellent, super-reliable 
performance year after year— 6uf no f rills! CPU, 12 
Pole IF Filter, Front End Preselector, and a 30 Wt, 
Transmitter are the only 'buirt-in' options available; 
but Autopatch, Rembfe Goatrol, and other equip- 
ment can be connected via' the rear panel jack,) 

Of course, if you do want a full featured/Super 
Deluxe Repealer, with higher power (30-75 Wts4 
and a full list of *built in' options, then you want our 
SCR1000 or 4000— T/ie Ultimate in Repeaters'. 
Available witti: Full Autopatch/Reverse Patch/Land- 
Line Control; Touch Tone Conlrol of various repeater 
functions; 'PL\ "Emergency Pwr. ID"; various Tone & 
Timer Units, etc. 



Shown in Optionil Cabinet 



Calf or write today for data sheets & prices! Sold Factory Direct 
or through Export Sales Reps only. Get your order in A.S.A.P.! 



Commerciat Business Radio Deaier/Rep inquines Invited 




SPECTRUIU 



Enpon Orders - Contact our imernaitonai Oept. 



1055 W. GERMANTOWN PK., DEPT &3| 



74 73 Magazine • March. 1982 



r 
I 



9M FM Repeaters, Remote Bases, 

Jom the fun with the growing ac- 
tivity on 10M FM! Extended 'supe- 
rior' ground wave contacts; iocal 
Repeaters; Rennote/Local Bases 
and IVIobile for Nationwide or 
Foreign DX, All with the ease 
of 2M FM! Or, tie a 10M Remote 
Base into your existing VHF^HF 
Repeater! 

Our Repeaters and Remote Bases 

are basically made up of 2-SCR- 




RX & rx Boards Now Available^ 

1000 Mainframes, complete with a 
VHF/UHF Link **built-in;* The 10M 
FM Receiver is "Super Hot*' and 
"Super Sharp." The transmitter is a 
35 Wt, unit with beautiful audio 
quality. 

A Complete Data Package is now 

available on both complete sys- 
tems and boards — all commercial 
quality. Call or write for more infor- 
mation today. 



SPEC COMM REPEATER BOARDS & SUD-ASSEMDLIES 



SCR200A 
SCR 450 
BOARD 




Th€i9 Mf9 Prof9ssionmi *'Comm9rctal Grade" Umts—Dastgnaif for Ejt frame Envifonmants i - 30 te + S0° Q. 

All •qulpm«nt assembled A tested. For 2M. 220 MHz & 450 MHz! 



WM ALSO 
AVAILABLE 







pmsQi 



FL-6 



SCR200 VHF Receiver Board 

• fl Pole Front Er>tj Flir. + wide dynamic 
range — reduces overload, spurious Reap & 
iMaf 

eS«ri« 0.3 uWT2iJB S^NAD typ. 

eS»l -6d& @ ± 6.5 KHz -laOdB m x 30KH£ {B 

Pole Cry si a I + 4 Pole Ceramic Fltre 
e'S Meter Qiscrjmtnelaf & Deviation Mtr Out- 

poisi 

eijie tudio quaiily' Feat squelch* mi<^QO0S^ 
Crysia) ("Supar Siftfp* fF fftr also a¥aitt 

SCR200 Receiver Asiembly 

• SCRZOO mounted In thielded houelng 
eCompieieiy aam&ld & tested. wtF.J. cap^, 

S0239 conn. 

• As used m Ihe SCRIUOO. Rejady to drop Inio your 
Sy&t0iTi! High RecQmTuendexi* 

SCR450 UHF Receiver Bd. or Asey. 

• similar to SCR2CN}. except 42fM70MH2 



FL-6 Rcvr Front-End Preselector 

• 6 Hf Q Resonators with Lo^Noise Tran&lslor Ann{> (2M or 
220 MHz). 

9 Pfowidet tremendous rejection dt " out- ot- band" li^nelt 
mtotit Ihe Uf ual tots! Can ofien be u^ed msiead c> large 
empensive cavity liters 

• Evireffiely helpful ai Siiea witri many nearby VHF iransmil 
efs 10 hlter-out ihese ovi-of-band signals 

CTCIOO Rptr. COR HmerContrQ) B4, 

• Complete scmkI state cofitroi lor rptf. COR "Hang"* 
Timer. Time-Out ' Timer, TX Shutdowfifflwet, elc 

• IncliKles Inputs & Outpul^ lor pa net controls & ^amps 




TOM ALSO 
AVAILABLE 
See A 110. 73 Ad. 




SCAF Autopitch Boerd 

• Provides A}\ bas^c aulopetch functions 

• S«Cure 3 Dig 1 1 Acceaa. 1 Au^ On-Otf function, 
Audio AGO; BuiH-in timers, eic. Beautiful Audio! 

• (VI inhibit bd. also eve I table 

• Wrltfrcali for detaHs aitd a <)eta sheet 

RPCM Boerd 

• Used w^SCAP board io provide "Reverse Patch 
and Land L'"e Coniioi ot Repealer 

• Includes land line iftswenng circu'tfy 

ID250 CW ID I Audio MUer Boerd 

• Ad|ua table ID tone. ape«d. leveJ. timing cycle 

• 4 Input AF Mimer 4 Local Mic amp 

• COR tnpul & *ft\U hold ctrcu«l9>. 

• CMOS log^c PROM memory — 250 bita/Chennei 

• up to 4 different ID channels' 

• Many ottier features Factory Programmed 







Repeater Tone 4 Control Sda,— For SCR! EXXU 4000 

ft CTC10QflO2SO dfity 

TRA-1 "Courteey Tone BeefMf" Board 

• Puts out a tone beep apit. 1 sac alter RX sif;. 
drops— thidfl allowing time fof bre^kefs 

• Resets TO Timef alter "beep" 

TfMIR-1 "Heichynker Kfllef" or "■Time Out Warning 
Tone*^ Bd. 

• For Que of above 2 fund ions 

• "Kerchurther Killer" provides ad> delay (O-lO 
sec ) for miuai rpfr accass Auto-Resei at end of 

oso. 

• TO Warning Tone provides aitfting warbte 
tgne apv iO sec tMtore Kmo chjI "' 



PSM*1 Repeater Power Supply Mod Kit 

• For SCR'IOCX) or SCft^4000 

■ Replaces Darlington Pasa Tr— for fmpfovmS 
rmiiabiiiry 

• Ir^cludes new overvoitage "Crowbar" ahut' 
down circuit, 

• Complete kit. w^assembied PC board $19 50 

4- $3 SO Bhippmg/rvandltng. 

PR M 200 Power Supply Rlter 
Cep/Reguletof/Metering Boerd 

• A« ijsed m trie SCRtOOO se mem part of 
13JVD08A Pwr. Sply. 

• Includes 14.000 hF Filter Cep. Reg IC ar^ Driver 
Trent., V/1 Meter shunts and cal pol8^ 

• Requires XFmr., Br. Rect . Pass Tr./Heat Sink, (Op- 
tionaf Meter), tor complete supply. 




SCT410X MTR. ASSY, 
SCT110 VHF Xmtr/Exclter Boerd 

• 7 or 10 Wis Output. 100 Vn Duty Cycle! 

• infinite VSWR proof 

• True FM for exc audio quality. 

• Designed specifically for contir^uous rptr ser 
v^ce Very low in "white norse ' 

• Spurious '70 dB Haimonics ^ d8 

• With .0006% Miai. 

• BA 10 30 Wt, Amp board A Heal Sink, 3 sec LP 
FHter & rel. pwr. senior BATS 7B Wt. unit atvo 
available. 

SCT110 Trensmltter Assembly 

mSCTIWmountadm s/i /eWed ftous tng. 

• Same as used on SCRlOOO 

• Gomplelely assmbid. w/F.T. caps, S0239 conn. 

• 7. ID. 30, Of 75 Wt, unit. 

5CI410 UHF Transmitter Bd. or Assy, 

• Sim//«/ to SCTf W. to Wts nom 

• Avail wr or w/o OS-It Sopw Hlgri StalillItT 
Ciyatel OecXhran. 

• BA-iC U^. min. UHF Amp. Bd. ft Heat SInii. 

PCB-1 Xmtr. Power Control Boerd 

• For SCT1 to or SCT410 Exciters 

• Varlea B + to control Pwr Out 

• 5wltchable HI, Low, or Med Pwr. out, locally or 
remotely, Adj. levels. 



I 



l 



TTC100 Toiichtone 



Control Board 



COn/IIHIUNICATIOIMS CORP. 



(nqulrw MbQUt *9itrpfu9' 2M i 220 TX BnmniB. Vt Mcel 
Nornstown, PA 19401 • (215)6311710 



• IdtgiiON 3d^it OFF conirolcil a single repeater lurK 
tion Or loptionat^ 2 fund tons {2 digits ONfOFF eachj 

• Can be used lo puH in a re^ay. tng^j^i ^ogic etc 

• Typically u4ed for Rptr ON/OFF Hl^LO Pwr 
PL ONtOfP Palchinhibfl/Resei etc 

• SiaDie anTi laising design 5s Limit on access 

• For AOd < Funcliorys)— Add a Parfra/ TTC BO#rd 

Cell, Of i^ea 
S^nd tor 
Dare Sfftwt 



I 



.''See List of Adveffisers on pag^ 130 



73 Magazine • March. 1982 75 



A, /. Massa W5VSR 

Bon 6075 

New Orleans LA 70174 



The Masher 

son of The Amazing Audio Elixir 



When I first read the ar- 
ticle on which this ar- 
ticle is based, 'The Amaz- 
ing Audio Elixir/' 73, Sep- 
tember, 1979, 1 really didn't 
read it at alL It looked a 
little hokey. Words like 
"amazing" and "cure-all" 
turn me off, especially 
when they're used to de- 
scribe an audio limiter, pro- 
cessor, compressor, etc. I 
flipped on through the mag- 
azine to find something 
more interesting and useful. 
It wasn't until several 
months later, when a friend 
asked me to help him check 
out a compressor he had 
just built, that I gave any 
serious attention to 
N6WA's article and circuit 
My friend, John W8SSM, 
had built The Amazing Au- 



dio Elixir and he was anx- 
ious to receive some on-the- 
air reports, )ohn was using 
the Elixir with his Kenwood 
T-599D and Heath SB^221 
We were on 40 meters and 
the band was in good 
shape, t would be able to 
give him an accurate and, I 
expected, negative report. 
It had long been my belief 
that unless you wanted to 
spend a tidy sum for a store- 
bought rf speech processor 
like the Vomax, all that an 
external audio limiter, pro- 
cessor, compressor, etc, 
would do would be to junk- 
up an otherwise clean and 
intelligible signal Cot the 
picture? 

John started the tests: 
"Compressor oa; 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 
Compressor crff: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 



And on and on. 1 couldn't 
believe what I was hearing! 
The blooming thing actual- 
ly improved his signal! It 
reduced the peak- to-aver- 
age ratio of his audio, and it 
seemed to give his audio 
more brilliance, that is, it at* 
tenuated many of the lows, 
which only consume power 
without adding to intelligi- 
bility, and it enhanced the 
mid-range and highs. It did 
this without causing undue 
distortion and without rais- 
ing background noises no- 
ticeably, lohn turned on 
The Amazing Audio Elixir, 
and he turned me on to it. 1 
liked what I heard, and I 
decided that t should have 
one. 

It should be noted that 
the circuit diagram appear- 



ing in the original 73 article 
contained one error. It 
showed the gate of Q1 and 
capacitor C4 connected to 
the junction between R1 
and R2. This should not be, 
and the corrected diagram 
is shown in Fig. 1 . This is the 
circuit that John used and 
that worked so well as is. 

But few things are so 
good that they can't be im- 
proved upon. After all, the 
original Elixir was described 
as a multi-purpose device 
— for tape recorders, com- 
puters, phone patches, re- 
peaters, etc. N6WA men- 
tioned only in passing that 
it might be used as a 
transmitter speech proces- 
sor/compressor 

So, I set out to optimize 
the Elixir for use as a 




CONSTftNT LEVEL 
OUTPUT 



(MPilT 



Fig. 1. Original circuit of the Amaz/ng Audio EtiKir(with cor- 
rection). 

76 73 Magazine • March, 1982 



*\t 






/9f iff 



R2 



i 



R3 
S60R 



C3 CR? 



mpuT 




CONSTANT LtVEl_ 
OUTPyT 



F/g. 2. The Masher circuit Une-tuned for speech processing 
tasks. 



transmitter speech proces- 
sor/compressor. By the way, 
John found it clumsy to re- 
fer to the gadget by its 
given name, The Amazing 
Audio Elixir, or by its 
generic name, a transmitter 
processor/compressor, so 
he tagged it The Masher It 
does ''mash" the audio 
peaks down closer to the 
average modulation level 
— a descriptive name, I 
think, and a v^hole lot less 
clumsy to use. 

Fortunately, N6WA 
makes available a neat 2" 
X T' printed circuit board 
for $3.50 ppd. I ordered 
one, and when it came I was 
pleased to find that an ac- 
companying data sheet 
gave significant technical 
information and specifica- 
tions, which I found useful 
in my subsequent modifica- 
tions. For example, the orig- 
inal circuit provides an 
af range of 100 Hz to 25 
kHz to the 2-dB points. 
Ham transmitters don't 
need that extremely low 
frequency response. The 
data also showed that the 
input impedance was 10k 
Ohms, My microphones are 
high impedance. These con- 
siderations prompted the 
modifications to change 
the Elixir into the Masher. 
The modified circuit is 
shown in Fig. 2. 

Experiments and orvthe- 
air tests indicate that 
changing R8 from 10k to at 
least 47k not only raises the 

input impedance, but also 
allows a high-impedance mi- 
crophone to retain its origi- 
nal characteristics. Values 
from 47k to as high as 1 meg 
were used without notice- 
able difference, I settled on 
100k. 

C2 and C3 were changed 
from their original values to 
0.001 ^F, providing a low- 
frequency roll-off at about 
400 Hz- R3 was changed to 
470k [Radio Shack does not 
stock 560k) with no effect 
on performance. And, final- 
ly, I used a regular 1/2-Watt 
audicHtaper potentiometer 
for R9 and mounted it on 

t^See List of AdvBrttsers on psg^e If 30 



the front panel of a sma 
minibox. The multi-turn, 
board-mounted trim pot 
originally specified made 
adjustment of the output 
level much too difficult. 

Construction is simplicity 
itself, whether you use 
N6WA's PCB [that makes it 
really simple) or perfboard. 
The hardest part for me was 
drilling the holes in the 
minibox for the switch, po^ 
tentiometer, microphone, 
and power connectors — 
and that was easy. I should 
caution you, however, to be 
careful in your selection of 
cable to be used between 
the microphone and the 
Masher and between the 
Masher and your transmit- 
ter, especially if you use a 
highimpedance micro- 
phone. Use a shielded ca- 
ble, but do not use the type 
that has the audio and PTT 
wires inside the shield. Only 
the audio wire should be in- 
side the shield, as the PTT 
wire may carry hum and rf 
to the sensitive audio 
stages I recommend Bel- 
den No. 8734 (straight) and 
Belden No 8497 (coiled] for 
this purpose. 

Testing and adjusting the 
Masher should present no 
great problem, especially 
if you have a cooperative 
friend with a good ear for 
audio With the Masher 
switched out of the circuit, 
adjust your transmitter mi- 
crophone gam as usual, for 
an ale indication of one- 
half to two-thirds of the ale 
range while close-talking 
the microphone at one to 
two inches. Set the Masher 
output level control at min- 
imum, switch the Masher in, 
and while continuing to talk 
in a normal voice slowly in- 
crease the Masher output 
level until the ale meter /ust 
begins to flicker. In most 
cases, further adjustment 
will not be necessary, By no 
means should you try to 
kick up the ale meter as 
high with the Masher as you 
do without it. If you do, 
your friend out there Jisten- 




FASTi 
SCAN 




Have you tried it yet? 

ATV TRANSMITTER/CONVERTER 

*10 Watts Output 
^Standard Frequencies Available 
* Broadcast Standard Sound 
*Hlgti-resolution & color video 
^Regufated AC Supply Bui(t In 
JQ '] *Tuneable Downconverter ^ Preamp 

Connect to the antenna terminals of any TV set, add a good 
450 MHz antenna, a camera and there you are. . .Show the 
shacK. home movies* computer games, video tapes, etc. 

ATV DOWNCONVERTER 





For ttKise wtio want la see the ATV action 

(before they commit lo a^cc^inpfeie station^ 

trve TVC-4 is for yau Great for public ^m* 

vice setups, demos, and getting a buddy 

interested. Just a^dd an anie-nna and a TV 

settunedroCH 2, 3.0T4andpluqmlo 117 T\trs a 

vortsac $89.00 I vU-4 

TVC-4L extra low-noise version. . ,$t05 delivered fa USA 

HOMEBflEWERS^ ASK FDR OUR BASrC FOUR MODULE PACKAGE 

CALL OR WRITE FOH OUR COMPLETE LIST OF SPECIFICATIONS, Station sal- 
up dJaQramSi and opHonal accessories which include antennas, modulatprs, 
detectors, lest generators, cameras, etc. WE ARE A FULL-LINE SUPPLIER OF 
ALL YOUR ATV NEEDS, 

TERMS; VISA or MASTEft CARD by telephio^e Of mail, or chwck or money order by 
maiL All prices afe delivered in USA Allow three weeks after order for delivery 

P-C- ELECTRONICS 2522 Paxion lim, 
Torn wooRO Mirv.nn WBevss Arcadla, California 91006 



ing with the good ear; will 
probably tell you that your 
audio doesn't sound very 
good and that the back- 
ground noise is too high. 

A final word. I didn't 
have any particular prob- 
lem finding suitable parts 
or substitutions for the 
MPF111 or the TL081 — 
lucky, I guess. But you may 



save yourself a lot of time 
by ordering them from 
N(iWA (C. W Electronics, 
Box HK)6, Van Nuys CA 
91409), The PCB is $3.50, 
the MPFTIl and TL081 are 
$2.00, and a complete kit of 
parts is SI 4.95. 

That's all there is to it. 
Try it and you'll be 
amazed ■ 





Parts Lis! 




De^patron 


Descriptioii 


Qty. 


U1 


TL081 BIFETop amp 


1 


Q1 


IVIPF111 FET 


1 


CR1,CR2 


1N914 signal diode 


2 


R4 


470'Ohm, y4'Watt. 6% resistor 


1 


R1, R2 


10k, V4-Wattp5% resistor 


3 


R5, R6*, R7, R8 


100k, V4-Watt, 5% resistor 


3 


R3 


560k, y^-Watt, 5% resistor 


1 


R9 


10k pot, audio taper 


1 


C2,C3 


,001 -uF capacitor 


1 


C1,C4, C6 


1-aF electrolytic capacitor 


4 


C5 


10-uF electrolytic capacitor 


1 




PCB 


1 


"R6 is a feedback resistor that determines ttie gain 


level for 


the operational 


amplifier chip. If the mike has a particyiarly 


low output level. 


It may be necessary to increase the gain by 


making R6 as large as 150k Ohms. 





73 Magazine ■ March. 1982 77 



Innovation or Consternation? 

recent patents dealing with radio 



U*S* Patent im. j, iwo 



Sheet I of 5 



4,206/410 









XI. 



fB 



FIG, 1 
?2 



m 



^ rfi*'r * Filter ^ 






?(} 






^ 



JK/ 




■^^^ 






K^\th Creiner AK0Q 
421 K Plea^am Hitl 8fvd 
Dei Moines fA 50317 



There is an old saying 
which says that in the 
life of every person there is 
one good book. So it is with 
inventions and amateur 
radio operators. There is at 
least one good patentable 
idea in every good ham op- 
erator. What about that lit- 
tle change you made to 



your antenna, or that FET 
you stuck in your FT-101? 

It Is entirely possible that 
if you wanted to spend the 
time and money you could 
discover that your idea is 
patentable as a new and 
unique device. As such, it 
could put your name on the 
list of over four million pa- 



U*t4 ^'B* • 4-V« i* * f WV 



Ff & 2A 



no. 2B 



Fl a 2C 




I k^fi 




k*Si 




Fig. h Automatic frequency control system. 

78 73 Magazine • March. 1982 



JS, O. 322-^2 A 



29 Claims 



*£/ 





'?:?^:^r<c^5'^*?5=7r7^'^^ 



29. A method of tnnsducing wind power to electric power 
^mprising the steps of producing charged liquid dropkts 
om an emitter having a ratio of mdius to number of electron 

Photo A. Wind to water to Walts? 



1 

pov 





4,205,317 
BROADBAND MINIATURE ANTENNA 
lul T. K. I'oung, West wood, Mass., assignor to Louis Oren- 
buch, Weymouth, Mass. 

Filed Dec, 21, 1978, Ser. No. 971,652 
Int. a.- HOIQ 2!/ 12. 9/44 
S. CI. 343—720 4 aaims 



u 



^2e 



^' 50 







47 



L 



3q 



4aJ 



iT-"-! 



H 



'^ 



2D 



-Si 



36 






UL 



N.4b 



U.S. Pttent 



Jun, X 19«0 



4,206,409 




FIGJ 



L A broadbfttid antenna comprising 

(1) a pair of parallel closely spaced elongate central condiic- 
tors, each of said central conductors being connected at 
one end to antenna output lerminaJ means, 

[2) a plurality of pairs of dipole elcmoits, the two elements 
of each pair being equal in loigth« the elements of each 
pair being disposed symmetrically on opposite sides of 
said closely spaced central conductors and eitendiog 
outwardly therefrom, each element having its inner end 
connected to the adjacent one of the pair of doeely sfiaced 






Photo B. Broadband miniature antenna. 



tents by creative people 
from all over the world. The 
list is a giant conglomera- 
tion of creativity with ideas 
from the truly unique to the 
absolutely absurd from 
the extremely useful mil- 
lion-doliar money-makers 
to some which are obvious- 
ly million-dollar boondog- 
gles. 

But for people who are 
constantly wondering 
''what makes it tick/' find- 
ing out how others made it 
tick can be a fascinating 
pastime A perfect source 
for details of these new 
ideas is the illustrated 
weekly publication of the 
US Patent Office, the Pa- 
tent Office Cazette. The 
publication is usually about 
an inch thick and contains 
hundreds of interesting 
ideas patented during the 
previous week. 

A subscription to the Ca- 
zette is not inexpensive; it 



runs about $300 per year. 
But for purists, I can imag- 
ine that curling up with a 
copy of the Cazette at night 
could be just as interesting 
as a Nancy Drew mystery is 
to a junior high school girl. 

Unfortunately, the Pa- 
tent Office doesn't publish 
information about inven- 
tors or their hobbies, so it is 
impossible to determine 
how many of them are ama- 
teur radio operators. How- 
ever, it is easy to surmise 
that many of the ideas 
might be the direct result of 
a night of DX-c basing on 
twenty meters. 

Patents are also a way to 
see the direction that our 
technology is taking. In 
fact, there is a section of 
the Patent Office called the 
Office of Technology As- 
sessment and Forecast. 
Some of the basic changes 
are obvious. For example, it 
wasn't very long ago that 




; !i 



MV 



FIG. 2 



Fig. Z l^elnnet-to-hetmet communications. 



parts used in patents in- 
cluded tubes, mechanical 
relays, and switches. Now 
they include many block 
diagrams showing the flow 
of logic and processing 
used in the invention. 

Following are some sum- 
maries of inventions which 
have been patented recent- 
ly^ 

4,206,410 

Automatic Frequency 
Control System for Single- 
Sideband Signal Receiver 

This invention (Fig 1)was 
patented by two Japanese 
men, Hideo I to Saga- 
mihara and Haruo Hiki. It 
could be perfect for locking 
your receiver to the trans- 
mitter of your friend on the 
other end. With it, you 
would never need to touch 
the dial for perfect recep- 



tion once you've estab- 
lished contact. 

The invention works in 
quite a simple manner. The 
received stngle-sideband 
signal is passed through a 
low-frequency audio filter. 
The low-frequency signal 
has been modulated at the 
transmitter with a signal 
which your receiver uses to 
keep your receiver on ex- 
actly the same frequency as 
the transmitter. 

How ingenious! Why 
didn't I think of that? 

To imagine the most ab- 
surd possibilities, if your 
friend's transmitter were a 
bit unstable, the two of you 
could go floating along to- 
gether all across the 80-me- 
ter band. On the other 
hand, given good engineer- 
ing practice, this device 

73Maganne • March, 1982 79 



o 



d 




MOCXXATOR 



i-i 




zT 



c 

G/ft 






t*J 



50 



^ 



^ 




&EiM5 txrr 






FIG. I 



(? 



:li 



MOC?LPLATt5 



5 



AfHOIEMATTOM 



f-^ 



-*^ 



^ 




MASf ft GAS 



■5 



en 



Y 



Zlii 




FIG.IA 



V, 



Kf&UTI^INO 
^EAM* OUT 



^ 

g 

w 
£ 



F*g, 3, intetligence-modulated neutrinos. 



Ualtod Stat«i Ptteit 



rrti 



nil 



1311 

tut 



hi] 



^TflnKHTlow orvici poa *?» ^vtcnma 



cnnEa nsiJCATiaiMS 





takw 



m t tin |in 
tm. CI 



\1 Tii 



?. f«l 



* iHli/U. »f. 144. KM 









US FATElrfT DOCUNErrrs 









t 

F 






lAlpiifliii hv prnv'tduf lu^ ■ncBiuiicHi ind k¥^ hh#u 
JUkB ■,(11^ (kkh* fkLIb ^^(nnCCUri to ftw unpti^r inpMi 

jpT^B^n kr> ihc outptff of I. F«£rif fiBg L-inruri wIih h in 
lum, pm^ldci k DC rnitiHt pTDponnwiiJ lif Ih- imj ni 
iHiktWl pven pt4lJll> dflhr AC sfjuJ uippJtK^ (o th- 
HpplirHf Fkmii inHir ihf Hibfcnber'i hoAic 



10 



tis 



"rffl 

t 



IB 



fi 
7 Ct P»'»2 ^ 



tl2 



{>— 1^ 



8 



It 



tiO 



t* 



12 Pj 



I 9.L 



C^ 



Di 



J 




Fig. 4. A device for an antenna anriplifier. 



could appear in a future 
generation of improved 
transceivers and be her- 
alded as a useful Innova- 
tiort for the industry. 

Look for this invention to 
appear first in some piece 
of Sony equipment. The 
two inventors have as- 
signed their patent to that 
company. 

do 73 Magazine • March. 1982 



4,206,409 
Motor Vehicle 
Commynication Apparatus 

This novel device by 
Samuel A. McKinney of 
Pickering, Canada, could be 
just the thing you need for 
mobiling from your Honda. 
See Fig. 2. 

It is made up of two or 
more helmets, containing 



microphones and ear- 
phones. The helmets are 
connected to a receiver, an 
amplifier, and a control 
box. Now, when you're see- 
ing the world on your cycle, 
you can listen to some nice 
music, talk on the repeat- 
ers, and even hold a decent 
conversation with your 
friend on the back 

I can imagine using the 
helmet and microphone 
combination in my car so 
that my wife and I can com- 
municate while the children 
yell to their hearts' content 
in the back seat. 

4,206396 

Charged Aerosol Generator 

With Uni-Electrode Source 

Could this be the answer 
to portable power at your 
campsight? (See Photo A.) 
Would it help you chalk up 
extra points on Field Day? 
Alvin Marks of Whiteside, 
New York, may think so, 

Marks says that you can 
change wind power into 
electric power by produc- 
ing charged liquid droplets, 
putting the droplets into a 
windstream, and discharg- 
ing them through a toad 
and a grounded electrode. 

No doubt, bright ideas 
like this may one^dav^sojye 

3 



our energy problems. For 
this one, I surmise that 
you'll need to charge bat- 
teries or find a place with a 
steady wind. Now, with my 
ingenuity I'd probably just 
hook it up to a big fan 

4,205,268 

Neutrino Communication 

Arrangement 

Could we some day have 
ham radio communications 
on the Neutrino Bands? 

Neutrinos are neutrally 
charged particles found in 
atoms which have a mass of 
nearly nothing. 

losefW Erkens, of Pacif- 
ic Palisades, Catifornta, 
theorizes that by producing 
a stream of neutrinos, then 
modulating that stream 
with intelligence, you can 
transmit that intelligence to 
wherever the neutrinos go. 
Erkens also has patented 
the idea of a receiver for 
this system. (See Fig. 3J 

4,205,269 

Remote-Control Variable- 
Attenuation Device for 
An Antenna Amplifier 

This little device could 
be perfect for that preamp 
on your antenna (Fig. 4). In 
essence, the inventor, 
Masakatsu Watanabe, 
sends an ac signal from the 
control box to the preamp 
along the transmission line. 
Two diode circuits at the 
control box allow him to 
change the amplitude of 
one-half cycle of the ac. By 
comparing the difference in 
amplitude of the two ac 
half-cycles, the preamp cir- 
cuit can determme how 
much to attenuate the out- 
put signal from the preamp. 
The current from one of the 
half-cycle signals is also 
used to power the preamp 
at the antenna. 

I see this as an excellent 
innovation in the field, and 
one which may soon appear 
on many antenna circuits. 
The patent, number 
4,205,269, has been as- 
signed by the inventor to 




ICOM 



SAVE $2 



• If 




IC-720A Digital Hf Transceiver. 9 HF Ham bands, 
receives J to 30 Mhz. lOOw output, cool LED readout 2 
VFO's. AM. CW. SSB & RTTV Ultn. P8T. RIT, VOX, semi 
*"^3k-m. blanker & processor, 13 5v/20A 4 :''h * 
d V w " \2'^6, 17 lbs (Reg $1349)... NOW S 1149.00 

FL-32 BOOHz CW filter SS.SO 

FL-34 5 2 KHz AM filter ..„„„....„„„ 4150 

^ccessofies for 770/730 
FS-15 Po^er supply (Reg S149) 
PS 20 20A power supply (Reg $229) 

Adaptor cable - PS-20 to 720>73O 

CF-1 Cooiingfan- PS- 15/20..... 

EX- 144 Adapter for Cfl on PS 15 



■ 4- # 4' a ■ 



f « P « ^ « « t I » « i- » -h ir . 



MH6 Mobile mount 

Phone patch ■ specify radio (Reg. 139) 

SP-3 Base station speaker. .... - 

SM-5 Electfe! desk microphone ..... 
AHI Mobile anl/tuner (Reg $2S9) .. 
AT-100 lOQwauto, tuner (Reg $349). 
AT- 500 SOOwauto tuner {Reg $449}. 



HOWS 134. 9S 
NOW mJ^b 

...10.00 

........45.00 

6.50 

19,50 

NOW 129.95 

....*,., 39,00 
NOW 259. 9& 
NOW 314.95 
NOW 399.95 




IC 2KL 160- 15m i^ARCl 5olid state finear. 500 watts 
oulout Wttti AC supply (&«. $1795) ..NOW $1395.00 

IC-2211 BOOch, 144- 147995 MHz, 1/I0watt5.tt»umt). 
wheel frequency selection 6'ii*w » 2^'*w * 8^*d. : 
lbs Mic . ml Scofd. (Reg, $299),. „.. NOW $289 95 
EX- 199 Remote frequency seleclor, , 35.00 

IC 290A All Mode 2m mobile, 143.8-148.199 Mhz, 
1/lOw. RIT, prog, offsets, 5 mem., 2 VFOs, 2 scan sys., 
SSB sq,H priority ch„ sidetone, blanker, T/T mic 
e^i'w * 2rh X S^'d IReg. $5491 NOW $479.95 

IC-4S0A (Newf^ All mode 432 MHz mobile 430 
439 995 MHz, lOw. scan mic. (^ferchj ,.,. TBA 




IC-25A Compact, 25w 2 meter rig, 5 memories 2 VFOs, 
priority channel, 2 scanning systems, automatic scan 
resume, provision for memory backup. With T/T mic 
Z'h « 5^y'w '^ 7"d (Reg. $349) NOW $309,95 






You pay LESS at AES. . .just Call TOLL FREE 
1-800-558-0411 - ask for our DISCOUNT DESK 



SAVE $129 

+ ICOM Factory Rebate 

$40 Rebate on IC-730 

$50 Rebate on IC-730/PS-15 

Hurry! - Offer expiree februiiry 28, 7 982 




r w T ri- 



IC-730 So*id^u;t BO-lOm {WARQ HF Iransceiver 
200w PEP mput 2 Vf Os. 8 freq memory. IF sliitt mlh 
PBT optional UP/ON tunmg with optiooal mic 9M?*w « 

NOW $699.95 

..59.50 

NOW 144.95 

........ 39.00 

39.00 
29.00 



a^-h-lOVd. 10 lbs (Reg $829) 
FL-30 SSB filter (passband lumng) ,,. 
FL'44 455 KHz SSB fitter (Reg. $15? , 
Fl-45 500 KzCWfjher , 

EX- 195 Markef unit.,. .;..... 

EX-Z02 LDA interface: 730/2K1/AH-1 

EX-Z03 150 H2 CW audio filler 

EX-205 Transverter switching unit... 
HM'IO Scanning microphone 



SAVE $30 

ICZAT Synthesized 2m FM Handheld 
with buUim T/T pad. SQO channels m 5 
KHz steps 144^147995 seiecled by 
t N u m b w heef s & +5 KHz upshift switc h , 
t 600 KHz allsets. With BP-3 250 ma 
mead pack output is 15 LOW or L5w 
HIGH. Optional pa^iks br larger capac^ 
ity or higher power. Supplied with 250 
ma. nicad pack, ^all charger, flexible 
anteona, belt clip, strap, earphone and 
pFugs Model IC-2A does not have built- 
iflT/Tpad 6.6''h-^6"w»14^d. lib. 

Regular SPECJAir 
iC-2AT HT w/np. mead &chgr..,. $269.50 $23150 
*C 2A 2m HT w/nod £ wall cbgr.., $239.50 214.50 
iL-1 Z3/I0w 2m mobile linear 89.00 79J5 




2fiS.95 
24195 

269.95 
249,95 
, 12,50 



4 ri*l IPIfl 




tC'ZSlA Mfcroprocessor contrDlled 2 meter AJI-mode 
Transceiver for 143,8 148 1999 Mhz 7 digd display. 10 
watts, 3 memories, mem. scan & programmable band 
scan 600 KHz offsets, variable spirts with two built-m 
VFO's. 13.8vdc or 117v3C. w/ampl hand mic. A^fi'^h* 
9^"w ^ 10^2"d, U lbs (Ree. $749) NOW S599.95 

IC-451A UHf Ail JVIode Transceiver for OSCAR mode B 
or J & simplex, for 430-440 or 440-450 MHz ??Mum 
simitar to the IC 251 A (Reg $899).. .....NOW $769.95 

IC-AGl UHFPreampljfief (Reg. $8S)....N0W $79.95 

IC'551 All mode 6m transceiver for 50-53,999 MHz 6 
digit display. 10 watts. 3 memory channets w/ variable 
scan. 2 VfO's & blanker, 13.8vdc & 117vat 4'. h * 

Wvt - 10^"d, 14 lbs (Reg. $4791 NOW $399.95 

EX 10€ FM adaptor (Reg $125} ........ HOW 112.95 

EX-107 VOX unit (Reg $55}.. NOW 49.95 

EX-lOa PB iune/RF proc (Reg 1105) .. NOW 94.95 

IC-551D same as 551 but 80 watts. EX 107 & £X 108 
butrt-m 13.8vdc @ 18A [Reg. $699). .„ NOW 599.95 

PS'20 AC power supply (Ffeg $229) NOW 199.95 

CF-1 Cooling fan for PS-20 45.00 

IX- 106 FM adaptor [Reg $125) NOW 11195 

IC'560 e meter SSB, FM L CW Mobile Transceiver. LED 
readout, 10 watts, 3 memories, memory scan & prog, 
band scan. 600 KHz offsets, 2 VFOs. 13.8 VOC @ 3 5A 
Microphone & mounl (fteg. $489) NOW $439.95 



tC-3AT 220 HT/HP. mead & chp„., 299 95 
IC-3A 220 HT/rucad & charger..,,.,. 269.95 

IC-4AT 440 HT/TTP. mead & chgr..., 299 95 

IC^4A 440 HT/n*cad & ch^rgef 269.95 

BC-25U Extra waft charger .,»..„ .,„.. 

BC-30 Dfop-ifi charger for BP-Z3 & 5... 69.00 

BP-2' 450 ma, 72v mead pk, IW output. „,.„. 39,50 
BP-3 Extra 250 ma nicad pk, 15WDytput ...... 29.50 

BP-4 Alkaline battery case 12 50 

BP-5' 450 ma. 10.8i^ nicad pk, 2.3W output ... 49.50 

CP-1 Cig lighter plug & cord (BP31„,... ,, 9.50 

DC-1 DC operation module „,. 17.50 

Hil-9 Speaker/microphone.... ....,,. 34.50 

Leather case (specify radio) .....„„.„.,, 34,95 

FA-2 Heuhle antenna for 2A, 2AT (BNC) 1000 

3A-nN TT pad for 2A. 3A. 4A 39.50 

*BC 30 reijo*red to ctvarge BP-2 & BP-S 

IC-202S 2 meter portable SSB Transceiver 3W PEP 
output Uses regular "C cells, optional Nicad pack & 
cbafger or IC-SPS AC supply /speaker. With hand mic 
whip antenna and Strap (Heg. 1279J.,...M0W $249.95 

IC-20L 2m, lOw ampt. (Reg |9B ... . NOW 89.95 
IC-402 432 Mhz portable SSB Transceiver Features 
same as IC-202S above fReg. $389)..... NOW $349 J5 

IC-30L lOw. 432 amp. (Reg. $105).... NOW 94,95 
IC'502A 6m SSB port. (Reg. $239) ..,,.NOW 214 J5 

IC-3PE 3A ps/speaker (Reg $95) NOW 89 J5 

IC-3PS ps/spkr ^ ports, (fteg $95) ..NOW 89.95 

SP4 Remote speaker for portables..*,*. 24.95 

Acnessortes: 

HM-3 Deluxe mobile microphone $17.50 

HM-5 3 or 4 pin t^oise canx mscroptione 34.50 

HM-7 8-pin amplified hand microphone.......... 29.00 

HM'S Spin T/T microphone , ,. 49.50 

HM'IO Scanning microphone (IC-72PI 39.50 

SH-2 4-p<n etectret desk microphone.,,,,.,.,**,, 39.00 
Sll'5 8- pin efectret desk microphone 39.00 

H r - 1 HsaO pnOfIGS .»*..•.»«... J^ . jU 



New AES Branch Store: Clearwater, FL 
189a Drew St, • Phone {813) 461-4267 





HOURS: Mon , Tue. Wed & Fri 9 5:30; Thurs 9-8; Sat 9-3 

(Las V**gj.<i & ChKUWJtff ^Irtrps tint api'n JiwiMLy t'yt?nJiig^J 



Call Toll Free: 1-800-558-0411 



In Wisconsin (outside Milwaukee Metro Area) 
. 1 -800-242-5 19S 



I 



I 



I 



Inc. 



4828 W. Fond du Uc Avenue, Milwaukee, Wl 53216 - Phone (414) 442-4200 

AES BRANCH STORES ASSOCIATE STORE 



WICKLIFFE. Ohio 44092 

28940 Euclid Avenue 

Phone (2 L6) 585-7388 

Ohio Wats 1-800-3620290 

Outside Ohio 1-800-321-3594 



ORLANDO Florida 32803 

621 CommonweaSth Ave. 

Phone (305) 894-3238 

Fla. Wats 1-800-432-9424 

Outside fla. 1-800-327-1917 



LAS VEGAS. Nevada 89106 

1072 N. Rancho Drive 

Phone (702) 647-3114 

Pete. WA8PZA & Squeak, AD7K 

Outside Nev. 1-800-634-6227 



ERICKSON COMMUNICATIONS 

CHICAGO. Illinois 60630 

5456 U. Milwaukee Avenue 

Phone (312) 631-5181 

Outside ILL 1-8OJ0-6 2 1-5802 



73Magazme • March, 1982 81 



U.S. Patent hhyu. i9m shMiior9 4.204464 



U.S. Pitent Miy 20. iwo 



SheM I of 4 



4.204.129 



^ 



,_L 











il ! 



1 



rtJ 



MM PWSS 



25 



I X'jl ??! Xj I I ^ 



^. „ 




FIC I 



mm m 



r 



-_^..x« 



r-S-fff 



? 









I 



i 




FIC 2 

Fig. 5. Taking a noise pulse. 



the Hochiki Corporation of 
Tokyo, 

4,205317 

Broadband Miniature 
Antenna 

This interesting antenna, 
shown in Photo B, is made 
of three di poles which are 
spaced apart from each 
other by somewhere be- 
tween a half- and a quarter- 
wavelength of the highest 
frequency to be used. 

The longest dipole pair is 
approximately one eighth 
of the wavelength of the 
lowest frequency to be 
used, while the shortest di- 
pole is roughly a third of a 
quarter wavelength of the 
highest frequency to be 
used. The middle length 
dipole is, according to the 
inventor, Paul Young, of 
Westwood, Massachusetts, 
"some intermediate fre- 
quency in the broadband.'' 

82 73 Magazine • March, 1982 



4,204,164 
Noise-Detector Circuit 

Having trouble detecting 
noise lately? Here is a cir- 
cuit by a Japanese inventor 
which is designed to do the 
trick for you — see Fig. 5. 

The circuit which has 
been assigned to the Nip- 
pon Electric Company, is 
described as consisting of a 
first circuit for slightly 
delaying a received signal 
which contains noise. The 
output of the first circuit is 
then fed into a second cir- 
cuit which converts the de- 
layed signal into a number 
of pulses. The rate of pulses 
per minute is directly de- 
pendent on the level of the 
noise being detected. By 
counting the number of 
pulses, you know the noise 
level. 

Although it sounds sim- 
ple enough, I am sure that 
the actual details, which 




' 23 C ^ ff^ . 



To ■» 



r/G./ 



— 1' 300,^^. 



LOAD h22 



T 



Y 



50E 



50A 



f 



'■» "^ 



30B I ^50C 






F/6.£ 



30 



F/G,4 




Ft 6. 3 



FI6.S 



Fig. 6. Capacitance-compensated cable. 



may be found in the origi- 
nal patent documents, are 
anything but simple. 

4,204,21 3 

Flexible Dipole Antenna 

I can just imagine this di- 
pole antenna made of a 



bright yellow ribbon-like 
material, and wrapped 
around an old oak tree or 
perhaps a small house. It 
may be just the thing you'll 
need to toss into a trunk 
while preparing for your 
next trip, (See Photo C) 



IftSjljtfvC; 






Filed AuR. IS, 197«, Ser. No, 933,!I3G 
Int. O,^ HOIQ !/2S 
UA <X 343—706 



ISCbOm 



«l baviiig &n output 
«d to receive a ^igrtaJ 

lutue! counted to re- 
jd iindestred stgnftf; 
p the outpttt t£rmift«] 

detiectiiig the relative 
End auxilLftry ch^Rtiel 
t mgii^ ituHcfltfv« of 

itqij in the connectiDn 
wwd f*» limiting the 
ml m Appliad there- 

cottpkd to said ^umI- 




1. A fkK)t>k lightweight dtpotcr antenciA comprising; 

(A) 1^ fiongated flfxlble substrate member; 

(B) A UyCT of eiectTic4lly cothJucrive mjAtenal disposed ow 
wM subslTAte member in a prcd«t«rnii!scd pattern whic 



Photo C Can you Mobius-twist it? 



.•^- 



Generals C 

^>^: Ire has amen 



HFSSTV 



The t^CC 
rules lo 
leuts to o 
freq^ 



ded Us 



\r ^^A November, and 
curred on ^^^^^^ date was 
pre has a..^^' ^^. v/hUe no ^"^ ^^ ^ to become 
^n .., oeneral class ama- ^ js expecte ^^^^ty 

allow gene^^^^ on any |^^^^^^.^e in J anuary or 

of 1982. 



ihey are a 






action by th^ 



iratismission 



The 



oc- 




The FCC last month approved a proposal 
(Docket - 80-252) to allow the transmission of 
television (SSTV) on all amateur radio frequen- 
cies above 3.775 MHz where voice transmis- 
sions are currently allowed. This resulted in 
opening up the general class portions of all 
phone bands to SSTV without impairing the spe- 
cial bands set aside for Advanced and Extra 
Class licenses. The frequencies now available 
for SSTV are shown in the accompanying 
band allocation chart. 



ti 




%m 








%r 




13™S 1» 






■it 






*•- 


T . . 


1 


1 




1 


1 


1 t 


1 








^^^^I 


T 


1 


. i 


? ; — 










^h- 




:3 




''1 


^ 


Z^ 






»J| 


*ip 








*P 








^J 






■«n 






1 J 


T 


1 


i 




T 


1 


±. 


t 


1^^^_ 




^^ 




J 


1 ■ 


^ 


m 




Kl 








it* 




Z ■' 


i ■ 1 




r> Jfi 


;i«i-i 


i k 




1 1 




, 




r 


k 






^^ 




_l 




1 4 


T — ; 








-^ 








^^^^BD^ 








29^ 


>*f 


I — 1 \ 




r 


910 


9 






VQ 








1^4. 






. tr 


1 ^fc^T 


^B 






^mm^ 






^^^ 






^^ 








^^^■^H 



With this new ruling there are no longer any re- 
strictions on using SSTV on the same bands 
youVe been working phone. By adding a Robot 
Model 400 Scan Converter to your station for 
just $795 you can transmit and receive visual 
data without having to change frequencies. Not 




only can you transmit and receive high quality 
pictures of your station, and yourself, but pic- 
tures of your new car, your family, and even pic- 
tures of minute items like coins or stamps. 

We estimate a 25% to 50% increase in the 
number of SSTV stations within the next 12 
months, and the majority of hams having SSTV 
by the late 1980s. 

The picture telephone of the future is here now 
for the amateur radio operator 

See your Robot deafer today for a free demon- 
stration or write for complete information on 
SSTV. 



I ROBOT I 



ROBOT RESEARCH INC. 

7S91 Convoy Court 

San DJego, CA 92111 

(714) 279^9430 ^54 



World Leaders In Slaw Scan TV^ Phone Line TV and Image Processing Systems 



t^See List ot Advertisers on page i30 



73 Magazine • March, 1982 83 



eii by the ttjotion com- Artlmr E* SioiltMrk, Cirf, N,CL; FttdMfck U* Ftrrwr, ftnub 
le synthetic anmy data y^, ^ad Dnticl H. Sdbi^Aft, Silver 00lim ^*>^ ^ ^ 

jMstgndfs to Th« Ueiled Stitei of AjncrM is reprcfteftted 
D^ (lie motion compen- tbc Seattuy of Hie Amy, WvM^tmk ^*^ 

PfM Dec «, 197S, Sier, N©, %<^»^5 
aiotioti compeniAtion I»t. Ci? HOIQ i/J5 

UJS, CL 3«-^7W MS ^CM 

an contp^isatiofl com- 



!g fed by the borcstglti 

t coordinate trajisforni-^ 
jidrant antPtitiA; and 
f tbe coordinate; trAii^ 
uf^uadmnt antenna. 



ON SIDEL08E 



J4 /Of ^^, 




/15 



/ 

r 



i. An electrically small microsljrjp antenna, which cc 

V **? ■ * f^ »*«! pfisesi 

i^ asij^or ID i^cnerH ^ sjybsigjiijally cylimiricaJ didccrdc tube having inner I 

outer cylindriciil laarfuc^sa; 



io. 45Z,07« 



iViniaM 



Photo D, Con format spiral antenna. 



The Gazette describes 
this antenna as a flexible 
substrate (the ribbon) with a 
conductive material at- 
tached to it in a predeter- 
mined pattern. The pattern 
isn't described in detail, but 
we can assume it is most 
likely used for matching, 
length adjustment, and Q 
adjustments. To make 
things mor^ complex, this 



layer is covered with 
another layer of flexible in- 
sulating material which has 
a conductive materjal at- 
tached to it. To top off the 
sandwich, another layer of 
flexible, insulating material 
is then attached, to make 
three layers of insulation 
separated by two layers of 
conductive material. 

The patent has been as- 



signed to the Westinghouse 
Electric Company. 

4,204,212 

Conformal Spiral Antenna 

There is no mention in 
the Cazette description of 
this antenna of what type of 
equipment it is intended to 
be used with. So, at this 
point, we can assume it is as 
useful as some designer 
wishes to make it. The US 
Army, in its wisdom, must 
think this is a useful inven- 
tion, for they have been as- 
signed the patent rights by 
the three inventors. 

The unique design is 
made of a cylindrical di- 
electric tube. (See Photo D,) 
On the inner surface of the 
tube there is a conducting 
material which is described 
by the inventors as "a con- 
ductive ground plane." A 
spiral strip of conductive 
material is placed on the 
outside of the cylinder. All 
you need to do is connect 
the two conductive sur- 



faces to your feedline, and 
you have a ''conformal 
spiral antenna/' 

4,204,129 

Capacitance-Compensated 

Cable 

Perhaps the best explana- 
tion of this design for cable 
is that it turns the cable into 
a series-capacitor between 
the frequency generator 
and the load. The generator 
is connected to the center 
conductor of the cable and 
the load circuit is con- 
nected to the shielding of 
the cable. The two circuits 
are completed through 
ground. (See Fig. 6 J 

In order to compensate 
for and control the capaci- 
tance, the surface area of 
the center conductor is de- 
signed to become smaller 
as it approaches the load, 
while conversely the sur- 
face area of the shield is de- 
signed to become smaller 
as it approaches the genera- 
tor (or vice versa). ■ 



ASSOCIATED RADIO 

8012 CONGER BOX 4327 
OVERLAND PARK, KANSAS 66204 



BUY 

All Brands New & Reconditioned 




3^3-381 -SSOO 



TRADE 





We Want to DEAL— Call Us— We'll Do It Your Way. 

WE'RE #1 



master charge 



NOTE: SEND S1.00 FOR OUR CURRENT CATALOG OF NEW AND RECONDITIONED EQUIPMENT. 

* ALSO WE PERIODICALLY PUBLISH A LIST OF UNSERVICED EQUIPMENT AT GREAT SAVINGS. 

A BONANZA FOR THE EXPERIENCED OPERATOR. 

TO OBTAIN THE NEXT UNSERVICED BARGAIN LIST SEND A SELF ADDRESSED STAMPED ENVELOPE 



S4 73MagazinB • IVIarchJ982 



the ALL 




radio 



Tempo S-4 

The first 440 MHz hand held and still a 
winner .. offers the perfect way to get into 
an uncfowded band Check one out at 
your local Tempo dealer or wrfte Henry 
Raclio. $289 S-4T $319 



Boost the power of your hand held or 
rnohile unit with a Tempo solid state 
power amplifier. A broad range of power 
outputs available at very affordable 
prices. Please write for literatura. 

COMMERCIAL HAND HELDS 

Henry Radio offers a fine line of UN F and 
VHF hand held transceivers for 
commercial applications. The operating 
frequency of the FMH-12 and FMH-15 is 
135 to 174 MHz and the FMH-40 and 
FMH-44 is 440 to 480 MHz They are 
extremely sturdy, their superb 
dependability has been thoroughly 
proven and the price is much lower than 
you might expect. Please call for 
complete information. 




Tempo M1 

Tempo does it again' Thts time with the 
world's first and only ALL CHANNEL 
synthesized hand held marine 
transcefver. The Tempo M1 operates on 
all marine channels. ..both U.S. and 
internationaL plus four weather 
Channels. This is a real working too^ and 
a hobby rig with hundreds of uses. It \s 
Skifltully engineered and built to provide 
endless hours of hard use. 1 watt low 
power— 2 Vi? watts high power positions. 
And the price... LESS THAN S500. 



money 

TEMPO'S ALL NEW S-15 SYNTHESIZED 

HAND HELD OFFERS IMPORTANT 
FEATURES AT A PRICE THAT DEFIES 
COMPARISON. 

Compare these features with any other hand held 
available... the S-15 is the obvious choice 

ji' 5 WATT OUTPUT (1 watt iow power switchable) 

* "EASY REMOVE" BATTERY PACK 

* 1 HOUR QUICK CHARGE BATTERY SUPPLIED (450 ma/HR) 
•X- BNC ANTENNA CONNECTOR & FLEX ANTENNA 

* EXTREMELY EASY TO OPERATE 

* PLUG FOR DIRECT 13.8 VOLT OPERATION 

■X- 3 CHANNEL MEMORY. (1 channel permits non-standard repeater 
offsets. 200 micro amp memory maintenance (standby)}. 

-^ VERY SMALL AND LIGHT WEIGHT (only 17 ounces) 

•^ 10 MHz FREQUENCY COVERAGE: 140-150 MHz (150-160 for 
export customers) 

•H- AMPLE SPACE FOR PROGRAMMABLE ENCODER 

^ SPEAKER/MICROPHONE CONNECTOR 

^ ELECTRICALLY TUNED STAGES (receiving sensitivity and output 
power are constant over entire operating range) 

•^ LOW PRICE...$289 



SUPPLIED ACCESSORIES: 

Rubber antenna • Standard charger • Ear 
phone • Instruction manual • 450 ma/HR 
battery (quick charge type) 



S-15 witfi touch tone pad. .$319 

OPTfONAL ACCESSORfES: 

1 hour quick charger (ACH 15j«16button 
touch tone pad (S15T) • DC cord • Soffd 
state power amplifiers (S-30 & S-80} • 
Holster (CC15) • Speaker/mike {HM 15) 



Available from Tempo dealers and 




Hem HuiL 



2050 S. Bundy Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90025 
931 N. Euclid, Anaheim, CA 92801 
Butler, Missouri 64730 



(213} 820-1234 

(714) 772-9200 
(816) 679-3127 



'See List of Adverfisefs on page 13Q 



NEW TOLL FftE£ ORDER NUMBER; {8001 421-5631 

For all Slates excepl CalilChrnla 

Cahf. residents please call collect on our regular numbers 



73Magazine • March. 1982 85 



4116-200ns 



ALL MERCHANDISE 100% GUARANTEED! 



CALL US FOR VOLUME QUOTES 



EPROMS 



1702 
2706 
2758 

TMS25ie 

2716 

2716-1 

TMS2716 

TMS2S32 

273? 

2764 



4027 

411&I20 

41l6^f50 

4116-200 

4116^300 

4164 



2101 
2t02 1 
21 LQ2 4 
21L02 2 
2T11 
2112 
2114 

2114L-2 

211413 

2114L4 

2147 

TMS40444 

TM 54044-3 

TMS40L44-2 

TMM2016 

HM6116 



266 X 
1024 X 
1024 X 
2048 x 
2048k 
204SX 
2048k 
4096k 
40961 
6192 X 



<ins> 

(450nsi 
(5V) (450n3) 
(5V^ (450ns) 
{bV\ (45003) 
(5V) (35Dn&) 

(45Dn3) 
(5V> (450ns) 1 

(5V1 |450nsH200ns> 
CSV) (450ns) 



DYNAMrC RAMS 



100 pc$ 



4096 

18.384 

16.384 
16.384 
16,384 
64.S36 



(ZSOns) 
(I20ns^ 
{I sons) 
ROOnsI 
CSOOfta) 
(20Ons) 



2_50 
8/29 95 
8/18.95 

a/i&9S 

8/14,95 



STATIC RAMS 



too 



256 M 4 
1024 K 1 
1024x1 
1024 % 1 

256x4 
2S6)t 4 
1024x4 
1024 X 4 
1024x4 
1024x4 
4096x1 
4f^x1 
4096x1 
4096x1 
2048x8 
2046x8 



{450fis^ 

(4S0n4} 

(LP| {450fis} 

{LPJ (250nsj 

(450ns» 

(4S0n5} 

(450ns} 

(LP) (200n5^ 

(LP)f300rt*J 

(LP) (450fis) 

(SSrtSj 

{450n3> 

(300ns} 

(LP) (200n3) 

(200ns) 

(200ns) 



t.95 

.39 

1 29 

169 

299 

2.99 

8/16.95 

8/19.95 

8/1B.95 

8/17.95 

9.95 

3.49 

3.99 

4.49 

(I50na) 

i 150ns) n^Onsj 



LP - LOW POWER 



74LS00 SERIES 











74LS166 


2.40 


74LS293 


1.85 


74LS00 


,25 


74LSe5 


1.1S 


74LS16S 


1.75 


74L3295 


1.05 


74LS01 


.25 


74L&B6 


,40 


74LS169 


1.75 


74LS298 


1.20 


74LS02 


.25 


74LS90 


.65 


74 IS 170 


1.75 


74LS324 


1.75 


74LS03 


25 


74LS91 


,89 


74LS173 


80 


74LS352 


1.55 


74LS04 


25 


74LS92 


,70 


74LS174 


.95 


74LS353 


155 


74LS05 


25 


74LS93 


.65 


74LS175 


.95 


74LS363 


1.35 


74LS0e 


,35 


74LS95 


.85 


74LS181 


2.15 


74LS364 


1.95 


74LS10 


,25 


74LS96 


,96 


7413189 


9.95 


74LS3e5 


.95 


74LS11 


,35 


74LS107 


.40 


74LS190 


1.00 


74LS366 


,95 


74LS12 


.35 


74LS109 


.40 


74L3191 


1.00 


74LS367 


.70 


74LS13 


45 


74LS112 


,4b 


74LS192 


.85 


74LS369 


.70 


74 LSI 4 


1,00 


74LS113 


.45 


74LS193 


.95 


74LS373 


99 


MLS 15 


.36 


74LS114 


.50 


74LS194 


1.00 


74L3374 


V75 


74LS2Q 


.25 


74LS122 


45 


r4LSl95 


.95 


74LS377 


1.46 


74L521 


,35 


74LS123 


.95 


74LS196 


.85 


74LS378 


T IB 


74LS22 


.25 


74LS124 


2.99 


74LS197 


B5 


74LS379 


1.35 


74LS26 


.35 


74 LSI 25 


95 


74LS221 


1.20 


74LS385 


190 


74LS27 


.35 


74LS126 


65 


74LS240 


,99 


74LS386 


65 


74LS2a 


.35 


74 LSI 32 


75 


74LS241 


.99 


74LS390 


190 


74LS30 


25 


74 LSI 36 


55 


74LS242 


1 85 


74LS393 


190 


74LS3a 


.35 


74LS137 


99 


74LS?43 


la'i 


74LS395 


165 


74LS33 


55 


74LS13B 


75 


74LS244 


99 


74LS399 


170 


74LS37 


.55 


74LS139 


.75 


74LS245 


190 


74LS424 


2.95 


74LfVT8 


.35 


74LS145 


120 


74LS24 7 


76 


74LS447 


37 


74LS40 


.35 


74LST47 


2.49 


74LS248 


125 


74LS490 


195 


74LS42 


.55 


74LS;4a 


t,35 


74LS249 


99 


74LS6B8 


169 


74LS47 


.75 


74LSI51 


Jb 


74LS251 


130 


74LS6^ 


189 


74LS4a 


.75 


74LS1S3 


75 


74LS253 


.85 


74LS670 


220 


74LS49 


75 


74LS154 


235 


74LS257 


85 


74LS674 


9,65 


74LS51 


.25 


74LS1S6 


1 15 


74LS258 


.85 


74LSfiA? 


3J20 


74LS5< 


.35 


74LS156 


95 


74L!^259 


285 


741 S^T 


230 


74LS5S 


.35 


74LSt57 


75 


74LS260 


65 


741^^684 


240 


74LS63 


125 


74LS158 


75 


741S7«> 


55 


74LS6fl5 


2.40 


741 S73 


40 


74LS160 


.90 


74LS273 


1 65 


74LS688 


2.40 


74LS74 


45 


74LSt6l 


95 


741 S775 


3.:^'> 


74LS6fl9 


2.40 


74LS7S 


50 


74LS162 


95 


74LS2/9 


55 


fltLS95 


169 


74LS76 


40 


74LSt63 


95 


74LS2S0 


196 


aiL&96 


169 


Fil ^78 


.50 


74LS164 


95 


74LS2B3 


100 


aiLS97 


1.69 


74LSa3 


.15 


74LS16S 


95 


74LS290 


1 25 


81LS98 


169 



CRYSTALS 

32 768 KHZ 3 9 

1.0 MHZ 4.9 

18432 4.9 

20 3.9 

2.097152 3.9 

2.4576 3.9 

3,2768 3.9 

357954S 3.9 

4.0 3.9 

50 3.9 

50688 3.9 

5 185 3.9 

57143 39 

65536 39 

80 3,9 

10 3.9 

14.31818 33 

18 3J 

18432 19 

20.0 3.9 

22.1 184 3,9 

320 39 



MfSC. 

AY5-2376 t2.50 

11C90 13.95 

XR2206 4.95 

3242 7.95 

3480 9.00 

MC4024 3.95 

MC4044 4.50 

7t03 9.50 

7106 9.95 

7107 T2.95 
76477 3.95 
aC3a 3.95 
95H90 7.99 
9502 ISO 



March Specials 

4116-250NS 8/13.95 



Z-80A CPU 
Z-80A PIO 

D3242 Intel 

2532 

2732 



LM1310 
LMIdOO 
MC1330 
MCt350 



50/ 95,00 
5CH 25.00 
5(V 70.00 
90f 50.00 



6,00 

6.00 

6.95 

8/75.00 

8/70.00 
LMi4aa 

LM1489 
DM8131 S 



16 PIN Low Profile fC Sockets 
100/512,00 

Spveiiii and M«rchi 31, 1982. Pl94w stale 
^'Marcli Spaciali ' whan ordarifiQ. 



800-538-5000 
800-662-6279 

ICALIFORNIA RESIDENTS) 

CALL JDR BEFORE YOU BUY! 

WE WrLL BEAT ANY COMPETlTOfiS* PfilCiS 



CMOS 



6502 

&502 

0502^A 

6504 

6505 

6507 

6520 

6622 

6532 

6551 



Z80 

Z90-CFHJ 8.95 

ZmA-CPU 6 00 

ZeO-PiO 6.50 

ZBOAPIO 6 00 

ZaO-CTC 595 

280A-CTC 665 

Z80-0ART 15 25 

ZSOADART IB 75 

2S0'OMA 17 50 

Z80A DMA 27 50 

ZflO-SlOit) 239S 

Z80A S1W0 2S 95 

Z80-SW1 23.95 

Z80A-SW1 28 95 

200-510^2 23 95 

ZaOA 310^2 26 95 

ZSaSlO^Og 17 95 

ZaOASIO^ 22,95 

ZaOfrCPU 18.95 

2S0BCTC 17.95 

ZBOBPtO 17.95 

ZS671 30,95 

,Z6I32 34.95j 



UtSV^ 1^1 


^p|. H 


74CDO 


.35 


74C374 


2.75 


4019 


4S 


4096 


2-tg 


TROLLEYS ■ 


74C02 


-35 


74C901 


.80 


4020 


95 


4099 


1,95 




■ 


74C04 


35 


74C902 


.85 


4021 


.95 


14409 


12.95 


1771 


24.95 ■ 


74coa 


^ 


74C903 


.85 


4022 


1.15 


14410 


12.95 


1791 


36,95 ■ 


74C10 


35 


74C905 


10 95 


4023 


35 


14411 


11,96 


1797 


54.95 ■ 


74Cld 


1.50 


74C906 


.95 


4024 


75 


14412 


12.95 


yPD765 


39.95 ■ 


74C20 


.35 


74C907 


1.00 


4025 


35 


14419 


4.95 


AAA AHk '^0- 


■ 


74C30 


35 


74C90S 


2.00 


4026 


T.6S 


4502 


,95 


UARTs ■ 


74C32 


,50 


74C909 


2.75 


4027 


.65 


4503 


.65 




■ 


74C42 


1.75 


74C910 


995 


4028 


.80 


4508 


1.95 


AY31014 


6,95 ■ 


74C4a 


2.10 


74C911 


10.00 


4029 


.95 


4510 


.95 


AY5 1013 


3,95 ■ 


74C73 


.65 


74G912 


10.00 


4030 


.45 


4511 


95 


TR1602 


4,95 ■ 


74C74 


,85 


74C914 


1.95 


4034 


295 


4512 


95 


IM6402 


7,95 ■ 


74C76 


.60 


74C915 


2.00 


4035 


.85 


4514 


1,25 




■ 


74C83 


1.95 


740918 


2.75 


4040 


95 


4515 


2.25 


INTERFACE ■ 


74Ca5 


1 95 


74C920 


17 95 


4041 


1 25 


4516 


1.&S 




■ 


74C86 


95 


74C921 


1595 


4042 


75 


4518 


125 


eT26 


1 B9 ■ 


74089 


460 


74C922 


5,95 


4043 


,65 


4519 


1.25 


eisa 


2,49 ■ 


74C9Q 


175 


74C923 


5.95 


4044 


.65 


452Q 


125 


ST95 


,99 ■ 


74C93 


175 


74C925 


6.75 


4046 


m 


4522 


125 


8X96 


.99 ■ 


74C95 


175 


74C9^6 


7.95 


4047 


.95 


4526 


1.25 


8197 


m ■ 


74C107 


1.00 


74C927 


7.95 


4049 


.55 


4527 


195 


sTsa 


99 ■ 


/4C150 


575 


74C92fl 


7.95 


4050 


55 


4528 


1,25 


0MS131 


2.95 ■ 


74C151 


2.25 


74C929 


19.95 


4051 


95 


4531 


95 


DSBa36 


1.2"^ ■ 


74C154 


3.25 


74C930 


13 95 


4053 


95 


4532 


1.95 


i**i f\f^ 


■ 


74C157 


1 75 


4000 


.35 


4060 


t.45 


45:18 


195 


ULUUrv m 


7JC160 


200 


4001 


.35 


4066 


75 


4539 


1.95 


CIRCUITS I 


74C161 


2.00 


4002 


25 


4068 


40 


4543 


2.70 




■ 


74C162 


2.00 


4006 


.95 


4069 


.35 


4555 


95 


MM5369 


395 ■ 


76C163 


2.00 


4007 


.29 


4070 


35 


4556 


96 


MMs^rs 


3.95 ■ 


74C164 


2.00 


4D08 


.95 


4071 


30 


4581 


1% 


MS M 5832 


7.45 ■ 


7iCl6S 


2.00 


4009 


.45 


4072 


J30 


4582 


195 


7207 


750 ■ 


74C173 


200 


4O10 


-45 


4073 


-30 


4564 


95 


7208 


15.96 ■ 


74C174 


2^5 


4011 


.35 


4075 


.30 


I'Wi 


9S 






74CI75 


2-25 


4012 


.25 


4076 


.95 


4702 


12 95 


f^f\kAitCt% 


^cr%^ ^1 


74CT92 


225 


4013 


.45 


4076 


.30 


4724 


1.50 


L-UN vcR 


TcRS ■ 


740193 


225 


4014 


-95 


4oai 


30 


80CO7 


95 




■ 


740195 


2.25 


4015 


.95 


4062 


30 


BQC% 


65 


MCUOe L8 


495 ■ 


74C200 


5.75 


4016 


-45 


4085 


95 


eocsG 


95 


OAC'0800 


*!! 1 


74C221 


Z25 


4017 


1-15 


40^ 


95 


80C97 


95 


ADC-OKM 


4 95 M 


L74C373 


Z75 


4018 


.95 


4093 


95 


@oc9a 


120 



HOURS: WCHi. - Fit, 9 1o 5; SaL, 11 to 3 



VIS(T OUR RETAIL STOREl 



mj\![i»i chatty 



ViSA 



JDR MICRODEVICES, INC 

1224 So. Bascom Ave, 

Sao Jose, C A 95128 

800-538-5000 • 800-662-6279 (CA) 

(408) 995-5430 • Telex 171-110 



TERMS: Fof shipping iriciude $2.00 for UPS QroufK*. $3 00 
for UPS Blue Label air. $10.00 minimum order Sa^y Area 
raftidents add 6^% sales lax Califomsa fesid€nis add 6% 
avJes tax. We reserve ttie righl lo limit quantities and suiy 
all lute manuraciurer. Prices subject to change wilhoul 
notice. Send SASE for complete list 



86 73Magazme • March, 1962 



271 6 EPROMS 450NS (5V) 



ALL MERCHANDISE 100% GUARANTEED! 



CALL US FOR VOLUME QUOTES 



8000 



8200 



8036 
S039 

floeoA 

80B5 

aoasA 2 

S086 

aoas 

8155 

8156 

8185 

61852 

8741 

8748 

8755 



16.95 
19,95 
3.95 
1Z95 
16.95 
99,95 

1195 
11.95 
29.95 
39.95 
39.95 
29.95 
44.95 



6800 



68G0 

6802 

6808 

6809 

6&09E 

6810 

6B20 

6821 

682S 

6834 

6840 

6843 

6844 

6845 

6847 

68S0 

6852 

6660 

6862 

6875 

6680 

BBBOO 
68B21 
68B5D 



5.70 

10.95 

9.95 

24,95 

29.95 

4,60 

495 

4.95 

14.95 

16.95 

14.95 

42.95 

44.95 

16.95 

15.95 

4.75 

5,75 

10.95 

11.95 

6.95 

2.95 

10,95 
12.95 

12.95 



8202 

8205 

8212 

8214 

8216 

8224 

8226 

8228 

8237 

823S 

8239 

8243 

8250 

8251 

6253 

8253-5 

8255 

82S5-5 

8257 

S259 

8272 

8276 

S279 

8279-5 

8282 

8283 

8284 

8286 

8287 

8268 

8289 



LEDS 

Jumbo Reef 
Jumbo Green 
Jumbo Yellow 
5082-7760 43 CC 
MAN74 .3^CC 
JMAN72 .3'CA 



10/1.00 
6/1.00 

6/1. OO 
.79 



45.00 
3.50 
1.85 
3.B5 
1.80 
2.50 
1.80 
4,90 

19.95 
4.95 
4,85 
4.45 

14.95 
4.75 
9.25 
9.85 
4,75 
5.25 
8.75 
6.90 

39,95 

29.95 
9.50 

10,50 
6.65 
6,65 
5.70 
6.65 
6.50 

25.00 

49,95 



TV 
CIRCUITS 

MC1330 1.89 

MCI 350 1.29 

MCI 358 1.79 

LM380 1.29 

LM3S6 150 

LMS65 .99 

LM741 .29 

LM1310 2,90 

LM1800 2.99 

LMia89 2.49 



•a 



f^. 



fi 



EPROM ERASERS 

PE-14 78.50 

PE-14T (with timer) 108.50 

PE-24T (with timer) 154.50 

ALL ARE HtQH OUAUTY UNITS ENCLOSED IN 
A BLACK ANODIZED ALUMINUM ENCLOSURE. 



800-538-5000 
800-662-6279 

(CALIF0I4MA RESIOENTSJ 

CALL JDR BEFORE YOU BUY{ 
WE WILL B£AT ANY COMPETITORS' PRICES 



VOLTAGE REG'S 

7fi05T ,79 7905T 
78aeT .99 7912T 

7812T .79 791 5T 
7815T .99 7924T 
7824T .99 

7e05K 1.39 

761 2K t.39 

781 5K 1.39 
7BL05 .69 

78112 .69 

7BL15 M% 

LM309K 1,49 

LM317T 1.95 

T-TO-220 K = TO 



7905K 


1.49 


7912K 


1.49 


79L05 


.79 


79112 


,79 


79L15 


,79 


LM317K 


3.95 


LM323K 


4.95 


LM337K 


3.95 


>3 L^ 


r092 



74S00 SERIES 



74S00 


.44 


74S74 


.69 


74S163 


3.75 


74S2S7 


1.39 


74S02 


,4a 


74S85 


2.39 


74S166 


4.65 


743258 


1.49 


74S03 


.48 


74SB6 


1.44 


74S169 


544 


743250 


1,83 


74S04 


.79 


74S112 


1.59 


74S174 


109 


743274 


1995 


74S05 


.79 


74S113 


1.98 


74S175 


1,09 


74 32 75 


19.95 


74S08 


.48 


74S114 


1.50 


74S181 


4.47 


74S20O 


2.90 


74S09 


,9B 


74S124 


2,77 


743182 


295 


74 $2^7 


4,75 


74S10 


69 


74S132 


1.24 


743188 


3.95 


?4S28S 


4.45 


74S11 


.88 


74S133 


98 


743189 


14.95 


74S289 


6.98 


74S15 


.70 


74S134 


.69 


74S194 


2.95 


74S3D1 


6.95 


74320 


.68 


74S135 


1,48 


745195 


1,89 


74S373 


3.45 


74S22 


.98 


743138 


1.08 


74S196 


4.90 


743374 


3.45 


74S30 


.48 


74S139 


1.25 


74S197 


4.25 


74S381 


7.95 


74S32 


98 


74S140 


1.45 


743201 


14.95 


74S387 


5.75 


74S37 


1.87 


743151 


1.19 


74S225 


895 


743412 


2.98 


74538 


1.68 


74S153 


1,19 


743240 


3.98 


743471 


9.95 


74S40 


.44 


74S157 


1.19 


743241 


3.75 


74S472 


16.85 


74S51 


.78 


74S158 


1,45 


743244 


3.98 


743474 


17 85 


74S64 


79 


74S161 


2.85 


743251 


1.90 


74S4S2 


15,60 


74S65 


1.25 


74S162 


3,70 


743253 


7.45 


74S5?0 
743571 


7.80 
7.80 



LINEAR 

LM301V .: 

LM308V A 

LM309K 1.^ 

LM311 .< 

LM3r7T 1.E 

LM317K 3.^ 

LM318 1.^ 

LM323K 4.< 

LM324 i 

LM337K 3.^ 

LM339 .\ 

LM377 2.1 

LM380 \u 

LM386V 1,; 

LM555V .;■ 

LM556 k 

LM565 .c 

LM566V 1.^ 

LM567V 1.; 

LM723 A 

LM/33 .t 

LM741V .i 

LM747 A 

LM74aV .£ 

LM1310 2.C 

MC1330V M 

MC 1350V i; 

MG1358 1.7 

LM1414 \.l 

LMl45eV .€ 

LM149e .? 

LM1489 ,t 

LM18t>0 2.%. 

LMl8e9 2A 

LM3900 .f 

LM3909V .? 

LM3914 ai 

LM3915 3.E 

LM3916 3.S 

75451V .2 

75452V .a 

75453V .3 



APPLE FAN $69.00 

EXTRA PLUG-IN CARDS CAN 
CAUSE YOUR APPLE TO 
OVERHEAT 

ULTRA-QUIET APPLE FAN 
DRAWS COOL AIR THROUGH 
YOUR COMPUTER 

ELIMINATES DOWN TIME 

SAVES REPAIR CHARGES 

INCREASES RELIABILITY 

CLIPS ON - NO HOLES OR 
SCREWS 

COLOR MATCHES APPLE 

LONG LIFE, LOW NOISE 
MOTOR 



IC SOCKETS 

1-99 



,15 



100 

.11 






APPLE IS A TRADEMARK 
OF APPLE COMPUTER iTslC. 

TRANSISTORS 



PN2222 

2M2222 

2N2907 

2N3055 

2N3904 

2N3906 

1N414anN914) 

IN 4004 



10/1.00 

-25 

.2fi 

.79 

10/1.00 

10/1,00 



7400 
7401 
7402 
7403 
7404 
7405 
7406 
7407 
?408 
7409 
7410 
7411 
7412 
7413 
7414 
7416 
7417 
7420 
7421 
7422 
7423 
7425 
7426 
7427 
7428 
7430 
7432 
7433 
7437 
7438 
7440 
7442 
7443 
7444 
7445 
7446 
7447 
7448 
7450 



100/ 8.99 
50/10.99 
50n0.99 
10/ 6 99 
100/ 8.99 
100/ 8.99 
25/ 1.00 
10/ 1.00 



S pin ST 
14 pin ST 
16pfn ST 

18 pin ST .20 

20 pin ST .29 

22 pm ST .30 

24 pi n ST ,30 

28 pin ST .40 

40 pin ST .49 

ST = SOLOERTAIL 

8 pin WW .59 

14 pin WW .69 

16 pin WW .69 

18 pin WW .99 

20 pin WW 1.09 

22 pin WW 1.39 1. 

24 pin WW 1.49 1. 

28 pin WW 1.69 1. 

40 pin WW 1.99 1. 
WW = WIREWRAP 

CONNECTORS 



RS232 MALE 3.25 

RS232 FEMALE 3.75 

RS232 HOOD 1,25 

S 100 ST 3.95 

S 100 WW 4.95 

DIP SWITCHES 

4 POSITION .85 

5 POSITION ,90 

6 POSITION .90 

7 POSITION .95 
POSITION .95 



7451 

7453 

7454 

7460 

7470 

7472 

7473 

7474 

7475 

7476 

7480 

7481 

7482 

7483 

7485 

7486 

7489 

7490 

7491 

7492 

7493 

7494 

7495 

7496 

7497 

74100 

74107 

74109 

74110 

74111 

74116 

74120 

74121 

74122 

74123 

74125 

74126 

74128 

74132 



7400 SERIES 

.23 74136 

,23 74141 

.23 74U2 

.23 74143 

,35 74144 

.29 74145 

.34 74147 

.35 74148 

.49 74150 

.35 74151 

m 74152 

1.10 74153 

,9i5 74154 

.50 74155 

,65 74156 

.35 74157 

4.95 74159 

.35 74160 

.40 74161 

.50 74162 

.49 74163 

.65 74164 

.55 74165 

.70 74166 

2.75 74167 

1,00 74170 

,30 741 72 

.45 74173 

45 74174 

.55 74175 

1 55 74176 

1.20 74177 

.29 74178 

45 74179 

.55 74180 

45 74181 

.45 74182 

55 74184 

.45 74186 



74186 
74190 
74191 
74192 
74193 
74194 
74195 
74196 
74197 
74198 
74199 
74221 
74246 
74247 
74248 
74249 
74251 
74259 
74265 
74273 
74276 
74279 
74283 
74284 
74285 
74290 
74293 
74296 
74351 
74365 
74366 
74367 
74368 
74376 
74390 
74393 
74425 
74426 
74490 



HOURS: Mon. - Ffi., 9 to 5; Sat. 1 1 to 3 



iii^sief charge 



VISA* 



^y/- 



JDR MICRODEVICES, INC. 

1224 S. Bascom Ave. 

San Jose, CA 95128 

800-538-5000 • 800-662-6279 {CA) 

(408) 995-5430 • Telex 171-110 



y\%n OUR RETAIL STORE! 

TERMS; For shipping include S2.00 for UPS Ground, $300 
for UPS Blue Label Air. SI 0.00 rrTinrniLm orcter Bay Area 
residents add 6V2% sales tax. Caiifomta residents add 6% 
sales taK. We reserve the righl to limit quantities and sub^ 
stityte manufacturer. Prices subject to change without 
notice. Send SASE for complete list. 



^See List of Ad^^ertis&f^ on fiage 130 



73Magazine * MarchJ982 87 



Lef s Go Shopping 

bagging the used gear bonanza 



Fred hurteau W04^KH 
Rt 5, Bon iJ-T 
Whiievide NC 2B472 



The most agonrzing 
ordeal you as a Nov- 
ice must go through is 
not the code test, the writ- 
ten exam, or the waiting to 
hear whether youVe passed 
the test or not. The worst 
thing you have to go 
through, by far, is choosing 
your first rig. 

How do I know how 
much money Til need? (You 
ask Yourself.) Where is the 
money going to come from? 
How do I know what is a 



good price? What kind of 
rig do I need? What fea- 
tures do I need? I can*t af- 
ford a new $1200 Superbolt 
HL But how do t tell if a 
used rig is any good? I don^t 
even know one kind of rig 
from another. Where am I 
going to find one? Where do 
I starts 

All these questions and 
more go through your mind 
when it's time to get a rig. If 
you're lucky enough to 
have a ham friend who has 
the time to help you choose 
and to go to hamfests to 
help you look over the rigs, 
you1l not be totally tost. 
But your friend can only ad- 




Wouid you give $J tor thh iunked home-brewed amplifier? 
t did. Along with p/ug-rn coiis, switches, insulated stand- 
offs, and other goodies was the Tl-inch long dual-section 
air-variable capacitor used in my home-buik SPC trans- 
matck A real parts bonanza for iust $3. 

83 T3Magaztne * March, 1982 



vise you, not choose for 
you You can't hold your 
friend responsible when it 
turns out your purchase 
doesn't do what you want- 
ed it to do. He didn't know 
what you wanted any more 
than you did! You must 
face the ultimate respon- 
sibility of making your 
choice and spending your 
money. 

Whether or not you have 
a friend to help you, I 
think you will find this 
article helpful in deciding 
what you need, what you 
can afford, and how to go 



about getting it. It wi 
guide you in organizing 

your thoughts and doing 
some conscientious plan- 
ning before you take that im* 
portant first step! 

Where Will I Get 
the Money? 

Empty your pockets and 
your piggy bank and count 
it. Uh huh, just as you 
thought only SI 5.42 there. 
Well, where can you get 
more? How about selling 
something? Maybe youVe 
outgrown your high school 
fixation about being in a 




My home-built SPC fransmafch uses the dual-section air- 
variable capacitor mentioned under the photo of the 
"junL" The single-section air-variable^ the roller inductor 
with turns counter^ and both vernier drives were salvaged 
from a iunked military surplus transmitter purchased for 
$12 at a bamf est The transmatch cabinet was designed to 
blend with my Drake equipment 



rock 'n' roll band. You never 
could play the electric gui- 
tar anyway, and it's collect- 
ing dust under the bed. 
Well, take it to the next 
hamfest and sell it for $50, 
or $100. or whatever you 
can get for it. How about 
that old dilapidated short- 
wave set your next-door 
neighbor gave you when 
you first got interested in ra- 
dio? Maybe you can get $10 
for it. If you have any hob 
bies like painting, wood- 
working, or arts and crafts 
stuff, you could try selling 
some of it. If youVe ever 
been to a hamfest you'll 
know that a ham is liable to 
buy anything Hams have 
other hobbies and interests, 
too. Old model trains, guns, 
cameras, and many other 
items can get you a dollar 
or two if you're willing to 
part with them So think 
hard! You can think of 
something to sell. 

Am i Safe Buytng 
Used Equipment! 

Now that you've figured 
out where the money is 
coming from and how 
much you have to spend, 
you can begin deciding 
what you want to spend it 
for. You can purchase a 
used rig for around half its 
original price and get years 
of good service from it- If 
you buy good, clean used 
gear at a good or "steal" 
price, you can always sell it 
in a year or two for as much 
as you paid for it, In other 
words, as long as you take 
good care of it, your invest- 
ment will not depreciate 
and you can gel your 
money back to spend on a 
nicer rig when your fi- 
nances allow such a move. 
That is the reason why good 
used equipment can be 
your best bargain. 

Et primo rule when buy- 
ing used equipment is buyer 
beware! You can get taken 
by a shrewd seller more 
often than you can find a 
steal unless you exercise 
reasonable caution when 
buying. This is especially 



true when buying used trans- 
mitters. receivers, and 
transceivers. There can be 
aggravating minor prob- 
lems that don't show up un- 
til you've had the rig on the 
air for a while. Usually the 
seller will admit to any ots- 
vious major problem with 
the rig being sold. Some will 
tell you every little detail, 
and some will swear it's in 
perfect shape when it's real- 
ly a piece of junk. You and 
only you can be the final 
judge. If you can't tell by 
the look of the rig, then try 
to judge the look on his 
face. 

Of course, no one selling 
used equipment can give 
you an ironclad one-year 
warranty on what he is sell- 
ing But if it hasn't given any 
major problems or had a re- 
curring problem while he 
used it, you can assume you 
should have no major prob- 
lems. If you can buy a rig 
from another ham you 
know and trust, you can 
probably get a better rig at 
a better price. In any event, 
when seriously considering 
buying any rig, ask to 
operate it, or test it out in 
some fashion before buying. 
This is an excellent way to 
see if you like the controls 
and features on the rig, as 
well as checking it for any 
defects. 

In spite of a real need for 
such testing, it isn't always 
possible at a hamfest. In 
fact, it has been my experi- 
ence that this is almost 
never possible at a hamfest 
Hamfest organizers often 
claim they will have a test- 
ing area set up, but usually 
there is not even an electri- 
cal outlet set aside for such 
purposes. The minimum re- 
quirements would include a 
table, a dummy load for 
keying up, and some sort of 
wire hanging up for mini- 
mum reception. So if you 
want to buy at a hamfest 
and check out the rig first 
at least ask, but don't be 
surprised if all you get is a 
run-around from the orga- 
nizing club. 




A matching transmitter-receiver combination is known 
as '"twins." Shown here are my Drake twins, vintage 7967. 
In T967, this set with matching speaker and ac power 
supply, had a combined suggested retail price oi over $950, 
including tax. They were purchased at a hamfest in 1978, 
complete and in excetlent condition, for slightly over half 
the original price. The wattmeter atop the transmitter was 
home-built. Its cabinet was designed to blend with the 
Drake equipment 



What Is Better for Me, A 
Transceiver or Separates? 

Now comes the question 

of whether to buy a trans- 
ceiver or a separate trans- 
mitter and receiver combi- 
nation. (By the way, a 
matching transmitter/re- 
ceiver combination is 
known as twins. They usual- 
ly look very much alike and 
are made so that they oper- 
ate together without com- 
plicated external switching 
hookups,) Here are some 
points to consider when de- 
ciding on a transceiver or 
separates: 

1) Transceivers are gener- 
ally less expensive than a 
comparable set of matched 
twins, 

2) Transceivers are gener- 
ally easier to operate, due 
to the absence of controls 
duplicated in a set of twins 
{2 vfos, 2 band-selector 
switches, 2 tuning or peak- 
ing controls, etc.). 

3) Transceivers can be 
more costly to have re- 
paired due to the com- 
plexity of the combined 
transmit/receive functions 
crammed into one case. 

4) Transceivers usually 
take up less space than 
comparable twins. 

5) Twins are more versa- 
tile. Having a vfo on each 



unit gives you split-frequen- 
cy operation without the 
purchase of an outboard 
vfo necessary for split- 
frequency operation with a 
transceiver. If one unit 
breaks down (the transmit- 
ter, for example), you still 
have the other unit to use 
(you can still receive and 
keep up your code practice) 
until repairs can be made. 

6) Twins often have 
more good features as stan- 
dard equipment than do 
transceivers. 

7) Separate transmitter 
and receiver units that are 
not matched (odd couples) 
can be hooked up, and in 
many cases may be less ex* 
pensive than either twins or 
a transceiver. 

Most Novices have no 
need for splrt-frequency op- 
eration available with twins 
or transceivers with an out* 
board vfo. Let your pocket- 
book be your guide on that 
point Split frequency has 
its applications when work- 
ing some DX, can be a help 
in contests and service nets, 
or it can be confusing if you 
don't pay attention to what 
you're doing. 

How Much Is a Rig 
Going to Cost! 

Now you should have 

73 Magazine • March, 1982 89 




This is^ a popular model of transceiver the Heathkit 
HW-tOl. purchased by one oi my Novice students at a re- 
cent hamfesL A little bargaining got this gem, including ac 
power supply and CW fitter, for only $175. 




Dont let minor damage like chipped paint and superficial 
scratches (circled area) deter you from a good buy on an 
otherwise clean, operable rig. 



three things taken care of: 
(1) where the money is go- 
ing to conne from; (2) how 
much monev you have to 
spend, and (3) whether you 
are looking for a transceiver 
or separates. Now you have 
to decide which brands or 
models are within your fi- 
nancial means. This can be 
a specific unit to decide on, 
or it can be a list of several 
good possibilities in the 
range of your budget, 

I strongly suggest check- 
ing the ham magazines for 
advertisements by dealers 
who list their used equip- 
ment and prices. These list- 
ings will give you a good 
idea of the market value of 
used units with the dealer's 
markup tacked on. Most 
dealers charge more than 
you'd have to pay for the 
same unit at a hamfest, but 
usually they have gone over 
the rig and checked it out 
before putting it on sale. 

Many dealers will give 
some sort of warranty on 
used gear, too. If you like 
the idea of having the extra 
peace of mind that this 
might offer and you can af- 
ford the extra bucks, you 
might consider calling 
them. In any case, the infor- 
mation on current prices of 
used gear is an excellent 
help in judging the real 
value of a rig. 

73 Magazine • March. 1982 



Compare the dealer's 
used prices with the prices 
in the classified ads of ham 
magazines. That also will 
help you develop some 
idea of fair prices for the 
rigs you are considering. [A 
word of caution is appropri- 
ate here if you are consider- 
ing buying a rig from the 
classified ads. You're not 
only buying a rig from 
someone halfway across 
the country, but you're buy- 
ing it sight unseen. At least 
at a hamfest you have the 
chance to look over the rig 
before you buy it. Prices in 
these classified ads can be 
a bit inflated, too. The seller 
must recoup his cost of ad- 
vertising, and those ham 
ads do cost money ) 

Another big help for me 
was a set of manuals called 
Ham Equipment Buyer's 
Guide, published by AX. 
Brand WA9MBI, They may 
be ordered from Barbara 
Brand Wixon, 189 Kenil- 
worth, Glen Ellyn I L 60137, 
These manuals show pic- 
tures of commercial ham 
gear and military and gov- 
ernment-surplus gear of 
interest to the amateur mar- 
ket. With each picture there 
is a description of the unit. 
Most have the date of marn 
ufacture or the date the 
unit came on the market, 
and its original retail 
price. These manuals cover 
gear from about 1945 to the 



present. 

This was especially help- 
ful to me in keeping all the 
Heathkit^ rigs organized in 
my mind. There seemed to 
be so many that looked 
alike, I could never keep 
straight whether t was look- 
ing at a 6-meter rig or an HF 
rig. It was equally difficult 
for me to separate the 
transmitters from the re- 
ceivers from the transceiv- 
ers! it is a small investment 
when you consider that you 
may be preparing to spend 
$200 to $500 or even more 
on some equipment. Armed 
with this information, you 
now have something to 
choose from, and some 
idea of the cost. 

Which Rig to Buy — 
When I Don't Know What 
to Look For? 

Now comes the hard 
part. Different rigs have dif- 
ferent features. What is 
standard on one rig may be 
an add-on option for an- 
other rig. The more goodies, 
such as RIT, audio filters, 
LED readouts, and speech 
processors, that the rig 
comes with, the more it is 
going to cost. If you've not 
operated any ham gear be- 
fore, you may well have no 
idea what features you wan t 
in a rig or which features are 
worth the extra cost So how 
do you know where to start 
choosing? 



The following is a list of 
features you should con- 
sider and some explana- 
tions of what the feature is 
or does. Following each 
item are one or more let- 
ters. The T means that the 
feature is usually found on 
a transmitter, the R that it is 
found on a receiver, and the 
X stands for transceivers. 
Read over the list and ask 
each question appropriate 
to each rig you consider 
buying. 

1) How many bands or 
portions of bands does the 
rig cover? Does it include a 
WWV receive function? If 
not, see item 5. (T,R,X) 

2) Is it vfo controlled or 
single fixed-frequency crys- 
tal controlled? CT,R,X) 

3) What is its rated input 
or output wattage? (T,X) 

4) What modes does it 
have (AM, SSB. CW, RTTY, 
FM, etc.)? (LR.X) 

5) Is its band coverage 
easily expandable? Some 
rigs have accessory crystal 
sockets which give you ex- 
tra band coverage in 400- to 
bOO-kHz sections with the 
simple addition of one 
plug-in crystal, This is an im- 
portant feature if you want 
to be ready for the new am- 
ateur bands recently allo- 
cated for our future use. 
[T,R.X) 

6] For CW operation, 
does the rig have full break- 
in or semi-break-in? This 



I 



RANSI-RAP 



Lightning & Static 



Mo^t^i 



If/ii 



rr 



t hook- 
your coax 

without one! 



Models 
H-T. 



«»« 






Protects sensitive solid state components in your 
equi[>ffient from fiigh- surge voltages produce<l by 
nearby lightning strikes, high wind, and static 
build-up. Even distant storm fronts are known to 
cause damaging surges without warning or time 
for groLindtng. 

The repiaceaDle Arc-Plug™ cartridge, which c^n 
fire thousands of times, utilize a special ceramic 
gas-filled tube with precisely tailored firing speed 
dnd level safely by -passing surges to ground. 
Standard air-gap devices are Ineffective due to 
theJf erratic performance. 

Trans i-Trap Protectors are the first devices In 
the industry designed wrth Isolated ground." 
This keeps damaging arc-energy off the chassis 
and routes it directly to ground. 



Models Availabie: r50 oiims 200 w 

models are most sefvs^tive. C)^t tor RCVRS 
and KCVU's 2 kW models designeti tor amps 
Ail fnooels ir>c)ude Arc- Plug canncige ] 

with UHF Connectors 

Modil LT PTOliCWf. UHF-type "V connecfor 
handles 200 W mjtput thru 2 meters SI9.95 

IIoiM R-T PrQlACtor. fiancMeS 200 W Outpuf 
thru 5O0 UHi S29 95 

MwM HV PT<it«tter. nandtes 2 kW output 
thru 50Q MHz S32.95 

with M Connectors 

iieilil LT/N Prolectar, ly-type 1' connector, 
handles ?00 W output thru ! GHz S3§ 55 

Re pia cement ^e Plug C3ftrid||lt 
(or Modete LT SS.§S. LT/N St9 95, 
R^TS9.9<$, HVS12 9S 



Ohio residents add Sales Tax. MasterCard, Visa, clwclca accepted. Ordef Ijy phone or mall. 

AlphaDflila Trans" Trap PrtrtKlfflni SvtHjms ,ire des-igrvedi lo redu« ffM hdz^ros o) lightning (rHiuced sutges 
fhise dEvinB^ i^wflvfif. Mi nd pr^vefii 3ire -of aacaiigi caused ^v J ^recl stroke lo jntcnna at atrter ^iFuc^urc 



/aPHA.M 



P,0. Box 571, CentefviJIe, Ohio 45459 • {51:^ 435^772 



OOlMMUNIOmONS 



FOR UNDISPUTED 
PERFORMANCE, EASY , 

ASSEMBLY, VERY 

BROADBAND, LOW SWR, 

RUGGED MECHANICALI 

DESIGN ... TRY THE 





t $0-440 




ISOPOLE 



TNI 



ANTENNA FOR YOUR NEX 



VHF OR UHF BASE 
STATION INSTALLATION 




ISO-144 

iSO-220 






RANGER II 

7dB GAiM 

HIGHEST GAIN 

2 METER OMNI 

OUTPERFORMS 
COrJEAND 
OOUBLf ZEPP 

WORK MORE STATIONS 

ELIMINATE MOISE 

LIGHTNING PROTECTED 

ACCESS MORE REPEATERS 

ASSEMBLE EASILY 

INSTALL QUICKLY 

A COMPLETE ANTENMA 
ALL mRTS INCLUDED 

600 ,000 HAPPY USERS 
BECOME ONE TODAY 

ARX-aB 134 ■164MHz 
ARX-220B 220-225MHZ 
ARX-450B 435'450MHz 



FOR AEA ANTENNAS 

OR OTHER AEA PRODUCTS, 

CALL OR VISIT: 



MAST NOT iNCLUDEO 



AEA 




BRITT'S 2WAY RADIO 

SALES & SERVICE 

2508 Atlanta St. Smyrna, GA 3008Q 

Brings you the ^all: (404) 432-8006 
Breakthrough! 

^S90 Usi Of Adv9fUsws^ an pjg« i JO 



MOBILE 
RANGERS 

MORE RANGE 

3dBGAJN 

5/8 XSTAtNLESS WHIP 

GRIP TIGHT 90LB 
MAGNET 

CHROME PLATED BASE 

NEAT APPEARANCE 

THUMB LOCK ADJUSTMENT 

NO WHIP CUntNG 

LOW PRICE 

MAGNF1C MOUNTS 
AMS-147 146-148 MHz 
AMS^220 220-225 MHz 

TRUNK UP MOUNTS 
A7S-147 146-148 MHz 
ATS-220 220-225 MHz 



BUY FROM YOUR DEALER 

custKraft 

COftPORAT (ON 

THE ANTENNA COMPANY 

48 Perimeter Rood. RO. Box 4680 

AAonchester, NH 03108 .^ i06 
Telex - 953050 




■ 



73 Magazine * March, 1982 91 



tm 



means you can hear your 
receiver audio between 
every dit and dah with full 
break-in, or only during 
longer pauses between 
words or sentences with 
semi-break-in. (T,R,X) 

7) For phone operation, 
does the rig have PTT [Push 
To Talk), or VOX (Voice 
Operated Xmit — short for 
transmit), or both? (T,X) 

8] Does the unit come 
with an outboard vfo, or 
at least have an acces- 
sory jack for an outboard 
vfo? (X) 

9) Is the frequency read- 
out digital (LEDs) or analog 
[dial markings)? (T,R,X) 

10) What is the band- 
width of the audio filters it 
comes with? For AM phone 
you need about 4.5-kHz to 
5'kHz bandwidth, SSB 
phone requires about 1.5 
kHz to 23 kHz, and CW, 
anywhere from 50 Hz to 500 
Hz. There are two types of 
audio filters: active and 
passive. The active type 
amplifies the chosen audio- 
frequency band louder than 
the background, making it 
easier to hear over other 
audio. The passive type 
cuts down the background 
sounds and passes the 
chosen audio band. Active 
filters are less expensive but 
tend to sound harsher than 
passive filters. tR,X) 

11} If it doesn't have the 
filter bandwidth you want as 

standard equipment, can it 
be purchased and plugged 
in inside the rig or must it be 
added externally? What 
would be the cost of the 
manufacturer's recom- 
mended plug*in type? (For 
example, new plug- in crys- 
tal filters can cost $40 and 
more!) (R.X) 

12) Does it have a notch 
filter? This is sort of the op- 
posite of an audio filter A 
notch filter cuts out a par- 
ticular thin band of audio. 
it is particularly helpful for 
filtering out a carrier signal 
in your audio, (R,X) 

13) Does it have a noise 
blanker? (R,X) 

14) Does it have RIT 





At the left is a Conset CSBKX) tfammiUer, vintage 1958, which sold for over $450 new. At 
the right is a Drake t-A receiver, vintage J 959, which went for $300 new. These could be 

used as an ''odd couple" to set up a Novice station. The Conset is a rack-mount unit and 
should have son)e kind of cabinet on it lor rf shielding and shock protection. It measures 
10'* X TS" X 20" and weighs 120 pounds! Be sure your operating table can handle it! [ The 
decorative face plate is missing from the 1-A dial in this photo.) 



(Receiver Incremental Tun- 
ing—sometimes called a 
clarifier)? This feature al- 
tows you to shift your re- 
ceive frequency 1 or 2 kHz 
without moving your trans- 
mitting frequency. This is a 
real help on a transceiver 
without an outboard vfo,{X) 

1 5] Does it have a crystal 
calibrator (usually 25-kHz 
or 100-kHz increments)? A 
crystal calibrator is a built- 
in crystal oscillator which 
allows you to calibrate your 
vfo dial without having to 
use external test equip- 
ment. (T.R.X) 

16] Does the rig come 
with its power supply built 
in, included as an acces- 
sory, or not included at all? 
(T,X) 

17) Is the speaker built in, 
in a matching cabinet, or 
not included at all? (R,X) 

18) Have there been any 
user- installed modifica- 
tions? If so< what are they, 
and are they indicated on 
your schematic? (T,R,X) 

19) Are the original oper- 
ator manuals and schema- 
tics included? (T,R,X) 

20) What is the appear- 
ance of the rig? Is it 
scratched, dented, rusty, 
cracked, knobs missing or 
mismatched, poorly re- 
painted, etc? rT*R*X) 

21) Is the physical size 



and weight of the rig suit- 
able for your available op- 
erating space and situation? 
1 1 ,K,X) 

22) What is the reputa- 
tion within the ham com- 
munity for the particular rig 
or rigs you are considering? 
(Examples: a reputation for 
frequency drift, poor audio 
quality, hard-to-find tubes, 
poor selectivity, hard-to- 
reach controls and adjust- 
ments, etcj (T,R,X) 

Boy, that sure sounds like 
a lot to think about, doesn't 
it? Well, it is a lot to think 
about. That's exactly the 
reason you should think 
about all these things a/read 
of time. You will find that 
before long you will auto- 
matically check for many 
of these items from memo^ 
ry, without having to refer 
to this list for them. Don't 
be afraid to take this article 
along as reference, though, 
you can't commit every one 
of these questions to mem- 
ory. Mark those options you 
are considering. Star the 
ones you must have and 
mark the ones you would 
like but would pass over 
unless the price was right 

What Features Do I 
Really Need! 

If you are still undecided 
about some of the features 



and options, the following 
list of comments and my 

own recommendations for 
Novices might help you 
decide. The numbering on 
this list corresponds to that 
of the previous list 

1 ) If you can afford an all- 
band rig, good! You will be 
happier with it in the long 
run. I recommend some 
type of WWV coverage. {Re- 
fer to item 5.) 

2) Crystal control is pret- 
ty much a thing of the past 
By the time you collect 
enough crystals to make a 
crystal rig of any value, you 
could have purchased a 
good vfo for the same 
money. If you can at all ai- 
ford it go for vfo control. 

3) Wattage choice is a 
matter of preference 
(though the cost can be a 
minor factor) Many all- 
transistor rigs are 20-Watt 
input or less. Tube-type rigs 
generally run from 40- to 
300-Watt input. The 50-to- 
100-Watt range is a good 
starting point for Novices, 

4) As a Novice, you cer* 
tainty need CW SSB is a 
good option so that you 
won't have to buy again 
when you upgrade your li- 
cense. AM, FM, and RTTY 
are of no particular value to 



92 73 Magazine • March, 19B2 



f 



il: 



OEAtERs 



THE ETCO MfCRO 1Q0Q 36 CHANNEL VCR PROGRAMMER & 

CABLE TV CONVERTER 



-•«' 



^^^■ 



VI DCDff 2«ffi PH I L If^ CT04 
WAG N A VOX yX-4«CC LIND- 
SAY V2U ^ flHQADES CO^Stt}^ 
PHILIPS CTC40 ■ WINEG ARD 
VC^TCSB md oltterm... 

WrONBOH 

OUBmOAY 

MONEY BACK 

GUAMNTii 



ONLY 



ETCO 



ffie ETCO Micro 1000 lakes the micJband and supar-band criannels 
your TV. VCR or projector can't receive and converts them to 
standard UHF channels any set can tune in. Easy instaHation no 
moving parts - FCC & LJL approved. Channel conversion chart and 
detallJed Instructions included, 447Veii4, 



As above - with Vefnier TynJn^: adjustabhe luring Jiu»tjros \q\'a\ tfacking 
compattbihly with att TV sets #47VC477 ,,.;. S7i,§5 



CHAIRSIDE REMOTE 
CONTROL 
30 CHANNEL 
CABLE 
CONVERTER \ 

only" 



20 



CABLE! 



'»-♦»■, - - - ■ 



« 



/ 






ITCO / $79,95 EA75 
S74.95 EA710 

YOUR SET STAYS TUNED TO CHANNEL 3 — No need to 
jump up to change channels! Converter and control unit 
are connected by a long flexible cable to permit chair or 
bedside tuning „ Remote channel selection, ON /OFF and 
fine tuning Complete with all instructions* 447V A275. 



, 



MORE CABLE TV BARGAINS 

tirZAD'il LihrDSAYiCFchanndprt^jimmable tireless coftyert&f 1119 DO 

II7VA9M ViDCOR 2000 conveflvrS VCR pfograinnier ItSfS 

UTVAfTT MjdbandmiDwbandlcnaiirieJbiocli converter 139 9^ 

147V $tZl% M idband la hpghband f chan ne l tAotk converter S39.K 

44JVA»3 Lks&a as^ isi OAK V 36 26 cnannel CitiJe TV conveners 13& 9S 

447VA395 ^^e^ 1^5 isi TOCOM DC ie}ODrem{>ie control 20 ctitnneUortverters S?9 9$ 

M7 V At96 U sed I a s-ts j M AG N A VOK ^ .?5 rfi mole eantr ut 20 c h innel tOft verters lU 15 

«7VAaJ5 75 ohm Ai'S switch wiih 'F'^conneclors .. |9JS 

4J7VA9Qi4 VNF^UHF/FMhighgambrcadbandcabJedrstribuiionampldier ....,..,. 159 JS 

W7VA9&? DelQClivefaS'ist wireless remote con rrc(lcohvertera-"u-Fi)(^... ,.. B^ &5 

i47VA503 i'Softm 3 posihon pushburiori co-a>i- sw<tch w^th F" connectors S19.95 

417V cm ^'-MDS microwave TV amennawdhdownconverter 1239.00 



THE ETCO COMMANDER 
5000 37-CHANNEL WIRE- 
LESS REMOTE CONTROL 
CABLE TV CONVERTERt 



24 MONTH 
WARRANTY! 



MLT 



'0f 



tl 



UL/I. 



Makes cable viewing an absolute joy! Connects between 
the TV cable and antenna input terminals of your TV set. 
Allows you to turn your TV on and off. change channels, 
recall the last channel, fine tune, all by remote control! 
Handsome woodgrain cabinet, pushbutton remote control. 
Your TV stays tuned to channel 3. The Commander 5000 
does all the tuning! Covers low. mid, high and super band 
channels. Order today! 447ZAO0S, 



NEW — As above, 5B channel version 'i47ZA01T 



SI 89 ^5 



30 CHANNEL CABLE TV CONVERTER 



ONLY 



114. 



./I 



^, 



/ 



GET THE MOST out of your cable TV system! Easy 
hookup — completely safe — and you get up to 30 
channels! Converted channels appear on the UHF 
portion of your set; channels 2 to 13 can also be 
seen on the VHF portion of the tuner. Easy to ins- 
tall - with instructions. 447AE047. 



INCREDIBLE ETCO COPYGUARD STABILIZER 

AND VIDEO IMAGE ENHANCER SELLS AT 

A PRICE BELOW WHAT YOU WOULD PA Y FOR 

EITHER UNIT IF PURCHASED SEPARA TEL Y! 




An ETCO exclusive! Combines both instruments in one, 
works like a charm! Try one on our 30 day money back 
guarantee! DEALERS WANTED 447ZA0Z1. 



It 



NOTE: Converters ori this page work 
Ofily if you have cable TV, Number of 
extra channels available GfiHer ffom 
cable system to cable system. Use of 
cable converters may be subject to 
rules l^y your local catte company. 




PLATTSBURGH, N.Y. 12901-1095. Tel. (518) 561-8700. 



DELLVERf HANOLIhTG^ tNSURAhJCE CHAFIQES 
F ifvo Tit* iocai Aiuounl ot your order ind youi" ftp cods beio« 5 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

PI CpTDn WliPQ^*'** * ^■***^ '"**'^'"®*^"''' I 
C L u V i n U nl I wO led Our loiflphdne order desh ■ 

L 





■ <l« 


TtMv 


WIH 




l« 


•fr 


tfr 


t Vi^i O^As^ ^stmtt 


twn 


iTm 




U^i*tllH 


itj 


1 w 


] n 


tituwmn 


tm 


tu 


141 


BitiieuaH 


IP 


*n 


s^n 


titJtftBtuii 


tm 


111 


in 


IHIIifiEIQM 


in 


tit 


lilt 


Ort* (MM 


110 


hji 


an 



ETCO Electronics 

Oept 457 

Plattiburgh. N.Y. 1290M095 

Send my tree ETCOCoMog now 

I om nol currently receiviri^ yourcatolog, 





Til i^GB 



Cl»cli mth otatit pHetm^e 
VitA & Uisierc^rsl O K 
(Sorry. imC O D's' N V st^ate 
rtfttdflfilt #i}d 7N sales l^i 

iflphdi 



Home 



A<ldr«w 



CHy 



Stote 



Zip 



^Ses List of Advertisers ort p^ge f30 



JSMagBzine • March J 982 93 




A home-brewed power supply like this one often can be 
purchased at a hamfesf for less than the individual parts 
could cost used! Even if it doesn't work, you could use the 
good parts and cabinet and build your own. Refer to anna- 
teur publications like this nnagazine for construction proj- 
ects on power supplies and many other useful items that are 
relatively easy to build. 



you as a Novice, 

5) If you can afford a rig 
with easily-expandable 
band coverage, get it. It will 
pay for itself in a couple of 
years when you upgrade, or 
when the new bands be- 
conne available to ama- 
teurs It is also an easy way 
to add WWV reception if 
the rig doesn't already have 
it However, expandable 
band coverage is not a must 
for the Novice. 

6) Full break-in or semi- 
break-in: The choice is a 
matter of personal prefer- 
ence. Full break-in normal- 
ly is available only on the 
newer transistorized, digi- 
talized rigs. Personally, 
I find full breabjn annoy- 
jilg, but you should listen to 
a sample of it to decide for 
yourself. Semi-break-in is 
quite sufficient for the 
Novice. 

7] VOX is nice when you 
upgrade, but is not a neces- 
sity for the Novice. 

8) An outboard vfo on a 
transceiver is nice, but not a 
necessity for Novice use. 
KIT will serve you as well 
However, if RIT isn't avail- 
able on your rig you might 
consider an outboard vfo as 
a second choice if the price 
is right 

94 73 Magazine • March J982 



9) Digital readouts are 

pretty but definitely not a 
necessity for Novice use. 
Digital readouts cost more 
and give more trouble than 
an analog display. If you 
want pretty lights, get a 
good frequency counter. It 
will be of much more use to 
you now and later on. 

10,11) The QRM on 40 
and 80 meters can get aw- 
fully hairy in the Novice 
bands. A good audio 
fitter can be a QSO saver 
and a nerve saver, too. The 
tighter the filter, the better. 
500 Hz or tighter is good 
{almost a necessity) since 
you probably need all the 
help you can get copying 
CW on the air. Don't worry 
if the rig you pick out 
doesn't have a tight CW 
filter, though. You can build 
a good add-on active or 
passive filter from any of 
several projects covered in 
the ham magazines and 
other publications, 

12) A notch filter is not a 
necessity, though it can be 
especially helpful on 40 me- 
ters where there are a lot of 
shortwave carriers. 

13) tf your choice of rig 
has a noise blanker, fine. 
But the cost of an add-on 
noise blanker could prove 



prohibitive to your budget 
You don't really have to 
have one. 

14) I recommend RIT if 
you get a transceiver. There 
are articles showing how to 
add RIT to many rigs. If the 
one you want doesn't hap- 
pen to have RIT, check the 
annual indexes of the ham 
magazines (December is- 
sues) and other publica- 
tions to see if there is an RIT 
modification for the rig 
you're considering. 

15) If your choice of rig 
has a crystal calibrator, so 
much the better You 
should have one. But if it 
doesn't, you can probably 
add one. Refer to the many 
amateur publications for 
details. 

16) You must have the 
proper power supply for 
your rig. When buying a 
used rig, deduct from the 
going price if the power 
supply isn't included. You 
have to get one from some- 
where, and they tend to 
cost more and are harder to 
come by when purchased 
individually^ This is especi- 
ally true of supplies for 
tube-type rigs. A 12-to-13- 
volt dc supply isn't as criti- 
cal or as hard to find, 
though must still meet man- 
ufacturer's specifications 
for the supply for your rig. 

17) You can buy a good 

speaker for a dollar and put 
it in some kind of enclosure 
if you have to. But deduct 
from the asking price if the 
receiver you want doesn't 
have a built-in speaker or a 
matching speaker cabinet. 

18) User*in5talled mod- 
ifications can be nice, 
but if they are poorly or im- 
properly installed they may 
do more harm than ^ood, 
Check workmanship care- 
fully and see that it is 
marked in the schematic or 
manual with the unit 

19) You need the manu- 
als and schematics. If they 
don't come with the rig, 
knock $3 to S5 off the price. 
You're going to have to 
order them and pay for 
them elsewhere. 



20) If the rig looks bad, 
it's probably been taken 
poor care of. Beware Also, 

you should learn to recog- 
nize the difference between 
fair wear on older equip- 
ment and downright mis- 
treatment and abuse. Don't 
knock too much off the 
price for fair wear, but 
watch out for excessive 
wear or abuse. 

21) Certainly don't get a 
rig that's too big and heavy 
for your flimsy operating 
table! However, if you have 
the room, some of those old. 
large rigs have a lot of good 
spark left in them, and 
they're cheaper, too! 

22) Put your ear to the 
ground and listen. Reputa- 
tions may or may not be fair 
Often there is a simple 
modification that can cure 
the reputed problem with a 
certain rig. Ask around and 
see what you can find out. 
Write the manufacturer He 
may be able to tell you what 
needs to be done to correct 
the problem. 

What About Home-Brewed 
Equipment? 

By now you should be 
well along in deciding what 
you want in a rig. However, 
there are stil I more things to 
consider before buying. Be- 
sides commercially-manu- 
factured gear, you may 
come across home-brewed 
equipment for sale at ham- 
fests. You should be especi- 
ally cautious of home- 
brewed transmitters and re- 
ceivers. You have no way of 
knowing the spectral purity 
of the transmitters or the 
sensitivity of the receivers. 
Often they don't even have 
a schematic so that you 
could troubleshoot any 
problems. Workmanship 
may be shoddy, though you 
can find beautifully-built 
home-brews on occasion. 

It's a different story with 
home-brewed equipment 
such as antenna tuners, 
power supplies, and other 
simple-to-build items. Many 
times you can find a home- 
brewed antenna tuner for 



BASSETT HEUUM 
TRAP ANTENNAS 



ISOflTIP 



{\ 



for soldering 



control and convenience 



.-^M 



.j<_ 



Commercial , Amateur, 
and Government Services 

Hfgh efficiency multiband broad- 
SKJe di poles I ha! use only one coax 
lint. Sealed helium filled traps, 
ceramic frequency conirol capac- 
itor, with heavy duty solid copF^r 
inductors. Engineered for up to 
2KW-PEP-SSB. Over 30 different 
amaieur systems including the new 
VAC-30/40/75for "off the shelf" 
delivery. Commercial systems 
designed to specifications. 

Wnte or phone for free brochure 
and price informatior on all trap 
systems, mobiles, and accessories. 

^^ REX BASSETT 

ELECTRONICS, INC- 

1633 NE I4tfi Ave., Bidg, 1 1 
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 33305 
T#l. 305^561*1400 




temperature control 

sow iron maintains any temperature 
between 400-750'F with ±2% 
accuracy to solder delicate com- 
ponents without damage. Allen key for 
temperature adjustment included. 
Heats in 45 seconds, indicated by ther- 
mostaticalty controlled lamp. 
Production 50 — No. 7200 








j^ 



cordless convenience 

High capacity nickel cadmium ballery 
power lets you take low-voltage solder- 
ing anywhere! Complete recharge in 
3-4 Va hours. Partial recharge in less 
time. Isolated tip design with a wide 
range of "snap-in" tips available. 
Quick Charge — No. 7700 

AsfBilabfe at most electronic 

parts distributors. 

WAHL CUPPER CORPORATION 

OHOf^ATO#?S QF PRACTICAL CORDLESS SOLDERING 

Sterling, Illinois 61061 • (615) 625-6525 *^ i03 
"Atantijacturmg Eiceiience Since 1919'* 




Compare the 





Power Line 
Filters 



Modei 
LF6 



Interested In RTTY? 



$169.95 buys a terminal unit kit with the features you need most 

for enjoyable RTTY. Our 3-stage active input filters, built-in AFSK 

and 60 m A loop supply moke the TU-170 a great buy regardless 

of the rig or printer you prefer. 

Sound interesting? Call or write for detaiis about our full line of 

RTTY equipment backed by o complete factory support 

program. 

Flesher Corporation -^ 

P.O. Box 976 Topeko. KS 66601 91 3 •234*0198 

DlitHbutors In Can add and Auitralla 




These fiJtefS protect any sensitive electronic 
equipment from power line transient damage 
and radio frequency intprference Both 
models offer common mode and differential 
mode surge suppression for power line 
spikes ". Rf interference is suppressed using 
both inductive and capacitive components, 
Ideal for compLJters. test equipment or TV. 

LF2 a duplex outfel. 120V. 8 amps man S39 95 

LF6 three separaieiy ffitefed duplex ouiiets. 

120 V, total fyS€d capacity 15 amps, 

powfr switch and indJcator lamp S59.9S 

Add S2.54} s^tipping and ^ndlmg per orctef 

Seivf check Mitti orctpr and proviclp street a(tdi«ss 
fat liPS 5lii|imtnt. Ohio res^Sents add SaSe& Tax 
Charge card tsuyers may oir toil frt*: 

1-800-543-5613 




DRAKE 



In Ohio, of fo* 
m forma ho ft call 
1513 866' 2421 

R. L. DRAKE COMPANY 

5^0 Ricr>ard Sifeei. Miamtsburg. Ohio 4b342 

FNSTlTUnCNAL AND DEALER INDUFRI££ INVETED. 



•See Lfsf of Advert tssrs Ofi psge 130 



73 Magazine • March. 1982 95 



sale for less than the indi- 
vidual parts and cabinet are 
worth- You may find a 
home-brewed power supply 
for less than the transform- 
er and capacitors in it are 
worth! These can be ex- 
cellent buys, even if only 
for parts. But other items 
such as frequency counters, 
electronic keyers, and other 
complicated equipment 
can be a real headache if 
horne- brewed, 

(White on the topic of 
electronic keyers. I whole- 
heartedly discourage 

Novices from using elec- 
tronic keyers. A good 
military surplus straight key 
can be purchased for as lit- 
tle as $3 That's hard to beat 
on a tight budget Electronic 
keyers are difficult to 
operate properly and sound 
absolutely horrid when 
poorly operated. The money 
spent on one can be much 
better spent on a dummy 

load, coaxial switches, 
antenna and tuner parts, 

etcj 

Another item found at 
hamfests is ye olde 23- 
channel (or 40channel) CB 
mobile rig. For $10 to S60 
you can get an AM or SSB 
CB for conversion to 10 me- 
ters. That's a cheap way to 
get on the air if you don't 
mind being limited to a sin- 
gle band. If you're not 
afraid to try a CB-to-10- 
meter conversion, then you 
might even consider trying 
to home-brew your own CW 
transmitter. Especially if 
you are willing to try QRP 
work, your chances of 
home-brewing a good CW 
transmitter are good, tf you 
can get help from another 
ham who is an experienced 
builder, you will find that 
help very valuable with 
such a project. And a home- 
brewed direct-conversion 
receiver isn't so bad either. 
So keep these options in 
mind if your budget is 
limited. 

Anything you can home- 
brew for your station helps 
take the strain off your fi- 
nances, and it gets you off 

96 73Magaiine • March J982 



on the right foot. Part of 
what being a ham is all 
about is being as self-suffi- 
cient as possible and not 
being afraid to try things 
yourself- Most everyone 
can build an antenna tuner, 
an swr meter or wattmeter, 
and other small items 
which can run into a lot of 
money if purchased com- 
mercially. I encourage 
Novices to home-brew as 
much of their station as their 
time, tools, workspace, 
courage, and talent will 
allow. If youVe never tried 
ft, you're missing part of the 
total experience 

I Think Cm Ready 
to Buy Now. . * 

Don't forget that you 
have an option not to buy 
but to swap. You may be 
able to work out a good 
deal by swapping your old 
guitar for something you 
want. Or you could swap it 
for something you don't 
especially want which is 
worth more than your gui- 
tar and probably easier to 
sell Then you could either 
swap that for something 
you do want, or you could 
sell it and use the money to 
get what you want. 

When swapping or buy- 
ing, a good rule to follow 
is: Don'f pay the asking 
price. Even if the asking 
price is a fair price [ac- 
cording to your careful re- 
search and pre-planning), 
offer less! If your offer is 
accepted, fine. If not, you 
can probably agree on a 
price that's acceptable to 
both of you. But if you 
don't offer less, you'll never 
know if you could have got- 
ten it for less. 

Two dollars saved here 
and three dollars saved 
there will buy that five dol- 
lar item later. If you can't 
agree on a price that's ac- 
ceptable to you. walk away. 
You may get called back, 
on your terms, before 
you've taken two steps! In 
any event, decide what 
your top dollar will be and 
don't pay more than that 




When searching for goodies such as coils, roller inductors, 
and capacitors for your antenna tuner and other projects, 
donl pass up goodies like these because they are hidden /n- 
side something else. You very often will find the best 
bargains by rummaging around in and under what looks like 
junki Be carious when shopping at a hamfestf The large 
capacitor in this photo is over 14 inches long! 



for it, even if it hurts. There 
are other fish in the sea. If 
you look on the next row of 
tables, you may find just 
what you want for less than 
you expected to pay. 

Of course, there are ex- 
ceptions to this rule. Once 
you've gained some experi* 
ence, you can spot a real 
steal when you see it In 
such cases, it's often better 
to pay the price, tf you wait 
until later, the guy behind 
you will have already paid 
the price and gotten the 
bargain. So if you're sure it's 
a steal, buy it whether you 
need it or not. You can put 
it on your table and sell it 
for nearer the usual asking 
price and make a little 
money on it. giving you just 
that much more cash on 
hand to get what you really 
need. With a little experi- 
ence, you can become a 
real horse trader and still 
turn an honest dollar. A real 
steal at S3 can be bought 
and resold at an honest fair 
market price of $10, and 
you'll undersell the crook 
at the other table trying to 
get $20 for the same thing! 

Ready to Co . . . Did I 
Forget Anything! 

If you can remember the 
guidelines I've covered 
here, you will feel much 
more confident about your 
ability to judge used gear 



and its real worth. You' 
not oniy be able to spot a 
good buy, like an old-timer, 
you'll be able to spot the 
rip-off s and iunk, too. You'll 
know the right things to 
look for and to ask about 
before laying out your hard- 
earned money 

Plan ahead and know 
what you want and how 
much you'll pay for it. 
And when you find what 
you're looking for, stick to 
your top dollar and don't 
pay a penny more! Never 
go off half-cocked. If you 
have planned and prepared 
well, the time youVe put in 
before the hamfest will 
save you money and an- 
guish when trying to decide 
what to do Don't buy the 
first thing you see unless 
you know it is a real bar- 
gain. Take your reference 
along for double-checking 
when your memory be- 
comes foggy. 

Check out the condition 
of transmitters and such 
carefully. Outward appear- 
ance is a hint, but test- 
ing is the oniy way to 
spot problems. If possible, 
have an experienced friend 
help you. Just having some- 
one assisting in spotting 
what you're after can be 
more help than you realize. 
tf your friend knows about 
used equipment, he can 
help advise you on its con- 



lARSEN GETS l£R OUT 
IN THE COLD. 



t 



The Canadion Arctic presents some of 
the worlds most difficult communications 
conditions. And when you're keeping track 
of expensive equipment recording cruciat 
informotioa you con? afford to lose it In a 
snow drift /he need for a retiabte antenna 
Is a cold hord fact Iti a long way back to 
ttie shop for o replacement whip or coil 

That% why Larsen LM series KOIrod anten- 
nas are used to keep track of scientific 
monitoring equipment on the polar ice. 
Because when communication hangs by a 
slender metal rod. you have to be sure it 
won't foil you. 

That applies whether you're corrh 
municating in ttm Arctic or in a downtown 
traffic jam. If fakes o reliable top perfor- 
mance antenna to do fhepb nght 
And Larsen Antennas da time offer time. 



Larseni exclusive KOlrod plating assures 
that maximum power goes info communi- 
cation —not heat So you can talk further. 
Its a finish that won? buckle undec even to 
icy exposure, 

And the precision tapered stainless steel 
whip provides flexibility and minimizes 
radiation pattern distortion to give you a 
clear consistent signal all the way 

That consistent per formance goes for 
our product integrity tea With a no non- 
sense warranty that wont leave you in the 
cold. 

&} whether you're tracking the back 
country or talking across town youll hear 
Larsen's performance loud and clear Ask 
your favorite Amateur deaier to demon- 
strafe how you can tmar the difference 
with iarsen Antennas 



'Sa 




rsen Antennas 



IN USA Larsen Eiecfronics. Inc. 
Ra Box 1799 i161i N£ 50th Av&iUG }A3ncou^mf. WA 98668 Phone 206^573-2722 

IN CANADA Conodton larjon Bedrpn/c^ tfd. 
2B3E1imAvBnuaUnitf0i \fynco*Jvm d.C. V5f 2C4 Pnon& 604-872-8517 

Wrfte for our heipMAmafmir Ca^og and fhB name off he tieafef neQre$f you 

KUrod' Is a reoKTefod troctemcvk of Lczsan Btt^ro^^ 




^See Ltst a^f Ad¥ertiS9fi On p9g^ 130 



73 Magazine • March, 1982 97 




The old and the new together: an Icom IO730 transceiver sits atop an '*odd couple, " Left is 
a Hallicrafterh HT-37 transmitter, vintage 1960, which tisted for $450 new. At the right is a 
Hammarlund HQ-145-X receiver, vintage 1961, which listed for $285 new. Connbined, they 
weigh 122 pounds! By comparison, the 10730 will do everything the older pair will do, and 
comes in a package less than 4 x 10 y^ 11 inches! The 1981 vintage Icom lists for $829. The 
older pair can be purchased now for about half their original price. 



dition. He may be more little things that you 
experienced at spotting overlook. 



may Even without the help of 

a friend, if you have pre- 



*l.»u 






"ELEGANT" 

DESKNED FOR THE PARTICULAR HAM. 

CLUTTERFREE CONSOLES 



pared well you won't be to- 
tally at the mercy of the 
other guy's honesty or dis- 
honesty. If you talk and 

look as if you know what 
you're doing, there's less 
chance the seller wilt try to 
take you for a ride at your 
expense. The only thing bet- 
ter than the know/edge you 
should now have is real ex- 
perience. But that, too, will 
come in time. 

I haven't forgotten my 
first attempt at purchasing 
a receiver and transmitter 
If you follow these guide- 
lines and suggestions, you 
can avoid the mistakes I 
made. I learned the hard 
way, but you don't have to. 
So go get 'em, tiger. And 
good tucklB 



Acknowledgement 

My thanks to N4BGU and 
KA4YBJ for their assistance in 
assemt>ling equipment for 
photos. Also a special thank you 
to KZ4J for his photo of ''TtieolcJ 
and the new together/' 



'•J 



» I 



^T * 



i 



PRICES START AT $203.35 

SEND FOR FREE BROCHURE 



,^S9 



98 73 Magazine • f^arch,1982 



Our new RTTY 
headquarters 





We've grown to meet the needs of Amateur 

and Commercial communica- 
tions around the world. 



COME SEE 

THE ATR-6800. . . 

Now available with TELEX/ 
Radio interface, data encryption 
(DES algorithm or Microiog's 
**CRYPTOLEX"), time diversity, 
full duplex, ARQ code operation, 
expanded memory (12K CMOS 
RAM or 128K "BUBBLE") for 
your commercial communica- 
tions applications, plus automatic 
computer training program 
modules for Morse code. 
Triads etc. 

THEACTl. .. 

The Amateur's answer for an 
economical full feature CW/ 
RTTY/SSTV system. Just listen 
for someone on the air com* 
pUmenting his new RTTY station; 
it'll probably be another ACT-1 
user! It's easy to hook up, easy 
to operate and easy on the 
pocketbook. 



Get a live '*ON-THE^AIR" demo of your favorite 
MICROLOG systems at our new engineering and 
manufacturing facility in Gaithersburg, Maryland, 
conveniently located near the Montgomery 
County Airpark. You can operate the N3JL sta- 
tion on HF, VHP or just tune around the bands. 
The new address for our manufacturing and demo 
station is 18713 Mooney Dr. (like the airplane), 
Gaithersburg, Maryland 20879. 

For technical assistance call (301) 258-8400. 

(301) 948-5307 is still the number for our execu- 
tive and accounting offices. TELEX: 908778, 



MICROLOG 



t^Bl 



See Usi of Advertisers op page 130 



INNOVATORS IN DIGITAL COMMUNICATION 

73Magazine * March, 1982 99 




ELECTRONICS 

61 Lowell Rd-, Hudson, N.H- 03051 

9-6 Daily (603)883 5005 12 5 Sunday 

riJI-TS |-LECTRON[CS is pleased to introduce our two 
;icwly affiliated stores, ARLINGTON RADIO is a new store 
ierving the greater BOSTON area. Their speciality is a new 
>ystem af CONSIGNED sales with an automatic marl^-down 
^V(?ry ihtrtydays^ BUZZARDS BAY ELECTRONICS is an 
established electronic supplier serving CAPH COD and the 
PROVIDLNCE area. TUFTS ELECTRONICS will be estal> 
lishing a few more affiliate stores to make your shopping 
more convenient. F'or details on how to become an affiliate 
store contact our main office in HUDSON, NIL 

BUZZARDS BAY ELECTRONICS 

T96 Main Street 

Buzzards Bay, Mass 02B32 

617-759-3376 



nu ^nMKic 



writ a-za ftiz hi^itm ^vmi ncM^ 
srrs jnr-EM rnaccoBO' 

CN-rS tUlCT'Kmf rtv^fr 
P-TS J>Hlb4C PATOi 

El-;4<i ijrHii kz i;i^ f slier 

*L-*HJ -SWl hT Ck lfLI„Sfft 
Dh-LBi!^ \WX} MI RTIir rii-tEn 
-ta.'-WKKI 4KNr Ml rlLli,!^ 

Mli-r AUi RM«B TKiaiUVI HJAflO rcp. rp- r 
NWC-i' i*»ic Btstra iM i-iai Ipr-'J' 
F^l ^*« NO* lft-Tj*-H-T/qi,-l(MO 
My-7 RCJiaTT (fl-D rcfi m-r 
ha-? wiwiP fiw '-LLrt. 

rrm.-> n^l^lir: MXriT FIK IW:- 7 

Tors Dvwtfiic HDiLLE ncc frt itit-t 

Tl^TJ DYHn(»IC Ct4K "?(: '■"(» ™-T 
'NHH EER^tCE tWrUH. 'm 7^-'' 

twra Bthvitt n*i^jw. fsm •-.r 
i^-vviR-r i:.«iM J' :in^|VJU3; -kiT 

44fi--FA HQIEC H MKXR r«n m^-* 

i«-fS 2«»d t*<-^^^ rtCTfft T(««n 
l^li-TlOu »UH IkA 10 IVTCn TUHER 
• 'L030 4VL ViAJLH HKI 11^4)4 
CS- ■" *£njH L'4yi I l^k 'l'^ ^^E ^1^^ 

EC- 3DC 3W] iUirr OUtTT'- LJQ40 

tL-swe i<HKi imTr oi>»™ LCrtc 

#4^-? RtW^n gli^^ P FCK n^T S1d^331hl 
Pf-ra HhCA SltflH.'F FCn- IB'T hl«J-Z2DV 
l.'T 4.U1- L3 2KM ^VT C- n 

L-'JH i»!i- IS. I .j^t* trr « •*£ 

i-S(JOt riJCt li: i«:*;UCU #Ofi .-Tl ^ ^ FEft L 751- 

T(XK>e kEVif^flQ rj;*M..Wir^1 IDHB TERniMH. 

nfe-s mcK kJvwcM f'nti lA-B 



I A^ . 'yt-- 



1*5. 






ira 



LJT. 



1MT* 









snJ. 

l.'<4f!:.SC' 
I^ISTl'SO 

■a».iO 
i-i.'so 

LDfi.'SO 
?*.-5S 

:I3.9D 

241}. 90 
T*. so 

».« 

T»il. V.1 

12^;. » 

■O.SD 




PISCOUMTS- FREE CATALOC - EXPORTS- PACKAGES 



the indispensable 




THRUUNE 
WATTMETIR 








ff««iH'r>i.> tJAil^cA^HfJ 


fl^WWt 


i 


I'i 


loa 


np 


4H- 


Haptir 


lb 


*4 


J4iJ 


»(t 


i««a 


^1 MJ1I^ 




\^ 


'•.4 


■.D 


M 


lllfr-iV- 




111* 


kl.N 


liMl 


10{ 


t\f*i\f<, 




J^* 


;ii 


^■itl 


.►Vf 


M1v¥^IM 


^UH 


lit* 


sm 


*.uri 


Sflt 


VWvi.Jir^ 


i[X3H 


ICXIA 


HJtX 


looij 


lOCK 


i'A 1 h% ^1 U 










%4xri 


14X11- >ti did t. 


KJUIIH 


1HI1II4. 


mOTK 


Kicxjri' 


1«iM 


j"inr>win^ 


rl^J1M 










SHlUlKwdEU 


^<1IIIH 











A*_l_ I «IWC-E f^f^™ 



u-f^ 1v m-rqii 'M'el. miiFi rOn ijo^'bAi 



«W4-r^[jK' A^TC*^4^M¥¥iB 



fcL •*•* f^aiJif »t|ej™* 



A^TMoMi I±CJl%f* 



rie •Atm 



AS-** 
flB-TH 

lti!,-a(>A. :;Ck M«^ 
'iw-3iQn 3Ci ftr- 



F L3V3C IVOLLAKD rUHCR BLTn. I> 
af^ JWtt 'HtUlllLUlfErV l***!* fc^f^T 
M«^ lI- vW MMlL ATin FOiSIt BJ^TL' 

13V« **bllL*TEft l»0«F- •kPflt.l' 

l^vDC RJCr r<«BP: BfFt. T •! 
VLOU. DTED IZVDC bUin. I 

BUPTl.Y H|.Tk DlHi. rC^UtS 



[7 113 BOLib rfAfJ llWltiFtElt l±VfC 4fl U^flC 



i;i».'3 



1 1^. ^^ 



^■■■^ 

1 .1 3 . *T 
I?4.<13- 
1^4. y* 

772 i^ 



■■7, no 



li^LIU 



ifUL 

iM'.'SS 

1 .'* , Sv 

]4T.SfJ 



Ni^ •"■TT ie|-fcl» «*«t5PT i(l-I^» W TVPE tt 
t*;i MTThFTFF ■.j'vAC'CAM.t N:?r iw 

■i3«i 3-10- mz s-w w^Tncni:" 
4Mi' v»» -~i-HiPH wiirp^iFP 

mz-'s^ "^ RAMI 9a rt4u#CL [ri:L.uiii: Q|iicnn>| 

Wj-IS'* " BAM> 3<i n««*L *Y-,^*fi f*r> BCCrtLL 

'Ac- 2117V ' vq^fr 2<'' ^^^^t*Kl. ina-aoLi. "ifzf^t 

K-2IV>:L b- IP^K l9 dirrH" -ll/EEAllCn ^ hOL9 
K-lM •UiUC4«LD n BAm tk O ir ll l l C L&YHr'ie6J [Et 



ftetvirji-tK'F^ 



»¥-£ M:i.-'-'cr rMvcc 

Tft- I A. ■ALLJt' l.^a-Kl »<J 
iq-Z* hPH^ M-» 1*13 *l 






ni TiH FDF r- 



A^- I nc^Ei^aijirv nzHip wnTTv i.£Vt^ 

£3^49 ».» «a FT hINt LJM6 llV mxCP tN«TI4.L 
WHC'CV 19 S3 F1 WjriU Lillft AftE'i CtitOtft UOria^ 

\i7 M ttt f "!■* 1.4W6 **F* |H Tijh^w iniTH^ 
3'|14'F-Ll3' td^F- HftST IKI^nBIT 'tWD-FV'" 



'JlL 



CHAM A c:B 



■ 4AIL 



L*V 



■ 4M]tL 
1*Hll| 



iitiTih. LED Z>*t*m Dll 
niniTPtrpT ifnEr4.T«JF:3(: Bt^i^FR 

^lfl.•^i!ii■^.•■^^ftKHI/fn./*a^^c a\.i>m',£fi 
HH'ailf MDt >nv*<¥iiTF..''M<itce iKk' 

lUiFrL ^Tid't •flM-'tt'i-v ^B itAs:q 
^fuWt^ « Fqai «xi LRfli.r rcr -uml^l 

CK^^:^ ]■ lOnT Eir L'dllLJl FO^ bP^Tj. 

H: C-MkS P4(^ A^ttcm' DC CAB.r FOt D3DPII '■OtTrLES 

HWtD niC "IFLPCKFCN' MFNP H IS * Pl 3 I^Lt" 



caft-u t^fikmu-mm 



**fl.?3 

in, ^ 



42- 13 

3^.13 



i¥."ia 



ItfDulMI 
1 I1.7P 
22fr. 2^ 
.in A. ta 



iT».'ta 



I'k.btl L.Clf4I3t 



**rMtJ «ATf WETF^i=*H 



1V4 bUm ki^ui 11*1 n tafiTF-R TD :iMin'i: Lsootnnf 

t!<|A ^,mHi -..ntia iiflrThT.ri.P ro SfK^IHZ I OTiiita I I Ei 
TSa [kJ>f1» UMDl -iMilTHlTlfF TL" *:»i**l3 fVmnl I B 

Wi Dumiv LiHW rtt Ko »»<? e-vifi iutte 

37-1-1 *H nHlEi^iATtm' L^ ^TEP< TQ kJ 01 23nn«r 
Hl^ ftFCrMHLC T/Pnil]lCH 1 13Vl>i: 



344 3. PDCLTCCIiJ tMjn isiuxfbimi 

^iKO a rot- ^fj'^'J- is^'.''^^ ij^ jfTTc in 

-y^t ? IPUJ 7 -put! I I tun 



Rtaaan 


»aL[ 


±3«.i)>» 


JlT,-!Hi 


■ «.<» 


iir.3P 


lOT.TS 


]0T.-» 


»*.* 


»*,» 


*^-?a 


K7,Sd 


M.SC 


TT. d<? 


fir-au-ff 


tAf-t 


K.W 


W-» 


7J-5* 


zr.30 


n.So. 


29. 3« 


±t,n) 


«-9i 


M:*^. 


W.*! 


'■*-n. 


i».ao 


Z?-P» 


22^. SQ 


24.30 


24: dp 



3 FT Kll-WSU M.F*V.-75? RDTh Ehd^S, 

in FT Ra--isu utr-. ir.'? ddii< chDa 

^-O F- KO IKW ■H'-n.-/4'' BI-'iH i:MKi 
n F1 £@-5fllJ iIjPi..;^ IDIH ETttS 

loa r: hc-^ki ii/PL-Ta' torn thts 
J F-T *ii-iu tt'in.-i^ iOFhi ehatf 

n f R!>-4lu iljpL-23U UTTh EHM- 
^ fT h^-flli k^Pu.-SS^ >CiiM 'I.itbj 
73 F"" '■Sailtl lt''L-73l BO-M tT'tlS 
JUP T1 itUi^gu *iri'L-irtf+ KITH FHDE 

ic.],^OH I'-Hi FT m r.crip aar^ cmile he#^^ 

«p~;4Xl -IMS TT RU.BI iP^^iL ]-*0 I- T !"**• 1^1 
llJl*. Il» ICLDrk) BIJl H;j-Suni. |Tv m^-^.! 
'SlU-liKi It^i ■> I Mhii4Li CDPy^A BAA IB 

1M-JT3-23 25 FC3 FB^^+t* *{!*< H|t-ajpji fLK Pl..r3T 
lJ0'-|?fr-23- £S PC* ■*(» -FOn BS-SBUcPJl-BP. ri^m ■'^-iS* 

4ie-BiL-|Cx> loo ft bj F^um LOrrcp vtiPiC KBfi Auvi i r 



-303 

51 h 

330 
376. 

■a? 

d(n 

■100 



LftL.Sv 
?5B ■ 51' 

4?. so 



FH«IE 
4S2 . SO 
4I«I.3^ 
13^4.30 
331. 30 
2S4.*J. 



S«-E 

4«i3VI 
t J.9CI 
7S.B0 



■ .'90 

iEr.'9fi 



•Km* 

74. '30 
IDCSfl 

I i:t.3<> 

I «i.i , 3^ 
17:1, ?iO 
243. :o 

'«'<L.:Kf 
■ ■9.9J3 
Ztw.'Sy 
1T3.-9D 
7T.3C 

2.91] 
IA,»4 



I. Si 
4-^.311 

34. 50 
'4*iM' 

tBI.^O 



(US MODEL 15-t60MTRS) 
Drake L-7 

2kW Linear Amplifier 

lOm-lGOm coverage, 2kW PEP, IkW CW, 
fiTTY, SSTV operation - all modes. fuU 
rated iriput, continuous rJuty cydS- Accurate 
built-in rf wattmeter, with fofward/revefse 
readings^ Is, switch srffl'Ct'ffd. By -pass switch- 
ing for iilFdighT thruutjhi, low power upera- 
lion without hsvintji to turn of^ am=pli1ier, 
Qaridpasi tuned input circuitry f-or low dis- 
tortion and 50 Ohm Input impedance. 
Operates From 12Q/34Q Vac. 50/60 H? 
pnmiry line VQltage^ 



HV— QM^i:'^ ^AfM-r-EFilHAi) 



DHAiKI 



T V 1 ^ 1 1_ t ews 



in»i 3un'm.sa>' 



1^-i TUT mcp at Liiqi WL^m^Tnutui 

uF-i l-a tmtUt Elk nECEFT I tDLe- 
Tg.42 LOUW LEW «ra^ M L I El< f» FBllhiH: ■ IBF* 
fV-jML' I'^^T^lf I.IV F-AK*. flltcr Fm ')Wpra"nT£*fl 
TV-fW joa £»*i Mi-EH paub r [L^IEF! F(M Iv SKU 
Tv-ra ra (wn H-EOf ni^s I'll, ic^ "Ffl* tj kti 



•s* 



Rfc. B« 



T-vmni 



@pi4-i« IFLPB^ raqon .>^iudi>aii >-i74 ^V^ifR 



i«imjL#n 

J'*0.4.KJ 

HW.'l>U 



qoLL 

S».30 

L* • *;•■ 

J*. 5(0 
■ 4-9» 

^.■39 



*43.?0 

:j?3.M 



T HAflfl £TE' 



t\-t'' -«4 l^i 'B^'M* hAI>. IF 
£T 1.E i.£4T'lCn CPAC 
iF^-SXm H^lltiiv PbCk 

^lE-nc: "MJbiLf c^i^w^Ft .^^ ■ UU.4 ciMn 
■04 : ^C'^DTt ^^tfl^H" "^C 



D BiMi sri FLFCJ-ma .;i^ I. CD i«««i*n.i> iwtp 

b-UQ2 . 1-^ FCCUUC'-i AMD rSHBiK'TMvCl -^b-'FI 
l^bui iMCuC >I.-||K ..EK I E ''TEW '^E.£ki hU..p.-lll.lLl I tl I 



FC)i IR All WVIt CElF CDHTP-IICE' V]ab>BL'^ih " 1 
FQI lt\t!*4 hi! ABDVT Ml TH IWrTJIC 'uWTROl 

airwK rai mp-ci-Atl Fti*rt li>ii«>: MS ktmn 



17^ .'W3 

n't, ts 



IZb.nq 
24^.0^ 



I4».»S- 
LTT.T5 
J4t.Ta 
13 *..¥» 



M»*n— HHEX 



•K-L IBUGilB P«4£tlJ HJT" t*K 
iW.-i^ tlAliiiarir K^r ujTH -BAV 

-Ai"^ fl^Cft^mi-z in:iTF 



i-i [-T-i=ict4 1 ei«c± 1 L-t.'oecai^c s 



urDTt 



I±U«3HeR«VFT 



■aicpy 3:^0-,/ a-St> 



FCBULF" 




73«M ?^'ZZ3 ml I' feLfcNfME ta-MI 

bL-T^-^fe * Ck.4F^tr1 1.7 lUWCUEUr'!:i4 PCUi £ •«: I C:M|i. 

tilS*>-7 2aD-2Z3 htT 7 LLE1M'< lAnit 

«ZQ-it *isn-Sria "it II FiFi^H^ "«-AM 

^AtlH-li 449 mu Lt ELEFItl'1 HEV 
Afl]e',22a» TK-'ZIS "^ll- ftjl*.! FllMWB 

fltis-4** '■9CI-1JO '*Ja fliHca. rahccf 
^ii--S!*-t ti:- rill' ¥ii p.EreHr -Hi's- hl<"^ 

|k9D-3 ^ rhi 3 EUL^^T Htiv- 
ABD-S 3D •HI 3 tLLr^tt K*** 

M}4f"l< *;? JklT II ELEKH7 S^-B,^ 
Of-i-70 7;^ IWI m ELEFEfC LUL IW'X 
Cl'ira *I2 wE 2p EL5rKHl Ji ildPfl 
FH't 45--M l^lJ Ri"** USABECIL 
M-4l^ ».* IvhE R:[M(a \MRT3D(H. 



i^iamiMf^f^nR- -t t^t* At4TENtMAn 



L^ 1 Ze- 
is « ^.) 



LLEFCr'r FAI-4«MD ltf.4ri ID 
t1 EWMl Ifll BHIC HL^H Lt.'' 
STAEhtUW ill*. *(nftLll(A*L 
$<43l«Jt9|l SIF.FL MWDnAH: 
T L ;-.^ rWl .4DB OM p! I I l-CFl Fd 

■ 4 .23 HM<J: rnUl -IfHTEEM. MtlTZftHA 
f 1« J I Ht^a 'CHW '^EKTl'^BL >U|l^M^ 

TFHF uer'rt«. *«^Tfi«^ 

21 2fl f*ff FSWdQ iDITlEfit 
2D mtMb. « BkAn^n *£'■»< 



■**.■^'^ 

Jl*.-»3 
£<f.¥d 

32.^9 
44.73 

■ijT.»a 

Af ,«3 



A£Au.^ 

IIT.T3 
IST.YS 

33T.Ttf 



■V+Hj- 1*N 3' 
t.i'4.. TFiMX L 

ll^A<. TPWCE. K) rML 



WEFH 

'dill' l>ri 
H l»dUE 



PPCD£ 






'■''■I52P 
V' ?<'l 

v->niR 

VWIB TDUr 3.*.- 'mt «flF* eATTtRT/r«:N FFCBC 
m lUPt -■■: rwi '•'■* l>Cki rhP PfHUK Ic'BI^ EVDIV 
AT-|iiAr ^-l l*U 11.^ 1 10 LOU £«•■ ■■•4ftt 4f^''(;C**i 

HLJf 



7B.3B 
IBT^ 30' 

I'.'SB 

tj.ja 

4f.B^ 

If. 94 
•*.3fi 
3?. 30^ 
m.SV' 
4'f.M> 
*i'Vi 



3»,30 ' 

taV.3U 

IS»,5i: 

I t4.l» 

72T.90 

2B^.*3 



S'TliF^ "KF*! I^ETEHT tfrE-*"* iWF.*i Si'fl-iP';^ 
l-f^ •■ VMp TAAF vCRl ICFI. LO-44 t^Tlm 
^HilV J BAlID THAP WCF'3t'i I'S-U" •ifTtRi. .. 
■tl-|4.H 3^B l|n« Z FtF "rM" ^ If AiTCWtP 
CE-Sii .^IH rU-tPt**! *"T 1^4 24 ETJD 
C>ai-3» 1' i<TR CUIhCAR US m n!ir»>: xlF KHFll 
IH1^33(' 7!!^**'Z EELJMift^ Hllil 1^*^* LFF t-^LUt 
O^'-ivU inn Bfl.L|ll OCK 'lfr«1i:»i Cni IhRAfl 2 HTPW 
>a-r-3l4|. 7 F4r b^^ Ca.lAFIV1 AMT PDP T nrK^ 
flO^-1 HdBlLE QjTTEF noUHT ^.'-B ?! 24 lt*f:«l- 
l«i<'J HWELE TOM. '<rpil ^^IJ i 34 TmSflC 
irt-1 !!<- 1*^1 FHFl FOJEfft 'iKHnn' W M^EHW 
l*-i M" l*ai sac KHTCM rtllilJr F* Mtllfupi* 

Bw-jii^ L* i«rEP tpyMqi* 

HK-u If )C*CA AEEDhATDP 

RM-17. L5 PETEP' wunHmrart 

f)fl-l^ -!« hCSTA |F:f,y!M^IDM 

Rt1-40G W «CTtn hi&l'' lT>t« l%t«ln*TJlfi 

imre J* pet* iiLau«iii)« 

Wl-ni^ n hETFR Hi FOtER REIDHflltRI 

|tn-0b aa IE1E4 REUDtMrni 

PW-OQE DP WtrEP Ml F<^*tl« ftf pilftArilH 

a^-3 ''-jnCFll: I '^ ?>iiitMtf£t EIII.1. aniJ. % 9rHEHb. 

a^-f uftwtPOL,:/^ ;:^A\tiu:aa jr£tL i«>ljl 'txf''' 

iai-3 EEBHKHLEAL SSt^lMJSi STEEL Sn^rMl 
ElA 1 Inl A 



aro.oo 

TS3.*!1 
■"TS.OB 



it*."*!' 
iL».« 

S*T.T3 
4*i« 
S*.fl3 
54. 'JS 

32. M 

iSfl." 






■•■Hi** 



3*. (^ 

IP. V3 
1¥.T3 



l»9A 
in^3Bl> 

l>;94A 
LS3H>. 



3WMJP J -L:i<'HCIlT TFIE-»*M> rei>l^l ! FfP- 
M}-I hV-QLIAII 2 tLt"ei*t OL*i< rPt^-BMBBF 

iMSip ■! fi.i?ieHT TPI'DMCtM 
rMat*:3 3 ELE'«*<T TF|-FP«BfH 

fMBOKi ¥1^1*1 iHij»*£H»Eftii i. v-vwmit im-Sfcie 

^Hrw^^ ■? flEHChTB THE BMBieF 
Q^|'1/|3A a ELEFEN: IO-ES »* T(F*S W-AM 
^P3»R ? tLt>*ir^ ih> p^rtB BGWI 

3 ELEhCTJl E3 •■iE>' -K^I 

:? fLRI^lv'' l-L' r*TER ^JW 

n eleh.Ni tjo .iig^pi 111 14 rtR P*:ai+ 

-I- ELbr^Ni '.Lm4 4i:k-w '■'A Ttll-l-fl Bt.i¥< 

1 ILtT-^ I L :.■•« j;>»< fit rtTR BCAf, 

■ ^L^ii^Hi Jr., ^^\^, HAH 

2 CCtfCMT *fl WTCB BtPFI • 
P™"i»X li*! SiMoLt in ri«u BO fctHA 
mil* [itMiLFT Ad. MtD BO Wfirt 
THIV [HIUai.i:T LP. TMiLi' dp Ff: r£l*$ 
['■v riHicp ' Lr> I'l-tnj fri ^^^R 'i^RT3n*i_ 

"UUT pr^ '!>' Fl^H- ufRT^EM.* 
IHAF' ITII.^L(«|. I'O iMqj 20 rE 4t*» 
rnFlf VERT I EN. Li» rrtHJ 4-^ FtlltAt 
rp^ UEP-kLW. ^1 4h#ai lu .^TT^IRB' 

\^\\A flt^ tf-fr^fi^ H!R 3UV4 T tLtltnH 
LPfMn ^IT En- 't^UITF TU 1«|/Dk 



zppg 

IDIIT 
IMIHI 

liAVU 
LDA^T 
EK'^D't 



H-Y-— UOi ] "^ 



::tlc^ktU«^ — LJWT TCTWie:^ b 



sj Fi air 3uiFiiii1 * » + 1 S<> ***< 
HBi-3UiT2 9a n iibt tajfPWir t 39 fp sd hri- 
™-i»ni ra * I BJK BiiPpgin P-.3 bo rr 30 m- 

Hb-S-tOB If FP KUF SJLPFCTtr T ^ 'f *3 W(^ 
Ii4-3AUD ■3A FT ECLF B<JPFIlI<.r LA. 9£/ r^' ¥> t^^ 
KKFUW f!> r r 4|!Lf igi#Fflftl 3* HO F1 «J FTH 
lA- i.Wl'?' U pr HLMC O^EDirr b.a ^ Fi :^. r^ 



ifi'D-'sa 

».« 
■]*,■» 

*.3C 
.*¥.91i 



LZO.SC 



]3t,i>0 



911L t 

IS-. 50 
W,4B 



^IHHii#fii«H^- 



I^lCPOiT 



HSMt 






UT'.1& 



S li^E TKI4 .n'MT^PM^AS 



RFAI*' 



EKit 34 to 3A 



U-E* li.«-l<4 WII LI ■LET^Hl 

if-if .1*4-141. nil: 14. tLfnEMi 

*E4-1 3M,!J-I4fl Hp.1 k4 EVDmiT fXP^_ 

If I ?|4i UEtH ptiMntmt. 

aiat-4 4 E2.EI<AFI EMP r%f^1 

AI4T-LL IL FXtFtPd EPfiAtr 

*14+-iClt » H.5**IUT d4J VtFf H; hC*:i FOft 1 4-4* 1 47 

BltS-K PLO *j4iT IJ #lthi hpn^MM 4MID Fl)|l|«ll6 

nx-^ HLhDQ FtWldl:^ iJ^-lnJ IWE 

AI44-LOT -t%fij: Ki El EICMT IHl-El fin l¥i»A 

Ai44-toi' Si's *iJ ja elefemf '"19^ M<-r^imui 

A1M-f£ "llfl Ml FDP r 'Mi'S'' AMTFlmAB 
AL44-7 k444Ml T ELL>«Nl •t'W 
AI-^A-ll J.44 l«<I LL tUlrCNl K.MI 



Rg.93. 

U*. V3 

4T.'ra 

««■.■?! 
■311. Ta 

^.T3 
41.30 



tUft- 2pCl2 BUTCTHT EC mJ ^^» flO-ja WHC 2I(W |I*P 

Cl*(-^:il F^PHljrti '^MttCCJfcl a- E3llft-30C'3 

S^N-jllJA ^Mi'.'PIC: hClEP OKRfS IKtALb I ^'i-*. HT1RS. 

fJM-340 3MB 'rWP mi* I,.'**!* «€fE.FEF *fc^ l*rB9 

CN..3SC SMT^P** n1*l imSE J*iF"-i L44'-=» P^i 

i|''-4Vd atJitO *CM-JS xivior 

RF-ib.7p FUJlD C'SOFlER Kit EU I I'll*l0* 

n«^«4r> fepcie fkhji-le "ic 

L-hi'A3^3P ]Ji;7-2 "Ih irJiA'.-iiATT hC^K [U4M. HCtBL^ 



Cf-*3r> 

cs-atii 

C.*|-*«3 



^4^^-^ai' J*hJ 5Mi.>hpr[ p^te!» PUI% i4JI>kt 
UH-4M» h"l.pfltJl: '*''*'< BJiTh .qC. TQ, 2 Kk 
T '"ja EC^-f is^'I li^H vlTH aOO<i^3 
4 PDA EEAJ SU:-CH -90 OV I tUjl ■•'> I CPH 

^ artHCH rtifflt p« IP*!* win *» nut cwl 



4W,« 
l^T.T^ 

■Hp.'S 
3P.T3 

k5Rr» 

Lbl.79 

zzs.'ta 

•T.Z9 

m^'U 



'ZQT. '^ 

is*'** 

34?. «3 
ltl.«3 

M'.-«a' 

T4.«3 
Li"^.** 

JM(4',4(f 
24Vl34 

i! 1 1 p^4 

n » . *S 

11».»3 



FfWJ,AK 

3*»r'M 



i»t.9b 
242.30 

Z«l,34j 

i!lii.:»(i 

2r4.Bf> 

1 4 L . iK^ 

t41'.S& 

L2J-.50 

U>. SO 

L J».5& 
JT+.-SO 
21B^S« 
2i.at-W 

il4..'&0 

3dS.3Q 

**,■» 
ins-Jfl 
337.3a 

L4V.S4^ 



'bS'W 

f-JO.*-? 

li'MI.'W 
SflS.'30 



1E«-3 t^aa WATTE. '■O 13 F1^B UHLU 4-3^'' I uB 
KIl-3 ?NU WI''l'!l PItM AFt* UQCB TiHtl ^-HdJ 

IJC •HiL4(rt MtT* S** Mf* ■►■AS PeTlFl 



HIDUI.-Afl BIU.E 

fe95i DO 4*. ■» 
"44.^ (JO **S.^ 

■ t44.Al 13*5. 3f> 



Lt;-2K|.. iiT-itio FiTP iixEp itrct. Li>a>¥< ipu 

ir^^MR rUTF AEIITODE FPI Hfi* C" I^Uftll 
LU-'l^La If* tC}j¥i' fC :k i 2VaC BTTE rPEO. 

iEii3L A r»rif i6p >>■"* *C i i?''K 

EE-9£ED .t. niK (K> UAIlEI IS'V uy^x-ll/} L EI'EOI 
EC-UfP'-Fi!.-.;^ 5!}ii^ 'Wb 4C BdTFLV 
Sf.-rSCA -T WMU I0CV1* -DCH CUVn lt€Cv I xvtC 

3C-!ri>? iTf-^ llTIi \MI UATT IT lETiK IT^IIC *\lt 

Jt-SSJ l^in m iiM mKKM uvh tSvK- 

]C..23A IHTH rpi l-j Htir P tntl E I)l i4]C l^vQE 

ic-zTPH i pi«i pflBlLE TOi- ™ ™ Fin nw pije; 
i(:-344 4KTh pM.'^EKEie FmaLi Frvti 

iC'iSA ? MTTI HALKTE l^.'FLCl;' **V W>4A 

rr.-2iftT Ec^a wi'H 1EXX.H rc>4 
it-irraa 3 "T^ s^ib PQRii««tr 

L(:-4"i' '<':F<><^' 3BP 'nSfllBBLS 
LC-V:;] t N'F ^ti 'P^K'itH.f 

p^ E'a 4C 's^.^^.r "I'll 'Vi-irt 

F*-iS |lC *JWM if5*i 3Sin 

p^-i Hill .dATT i.ihcau pep lE-':* 

I ■{U'lu L-JinA^FX FDA EE lA 
■ 2S|M AT T.2^ HECE' 
';9{l|H MTED 

P4,KPLL>^ CIWC FEK ]C'3A 
42? HH LQ.BV NEiZT P'^ K-rt 
D3E SFftrr*! 'eFt*i«,ft 
MpE^h PHW PATCH FEH 4fP ETtllt^v 
EECL EhOi rtm 
DC or PotK f-CFl It-iA 
r. u ^3l. liTA F'nn T2CA 
BVAHEH lie *3PI rC-ilfF 

Ir^ATP^ E^UE: 'l^RTHEP CRHt F[^ IT'-FA 

aM-7 [tCtbC -HIE ' Pil* 

■a^TI e P3H toBt ■"If 

1c- Mt f^ HMl- ^'.'Wli HMC!tCL:a J. a -WitTTB 

1C-5* *m ■*nw: fiti. hd rnxti '(we 

r-3|4T JfcM Pip» I.EH ^JiaS tSuP "HStP* * EI+l) 
^-9001. 3 lCEi:iDh LC P'»t" -..11* FiLTiA iAI* 
E-a™. 1 iaC13<l« "b AW^ ? Al*^ NPli 
E'SLi-LL 1 ^C'lJl*' l!l ■A**^ At i|HWr 
C-?a.b-l..£ ^^ .AbSME 22P ViV 

t^S*-lF 11' MO >l»l 11 1 Ah FPUS' f^FLrfift FW IW 
CilT TT -Ji9 Aht'l^ '&f?9- «*« 
-■rSli-»S 4S nMJv! JWii'^lM- 



W.Af4T'F^CII4 X CH 



SJ 



iF-9 
CF-3 
FWF* 
fF-l 
BE -I 

F«1-.-F 
kn-30 



|TB». <» 
T4«*^™ 

*}«-« 
i34P.Da 

i4Pa..4o 

l^,«F 

?««■** 
^pn-.oo 

2J»i3(i' 
1B9.O0 



H'f-^ 



2ii?:?3i 



A(ilAK 

.PA. 3D 
ST.OO 

Pk.aD 

■ ■.30 

IB. 34 



L9TT.i»- 
*44.KI 

31TT.HJ 

lS?*.54 

T34.90 

»!'*■!«> 
4T^.Sh> 
4'J1.50 

S^^.'SC' 
14. T. 9"' 

143.3a 

2SB.3a 

B1< . 31.1 

IT.90 

L2.Sa 
4'.S*J 

.L2V.99 

■a.jia 

JT.'SO 
S*.X! 

3*.54 
39. 3D 

i4.'aij 
i4.. 84. 
*».54. 

IMJ.5t> 



3 3.-»* 
a*. 90 

ai!.3v 

I J . Sh 
I I .3C' 
'IJ.SD 



P eEle e^'' El: famt*Titf«mcii ^nC^K 

FEElD DA'P 3M. ^HltLDtD -"t** 1 0" FEfi AUl 

fiSne p£4Hr &9'*^'^cr HI kii /RUHX-Pi Fr:R CH/m^'iJ'RSCI 

(.^iShfCIl LISHMl ElVDflEEF b4JV. MMtt} FH'dfh 
•rf*]l3:.l ^AMlKLLft* MS4*i 6J*i.JT(C liinjj] »Ji.1IP 



43*. »^ 

I Sl*.»5 

JA'5.'T1 

LIf ,S 



EAtr'1'9 PTI^f* «1B WTEF VBT IP BhilF I pntlC 

1,4^0- lo pnci •<](] D1U pj6>TiPv IF 8«iri 

rtPWll DlQirh. l*D PI-Er »fn.fMEH 

M:P4i-t rtHju in; ixa 

^iTFRhAi UFEMEP hi Fh. !ltLCLtFA.E F|l. PEIK 
pii1T£J|liA iL#ltH ;^*liAF l'0*^B ^TFR AhT/Dto 

Bq-l^ ptikELE iCuit ^ih; xpceem ittmictt^ 

ikFxUT^ hfFD FEfl TB-- 1 3t7 

aiaEFA. i-pia r]EnFfl)kj.A* w^rth ^™' "t-iH- 

AMFEHMA TLH74 >a> 4^ll0 

-miBILl: BPia(.*ifei HG*f te-t TO 
Inte V^n-V- ■•■;>! T^'I^Fi iS-Bv TOAIVB 

ni^nHK. ■riwm 'Uk n-ii.H>4' 

E-kO' ;3 1 lit'i '.. |4<^ -nHtF- 2 KHi PGP 
Bifll {.(^ l*Oll|TF)fl IDtWE 



ti>t,S4 
k3':'.3d 

if*.*? 

I^Pt-*- 
12. SE- 
'4l.«V' 



-m-9d 
3kV,Si7 

15-*a 

2fl,5Q 
41. 3D 
4L.44 
B-1.54' 
LIT. SO 
IL.!V> 

77. SO 

ts.so 

■ 1.9CI 

■ T.^ 

It.W 

l-T.W 
JU^ bit 

i I . i)i:i 

33. 3C 

zi.da 
J|]..3if 

iL.aii' 

L?.2E' 
Llk..^ 

VLt 

4L(I.3D 
3''B.3q 

pF.gii 
bk.ao 

97.90 

rr.'se 
4 J4.3a 

■ 31.'M 

1-3*. S4 
K3-90 

TL.ao- 



TE-33Ca 
WFD.'2IKl 
"P'El- rti' 
■5*=-^Ki 
A>-^::30 

Ik'I^Cfl 
■*!{>- 1 »- 1 

|lFi;-2!ki 

1^- i2n 

HB IIH 

Pd-30 

F-1(MJM' 

BP-l'^ 

TL'ISTl 

in -Ho 

■e-'^'^W 'SOt- NI ILK EILTEF TDtl FBr*!^ '4.S* liFl 
'(Q-4?5E)l 23D fX h'lLt'l^ 

"^.'OOC ■iWOHf C -f IlTER r6-9.Ttl''5.»'' l30ia.B3 ]F • 
■n.-aBCi1 374 hE ^ FELriR 

^<-pnfw 1-it.HX 9ni PELrtji ^r*' T^-^Sdj-i Wi 

P<:-.3I]B sew IMf HP"* "J' 
iq^-U^lj -j^lt; l^* hnKC PIEL 
HC-n*'. hULQ jtKiUVtCI, DEBt tLL 
FE-I F>mB! FASEM 
EtP^ai Atib «ir «*tTTB 

F<.-Le' (FFSE'iM HEnruTmiuiD mrnLH eljdce 

hB^5 EieUUPT 'tt^POBCI 

I*-* LB*u i^l^Hl HfAC*«U**E 

RU-2t' 50 EMI W- Bift*FY LOpit lt>J fll W fUT'P 

ia-p4Q l9'lt"* tifi iCvR ItlCirni. j)a.]f SI'A'II. iiM 

tK-J^H *1 riLTDI A K4U 

K.iir-MftKtJ^LJO '^/HP' 

'H Toat IJTFB rP "li »*45ttl 1^ "«» P«*||in.|T1f 

1P-T*JP flS bMmE ElCEF" n "ATTfl 

itJi'?.? AT auprtj TEFl: T<1 TDIW Tp-H4n<: LtVET. ' or* 

p»l-j2 Bc 9i^^Li FEn 'cn Tn rD3fi 12 mdc ij: nr^f 

Tfl- WK* IFITPF FFlXBB'PJni 3 FCP" m.*f WatHH 
*S-tV i: ftJf^V' FQfi 1A-fl044 F^rmC 4.3 Art's 
^-l'^>C ^lE^MIAl. ^FAKE;? FDR TPr-TOOO 

K>'i wiami' SKI', in' FiMtn iiurrLT r-ai cp-w^p^ 

■=": B**© r?C"l B-PIPII 3. I*" WiiN 'ti Mti5 «? *h 

■"^-^^W f.O^PACT 3 ■ttra FF< 35 wiP' Ti ►■H H3W*. 

pC-^D T-lctHM TlinF nlE ik BilCEH 1 1l«7LkJDCD Hffrf!' 

TR.TaOO 2 'HTR FA NAHE-WLD 

BT2 Bflte. SU-FLV qnqj L-HU^alfA *l1A ;ftj.Hl 

"8-1 'lOBn.'E S»i«>KT Ct^kRVP: F(p j^Of 

PB-;A Hl-ra bKICTP'i ^^IU> 

EHC-T^ EFEAKEP HEE KWt ETKW ■.. 

LP- 2 DCLLIFE LEA1*KP ^.PHt ■'Oft Xhrt 

fc<^-I KLI P0> F(^ TR-IIHiO- 

14-1 inim d^l^AP FFW TP'2;H>0 



KE_i^ ^1 

^»}-751l ?■ 

pvM'acB. : 

■^4-|*(rtl!t.- 

p^34-'iJ«- 
■PPia' L64B1. 
iFAJi^- I UlfH. 
PA4-7C*E 
FPIS-«MC 
fPiLl- S'Btjte 

*ni'1-l1i.«F 



PEBULPtl 
'Ml-. 4* 
?1^.'3 

1*4. »3. 
t*Hl.« 

i44.*a 



133 



JP*,SB 



in.*9 

&fi»."3 

i4,*3 



ITT. '90 
t^b.'SKI 

2S3.3D 

I 11.90 



4>Lk 
■9*. 30 
r24-.Kl 

F*».ao 

F3.*J 

te-f to 
T**.3e 

1-30.94 

2a:i,Sv 
V I . Si'' 

i3a.?o 
1r*iW 

HT.SO 

4T.,3<i 

3'3(l£sHl 

533-90 

B3. 94- 

LLl.» 

, ,*^.'bO 
^7. -so 

*+.-» 

♦ T.9* 

-taZ.SD 

1«J,K 

VHtVt 

11. 94 
'b.l"-.4V 

aF,94 

4? .34 



AEOULPA 
441-. T: 

T*T . **. 

'*«l'*l' 
tW'.-5'l 

I'T.^li 
4t.<l4 
.*!,« 

!4P.»3 
4.-2.^3 

ir. TS 

->,'*5 

3T.PS 



SWLE 
14T|-K-' 

?T.9i:' 

*.AP.3a 

5».Sft 
A3. 94 

'4021.^ 
S.L4..9CI 

|i7.'3^ 
?*,*> 

5*r54 

37.311' 

4. SO 



-: 



#*f^F^tF 

79. WtiTTB.- 2> PCXKS 
: P^Ttm. 4-iPO HWlfi i-PIJlilU^ 
f M{-IE|e4 i,-d^l aATT( FfJBLM 
^ i^TTPS bO'-TO W4TTS F H-''3S* 
r I1t't"i 3;3 IAD l*fl'-^-^ 'PI'TSB 
.-? h^FB^ +;(' |JM> HATTS rh.'?!S|i 

rxf t*)! i' 70 «iTTB rpi.'nai 

7if' PWZ 1 brtU' HftF FW PFl''*BB 
fKi.. "Mj- I i- iXi M"< I* ■t^.'-MB 
7^ Itllir 49- LSO LMIIS FH.rSSB 

i^^ V'l 4'40-mi-i3 m/mf 
■*P PfJ- LS-4C >wii-t f"-'-Bhh 
I4ir PHi'|9-n-£' MITE FjvBIS 



nxli-k_l!!ni« 



AT-734f): 
EHR^JtHI 
rjT- A2^ 
EK-.i^TJ* 
EW-*14l 
W-3C1I 
H 



?.£ P-U MJ1>3 IMT' THI- T-lBFHa 1«^.'Th« HIH 

5«iw Auia «MT I'lp* Bc/Lcnrnn r^^.mm ni* 
Lt<^i-j ITO -"iha ti:w. i*fhJ. »«i/-^.* Bin 

l,nlHjt P^lflA -F'lir.f 'jF>t>-l'l^ IV *,UtJf 
;|W-l-$ll -wF 1^*^ hmXE Sdl^'^tfl •KEEP 
.^ FEK CaiJkrL. SH. 2.St<:il SX' FPU 
4 mqjTEDH EEH1 SMtlM 43 DHlhS4 



PWDLLAFf 


BW_I, 


ft.mi 


*1.5il 


ii4.'S* 


ifm.511 


jTT.rt 


/ZAT> 9D 


?T*.-» 


nr+.s*i 


!if«,^ 


.SBfl-.Sii 


TftP:T3 


.233^311 


ii*.41l 


aMA- 34 


1.S«s^a 


17?.9^ 


+!».'*• 


ayi.,io 


»Jt,1* 


ia-j , 5»' 


***'•• 


'»J.;^ 


n»;4* 


-k7T-.50 


av»i*e 


Ti-^.^c 


iXOLlAF 


Eiu: 


tn^vj 


A*fl.hi 


phi^ra 


-.*».*> 


iM-ra 


J34.P* 


2 ID. 79 


17i.3C. 


tffi-. !i 


1*-',*!' 


it:9» 


M-5* 


■.^(^■: 


*»,» 



SAl.( 

RP.50 

T4.3CI 

.Zt^.^O 

a^.-K-' 

»^.^4 

47.94 

JD^.Sa 

42. » 

74 . >^ 
3^. SO 

42.50f 
t-t.K'; 



BOSTOK 



With the cornpletion of our recent move to HUDSON, NH TUFTS 
ELECTRONICS i^ ready to bring you more exciting inovatlons. Our 
complete AMATEUR RADIO CATALOG is now available, packed 
with DJSCOUINtTS, PACKAGE DEALS and plenty of those hard to 
find items! Our catalog is computerized and updated daily to assure^ 
you of the best prices and most up to date Informatiori available any- 
where. Come visit our NEW MODERW SHOWROOM. Tufts Elec- 
tronics is only 30 minutes from Rte 128 in BOSTON via Rte 3, With 
the SAVINGS from our BIG DISCOUNTS plus NO SALES TAX in 
New Hampshire you'll be smiling all the way[ To make your shopping 
even more pleasant our new store hours ere 9-G daily and 12-5 on 
Sunday. Thats right, OPEN SEVEN DAYS a week. Come visit us 
soon and let us save SAVE YOU PLENTY \ 73 WA1 KPS 



too 73 Magazine * March. 1982 



DISCOUNT CATALOG 



d^nSEt^ nlMXEMiiM^na 



ILPI-Ifc rPUTH LIP '^/l 2 KTIR iMT 

lH-f50i i^t liAn iWLt muHr J nt^ ■a^'i pkt 

LV^IIP J^tr ^TO rVWCTIC KCLKT 9^3 MtT 
T^-!?* '"fV^ Lt^ nOUMI a/B I3C- HWI? 
U1-23I1*! 3.'Hi Fh*»4 FOtf fi<h^T Jr* ^1 »DH J2» 

LTt-tK 3r« JH hOLr rttrr it* bamc rqit v^^^zjO-'tlH 
M^-i*i-*5i:i **.!' ptHe rwHwuc i^r imin tmt 

TLF^I'BO T^-BK LIP KUir V.l« « ' F^lJA: 4$? 
Ll^-tS:^ t/< Ifr Ha.E PELHT Wl LW MVT PTK 490 
U»'M« M^MTK. &>(IE I'U^ LH r<llHT win-t-*** 
LnrQ ULKH1EA tWUE d'liP' F^V) ■•Mfjl/t* F] Tf ^n nT 
Lta-K J..'*. tH l-KILE tnUKT K :T Ftn in AhTEMM 

U^DC DJ7TiR ^.AHP HOldt'T FOt L.ri JtaTRM^ 

Lr<-isDi/zk> ric cdil OM.y -ivcF hot [tcLucciv* 

4^^*34- C4rL MIO WIJP -PHOCFVLy 



BALE 
4d-. so 

Ml. do 

jT.'ao 

4a. ■30 



HALF^SIZE FULL PERFORMANCE 
l^i^lti-Band HF CominurvicaMDrTS Ani&nnaa 



^ 



itaH lll.f<VH 



I044 m^-n pRi;ru:i kii'T'Cft ^ . j-^-n^ci: ptiefc-i MKiiuq^ 

TSD flCVR AhT TLUR i . > SOthll DUN. aWUT 

**oi^ HoitH h:?h vu ■^tTt" 
lA-iLL HE pntivFitrirp u.-«>aem# 

■■a.J'a.i'J-|H./KHi|''kEi;:VAMD ZHiVCPTCR 

*d 4MC7-T S4W w^T ra 

DIL F]L|,£D 3llU DlM^ l ^ap 

IMi'MA''' rciEH 14 i?i! mHr 

Clir^FM. CH.1BW1THI. 



XZL 

Jet 

JO* 

3sa 

*l-± 
•1.1 

tD2 

DPD-99? qilH Pff#lia «l£4LUI?q» 
2I]r2 IV M>[Br BftinE 

■^T ^t} m'Hf iirr FPM4wi:im 

«at< H^W iM itpiM vf(! filti ml/t 

91'DI ■ SOCKET HFF FILYIIBZl 'HaVIt ^iniF 

lioa Lz HscFt's 4A rii.'titK rat hvjl 
r 1 L T^JVB 



TT.Ta 
*t.T9 
ZA.19 

J3-.9* 

^.« 

14 . T9. 

W.4* 

3T. re- 
s', ra 
44. *a 



T9^ IXm, Ti**fc.E WtJOl ACT CM FILUA 






■ 3.90 
T1.30 

».^ 

( 1. 1 . K' 
SB. 30 

T4,ao 

74^90 
7k. 90- 

±t,a4 

a«..Ba 

jf.9a 
z*.40 



BALE 
14.36 

3T.9D 



Mia 
*m\ 

4 A J 
4V* 

93 

a> 

*14 



QjiTcs Rimn Pi I.S rrxf fi^p^AATiifi 
KMuarttBTzn WHonv Rr-TR ? 9<i ci- hb^ 
M 'tc^ ur 4a 12 pmia ur "□ ]« ek rsna 

ELPf A FRht^Mp I I mt- Cm *L^**fi I WN 

nroK n.La en h3tieli -rm 4t* 

LAV' Kf-rEF^ initHI I >f 'ViGU.i 
□.DCK Hf»l,E.E FEF- *«• 

CM Bflbnc me: 3 xeydd/so cm ■.r'BiiHUKmiPiv 



^^FJTEMNn XLJt4E1=tB 



]3^j1>9 



■F^TS 5«nH Tutctt/aMP unT'm'pq/i.[Hc..fHvr ■ 

ftE HArd^ '<t#Bfl^nU).l,^PI»l U:nEB;.BM.MCE t-F 



itiMn t* wim lUiAj.. elopes M;g aM,i^T CM( 
1i7iU Ufi* :H fAA clock 

rttv^ %^-x HT-f »4<p 






34. V^ 



WQTFR- KfT tM civ Jiv hG^lVK BWHr *qVY VMIB PflAl tidVUi: 
.'ilO-0«iT BTJMDAHD C^ eCi h.' Mi1EI< 

3i'}-9vji w^paa n-flxnf cu tcfv ■j' fiirrr^ 
TT'^-^'^F niotCe '^rted wav> bjtv la Kf:^ wi-pd 

Tai-OOT 9«V« PL*Ttb rtll*« tkiT¥ *J!Y HfH 
UJ-^TOd- B*WI VCmUDta OF UtHM} 
*H-«iill taSt P«WI|H.ICI BCr W/HElf- 

a*"-l-Ct' nii.LiB-n.ArTEii ^-i 

"■■-Wl *UT1KlilTtt 9.W t i J hTT JKTER 
a>lt-l»l'3 n im g rWTEH U^m BpfAlcTTI' 

"— '•"'^■' RSBU,«fl 

n II -«] WN BHUM VWU-MTT MCTfifl pfrtOrr IrtlfTDI 33=. OO 
n* II ,H»Z *t tiBtlve HETKUI HLUH SOA.gQ 

^ I|-t4];I Bill IBI 1(1T 



frni_AJ[l TM 



IT99 «B AkOvt: fiLUA EEH-ZPUJTY AMh AL^ItLC 

J7'9Z EIVtTJikl-ITYl'VEl. iJQt If.'alt" 

ijds %tt*^i st^.^ oixj uEif. atiiippers l^j^umi 

HiO PELl^ OH.f Sil|T£" U" ia (..'D EMN.E 

ly^fo vrta-Cfsita TWi t^^^rtHA -aTYT.!: neLuit 

4El9i U: FbbVE y31H iihiatibh; e;*)- 

2T1-2 Wl«,rtetF*.Hl rn-a rcn L700 

a;f'E4 HCPLACnVhfl TIA PO* ll^l 



r2 1 - M 

• 3,?0 
t30.'9C 

ST9„5t! 
I3J'.30 



atiLM 
1.5+-50 

IW.9D 

W,3« 






24. 9D 
13.30 

■a.3B 



'ZkTL90' 



34.90 

■•.■0 

?4.5Q 

J3.^0 
If. BO 



' Qmt •ujr ihi i^Aqnn dl ivni^Ahi^iiii ii«4i.w#n AhhiIk 

Lij.:.inuH «<|ioihii:k - I'H-i Insju Hi|tHn|] i;pll|, ^ JFlllbt 
■ ^.iIlK fSHmtil^ rnt f>rt\uia» fiO P^A3ven«, lU ELlflUjg 
' 1*11 W«a1h«> I'Mtd 1 kW AM it) HLVr CW Dl I'EP S^'ft 
' P^QUCn pVTOrininE* "IDIi "Un I'LJ'ClM n*»* D*«h Mi:lY«<44 

' Fmmi ult^ai iim h«'«i|w^iE«B o^ iinlBr'E i'tmvt irfMn. 

' QT<t ttffx^ tV BfMllllGll Oif 111 DaMIi 

' UivkU isUrnighuI pfiirjrrr^iint jnll»nnB «^ ttlR nwhCH iDDAf 

' HiDhESE I>trh]r*unc4' IdI tht f»TiU u w*> 4* IPb ^lr*-t^iM< 4lT 



II fitCIR— 13 A i IH» 



■(I-21J 

■O-Ul 

no +01 

va-ro 
'3--ro 

Tj-ic- 

7^-10 
Ki-lC 
lKi-|i.> 



lip .-a 
Hftcfl 

l-CifA 
kfh.ipl 



mi''^ T J 9 HiTp- «]pAf ^ ^i- ujni]-z3v 

>=.y40 HTq DIPCL^: J^ f\ W'BO-22^ 
BF fa ABOVE TUri! Tl) ?4H>^ 

f^J-ta^K Mm D-LPELE ifcTT »'5J1-7,I* 
SiP A± ■•i&{)vf l'ijn4D ^i! 3«UC 

'Sf4lIl-'IOn'9H Ji KTP.- -IZfSfll. K *ftF t «0- IHf 
"^ M 4AEIVt. T1IN«C ra ;f;>{] 

•D.^4A/J&./ cSii 9-:i nIA r-rr-lDlje «■* ^T Ba7S^ 
NT AU tmuc IvHfV fC^ f^JJtE 



AC«H.>A 

lO-T.90 

t04.79 
■ Of. 73 

t^t.oo 

L?|.«l 
I 4 L .00 
|.'[.«9 

i*7.atr 

I4T. 00 



iT?.^a 



AlffTD USA hllTEHIITtC: f^dM' ^"--1^1"" 

vDt ^tm ai 'qonvc hi em var iblehiiep >tQa lapacity 

Ri:W]iTE WU< rtt.i. AKruC f^.i^ Si6'<if( 4n.Dvb<ii.-K Ftr< nAdli±44, <t4 

1KIVTE ^MA fm^ ALBOUE F4.UE RCIUTE OJIh.'^lltf. n^f ir34.|4». 44 

Dciin. ENnj.99 LEXP- auiiniiw tak i: td isc ^^ 
I^JM Lfi'M'^.l.ua iPctnlHD ^aa rw^ jv il^ 

lEUM- J^l JUUtr^ ^ HIN 
^K-l E«ERA FUHITE KEV FIK DiM SPECIFY fABB 



*dO BLEW OIAh IV catjimrfi 
A04 ett/PrFV Kf.YBDMII!' 9in. S 1 9E1HEI3 
«AIIVe uH-41ft* f I M^H taw jO"1 ri3*i 
VC-']«nX HU nLEvlDEQta ElVSHM 





fffff 



WITH PURCHASE OF 
3-TBA AMTENNA 




ALLIANCE HD~73 ^^v 

HEAVY tHiTY ROTOR S15(9.9& Value ^"^^ 

3-TBA Tri-Band Beam 

10- 15 -20 METER 

Fixed station Antenna 

OutS^flndinfl fiuflMr i4yuu<t ifi lite mij'rW'l 3-TBA [li- 
baritl bfflnHur lO rt Wnreifjl't: 

n-Hpi rr-iluti.'. ^-n^il iviiilini) lirlii i.iulTall 
wH.iijM Mhili^ .iilijviiinis am f-miiiominai's 
viiJl'" bfl'"" h^irjEj* 

L-l.'^i^iUii llr-'l'^q ■ n ^11 IhrflM tHJPrl 

txitim iri i>ipmfrl TrtJiiniinE- 
ano! N>Jivv niMv-LEinslTLr: 

^■..■laiii 




i^iir-ijarti:^'' FiC'iiiiT^^ 

tiiiQ HhLr .in t^ .4>1> II-Hj- lin 1^ 

tn>.) 2ij6 KHf (VI 2a 
^"Vitj 'FnnI la tmzk f^Mili 

MilF.IFT!Urn JKllM'' JetJJl 'irifilF 

j.<mhickh ifii-i"i.-iii -23-^ ^ityi 
EiutKTi LtrtEjrh 1^ i-fii'! 9 lie 1^:4 
Tuihnrtuifidiut- 13 fPPi 
A'Ti-i-'i: i< D ID6 



TUFTS 



ELECTRONICS 



$31S.9& 



BQTH F43R DHL V 



LrMITEDSUl^LT 



^'790 
XBH'Z90 

Si'+I : r'-F* 

Lr17L]I'-'BB 

fp-*™ 

B*-T5C 



LD FT 1EIBM BEEFEEXJ 

! TOK atCtiCH N/S«^Drt1 TlJBt Z S'l- ^DD 
rW StCTIJ^ !*.■«**]"« PT.ftFE TCP 
BUINIT HUr TO HQLh? 9M CWdlCII 

KLH3cn wanT ba^ Ffin cuiimrTK 
LiMcpiTE NHe n.tirE 

PrSK P'lH lUrFIWr,^ ta^lM fdlWTRCrt ^frQFn 
11 BA^ BOLT FDtt NIIWMD BAEC PLATl 

*LPT nlicr ncMHF 

t^tw NOV 'VulrT 

fidTIJh Pf^' 

ACEECm^ >>VLr -jPODEEn n^TB.1 

CUY VOPCI^EI H]l^ lEinDLii -WIS 

^iT iiEAfn^Y 
km; LMEVmSAl IC4JOI aiACKET h' m 3D^ 
l'B-30 hJBMlhtl. |-r>ll 25*a-3 
TB-3 rtitilET BFAfl LI4 

v-z^o MatK PLAi^pcvn 
L*-*i4* tttt^i I LPi it ;■ ■ Tip* 

^% tiMi ^J1IC Eh^LLATCH 

WjHKl LO Pr -BTZEI PHSI 2 I HDr [B 

"2Wh »■! *T HTEtL N*JT ^Jli/* kMi a Ih Q^ 

I Hi n- THIHB,EE FEP- BLII' 14 1 RS 

■5/14 C01 Jri6 LAdLEL ^Jijiw^tl P|W Silt OAfLE 

3/B TB EBC r-.ni4BlCkLE EYT «MG F'eE 

3,^0 TB Eb] TiMnaUCIrl.C fit. MIE- JAri 

3"']4 CHI DU*' N]*£ 3ri*- nCEL PEP BOO '1 

>M-Vir^ V'l E'T Ttrnfff PMf^'t^K. ME Eh hQi'IU' iRlil^CfT 

Z9a-9WTj-E' 50 7 T TDU!!' FWlUaF QufEfi 

TWT'3*, 3 pi BT^CL TPIPTITI 

*A1-#fl a Fee" HHlvln; tr^fcL 

TnT-ll?- \.C! FCICIT TnFFpQ ^T^Sl. 

SWB'-ZSB-Z 9ECC -Vm BPACKEl 

LP«-£3fe UEBIE. -I)!^ QLK'' F'r>« 9-uiLL MI l2 lllttHIbi 

wc-wi a ET ccPi-jirTf. ew' **iflB» juc finii^FTfH 

HTO 30 FT TELESCCIPIHB FTEEL HIIBT 
ma* i.'*- i ACAT di^ixr^ A«e 

sj-B" ^ FpoT ^QU« ax 



tZ.V} 
H?..3«> 

4T..9D. 






Z3lT3 



4 IP. 35 



»^BS 

o 



aHLff^IL rn I'EJHEl^lHeiTHflE.i* 



441.11 pgih ErF^^AnrjtCE DrS> HIE B^CALL ifTTEHfT 

9atT nvHAxiE o-i^iriEn dcs^ pii: 

4C1»C ■LTWriH.T.HD >•=[(«; H I £ H|M4U PtC MiJL IMlflO 



HT. WJ 



[CF-.KKJI Mh «js« flo^^/eieiTJK T(^fLC*-'Br.AtiJ->*H 3*B,t5 

EEP-dKHW ^L WWUiHDlBITAL DlS^.RY/'DlEH EElVq ItE^-P: «n.T=. 
EEF.7UH] 7 Brm CDIPACT BWHAniFril HEEM gLM-ITV tflXm 19T.f5 



Wl-I IT^I 4fE«Jt|i ^nHeerrt h^ |ti«^ id^i i^JlbBE^ »f , tO 

Wt-P »|LTi** BM*l,i fiff (iBC«F Pi. IIS i*ii I* PiJiiRAT-K I??,™. 

Tj;¥-39ei nsfi.T STr^az-D/LB-T ic •tnoET.- record h plaw it*. *a 

i*-it}o<> nj'cnD Caoii't*: iteikd micmD. v plai/hdhet ]n.f9 

^*.^-iim m pt4K'v«4 yifE.wa'L&iT 1*' HtAwin w,-^ 



PIE«l>.4l^ 

PRCi-<;0*i ^^ i-EE^i i^ighr agcM itee i^aeKT u\.j\,9 jinw 

PnO'-EEm 2041 ElUAL hILrr BliCm HlC 'EADSII MI^Ul ItW TT. TB 
fB-l 'out 9tfEreH ^rjt PPIJc:i>TI H:nUDfc-t 

#p-L h#i4^jTrH. i-dit fitiOfJit^ htfitriMTg. 

PE-LOO B-^eW atn, hCtUHET 
4M.-ALO ZlOCV Ul<*< hCA^Stl 

C- 1 its' Sk¥it i^^F- i-ii-nBKf ■^-io fHiiy 

rE'l^SO- EM^ <kfr NEAB^T 3-^0 £3*40 -til - VS 

E3-7 njN. Wrr ^OO Oltl kCACOET #f.Ta 



*<« 



»< CEL. I TE TC»IT)U.e 



'CCBY ri» »CE[M.E MCKZ EUSKEDN SI1P 
"[Kf ! KXI l-'ljEh riMTER EllfiHlOh ■»£■» 
BEHI PLLBH CuTFEH: UlMUHiAL ELn;<lir*h EUtEP 

AE A90vV vITk 3TFcEP4^[it ruti: i^Df^h l>H>u 
'^M ^^ !;cnEy[KivEn sxi 2 'mlllc'^ t- oi-dtfed 

FKI-:] Jl PE F|i ^LILP? QUIIEPa En3'-«J>!1 LAS. 
3-iE. EUBirPi']*! 6L|> JtlJMl fLJEAS 3- 
ttt4C6 JilBE Cljnt* Brp-[PMR *(.L ateit HLlMt 
IS.1 J.EA.FWR TDOl ICLCm 

':e:-3ckibt BPiir^mgi: tdcl Kit |Ep texli i^ oiicvtiri 
te;> l<HirGT HV Afv 23 HMidEiat.'i 1 E Dftiunac E 



hEEIXAIi 



ZTJ-S.BCl 
J-'-Tr J*J 

40*. 17 



tt.-Sd 

•4.50 
i[j».ao 
li>*,3o 
J 77, so 
] 2^.94 

izj.sa 



L3A.9D 

zsT.aa 

3LL.90 

«.» 
i.ao 

f*,4o 



L»^.90 
24T.50 



BULK 

id.srr 
i(j-.E» 

3k. 9C 

^.so 
<,!K 
4.K 

3T.90 

33.04 
T.fl4 

4 3-V> 

24.90 

JI.EW 
30.-30 

U.Ba 
KI.IH 
^.M 

1-49. te 
24.-90 

+i.n:i 

IClrKi 

»4,3Q 

LI-.SO 

EJ.50 
17^90 

».w 

TiBO 

It. 90 

I»,9a 

4.00 



||4LE 
4Z. dio 



EMLE 

ijq-.so 



BALE 

T7.go 
iiT^lhi 
ja.11.30 

IT4.90 
Id. 94 



9«.E 

1(1. » 

M.SlO 
4V&0 



HALL 
LL.SO 

n.so 
iL.ao 

B. K. 

L4.30 

4r.bci 

1,3& 

L7 . 90 
]Sft.3« 
3*V,V> 

217. 94 



OUR RETAIL STORE PRICES 
MAV BE SLIGHTLY HIGHER 

ON SOME ITEMS 



TKMi— Tet Jimc: 



**fcM(MiT EXr KUufl Bfi*^ ™ -Kl-lO F«^eq 
**W t'' BBB/EH BO'l-O I^T^tt^ 
Eims Ojp.lT*j. IM^-IP IVFW EIVB 
HLT^ tal^'CB LV-t4 EtVtl 

Z£fl A#a -iLBV«j Qua «p]i>iic 



334 IAF°^v iipHi-Juuac, ro 

293 ECLUIE. BlJiri..'p ia0.'2^OvM: FEIN Um« 

Htni.1JI.fcT I ^m LEXCHH BLD BTATESBUFPLT 

234 I^CCM AWJCSMOA 

214 ELBCTViT PIEE- PER 234 

319* hbt 1-0^ x^vn 

.^43 RCKnE l^C FEW 1>HX 

:HJ iWisTFt v^u roc ccLt 

J** lis? n*TT UVP*^ I (mp 

-14-3 lfl.TN?A^:E [KMl. 'AEOLE -^EYEK 

-kT? EEMSlE 'T'^DDi.E KE-IX 

Jifr^ iVTEi- E-u »- 1 L I cp r on fmnattHit 

&*IJCJ-NEIlftA.tS SPtLEA*. r^oiiraat 

ZZf 2 KH AitVEUvA TlriffK UH^H |tA | BW ■"£•<* 



TF^-122 EMDB EVECTDDhiEE k^iFA 

r£-L;; iDina elee^kmje kevip: 

■tl-tM KluiE 0*8 tLtCrrtmJc Ktirti* 

-TE.'-ZIM HCflnAar Wnniv |i.h:Yi::A: 

TE-aB4 DCiuXE FC-SS^H WIKK^i >C£VEn 

-n'.474 TIMC OB Qt ■itfHr.EDpiM 



T-F^ I C3»^ V JC 



I.HT> 



Tn-LOOO -itMJ TD l,Oa«lT .EH PAH 7 DIILET Ep^nXH 

\^^n ao^i>c:M E4^iia 



11-13 
9(1-40 

pufnoi-u 



lie pCTEft DEPOIJ itd FT 

4IkyL9l PCTEfl DEPCLT kA -FT 

3^ WTf" EJ-JPftLi 31 fT 

J 9 rVTEir 01 POLE 1^ F1 
L^ •C^^Cn DIPI3LE 3 k -TT 

flU F<r(A miir- bti'U.f M F» 

4E' n^TFA TPAA OlAO.' 43 FT 

BO- THVJ JD KFER PCE.DED DIPOlE J 30 FT 
4^ 9-fttJ Lr- PBtm) r'EILEiCD VlHiLt bt- f* 
i*ti B0.^«Of3a flCTpi FU,,[*P ^EPflfcE iM fT 
t'V'WlZO 4t>^30H'J9 l«TEn PtE.D[0 DIPELE ** FT 
m-O **4;lA H[-0 »>I,|P1 

V I Bf%ORl-EK 

EAMBIF: DClUlE .':>Anw: pi AlfD IAi*[E. fM'H^ PN>Dlr4 
EAHBEC IThO LAHIIC D FAilCAKE DhUU. PABCLl 
^'E^W-^'tYEP -IJt:_UJ-E EI-HJUI L '^.BTED l'lAtiB(.£ 
^[■AC-fCt€« 6.T4mI>^0 ei 141.1 A«»CI 
PPraEHTATIOtn 3JPEq OELLilB 
[7<EViPM>L iKLUIE FE<<' 
(5ffi4!Hi1* sr*H(lii«i «iT 
LEESKTEHQ BlW E3CLUIE 
LEEINiIPa BUD VAAHMilD K£T 
E|I#HI»t(!i4 ^Ifr^fEC Ftv 

^'D C^OT^P^ ^n-E3[>Ljl±'^ta 



*E»A*^ 


SALE 


4k^.OO 


tt*.9fl 


V*,<X. 


474-, »^ 


iZBV-.Qei 


lE7T-.aO 


■BT.ai 


Y4*.90 




71, 3^ 




T9-9^ 


HTjTB 


izn:,'90 


iT*,gii 


1 «4, 3El 


L9.^^.■^JD 


I3?»,-S0 


U*.*ft 


l3«-,39 




3*. so 




Z».90 


Hi*.'»5 


i7-r,V 


IIPT.Tl 


IB4.90 




itt.^U 




83-. 90 




a*.?* 




9?,3& 


SAZ^.OQ 


19*1. 9f> 


S4».« 


»»&.» 


PCBULIH 


nCLE. 


*».w 


*?-» 


33. ?a 


ai'.-so 


b9.n 


kz.te 


ffi.rt 


?B.-90 


t*.w 


P3.90 


■za.T9 


LIT. 90 


•4. fa 


mf,v 


tiv.-n 


LM-.SO 


UauuM 


EIALE 


ta*.^ 


t4*.30 


•IBEUJ.AP: 


BALE 




z«,i« 




19. 30 




34, K 




a»,K> 




ZZ.SO 




ai.BQ 




Z»,» 




3*'.90 




3a, 9« 




HnWl 




ELECTRONICS 

61 Lowell Rd. 
Hudson, NbH. 



1P..4Q- 



l.'-B HHIP EOl.LArSI&X I? ' IMIP PDfl- Z I^TEH tldLKEn 

±n PFpi|-|hK 2 KTEP Pll*l]-tlU( AH1E;"flH Bt4r 

i rTIr n]ni]-h# £ ptren ntnt-Ar IttiiiiWW )']« ThHiHCB 

ZCt)^ J- Mm ^MCn- KOVTEfl z pp 7? -hATTE. 

ZEEI90 7 in PCHCP BOaETEH Z ia 90 ItATTS 

MhlAD 1 U^.A>'RCVCO 



MlnU- BALJUrH ]-| 
uSAu/u?^. JMT 



Dg. ^tL,^ *^ FtX«C« blfiX£4 

a pAMp MTEh*A KIT Jjn FssT mMTH 



B#^Kl 

9^130 

*-» 

l*^4d 

H7LZO 



CC-. IDI» fCLOE^q BTA/^Erm. MAKE SO DEO BTEPS 
tC-tOO* a* **«^^ irl Fh ^J(b FEW l<K*WR|1 

U4« All FLiV<liBt: UOLeft ajf l^t'i^H) i^J^S 

tr^^atl MLL PLHPOK BO|.BCR OjM 3iCrf7a^ ■UTTE 
tC-]4H] EEnUM-EIB KIEMAnKAM-E LPEH P JtC Pt TIP 
FEril ]± VDLF JElLDtlP tPm Mr'BflTT tLIFTfe 
±3 tm"> -mjLlKB tK^ ^iClL HF 
40 MTT fOLEW-A I HDH FfMC I l Tip 
AnifV rUTV 9ELECK :>«3>4 IZ^^ WAITt 
HHIFEI4EMM. ■^n.lT'.A 9i-^ r(Ki H* » vA'i r 
-PnOFmi^llUk ^CLEFR 1-lHMl 70O UDQ 40 BATT 
PE^ELL FH3H Bi.DCR EREH TOO DCO fS MATT 

m* c*n oi/Thji jM^ if^rj *--aft ifrv'HJW'Wo w 
Bn-[;pM ivnp Ei)KrH3,j.rD iTh p;pi ta<i-KH' umB 

Pr-ia)' •ILIrEArLnE -EDtlTRElLLEIO DTAFLEVl *oo~Hm [ma 
Kl«!^|l I-iClW *.HJl|l'«rlA.[*<4 Wi,»*H.'^«it .Ri.Ef 

BANDPASS-REJECT DUPLEXED 
DPLA-144 FOR 144 174 MHx 

Alid avallabt« for 
S4, 220p4SO hAHz. 



«-,43 


rt,» 


94.19 


-90.90 


«S,«9 


fei.Sq- 


3a^W 


Hi-» 


.»*, rt 


VI ..BO 


4fT;» 


•A,^ 


3*,«3 


W--W 


».» 


M.1I0: 


9^.4 


ai.» 


Jp3.-P9 


5?.» 




&A.C 


! 


Z4.90 




E4.-ft? 


LJHCB 


l^rW 


•4.-13 


7T.D0 


iz4.*a 


Lt'>..-90 


RE[U.An 


SALE 




ct.Hi 




ItrSfl 




S4.90 


-nCDLLift 


BdLE 


EI9.0D 


B^.'M 


1-ia.™^ 


i|»-Vi 


t4,l}r 


L».» 


W-l^ 


3;.9£< 


U.El 


St.9f? 


sa, E:f 


S2.30 


7,» 


i.v 


jckao- 


1.94 


L>. t^ 


3 3.34 


l*,3* 


13-S* 


L7. ^7 


J9.90. 


1^.44 


3k^9<? 


IT. 47 


!?-M 


74.34 


^0.30 


**.M 


03.3^ 


77.34 


a-*. 30 



WACOM 




These Band Pass Band Reject Cir- 
cuit ctupleKers Include the use of an 
exclusive circuit developed for 
WACOM, which provides superior 
sui>presslor\ of spurious sideband 
noise between and adjacent to the 
duplex frequencies, wnen used with 
a high Q filter, the Band Pass Band 
Reject Circuit provides frequency 
response curves with bandpass cavJ- 
ty characteristic^ at the frequency 
to be passed and band-reject cavity 
characteristics at the frequency to 
be attenuated. 




eiij*=i,,b: iisKB^* 

, , ____ PEIBJ.Af SALE 

2 PBlCn 39C' MATTE 4 9''EM^MT1E1 BDC« ] BDl SZ^.OCi 414. W 

Ae Bfft^ *im jjljtw: BOTMl EPC3.UI1C EABLBI 931. <^0 4P1,34 



zi—KLC-rrtdf^i E^o 



FT-pdJH 

FP-I-P7E 

FP-ISI 

FE.-I07 

FV'IOJ- 

V--IOT 



A-t-^i^fin 144-34 1*iT(lt Ohm ■myrWtfZK'f MIO KEVER 

fv..tiq;-im BYMB "iIWV 

PE--TOE "WEI**" -flP^f 

tr-^iH REPD-IE 3PtP*En 

FTv-'tQl-Pl TIMA«y«nTEH «r»ITn ifHIULP 

unn ^tmuLE peidule pep >-iv-i4lP( 
?«epi iMna.t rm^^t t^o" Aiv-#«ii 

-ra-#^3.»^ h^tilT1(W PEDPf Bi-AiWiUlAmK 
yB--*03 CM prF". PC4IDEP ('-'itt* "ftn-t ' &I t|-l»*l 
D^L-Fi ^tBOA^ 
IkCl-LO FlT-ll/BLE- I1r03UITALj|-PEfI^rT/nt-E!C 
ElFEfVtJ^ AC 3L^».r I'l^A i^f- 
JirlEHtHL m W^Pl,-! fVf FT- IDT 
AHFEHM TiHBP: 

cxTEPHAL. •irn 

CXERIiAL E^EiUEP 
FTV'3-D7ii FPAHB^n-niEP n'S nT4 r44w.i 

FT-ie3rt l«-l* HTJi ,eCV» OJfllTM. APP IMAC 
F^.-k«1T EiTEPHUta. VFD 
BC-IOIIP DE EEHVtfl-niP 
An-I03t »fl I^MJT fUfi Fi-(uJip 

PH-lto!]' rn Lti:; m ftloieo 

PF.ra7 B»-LO HTB E U I A t lj K4fVA KA PieHJl.£/IHI 

FP-7Q7 m; p^vk imvplv 

li-E'TOF 4ITEHHA ILPCH 

pr*-a M*lLt ^w.-»IT 

IFB.TtC 4b« HE Fl£.TEn FER FT H LD¥ 

jrB.-YMOl 3K) HE El FEL'C" T'Epi t* [*-4AG 

JFt.-t* Ml FJlTift ^HA >* PZ9B 

VH-T7 ^lVHTkE3*lT iWACSl iTDfl W LRJ-2n 

STlF^MB nKWTJ kQ^LD tLiijCll. 

VV-IW ZitVvb *A'-l4A.TTT>f fSK pqiW TQ kSEMHT 

Yt^rXrCr 2aOnM EH<AH.TTP«TEn •000 T[7 tOVPld: 

^fp-l90T fliPTTF Ejonb WAi-Tnl^e* 
vc-tLiog^ iimF)^ 4MT6 pqis^fBgA 

FA^T eiOLFim PAM 

PHa-77C4 fi'tSITi^. arrf wy tb 3Qn42 laryn 

PL|..77afl- P4H31T ^AIET 
fftM^TDO AHTEfPU TIBCR 
FF-3 VLP LEW T^Bl PEL4iH 
pC-TTiftO K WA^^ItA FIT 

rRv-THH iLi^i-30 i«a nM^mtTek- 

>E-7^ bfAHD P!EE Figi^lID 

Te-L4« K3ll "it- HJ'-LlS P« *TLD-Lri> 

Yft-I4 E^ Hit Hj,-v!J F[)» stJff^r 

Tf^-M -itiip* PIEC lOJ/>a-7 

W*-!* IW^we niC J1I7/7-07- 

YTI-^ DCBr. SUWI MIC kCT'^^ 

A' -Cm. '^L ftilf KCUR- EPLi W* G^ IHM^ >cCY£4 EIC 
IF^.-niC riHlut * f^LE I'LL FEB eiH FT-fl** 
tm.lKOI 31^ NZ B P^ F ^KIe^ f(^ rr-EKE 
?.rt,*Kfk t, i^lMl 1 PEL*- AH FLLTit* *-am r F'E*B 
ITIO-.^kC 4»V- fZ X ■NLE 3Ha< EF ril TEA P^ Fl-.£p« 
BWl (Prr ^vlffA^ IXiF-*^ BDflllf FEir F-T-m^ 

'•t-am CLR3)? g«^i ^i-^H \mi' "(M FT-ot* 

K-SAflLZ. DC EXILE FEW- F 1 ^3i|E 

F^-|^3D«< lYm BCAtMZNS >tC)IIWi> -jrCf FH f1-lV[ln 



■vm 



-^-LJI 



FT-;<dA ,2 h!i1A| rrf i>^mi L» DOtWEEB HP te** 

Fta-'l- BHTT PACK 
YP>-r4A ETEPf.Cn TEE 

HT-B I4IV-IEI B^<34 ri-rtm»n 

*^'3 PEI1:LE ADAPIU* ENAHKn 

I..L'i-B. iJklKCp Tklft. 

AT-Ifl«fl <*i,\, Bflet i (^TT tHI* -MJM^f^MjLC ^EWfr 

IK -J in 
uee-H i:M«tr 

FT-7S<itHrt4 f^ 3H!M rjl HMIUE. -pc«li PEHSAt 

Tza-*d TOt« 1 (HI HP ttjug timjr 

I -72 EkiE-roH aoi feh 'IWLTEP^B af kC^I 

■■''P-S A> MC*^ JWa-LLt PEHMT 

E . 3 7B BKKT CAfLE 

. E-?3L i.DHa EAk.E 
' PpA-U PdCtLt. BflALI'X.3 -4410 AUrVYm FEW ZfOC 

FC-^iio lO^ Mki-i if* p-iaK 2T«* cfnm mfl-iih 

FT..HlBfl 70CH tfvMl ni«|>*LLI *«-*S*1IH B+t^liCH*! 

l-l-VKIk BIX PriEH B>hM ^>lMTnaLE KU.1I-H4K 

-TT- 

F1- 

PT- 

FT- 

P~l- 

Hl- 

FF-- 



2 KTFi -Pt^ hi*. ■ B -PCM lIMf 
-LJ7P'A =20 rn fiTHI ICHni -iH;MMi.|l4 
-137- IS LWWOitl. ZZ? FPI ICA 
-4BC* t»»" ALL PlfllHL A prn |C^ 

TB«i iio-i-^-:.! "^i avF*! nu.tl-rTEe 

T20PLI 4*0-4SC- Wn pYMt- i^bR MCltOAr tt^Hplj* 
-B* flAICHIhO- 5UI"»1Y 4>OrM»-^7Ba 

-J uMaTf 6i^#i€fl fofr pr«]5.t: 

12 IZ LJVDE SLTFlt .|l-.^EAkfA 
y> BCAAI ^EYBQAKEI >^ I E FElt JZO 
4« TDM Wf^JlfyllsS mi'^ run 4«<1 
'-^■fH 2 Pin-q Z5kJ HV EkEER O^V 



p-rt|..cir*«i**iR bmq 



PB-EOO NCE^ BBLECE ~XE ITEBIEPINCC: L RffA^MUqC 

U(,F-* -^.f rtMi^-llEP IO-■^■J5 'HI FD »ri HCTEBT 

t/LF 'B AS AA3-^ hi- r !0 (^^ -tnt^; |y*tD 

LA-L <.-3«l hC:-EI !.-aDP HCUK MIT M}rm.lt;i 

I Wb SHgCtFT \tl'>r--XrO^ "HI 33r--E-fc!W*-|*I 3- tWlttf 

TEltE-EO --ilT FfK ff USE 

FEPEllil i«LT Srsn PEMEflP 

P-3|i;.| I^AtlttE Bt^VPI PPEAIT lin^AC 

fan Ik-l iSu-Sfli- EMi l-»3lj- iBpn hBlH] 4(»-C9(!«HI 



iRf"T KB_t±Er-rRc»sEi^a 



144 3 HTB RfP^ATEJI » U*|TTB «LlP IT*Tt 
2SV MQ •WI PEPEAIEA 19UA1TE HEt-E* -PTi^FE 
*5K!- -J-SO '•*r K-l^J^lip LDMATiA 10.3-0 -bthte 



DISCOUNT 

EXPORTS 

PACKAGES 



J433.D4 


ITTT.bO 


«3l,«« 


Hi*.-5a 


tW-M> 


tak.90 




'* -60 




U.BO 


^n.do 


-*4Jl*J 




lio.m 


=99.00 


ziB.4a 


91 3. DO 


■i.a*--B4 


7-^.00 


iktT.SO 


JT9.DO 


t-bJ.-Ho 


l|A1,4f! 


*t4.-J«j 


(.43. CO 


■ -^.■90 


131. D<! 


tls.^ 


1D4.V4 


BkO.-W 


lUO.DO 


L40.-3a 




«3.!» 




JlrM 


m*,» 


330.30 


v^..oo 


■>7.^ 


11».1H3. 


l«7.H 




4A.S3 




IT.W 




t#,» 


ai^.oo 


in. -90 


ZT1.O0 


3-49 ..So 


lAi'-.DO- 


iSi.W 




l^-V 




ZOl'90 




#«.» 




W-ao 




Ad.AO 




|1,H 




44.90 




ft.iS 




*4.-Su 


13*. 13 


■ -Zk.90 


IBOO.DO 


iT-n.-io 




2t.Vt 


344-,» 


***.3« 


t4T.-V9 


■ «D.90 




■ST.-Xf 




W,* 




*.» 


IBt.DO 


144. -90 




LZ.4e 




.11.-90 




3t.90 




»?--tK^ 




30,-JKl 




30.90 




i*-so 


-2W9..D0 


»4oe.*fl 




4T.5!j 




AT.se 




■ t.3« 




"-« 




31.39 




■i.io 




3 k. 3? 


39P.OO 


i)k.9a 


P<DU-An 


SALE 


vs*.n 


10* » 




31-3* 




3'.S> 




9TjBC 


m.^ 


lU, so- 




il. 9ft 




33.90 


SM.M 


j-st.ao 




1,9fl 




11.90 




3.!H 


JZ4,i)0 


].»*.■» 


agj^oo 


ZZ7.9a 




U,!lQ 




f-?* 




33.30 




■0.90- 




W,S* 




11.3* 


38^, OO 


314.90- 


*^t,i5* 


SS».9U 


-aziiDO 


4*g.'30 


■kM^-DO 


4X2.90 


Sff.M 


l4,«.fl« 


5W.« 


JVf.» 


Tca-oo- 


*»!.W 


■»H..«J 


JE«.90 


*»,» 


•trfiV 


1*1.-13 


l»k.3B 




^■--v 


m.-iw 


LZ4.3I0 




J-i.io 




»t.sa 


i*i..oo 


20«.SO 


aldllaac 


EflLE 




S4,3« 




"-54 




H,90 




^:i;. 




94] .,'90 




3 0,S«' 




*7.» 


z 


■91. 9« 


IKBULHH- 


-BflLE 


t«ft,60 


tJt.Bo 


^S.M- 


^at.M 


m-wi 


-10s. 90 



MODEL 



DESCRIPTION 



GTY 



UNIT PRICE 



NAME 



MINIMUM SHIPPING 



ADDRESS 



NO SALES TAX IN NH 



CITY 



STATE 



Zip 



TOTAL 



CHECK 



CARD WR 



MASTERCARD 



PRICE 



3.50 



EXP DATE 



VISA 



SIGNATURE 



WaiifrrCOrtl 



ORDER BLANK 




61 LOWELL RD„ HUDSON, N.H. 03051 
TEL: (603) 8B3'50CI5 



*^ea 



k^See List of Advertisers on page 130 



73 Magazine * March, 1982 101 



SAVE on Cowduiet Age HAM Accessories at AES 




MBA-RO BasJcCW/ASCll/Baudol reader,.... 1299.95 
HBA-RC Deluxe reader/cacte converter „ 399.35 




DRAKE 
TheUTOOOE CommunJcatJon ten 



...41095.00 




DS-31(X)ASR ASCII/Baudot/ Morse terminal $2195.00 
OS-3100 w/MS-03100 Message store option - .. 2790,00 

CWR-685A Telereader *.. 995.00 

CT-2100 ComTmjnicatJons receive terminal .....845.00 

KB-2100 Keyboard ,..„ 175.00 

MSG-2100 Message storage ROM 25.00 

RM 2100 Rack THounling kit.. .„.,,., 25.00 

0S'20&0 KSR ASCil/Baudot/TX morw terminal 6*9.00 

II R' 2000 Morse receive option 159.00 

DS'2050 w/ltR'2000 Morse receive option..... 808.00 
ST-6000 OemddulatDr/keyef w/osc tumng.,.,. 699.00 
SI- 5000 Demodutatoc/keyer .,..*.*.*... 249.00 





WS4* 




IRL 

FSK'IOOO RTTYriemodulatDr.. *...*.. 

fSJC-lOZO AFSKKeyer..,.. 

FSK-IOOO w/FSK- 1020 installed....- 
FSK'500 Basic RTTY demodulator ... 

FSK'5iO Loop supply (plugnn) 

FSK-SOOw/FSK- 510 installed... 



.... $49S,00 

47,00 

......545.00 

.249.00 

, 29.00 

......278.00 




KANTRONICS 

Field Day K CW/RTTY reader J449.95 

Mini-Reader CW/RTTY reader „„.*«„. 289.95 

Micro-RTTY CW to RHY send/rec converter . . . 299.95 



rMPORTANT! 

The prices shown in this ad are 
suggested by the Manufacturer, 

On most MAIOR items we can 
give you a Big Discount. Just 
Call Toll Free 1-800-558-0411 & 
ask for Paul Sirbin&ki. 



MFJ-494 CW/Baudot/ASCII sup^r keytMard . $279.95 

MFM96 Super keyboard II 339,95 

M FJ'53 AFSK plug in modyle 39,95 

MFJ-54 Loop keying plug in module..,. 29.95 

HFJ'Bl Clock module tor MFJ'496 , 29.95 




MICROLOG 

ATR'6S00 CW/RTTY/SSTV terminal $2370,00 

ATR^6fiO0 wf/r mpmior .„„,.. 2495.00 

80 column dot matnx pfinter.. ..,., &95,00 

Pnnter bought w/MicrtjIog major unrt .....*, 650.00 
AKB-1 Deluxe programmable keyboard..,., 449.00 
AVR-2 CW/RTTY/ASCII/AFSK demodulator 599.00 
AKB/AVR Sptit screen system w/mod 1099.00 




MACROTRONICS 

TefTninall Tl Co mm. terminal tor TRSfiO .. {499.00 
Termmall T3 Comm. term. ■ Mode! -3 IRS 80 499.00 
TA'6&0 Ham interface for Apple II......,,.. 499.00 




ROBOT 

Model 800 ASCII/Baudot/CW termmaL 



£895,00 




ROBOT 

Model 400 SSTV scar? con vertei 
RF-1 RF video modulator board 

B&W TV CAMERA 

RCATC4000..... 



'*¥»¥*■ 9 'W ■W 



« *■ H- « V V ■ 



$79100 
...29 00 



........$290.00 




B&W TV MONITORS 

ELECTROHOME ESM-914 B\., $169.00 

NIC JB-1201 M(A) ir (green screen}..... 199.95 

RCATC'lllO 9\. ..„,,- 215.00 

RCA TM209 ID" 305.00 

RCATC'1217 IT... 500.00 

PANASONIC TR-930 9" (pictured),......... lilOO 

SANYO Iz .,. — . .,,,,,,,,,,,., ZZ9,0Q 

SANYO 15" ........ 279.00 



Call Toll Free: 1-800-558-0411 '""— - -^-^--ir"-"' 

AMATEUR ELECTRONIC SUPPLY 



® 

Inc. 



4828 W. Fond du 



Lac Avenue; Milwaukee, Wl 53216 - Ptione (414) 442-4200 

:S BRANCH STORES ASSOCIATE STORE 



WICKLIFFE. Ohio 44092 

28940 Euclid Avenue 

Phone (216) 585-7388 

Ohio Wats 1-800-362-0290 

Outside Ohio 1-800-321-3594 

New AES Branch Store - 



ORLANDO Florida 32803 

621 Cammonwealth Avs. 

Phone (305) 894^3238 

Fla. Wats 1-800-432-9424 

Outside Fla. 1-800-327-1917 



LAS VEGAS, Nevada 89106 

1072 N. Rancho Drive 

Phone (702) 647-3114 

Pete WA8PZA & Squeak AD7K 



ERICKSON COMMUNICATIONS 

CHICAGO. Illinois 60630 

5456 N. Milwaukee Avenue 

Phone (312) 631-5181 
Outside ILL. l-SOO-621-5802 



Outside Fla. 1-800-327-1917 Outside Nev. 1-800-634-6227 Outside ILL. 1-800-621-5802 
1898 Drew Street • CLEARWATER. FLORIDA 33515 • Phone (813) 461-4267 



102 73Magaime • Marchi. 1982 







IMPROVE YOim 
MORSE SKILLS 

WITH THE 



■'■i 





ol» =A 




MODEL KT-1 
KEYERTRAINER 



FEATURES INCLUDl; 

• PRECISE SPEED CONTROL 

• 24,000 CHARACTER PSEUDO-RANDOM LOOP WITH 
to STARTING POINTS AND FREE ANSWER BOOK 

• EXCLUSIVE AUTOMATIC SPEED INCREASE 

• RANDOM PRACTICE MODE 

• OPERATES FROM 1 2 VDC 





UPDATE YOUR 2M RIG 



SCANNERS: 



IC2AT 

KENWOOD TR7400 A, TR7600, IC22S 

& TR7625 

TEMP0(S'1,S-1A, S-2, S'5) 

KDK2015, KDK2016A, 

YAESU FT227R 

MIDLAND 13-510, 13-513 

CLEGG FM.26 

KIT PRlC^S39-9 5 

{TEMPO sTTc^aI 

PREASSEMBLED ONLY^ 

SPECIAL PREASSEMBLED: REG. 



J59.95 SPECIAL NOW $49^5 



AUTO-RESUME SCAN 
MODULES 



S24.95 



C8H or visit: 




Brings you the 
Breakthrough! 



DERRICK ELECTRONICS 
714 West Kenosha 
Broken Arrow, OK 74012 

TOLL FREE (BOO) 331-3688 




YAESU: FT227RA, FT227RB, 

FT 207R. CPU2S00R 

AZDEN: PCS2000, PCS2eaO, 

I COM: IC255A 



FM ADAPTER 
NOW AVAILABLE 



CONVERTS EXISTING HF 

TRANSCEIVERS TO 

10-M FM 

KlL139.9_5 

Preassembled S4995 



INCLUDE 11 50 FOR 
POSTAGE AND HANDLING PER ITEM 

AED ELECTRONICS 

Je\: 514-737-7293 

P.O. Box 730, Snowdon Station 

Montreal Quebec H3X 3X8 Canada 



^ 3 



TM 



PORTA-PEATER 
INSTANT REPEATER 



Command and conirol module makes ^n Inst^fit re- 
peater from any 2 radios with absolutely no ffioditi- 
cations 10 the radios. Interfaced via the external speaker 
and mic !ack$. Perfect for a personal, emergency, or 
fixed repeater. Wnte or cal I tor detailed data man ual. We 
actept VISA and M/C Request calalog. 

• 4 individual CWIOs (IK PROM) 
»VOX— COR, COR triggers 

• AdJ, 0-15 min. ID cycle timer 

• Adj. 0- 1 5 miri Tim© Out tfnfier 

• Adj. 0-30 sec. h^ng timer 

• Adj. 20di3 tocai mic amp 

• True repeater beacon, or manual modes 

• 250 volt switching capability 

• Cornplete gain/interface controls 

• Complete technical manual 

• PCBsize5V4" x 5%" 

• 22 pin edgecard interface 



THE AUTEK "QRM ELIMINATOR 



99 



Model QF-1A 

&CW 




11 & VAC supply IJuHt- Auxiliary Notch re- Four main rF11«r 

In. Filter by-passed jects 80 to 11,000 Hz! modes fof any QftM 

wti«n off. Covers signals other altuation. 

notches can't touch. 



Conllnuousty varl- Continuously ¥arh 

able main seractlvlty able main frequency, 

(to an incredible 20 (250 to 25O0 Hz} 
Hz>) 



%P%79. 



Assembled, 
Tested, 
00 Burned In, 

Progratnmed 
(Inc. $3. postage) 



M^302 



AUTEK pioreeretl Ihe ACTIVE AUDIO FILTER back in 
1972. Today, we're stitl the engineering leader. Our new QF- 
lA is the tatest example. It's fNFINITELY VARIABLE. You 
vary selectivity 100;i and frequency Over the eritire u$ahle 
audio range. Ttiis lets you re|eet whistles with dual notches 
(to 70 dBK or reieci S3B hiss and splatter with a fulfy ad- 
luBiatJie lowpass plus aux. notch. Imagine what the MAR- 
ROWEST CW FILTER MADE will due to ORM! HP rejects 
.low frequencies. Skirts exceed 80 dB. 1 wait speaker amp. 



Built-m 115 VAC supply. SV2Vib'n2V2. Two-ionegrey styling. 
Even latest rigs i'nc^ude only a fracilon o^ the QF-1A 
selectivity, Yet it hooks up m minutes to ANY rig--Yaesu, 
Kenwood, Drake, Swan, Alias, Tempo, Heath, Collins, Ten- 
Tec, etc, Just plug it into yourphone jack and connect spkr 
or phones to the output. Join the thousands of owners who 
now hear stations ihey couldn't copy without a QF-lAi it 
really worksl 



WORLDS RECORD KEYER. OVER 4000 DX QSO'S IN 2 DAYS! 



W-S ENGINEERING 

P.O. BOX 58 

PINE HILL, N,J. 08021 

24 HR, PHONE: 201-852-0269 




Model MK-1 Keyer $104.50 



BOX 302S 
OOESSA, FLORIDA 3355fi •(B13) 92Q 4349 



Probably the most popular "professionar' contest keyer 
(n use, yet most owners are casual CW operators or nov- 
ices . After a few minutes, you'll see how rremory revolu- 
tionizes your CW operation! Just start sending and record 
your CO, name, QTH, etc. in seconds, 1024 bits stores 
about 100 characters (letters, numbers). Playback at Aw^ 
speed. Dot/dash memories^ triggered clock, repeat, com- 
bine, 5 to 50 + WPM, built-in monitor and 1 15 VAC supply. 
Works with any paddle. Sit back and relax while your MK-i 
calls GQ and handles standard exchanges! 

Optional memory expander (ME- 1) expands any MK-1 to 
400 characters. ME-1 factory Installed S35. Owner in- 
stalled, only $25. Add rrore merrory now or later! 



NO LONG DELAYS. WE SHIP 95% OF 
ORDERS FROM STOCK 

We sell onfy factory direct. No dealer markup in our price. 
Order with check, MO., VISA, MC. We pay shipping In 48 
states. Add 4% tax in Fla. Add $3 to Canada, HL, Ak. Add 
$13 each elsewhere. (Shipped air.) 



See List ot Adveftsseri on psge 13U 



73 Magazine • March, 1982 103 



SOCWi EVEHTS 



from page 61 

22nd annual ARRL-approved La- 
fayette Amateur Radio Hanrtfest 
on Saturday and Sunday, March 
13-14, 1982, at the Evangeline 
Downs Racetrack Club House 
facility, located directly off 
Highway 167, five miles north of 
Lafayette LA. 

WINCHESTER IN 
MAR 14 

The Randolph Amateur Radio 
Association will hold its 3rd an- 
nual hamfest on Sunday, March 
14j 1982, from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm 
at the National Guard Armory, 
Winchester IN. Tickets are $2.00 
in advance and $3.00 at the 
door. Table space is $2.50 and 
table space with table is $5.00. 
Setup times are 6:00 pm to 8:00 
pm on Saturday and 6:00 am to 
8:00 am on Sunday. For reserva- 
tions or additional information, 
contact RARA, PO Box 203, Win- 
chester IN^ or phone W9VJX at 
{317)-584-9361. 

MARSHALL Mf 
MAR 20 

The Southern Michigan ARS 
and the Calhoun County Re- 
peater Association will hold the 
21st annual Michigan Cross* 



roads Hamfest on Saturday, 
March 20, 1982, at the Marshall 
High School, Marshall Ml. Doors 
will open at 7:00 am for ex- 
hibitors and 8:00 am for buy- 
ers and lookers. Free parking, 
carry-in help, and full food ser- 
vice will be available at the 
schooL Table space is $.50 per 
foot and will be reserved until 
9:00 am. Talknn on .07/.67 and 
,52. For more information, write 
SMARS, PO Box 934, Battle 
Creek Ml 49016, or call Earl 
Goodrich at (616)-781'3554. 

GRAYSLAKE IL 
MAH20 

The Civil Air Patrol will hold 
its second annual spring ham- 
fest on Saturday, March 20, 
1982, at Lake County Fair- 
grounds, US 45 and 120, Grays- 
lake IL. Donations are $2.00 and 
tables are $3.00. For more infor- 
mation and reservations, send 
an SASE to Captain Ed Rehm 
W9NXR, 637 Emerald Street, 
Mundelein I L 60060. 

FORT WALTON BEACH FL 
MAR 20-21 

The Playground Amateur 
Radio Club will hold its 12th an- 
nual swapfest on Saturday, 



CORRECT/ONS 



Readers who build the 
VE3CYC ATV project beginning 
on page 20 of this issue should 
include the following changes 
to make the converter more 
stable and less sensitive to 
antenna and feedline changes: 

1) Install the MRF901 tran- 
sistors from the foil side of the 
board, 

2) Referring to Fig. 8 in the ar- 
ticle, add a 63-Ohm resistor 
directly across the 440'MHz in- 
put cable on the circuit board. 
Solder one end of the resistor to 
the stripllne near the center con- 
ductor of the coax. The other 
end of the resistor should be 
soldered directly to the circuit 
board ground foil. 

Jeff OeTray WBSBTH 
73 Magazine Staff 



The schematics tn *'TVRO Sig- 
nal Source" (page 46, January, 
1982), are missing a resistor be- 
tween the -1-12-V terminal and 
the collector of the oscillator 
transistor. This part should be 
added to Figs. 1 and Z 

Tim DanidI NdRK 
73 Magazine Staff 

Paul Grtjpp KAILR's revtew of 
the AEA MBA Code Reader in 
the January, 1982, issue of 73 
mentioned that a cure is avail- 
able to reduce noise emitted by 
the unit's microprocessor. AEA 
informs us that thts cure is very 
simple: Just put a bypass ca- 
pacitor at the power-line input. 

Tim Daniel N8RK 
73 Magazine Stat! 



March 20, 1982, from 8:00 am to 
4:00 pm and Sunday, March 21, 
1982, from 8:00 am to 3:00 pm at 
the Okaloosa County Fair- 
grounds, Fort Walton Beach FL. 

1RVINQT0N NJ 
MAR 21 

The Irvington RAC Hamfest 
will be held on Sunday, March 
21 , 1 982, from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm 
at the P,A.L Building, 285 Union 
Avenue, Irvington NJ, Take the 
Garden State Parkway to exit 
143 north 143B south. Admis- 
sion is $1.00 and tables are 
$3,00, Refreshments will be 
available. Talk-In on .34/.94 and 
.52. For additional information, 
call Ed WA2MYZ at (201>"68^ 
3240 or write I RAC, P.A.L Build- 
ing, 285 Union Avenue, Irvington 
NJ 07111. 

JEFFERSON Wl 
MAR 21 

The Tri-County Amateur 
Radio Club will hofd its annual 
hamfest on March 21,1 982^ from 
8:00 am to 3:00 pm at the Jeffer- 
son County Fairgrounds, Jeffer- 
son Wl. Tickets are $2.50 in ad- 
vance and S3.00 at the door. Ta- 
bles are $2.50 in advance and 
available at the door for $3.50. 
Parking is free and there will be 
plenty of food, beer, and prizes. 
The grand prize will be awarded 
at 2:30 pm. Talk-in on 146.52 and 
148.22/.82. For more informa- 
tfon, advance tickets, and ta- 
bles, send an SASE to Horace 
Hilker K9LJM, PO Box 204, 261 
E High Street, Milton Wl 53563. 

COLUMBUS GA 
MAR 27 28 

The Columbus Amateur 
Radio Club will hold its annual 
hamfest on March 27-28, 1982, 
at the Columbus Municipal 
Auditorium, Victory Drive (US 
280) at the south end of 4th 
Avenue (Highway 27), Columbus 
GA, from 9:00 am to 6:00 pm on 
Saturday and from 9:00 am to 
3:30 pm on Sunday. Features 
will include a flea market, free 
overnight parking at hamfest 
site for self-contained campers, 
free coffee and hot chocolate, 
inside exhibits, and many prizes 
(including a main prize of a 
Radio Shack TRS-80 Mod ill). 
Ticket donations are 6 for $5.00 
or 13 for $10.00. To reserve in- 
side table space at $3.00 per 
table per day, contact Jeannie 
Hunting K4RHU, 2701 Peabody 
Avenue, Columbus GA 31904, or 
call (404}-322-7001. Talknn on 
.01/,61 N4BJZ/R. For additional 



information, write CARC, PO 
Box 6336, Columbus GA 31905, 

ST. LOUiS MO 
MAR 27-28 

The Gateway Amateur Radio 
Assn. will hold ARCH '82, an of- 
ficial ABRL convention, March 
27-28, 1982, at the Chase Park- 
Pi aza Hotel, St. Louis MO. Ad- 
vance tickets are $3.00. Fea- 
tures for the amateur radio oper- 
ators and computer hobbyists 
will include a flea market, work- 
shops, forums, major national 
exhibitors and dealers, prizes, 
ladies' activities, and a Saturday 
evening banquet. Special hotel 
accommodations will be avail- 
able. For additional information, 
contact Gateway Amateur Ra- 
dio Assn., PO Box 8432, St. 
Louis IVIO 63132, or phone 
(314)-361-4965. 

IVIADISON OH 
1UIAR2a 

The Lake County Amateur 
Radio Association will hold its 
fourth annual Lake County 
hamfest on Sunday^ March 28, 
1982, at Madison High School, 
Madison OH. Admission is $2.50 
in advance (send an SASE be- 
fore IVIarch 1 4, 1982) and $3.50 at 
the door. A table and display 
space is $5.00 for a 6-foot table 
and S6.50 for an 8 foot table. A 
table donation with a reserva- 
tion will hold a space until 10:00 
am. There will be plenty of free 
parking, commercial exhibits for 
ham and computerist, an inside 
flea market, door prize drawings 
hourly, and amain prize drawing 
at 3:05 pm. Hours will be from 
8:00 am to 4:00 pm and vendors 
may set up at 6:00 am. Overnight 
accommodations are available 
within a 15-minute drive. Taik-in 
on 147.81 /.21. Check-in on 
146.52/.52. For further informa- 
tion or reservations, send an 
SASE to Lake County Hamfest 
Committee, 1326 East 349th 
Street, East lake OH 44094, or 
call (216)-953-9784. 

GRAYSLAKE IL 
MAR 28 

The LibertyvHIe and Munde- 
lein Amateur Radio Society 
(l-AMARS) will hold its annual 
hamfest on March 28, 1982, at 
the Lake County Fairgrounds, 
located at the Intersection of 
Rtes. 120 and 45, Gray slake IL 
Tickets are $2.00 in advance or 
$2,60 at the gate. Doors open at 
8:00 am. Hot food and drink will 
be available, as well as 9-foot 
tables at $5.00 per table. Prizes, 



104 73 Magazine • March, 1982 



FILTER CASCADING 
WORKS! 



You can get significantly better performance from 
your Receiver by improvi^ng its IF filtering. The most 
Cost-effectFve way to do tiii^s is to piac^ a superior 
8-pole SSBfUteressentialiy in series (or Cascade) 
with the original unit. The resulting increase in the 
number of poles of filtering to as many as 16 
causes a dramatic increase in selectivity and re- 
duction of adjacent channei QRM, The authors of 
the following maior articles all stress the effec- 
tiveness of FOX-TANGO filters in this application 
and comment on its simplicity: easy soldering; 
rto drilling, no switching, and no panet changes. 
As a bonus, CW performance is improved as well 
as SSB, at no extra cost or effort! 

R9ceni Mitga^ift^ Artfcfm^ en FttfmrCmacmdfng 

YAESU FT'901/902. Soe *'?3'\ Sept. 1&81 
HtATHS&104A See "Hem Radh" Apfif 1^1 
KENWOOD TS820 See "CQ'\ March 19Q1 

Read th^ original articie or send SI to FoxTango 

fbf complete details of the one that interests you. 
To make the modiftcation, order the appropriate 
cascading kit from l^eiow. Each contains the parts 
specified fn the article^ the recomn^ended Fox- 
Tango filter and complete instructions. 

Improved Fax-Tango Cascading Kits in Stock 

YA ESU FT-901/902 Series - $65 

HEATH SB104A Series -.*.., $60 

KENWOOD TS&20 Series $70 w/mini amp. 

"KENWOOD TS520 Series ...$70 w/mint amp. 
"YAESU FT 101 Series (r\ot ID) $75 w/casc bd 

•Proven mods based on articles in preparation 

Shipping via Airmail: $2 US/Canada, $5 Elsewhere 
Rorida Residents: Add 4% sales tax 

FOX -TANGO stocks the widest variety of custom- 
made time-tested crystal filters available from any 
source fof Yaesu, Kenwood, Heath, Drake, and 
Collins rigs. Cascading is only one application for 
these f liters. Others include replacing outdated or 
inferior original units, fiiiing spots provided for 
optional filters, or adding extra filters using diode 
s wl tohin g boards if the "spots " are f i He d. Howe ve r, 
since \be degiree of improvement depends upon 
the quality of the filter used, cheap sutDStitutes 
are no bargainl FOX-TANQO has never spared 
expense or efforl to make its filters the very BEST 
and guarantees satisfaction -plus fast, friendly, 
knowledgeable, personalized service For infor- 
mation about our complete line, including SSB, 
CW and AM filters, phone or write for our ffee 
brochure. Speci^fy the set you want to improve. 

We welcome mail or phone orders and accept 
payment by VISA. MASTERCHARGE, MO, Check, 
Cash, or CO D. (at your expense). 



FOXTANGO CORPORATION 



Since T971, By antj For Radio Amaieur^ 

Bojc 1 S944S, W. Palm Beach, FL 33406 

Phone: 1305-683-958T 



^323 



3 ifigjer ports: 

AlHrninum PtA^ 
AE3«mblr ID H. T^ng 



NEW! 





EWJffWEfn 



F p. Siu O-Orik L>w„ 31 -60424 



GP '81 GINPOLE 

■ Fiti nil popular ti^werv 1'^ D.[^. ta 
fM O.D leqi 

■ Dcfid lift tected at 1 20 Ifai. 
-■ VVilt laat □ lifftinie 



CFomp Aii^^mbl 



puichaiitig the lU E-qu^iainertt 
CMPOLE AF« awgijoble 

MEthwl 11 ; Pureha^ GP B1- Kit GINPOLC 
IndHdlef pulE»y d^d damp laistmblJ^ 
whidi^ CQJi eeiity b« (hipped U J.S. 

Th« cuittrrri^r purchaf«i th« pipu ]«ca(|y 

to iaifc ihipptFlfl tftit. fi-c,;d>Frnnefld«d pipK 
is. aJumJnum I';' (3" OO.] «ltctrkal 
nie!!(tiaFtic<i[ tubing. o.Leqp w^ttititA t4 a.i 
1«f" E,/W.T. h^-msv^w. (f Ewitoblt substitute 
may be ui«d. 

GPgU Kit $139.50 UPS ^\»ti*^ 

MelhiMd 1,2) Puwfhan CP Bf^l GINPOifi 
Asirmblv E"tirQ GINPOLt ihippcdl M(itpr 
Freight F.O.B Oak Lawn. IL «15«'.50 




"i,_ 



GO MOBILE WITH YOUR H.T.! 






o»* 



ll9 



bve 






"A unique battery eiiminator' 
HANDI-TEK Regulalor allows constant hand^heid 
operation from auto OC or base supply with no m- 
cad dram and WITHOUT RADIO MODIFICATION! 

NOW FOR FT-208R & TR-2500 

WODEL K^T tor TR'25O0 (similar to I) 

WODEL N for FT-20eR (similar to kit) 

Model l-lcom IC-2A/T: K— TH^2400; N— FT206fi 

Y— FT-207R. T— SimpJe mod for Temp 

$24.95 PRO in USA. CA add $1 .50. 

*^460 

HANDITEK 

P.O. fiOX 220S, LA PUENTE, CA 91746 




DIRECTION FINDING? 



'^ Doppfer Pirectipn 
Finding ; , ' 

• No Receiver Mods 

• Mobile or Fixed 
^ Kits or 

Assembled Units 

• 135-165 MHz 
Standard Range 









Circular LED 

Display 

Optional Digital 

Display 

Optional Serial 

Interhce 

12 VDC Operation 

90 Day Warranty 



Actual Size 



Iter! 



Biesc^Lise yoti and th^ 

teadtng radio manu- 
f^turers want the 

best-pefformfoa the 
best looking antenna; 
Centurion hS$ grown 
to fee; the Diick feader;^ 
We've developed 
many smafler antenha? 
to make the hand- 
held radio perform 
better snd no* the 
nev^estduek..,th€ Tuf 
Duck"minfJt% 
shorter (about 3" ) yet 

itiaftjiri/4waye; r. 
radiator on VHE 




hvi 




New Technology (patent pending) converts any VHF FM receiver into an advanced 
Doppler Direction Finder. Simply plug into receiver's antenna and external speaker 
jacks. Use any four omnidirectional antennas. See June 1981 issue of 73 for technical 
description. Kits from $270. Assembled units eint) antennas also availabi^. Call or 
write for full details and prices, r ^ 

■^ 5540 E. Charter Oak, 

P DOPPLER SYSTEMS, Scottsdale. AZ 85254 




ANTENNAS 



CENTIiRION ^^^^ 

Wione 402/467-4491 

Telex 48-4377 CENTURrON ICH 

P6. k>x82S46 Lincoln, N£ iaBOl 2346 



<602) 9M-1151 



'42S 




M^S&e Ltst of Advert fsers on page J 30 



73 Magazine * March, 1982 105 



including a synthesized HT, will 
be awarded to licensed ama- 
teurs. Talk- in on 146.94 and 
147.63/.03 (Waukegan repeater). 
For reservations or tickets, write 
WA9HRN, Chairman, LAMARS, 
PO Box 751, Liberty vl!le I L 60048 
and include an SASE. 

SEWARD PA 
MAR 28 

The Conemaugh Valley Ama- 
teur Radio Club will hoid its fifth 
annual hamfest on March 28, 
1982, from 8:00 am until 4:00 pm 
at the Sandy Bottom Sports- 
man's Club, Seward PA, approx- 
imately ten miles northwest of 
Johnstown on Rie. 56. There will 
be plenty of food and refresh- 
ments available, as well as 
many good prizes. Talh-in on 
146 .34/^94. 

BALTIMORE MD 

MAR 28 

The Baltimore Amateur Radio 
Club, Inc., will hoid the 1982 
Greater Baltimore Hamboree 
and Computerfest on Sunday, 
March 28, 1982, beginning at 
8:00 am at the Maryland State 
Fairgrounds Exhibition Com- 
plex located at exit 17 of 1-83, 
three miles north of l>695 (near 



Baltimore) in Timonium MD. Ad- 
mission is $3.00, Amateur radio, 
personal computer, and small 
business computer dealers wii! 
be featured at the dealers' dis- 
play area. There also will be an 
indoor flea marketi an outdoor 
hard-stirface tailgate area, food 
service, free parking, hourly 
door prizes, and cash grand 
prizes. Talk-ln on .34^.94 and 
.07/.67. For more information 
and table reservations, contact 
GBH5tC, PO Box 95, Timonium 
MD 21093, or call (301 )-561- 1282. 
For a recorded announcement, 
dial (301)'HAM^TALK. 

TRENTON NJ 
MAR 28 

The Delaware Valley Radio 
Association will hold Its annual 
flea market on Sunday, March 
28, 1982, from 8:00 am to 4:00 pm 
at the New Jersey National 
Guard 112th Field Artillery Ar- 
mory, Eggerts Crossing Road, 
Lawrence Township NJ. Ad- 
vance registration is $2.50; $3,00 
at the door. There will be indoor 
and outdoor flea market areas, 
door prizes, raffles, refresh- 
ments, and FCC examinations. 
Sellers are asked to bring their 
own tables. Talk-in on 146,07/.67 



and 146.52. For further informa- 
l\on, write DVRA, PO Box 7024, 
West Trenton N J 08628. 

FRAMINGHAM MA 
APR 4 

The Framingham Amateur 
Radio Association will hold its 
6th annual spring flea market on 
Sunday, April 4, 1982, at the 
Framingham Police Station driti 
shed, Framingham MA. Admis- 
sion is $2,00. Sellers' tables are 
$8,00 before March 27, and 
$10.00 after that date. Doors will 
open at 1 0:00 am but sellers may 
begin setting up at 8:30 am. 
Radio equipment, computer 
gear, food, and bargains will be 
available. Talk-In on ,75/.15 and 
.52. For more information, con- 
tact Ron Egalka K1 YHM, 3 Drls- 
coll Drive, Framingham MA 
01701, or phone {617)-877-4520. 

GRAND JUNCTION CO 
APR 17 

The Grand Mesa Repeater So- 
ciety wili hold the third annual 
Western Slope Swapfest on Sat- 
urday, April 17, 1982. from 10:00 
am to 4:00 pm at the Plumbers 
and Steamfitters Union Hall, 
2384 Highways 6 and 50, Grand 



Junction CO. Admission is free 
and swap tables are $5,00. Fea- 
tures will include an auction, 
door prizes, and refreshments. 
Talk-In on .22/.82. For further in- 
formation, send an SASE to Dale 
Ellis KDOM, 588 Starlight Street, 
Grand J u net ion CO 81 501 , or call 
(303)'434'59ei. 

RALEIGH NC 
APR 18 

The Raleigh Amateur Radio 
Society will hold its 10th annual 
hamfest on Sunday, April 18, 
1982, from 8:00 am to 4:00 pm at 
the Crabtree Valley Shopping 
Center parking area, Raleigh 
NC, Admission is $4.00; there 
will be a table charge for ex- 
hibitors and flea market dls- 
plays. Ftrst prize is a choice of a 
Kenwood TS-830S transceiver or 
an loom IC-251A multi-mode 2m 
transceiver with a Mirage 8108 
80'Watt amplifier, A hospitality 
room and party will be held the 
preceding evening from 7:00 pm 
to 10:00 pm. Talk-in on 146.04/ 
146.64 and 146.28/146.88 both 
days. For more information^ 
please contact Ken Boggs 
KB4RV, 8704 Cliff Top Ct., Ra- 
leigh NC 27612, Of phone (919)- 
782^8646, 



TwoKeysTo Perf ectcode... 





^^^^smas^mamm 




Save over $14.00 with complete CW package for H*8/H»89. 

Package includes CODEM, Interconnect Cable, Power Supply, CW89 
Software, complete documentation and shipping. 



COMMDSOFT 



f^59 



665 May be 1 1 Avenue • Palo Alto, CA 94306 • (415) 493-2184 

Write for fwB C3italog 

California residents add applicable sates tax. Master Card and VISA accepted 



The CODEM: a universal CW interface for 
your personal computet 

*1 24.95 

Mere Is an easy way to get your Morse code software on 

the air! The CODEM converts received CW audio to 
RS232 OF TTL signal levels and RS232 or TTL signal 
levels to transmitter keying. The CODEM doubles as a 
code practice oscillator and CW regenerator A sharp 
800 Hz bandpass filter, AM detector and low pass filter 
are designed into the CODEM to provide outstanding 
noJseandORM rejection. Requires aSVDC power supply. 

CODEM , S124.95 

9 VDC Power Supply ..,.,_ 9.95 

Shipping and IHaridling ..................... 5.00 



CW89: a sophisticated split screen Morse 
code transceiver and trainer program for 
IHeath computers. 



^9.95 



Transmit and decode CW with your H-8/H-19, H-89 or 

Z-89- This feature packed program incorporates 4-99 
WPM operation, receive autotrack, a 1000 character pre- 
type buffer, 10 user-definable rnessages. unique break- 
In mode, on screen status, disk I/O and hard copy and a 
versatile code practice section. A comprehensive 
manual and prompt card are included with CW89. 
Requires HDOS, 32K RAM and hardware mt erf ace (such 
as the CODEM). 

C^BB postpaid . . . .:^ ....,, S9S,95 

0W&9C H-&/H'89 Interconnect Cable for CODEM 24.95 



106 73t^agazme • March, 1982 




ANTECK, INC. 

STAINLESS STEEL WHIP— FIBERGLASS LOADING COIL 

- PATENT APPLIED. NO COILS TO CHANGE. 

— LESS THAN 1.5 VSWR (ENTIRE TUNING RANGE) 

TUNE 3.2 TO 30 MHz FROM THE OPERATORS POS^TIOf^ 
- FAST AND SLOW SCAN RATES 

The Modei MT-IRT mobile antenna tunes 3.2 to 30 MHz inclusive, 750 watts CW, 1500 watts PEP for hams, mliliary, 
MARS. CAP, and commercial service. Ceoler loaded for hJQh efficiency. Enables tuning to exact resonance to 
w-anted frequency. Allo>vs full output from solid state finals. No worry about reduced output from shut down cir 
cuits. Output is unaffected by morsture and ttie elements. Tuned tiy a controi box at the operator's position, Mast 
section' contains a double action hydraoltc cylinder driven by two miniature hydraulic pumps and 12 ^olt DC 
motors for posittve control. No creeping durmg operation or mobile motion. Can be remoted up to 500 It, from 
antenna, 

MT 1 RT amateur net S240.00 9,00 UPS shipping in US. 

MT-1 RTR (retro kit f or a 1 1 MT-rs) $1 1 8.00 

MT1 amateur net 129.95 

MT'1A(marine} stainless steel S1 79. 95 



7.00 UPS in US. 
7.00 UPS in US, 
7 00 UPS in US 




VisA^ 



Route 1, Box 415 
ANTECK, INC. Hansen, Idaho 83334 



masief charge 



208-423-4100 



Take your favorite HX out 
for a drive tonight. 




A 



VISA or MASTERCARD for 
same day shipment 



For $69.95 you get the most efficient, 
dependable, fudy guaranteed 35W 2 meter 
amp kit for your handy talkie money can buy. 

Now you can save your batteries by operatmg 
your H.T. on low power and still get out like a 
mobile rig. The model 335A produces 35 watts 
out with an input of 3 watts, and 15 watts out with 
only 1 watt in. Compatible with IC-2AT, TR-2400, 
Yaesu, Wilson & Tempo! Other 2 meter models are avail- 
able with outputs ot 25W and 75W, in addition to a 100W 
amptifrer kit for 430y HZ. ^ 382 

#%^_^..^..„S—.—.*:-fc-* #*-*-*-.-***»— L^ 2648 N-Arsgon A VB, Dayton, OH 4&4aQ 

Co mmu meat lon Concepts Inc. ($13)296-1411 



"^jnlS^ 



'^r^^i 



wlt^ 



/ 



Digital 
Nlultlmeter 

The Drake DM2350 Digital Multimeter is a 
convenient, small handheld liquid crystal 

display meter Ideai for the serviceman or 
hobbyist. This 3V^ digit meter is auto-rarging. 
auto-zerping. has polarity indication, and an 
over-range warning signal. Battery life is 
greater than 300 hours with a "low battery ' 
indicator. A conti:nuity test sounds 3 signai 
when circuit resistance ts less than 20 ohms. 
Dc accuracy is a basic 0,B%. 

Batteries, probes, 20 amp current stiunt. spare 
fuse and soft carrying case all included at $95.95 

Aijd S2.50 shipping and handling per Ofder. 

Send check with order and provide street address 

for UP5 shipment. Ohio residents add Sales Tax, 

Charge card buyers rnay tail toll freer 

1-800 543-5613 

HHHffH In Ohio, or for 

MUMm^ 1-51 3-866' 2421 

R. L. DRAKE COMPANY 

540 Richard Street. Miamisburg. Ohio 45342 



FNSTITyTIQNAL AKD OEALEI^ kNQtjmi££ INVETEO. 




]NEW PRODUCTS FROM HAL-TRONIX 



2304 MHz DOWNCONVERTERS 

Frequency Range 2000-2500 MHz 

2304 Model I ; Basic three-stage, less case 

and connectors..... ^-r-.-^ — ■■■- .$49.95 

Z304 Model 2: Three-stage, includes preamp^ with clie-caM 

case and connectors ,......* „..$ 59*95 

2304 Model 3. With htgh-gain preamp. die-cast case and 

connectors , $69*95 

The above models complete with high-quality drilled PC boards, 
all electronic components, etc.. with I 5-page manuaL 
No^el Any of the above, factory wired, $50 additional 
POWER SUPPLIES FOR THE DOWNCONVERTERS: 

Power supply kit # I , less case and connectors., **...,,.*. Si 9*95 

Power supply kit #2, includes case &. connectors .$24.95 

Power supply — already built, complete , .$34.95 

PARTS FOR THE NTSC RF MODULATOR FOR CHANNELS 3 . 4, or 5 . 
This is not a complete kit. The hard-to-get parts include 
the LM-18S9, the .08 microhenry tank coil, the 7-14 micro- 
henry adjustable coil, the 10 microhenry RF coil, with sche- 
matic (no PC board) as used in Bob Cooper's satellite TV 
receiver. Real buy at - $5.95 

SHIPPtNQ iNFOnHATlON 

ORDERS OVER $20 00 WILL BE SHIf»f»£0 POSTPAID EXCEPT ON ITEMS 
WHERE ADDITIONAL CHARGES ARE REQUESTED CH ORDERS LESS THAI^ 
S20 00 PLEASE INCLUDE ADDITIONAL S! 50 FOR HANDLING AND MAILING ^ 
CHARGES SEND SASE FOR FREE FLYER C* 



TOUCHTONE DECODER KITS 

HAL 567*12: single line in. 12 lines out, complete with 

2-S)ded plated-through GlO board and ah 
components. Uses seven 567 s and three 
7407'^ 4^9 OS 

IIAL567-f6i single line In^ 16 lines out. complete with 

2-sided plated-through G- 1 board and all 
components; includes 22-pin edge connector. 
Uses eight 567's and Four 7402 's. (See con- 
struction article in April 1981 Radio &. Elec- 
tronics for complete writeup.)... $69*95 

TOUCHTONE ENCODER KITS 

HALECD-12£ 3x4 twelve-character encoder utilizing the 

ICM 7206 Intersil chip. Kit comes complete 
with both LED and audio-coupled outputs 
(speaker Included). With aluminum anodized 

HALECD-t6£ 4x4 sixteen-character encoder uriKzing 

the ICM 7206 Intersil chip. Kit comes com- 
plete with LED and audio-coupled outputs 
(speaker Included). With aluminum anodized 
case...,, ....$39.95 



1^31 



^j" 



'*HAL'' HAROLD NOWLAND 

W8ZXH 



* •' 



«ii li^-^ 



Hal-Tronix 

p. O. BOX 1101 

SOUTHGATE. MICH. 48195 

PHONE (313) 285-1782 



i^See List of Advertisers on page 730 



73 Magazine • March, 1982 107 



HfiL Communications Is Proud 
To finnouncQ That Oar 
flmatQur Radio Products firQ 
Oaing Stocked fit The 

Foiiowing Lauding fimutaur 

Daalar Stores: 



NICAD BATTERY 
CHARGERS 

RAPID MOBILE CHARGER 



EASTERN UNITED STATES: 

AMATEUR ELECTRONICS 
SUPPLY 

26940 EucliO Ave. 

Wicklilfe. OH 440S2 

{2t6}5BS-736a 

ELECTRONICS INTER* 
NATIONAL SERVICE CORP. 

11305 ElkJn5lTQe1 

Wheaton. MD 20902 

(301) 946' 1 0dd 

MIDWEST UNITED STATES; 

AMATEUR ELECTRONiCS 

SUPPLY 

4S2a W. Fond du Lac A**, 
Mltwayke#, Wl S3216 
(414} 442 4200 

DIALTA AMATEUR RADIO 

SUPPLY 

212 -4dth Street 
Rapid City, SO &7701 
(605) 343-6127 

ERICKSON COMMUNICATIONS 
5456 N. Milwaukee Avenue 
ChJcago, I L 60630 
(312)631*5161 

HAM RADIO CENTER 
6340-42 OUve Blvd. 
St. Louts, MO 63132 
(314)993^6060 

THE HAM SHACK 
606 N. Main St 
EvansvilleJN 47711 
(812)422^0231 

KRYDERELEC. 

Georgetown N. Shopping Ctr. 
2610 Mapleerest Rd. 
Ft. Wayne JN 46615 
(219)465 9793 

UNIVERSAL AMATEUR RADIO 
1260 Aide Drive 
Reynoldsburg, OH 43066 
(614)666-4267 

WESTERN UNITED STATES: 

AMATEUR ELECTRONICS 
SUPPLY 

1072 N. Raficho Drive 

Las Vegas. NV 69106 

(702)647-3114 



SOUTHERN UNITED STATES: 

ACK RADIO SUPPLY COMPANY 
3101 4th Ave. Soulti 
Birmirigham. AL 35233 
(205) 3220566 

AG L ELECTRONICS 
13929 N. Central Expwy 
Sutte419 
Dallas. TX 75243 
(214)6991061 

AMATEUR ELECTRONIC 
SUPPLY 

621 Commonwealth Ave, 

Orlando. FL 32803 

(305) 894 3236 

AMATEUR ELECTRONIC 
SUPPLY 

1698 Drew Street 

Clearwater. FL 33515 

(813)461 4267 

AMATEUR RADIO CENTER 
2605 N.E, 2nd Ave. 
Miami, FL 33137 
(305) 573-8363 

BRITT^S TWO-WAY RADIO 
2506 N. Atlanta Hd. 
Belmont HMIe 
Shopping Center 
Smyrna, QA 30080 
(404) 432^8006 

GISMO COMMUNICATIONS 
1039 Latham Drive 
Rock HilLSC 29730 
(603)366*7157 

KRYDER ELECTRONICS 
5626 NW SOth Street 
Oklahoma, OK 73122 

(405)769-1951 

MADISON ELECTRONICS 
1506 McKinney Ave. 
Houston, TX 77010 
(713|6S8>02S8 

N & G DISTRIBUTING CORP. 
7201 N.W. 12th Street 
Miami, FL 33126 
(30S) 592^9665 



MOtlU &nAl£f£l 



CW ELECTRONICS 
800 Lincoln Street 
Denver, CO B02Q3 
(303)632-1111 

HENRY RADIO, INC. 
2050 S. Bundy Dr. 
Los Angeles. CA 90025 
(213)620*1234 




RAYS AMATEUR RAD»0 
1590 US Highway 19 South 
Clearwater, FL 33516 
(613)535-1416 

Coll Or St op- In find S«9 
HfiL Equipment fit Your 
Favorite fimateur pQatar. 

Write today for HAL's latest 
RTTY cafalog 

HAL COMMUNICATIONS CORP. 

Sox 365 

Urbatia, IIIFnois €1601 

217-367-7373 --345 



Charge your handheld radio off 12 volt source In 4-6 hours. 
Will not overcharge your batteries due to automatic shut- 
off circuitry. Equipped with cigarette lighter plug on the 
input side and the appropriate charging plug on the output 
side. Cord lengths affow for conventent use whtfe 
charging! Models available for the Kenwood TR2400, 
Yaesu 207R. Tempo 31, S2. S4, S5, Santec HT1200, Wilson 
MKII and MKIV. Other models available also^ Please call or 
write for more info. 

RAPID II CHARGER 



HAPfD // 



■f CH-iift<S|| 



Our NEW AC version of the Rapid Mobile Charger. Charge 
your handheld radio rn 2-3 hours. Will not overcharge 
batteries due to the same automatic shut-off circuitry 
found in our Rapid Mobile Charger. The input is equipped 
with a UL approved transformer and the output with the 
appropriate charging plug. No adjustments necessary! 
LED indicator shows current is flowing and all the proper 
connections have been made. Models available for 
Kenwood TR2400, Yaesu 207 R. Tempo SI, SZ S4. S5. 
Santec HT1200, Wilson IwlKJJ and MKIV, 



i&4i7«%ld 



TERMS: US & Canada add 5% shipping, handling and insurance. 
All others add 10% (20% Atr Mail). COD add $2.00 COD fee. Ohio 
residents add 4-6% sales tax. Visa/Mastercard welcome. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 
10 day unconditional guarantee* tf you are not satisfied with this 
product, return it within 10 days in original condition and we will 
refund your money (less shipping & handfingj, 

DeaCers please inquire 




DEBCO ELECTRONICS 

P. O. BOX 9169 DEPT. C 

CINCINNATI, OHIO 45209 

Phone: (513) 531-4490 



^330 



Without doubt LR-1 is the repeater value leader! Compare its 

outstanding performance with any repeater -- then look at 

its price. LR- 1 features include individual die-cast shielding 

of receiver and transmitter plus a separately shielded 

6'Stage receiver prefilter for peak performance in 

harsh RF environments • Front panel metering of 

all vital functions • CW identifier • Symmetric 

hard limiting for clean natural audio • Low 

power MOS control logic • Even the 

cabinet is included — just plug in and go! 

The price? Only $1095 (US amateur club 

ner). 

LINKING? The LR-1 is also available with 
control circuitry for Link Transceiver 
operation, Now link repeater sites with the 
flexible control capability youVe always 
wanted. 

HIGH POWER? Our PA-75 power amplifier is the 
champion! Ruggedly built to give years of dependable 
operation in continuous duty repeater service. 





Mark 3C repeaters and controllers have no 
equal in performance. Both units feature 
auto patch, reverse autopatch, autodial, 1 3 
Morse messages and a total of 39 func- 
tions. Both feature microprocessor control 
and both have been proven in the field from icy 
Alasf<a to tropical BraziL A Mark 3C supercontroller 
can make any repeater a super performer. The Mark 
3CR repeater is in a class by itself. It combines superbly 
designed RF circuitry in one handsome package. It is 
without doubt the world's most advanced repeater! 



• SEE US AT DAYTON • 
CALL OR WRITE FOR FULL DETAILS 

MICRO CONTROL SPECIALTIES 



yf 49 



23 Elm Park • Groveland, Massachusetts 01834 • Telephone (61 7) 372-3442 



'S^^ L'S/ of Advertisers on page 730 



73Magazme • MarchJ982 109 



NEW PRODUCTS 



OX PREFIX LIST DX-1 

The DX Prefix List fs a cus- 
tom-printed Jist of 367 separate 
places, including all of the cur- 
rent ARRL DX countries. Each 
location is calculated by pin- 
pointing two locations. The DX 
Prefix List has tO unique col- 
umns of informafion. First the 
list IS arranged alphabetically 
and numerically by prefix. The 
next column contains the name 
of the country. The third column 
describes each CO continent, 
while the fourth column lists the 
CQ zone- The ITU zone i$ listed 
in the fifth column. Columns six 
and seven give the short and 
long path distances in statute 
miles. The eighth and ninth col- 
umns provide bearings for short 
and long path. The rest of each 
line has a checklist to tally con- 
tacts. SSB or CW, and receipt of 
aQSL 

The DX Prefix List is priced at 
S6,95<plus$t.50 shipping). Each 
listing is custom-printed for your 
station's location. For more in- 
formation, contact OX Prefix List, 
Jon Presley WDQEAO, Route 3, 
Box 17 7, Lebanon MO 65536. 
Reader Service number 477. 

QUAD BANDER 
ALL MODE TRANSCEFVER 

Trio-Kenwood Communica- 
tions has announced a unique 
new radio, the TS-660 "Quad 
Bander/' an ail-mode tfansceiv- 
er designed for operation on 6. 
10» 12, and 15 meters. The unit 
features built^n dual vfo's, a 
five-channel memory, and mem- 
ory scan. Modes of operation 



are FM. SSB (USB). CW, and AM. 
The TS'660's rf output power 
is 1 Watts on SSB, CW. and FM, 
and four Watts on AM. The radio 
operates from a 13.8 votts dc 
power supply. Kenwood's list 
price is $699.95. Additional in- 
formation may be obtained by 
contacting Trio-Kenwood Com- 
municattoas. PO Box 7065, 
Compton CA 90224. 

COAXIAL ANTENNA 

Power Gain Systems has an- 
nounced a coaxial antenna that 
offers a f^ew approach to the 
construction of the well-known 
double^bazooka dipole design. 
The antenna has the broadband, 
low swr characteristics of the 
bazooka and features injection- 
molded plastic construction for 
weatherpfoofing, strength, and 
durability. 

The antenna comes with an 
SO-239 fitting and fs ready to ac- 
cept any length of 50-Ohm feed* 
line without the necessity of a 
balun or tuner Available for 80 
through 10 meters, the Power 
Gain Systems coaxial dipole 
costs between $34.95 and $39.95. 
For more information, contact 
Power Gain Systems, 1007 Cy- 
press St, West Monroe LA 
71 291; (31 5)^325-4754. Header 
Service number 476. 

10.kH2-TO-30-MHz TUNER 

The new Sign a/Match from 
Grove Enterprises is a state-of- 
the-art frequency 'Selective tun- 
er designed to optimize imped* 
ance matching between 10 kHz 
and 30 MHz, It will reduce, and m 





Kenwood's Quad Bander aH-made transceiver 



many cases remove, receiver in- 
termodulation. images, and 
front-end overload. Background 
noise is reduced, VLF signals 
you never dreamed were there 
come roaring in loud and clear. 

Front-panel switches allow in- 
stant selection between two an- 
tennas and between two receiv- 
ers (or two antenna inputs to 
one receiver). Matched rotary 
switches permit the listener to 
peak signal strength of the fre- 
quency of interest, while a main 
tuning dial provides sharp reso- 
lution of the final signal. Priced 
at $99.95, SignayMatch comes 
complete with instruction man- 
ual and all interconnecting ca- 
bles. For further information, 
contact Grove Enterprises, 
Dept. C, Brasstown NC 28902; 
(704}-837-2216. Reader Service 
number 47S* 



3.3-METER DISH 

The Director 111 satellite re- 
ceiving antenna from tnterna- 
tional Satellite Video Corpora- 
tion utilizes space-age materials 
and technology for a unique 
lightweight design. The 3.3-me- 
ter dish has a high-efficiency 
Cassegrain (dual reflector} feed 
system which places receive 
electronics at the rear. The un- 
usual perforated aluminum re- 
flector surface with approxi- 
mately 80% open area is almost 
impervious to wind. 

The Director HI Is supplied 

with a correcting polar mount so 
that satellite selection requires 
only one adjustment. The com- 
plete system may be shipped by 
UPS. Installation time is approx- 
imately 23 hours. Options In- 
clude programmable remote sat- 




Grove Enterprises' Signa/Match, 
110 73Magaiine • March, 1982 



The Director III 3.3-meter dfsh. 



ellite aiming and electronic 
polanty selection. The Director 
Fll Is a^a\\3ib\e horn International 
Satetlite Video Corp., Box 5685, 
OrangB CA 92667; (714)-998- 
6080. Reader Service number 
461. 

HFSWR/WATTMETER 

MFJ Enterprises is introduc- 
ing its new MFJ-816 low-cost HF 
swrfwattmeter for the 1,8- to 
30-MHz range. Features [nclude 
toroidal pickup for uniform sen- 
sitivity over the entire HF fre- 
quency range, dual ranges (30 
and 300 Watts), and a two-color 
meter scale. 

The MFJ-816 HF swr/wattme- 
ter is priced at $29.95 {plus ship- 
pmg and handling). For more in- 
formationj contact MFJ Enter- 
prises, PO Box 494, Mlssissippf 
State MS 39762; (800)-647-1800. 
Reader Service number 479. 

SATELLITE TV RECEfVER 

Telecom Industries' new TIC 
1240 satellite television receiver 
now provides improved AFC and 
scan tune {for fast and easy 
satellite locating) as standard 
features. Improved threshold 
combined with better video res- 
olution provides picture quality 
found in receivers twice the 
price. 

The duat-conversion down- 
converter (204A) mounts directly 
at the LNA output while provid- 



ing + 15 volts through the N 
connector as well as ejcternally. 
Improved environmental charac- 
teristics include hermetically- 
sea led connectors and tempera- 
ture compensation for a virtually 
drift-free picture. The TIC 1240, 
with a retail price of $995, is 
available from Telecom Ir^dus- 
tries Corp, 27 Bonaventura 
Drive, San Jose CA 95134; (408}- 
262-3100. Reader Service num- 
ber 482. 

5^6- WAVE HT ANTENNA 

The Tuned Antenna Company 
has announced a two-meter biS- 
waveantenna, the Super Stick II, 
for use on hand-held radios. The 
Super Stick II, when fuHy extend- 
ed, offers 6 to 9 dB of signal out- 
put over traditional rubber duck 
antennas. All connections are 
soidered and copper-plated for 
years of troubtefree service. The 
Super Stick II has been de- 
signed to operate when col- 
lapsed, giving performance 
equal to or better than a rubber 
duck antenna. 

Super Stick li is available with 
BNC, 5/16-32, F, TNG, or PL^259 
connectors, at a suggested re- 
tail price of $19.95. For more in- 
formation, see your locai ham 
deaier or contact the Tuned An- 
tenna Company, 9520 Chesa- 
peake Dr. neoe, San Diego CA 
92123. Reader Service number 
480. 




The Tuned Antenna Company's 5/8-wave HT antenna^ 



LETTERS 




I enjoyed very much the inter- 
view with the Golvins of Yasme 
fame in the October, 1981, issue 
of 73. Many DXers I know would 
give their right 3-500Z to go on a 
DXpedition like those the Cot- 
vins are famous for. To be a DX- 
er one must incorporate feelings 
about being on the other end of 
the microphone. Some day I'll be 
there, but for now, CQ DX, 

Michael Weber WBSRDN 
Cincinnati OH 



whimsical nautical definitions 
by Henry Beard and Roy McKie. 
Therein I encountered the 
following unlikely commentary: 
■*Citizens Band Radio— Part of 
a government study of ter- 
restrial radio emissions to deter- 
mine if intelligent Hfe exists on 
Earth. None has so far been 
detected." 104! 

Robert Rice WB7VIP 
Oak Harbor WA 



EARTH PEOPLE 



] 



I was recently rummaging 
through Sailing, a new book of 



SING ALONG 



] 



Kft K5KLand 73 Magazine ^tb 
to be congratulated for the fine 
story, '"Update your CW Music 
Keyboard/' In the December 
issue. It is hoped that this article 
will motivate others to write 



about their experiences and 
improvements. 

CW music keyboards {'This 
Station Plays Beautiful CW," 73 
Magazine, February, 1979) are 
playing from Auckland (Fred 
ZL1ALP/MM) to Vienna {Hans 
0E1WH) with many in between. 
My mail indicates that others 
also could write interesting 
stories and additions and im- 
provements for the CW music 
keyboards. Topics mentioned to 
me include: hard copy, expanded 
memory, speed indicator, re- 
placing the 4078, use of the 3351 
and a singte-voltage power sup- 
ply, solving propagation-delay 
problems, Crom was wrong to 
badmouth wirewrap, and many 
others. 

ff anyone still has a problem, 
be advised that I still answer all 
letters. Please include an SASE. 

Russell C. W. Crom AG9N 
Mt. Prospect IL 



WATCH IT! 



In the article. "Ham Shack 
Design for Beginners/' a very 
dangerous situation could 
develop if a reader followed the 
author's advice. I am referring to 
questions two and three that 
deal with fusing both the hot 
and the neutral. 

In the National Electrfcal 
Code, 1981 edition, Article 240, 
Section 20. it states: A fuse or an 
overcurrent top unit of a circuit 
breaker shall be connected In 
series with each ungrounded 
conductor. 

Section 22 of Article 240 goes 
on to say: No overcurrent device 
shall be connected in series 
with any conductor that is Inten- 
tionally grounded. 

Besides being against the 
Code, the article's suggestion 
could pose a serious hazard. If 
the neutrat fuse should open, 
the equipment, though not 
operational, would still be 

73 Magazine • March J 982 111 



energized and a possible 
hazard. 

Although I do not agree with 
the author's suggestion that the 
neutral be fused for Hghtning 
protection, it can be done ac^ 
cording to the Code Dy using a 
special tjreaker that discon- 
nects the neutral simuKaneously. 
This is commonly used in ser- 
vice-station wiring. 

Gary Strong KB0UI 
Auburn KS 

MAJORITY OF ONE 

\ am firmly opposed to any 
type of no-code license on any 
band. You have constantly 
criticized the League for forcing 
incentive licensing upon us 
despite the majority of active 
amateurs being firmly against 
the whote concept. Now you 
have somehow arrived at the 
Idea that we need a no-code 
license and openly admit you 
will push for it despite the wishes 
of the majority of amateur radio 
operators, I find this contradic- 
tory » to say the least. 

You afso state thai amateur 
radio needs leaders. Well, that is 
true, but we need leaders who 
are responsive to the wishes of 
the majofity of all operators, not 
to the wishes of "'thousands" of 
would-be amateurs who want to 
be licensed at their owr^ terms. 
We also do not need any self- 
appointed leaders who decide 
single-handedly what is good or 
bad for amateur radio, 

A true leader should always 
work with the majority to 
develop new ideas and accom- 
plish needed improvements. 
This is a democracy, and that's 
the way it works. 

Charles E. Daum WA4YZF 

Lutz PL 

Chaites, amn't you a tittle con* 
fused between what is a leader 
and what is a foUower? You 
seem to be looking for a leader 
who won't lead, but who wttt do 
what the matority wants ... if 
mifforte reatty knows what that 
is. When the ARRL proposed the 
piarf to get 85% of the hams off 
phone, they claimed that only 
20% of the members were op- 
posed, so perhaps they were 
representing the majoniy. Smce 
we ha\fe no elections in the ham 
field for leaders, ail you are ever 
going to get are self-appointed 
ones. Now, if you want leaders 
Without any ideas and with no 
interest in improving amateur 
radio . . , which is what you 

112 T3Magazme • Mafchj982 



seem to be plugging for . . . by 
goffy why not back all of those 
you see around? I opposed the 
ARRL plan to return to the pre- 
war band system because I felt 
it would create severe probfems 
, . . and i pointed them out. I did 
not oppose it as a representa- 
tive of amateur radio or a leader 
presuming to represent the ma- 
fority. In the present case, where 
f feel that we have had ex- 
hausttve proof that the code re- 
quirement does not keep out the 
severely psychotic and where 
there is a good reason to believe 
that a license based upon 
technical competence would 
dean things up, i am going to 
push for that, majority or no. t 
expect to find a wide variety of 
the confused, the apathetic, the 
psychotic, and reactionary 
hams fighting any changes. I 
also expect to find the more in- 
telligent hams looking at the 
situation, weighing the evidence 
. . . and decidtng that my ideas 
are worth a fry. It would be dif- 
ficutt to have any new system 
fail worse than the one we have 
now, Charles, t have never been 
responsive to the majority and 
t*m not going to start now. When 
t perceived that FM and 
repeaters would be fantastic for 
amateurs t went ahead and pub^ 
lished hundreds upon hundreds 
of articles . . . f published book 
after book . . .and held Ffvf sym- 
posiums , , . plus a monthly 
repeater newsletter The major- 
fty of hams hated it and raised 
hell over this, i stuck to my guns 
and today FM is the most popu- 
lar aspect of amateur radio by 
far. Now the majority sees it my 
way . . , and perhaps now I am a 
leader in their eyes. Well, when I 
was one against the crowd, was 
I a leader then? You don't want a 
leader, you want a wishy-washy 
namby-pamby puppet and I wish 
you a tot of luck in finding one^ 
Come to think ofit,,. you won "f 
have much trouble, for just such 
a sterling man seems to be in 
the offing. If you really want to 
be in the large group followmg a 
puppet, your opportunity is at 
hand . . . but feave me out of 
that.^Wayne. 

HOOEY 

In an effort to sell magazines 
and memberships, the ARRL 
drafted almost every CBer onto 
the ham bands. And now you 
want to drop the code re- 
quirements and draft everyone 
else, probably to sell magazines 



also. If the Aircraft Owner's and 
Pilot's Association look the 
same position, we would have 
the air space completely full of 
aircraft. 

Mister Green, you need to 
understand that amateur radio 
is a hobby, not a business. And a 
no-skills license is not the 
answer lo poor circulation. 
There are many hams that have 
dropped 73 (like myseMn 
because of your "license every- 
one" position. In the future, I in- 
tend to plug you on the air and at 
meetings as the man who "sells 

magazines at the expense of 
amateur radio," Regrettably, 
your publication is a very good 
one. But it is not worth the 
damage you are doing to 
amateur radio. 



mouthed nerds getting ficenses. 
It Is you who are domg the really 
serious damage to amateur radio 
, . , not those of us who are trying 
to clean It up by setting better 
standards fort/censing. — Wayne, 



441 



Butch" Rogers K3RYI 

Wichita KS 

Butch, you are full of guano. Oh, 
I've heard that brand of baloney 
before , , , about the crass com- 
mercial interests trying to get 
anyone and everyone into ham- 
ming in order to make dirty 
money. Welt, it's hooey. ARRL 
did not draft CBers into amateur 
radio. If you would put what is 
left of your brain into gear you 
would recognize that anyone 
with any kind of an interest in 
radio communications . , . 
which is what t think we're look- 
mg for in hams . . . has to be a 
fruitcake not to try out CB for 
starters. If there had been 
anything like that when I got into 
ham radio, you can bet I would 
have been using it, So putting 
down someone for starting off 
with CB is ridiculous ... a 
redneck reaction. No one that 
I've seen Is trying to draft people 
for amateur radio with less 
abilities than now . * . indeed, it 
would be difficult to have a 
lower entry requirement than at 
present, considering some of 
the turkeys we have been get- 
ting into amateur radio of late 
. . . in case you've turned on a 
radio. I , . . and 73 Magazine , . . 
are proposing a much tougher 
type of license exam than at 
present ... one which might 
keep some of the pigs out of the 
ham fraternity. I think we've 
seen more than enough proof 
tha t a code exam keeps out little 
and that some other means of 
separation of the sheep from the 
goats is needed. I believe that a 
technical exam, given by a ham 
club, one which follows a series 
of technicat classes given by the 
club, will be a better system and 
will result in fewer obscene- 



[ 



NOT DUIVIB 



_! 



I fully agree with you in 
reference to youf editorial in 
December*s 73 Magatine. I 
would very much like to have a 
ham license but \ have trouble 
with the code portion of the test. 
I do not consider myself a dumb 
person, but t seem to have a 
mental block concerning code i 
have used your tape and others, 
but it seems that when I learn 
the sounds, I cannot get words 
out of them. Anyway, keep up 
the good work on 73 Magazine, 
knowing that I for one will nol 
drop my sub until your mag goes 
to all computers. I use com- 
puters in my work, but still do 
not own my own personal one. 
As I live 90 miles from Denver^ I 
do not get even one television 
station and so subscribe to 
about 70 magazines at this i me. 
\ must say that the most-read 
and looked-at magazines are the 
ones put out by you. Keep up 

good work. , 
You can also be sure ? f 

support con^ceromg a non 
license. Basically, I would . 
license to be able to use horn 
radio In emergency situations. 
To be honest, the way the bands 
sound I do not have any interest 
in DX. It seems that most sta- 
tions are interested only in a 
signal report and a OSI. card. At 
least as far as US stations are 
concerned. In case you were 
wor^dering, I have a business 
license and so do use radio in 
the course of my everyday 
work — which is running a ranch- 
ing business. Well, anyway, 
keep up the good work with your 
magazines. 

David L Afi draws 
Gran by CO 

David, a contact is whatever you 
make it. Whether you are miking 
on two meters, on 75 meters, or 
working DX, the type of contact 
is up to you. Oh, if you call in on 
a DX piteup or on a list opera- 
f/ort, you know you are in for a 
QSL-type of contact. But if you 
are really interested in meeting 
people and talking with them, 
they are there, and they are as 
anxious to talk with yov as you 
with them , , , if you give them 
the chance. I've had hour-fong 
rag chews with even the rarest 



Interested In DX? 

Dick Bash says you need THE COMPLETE IDIOTS GUIDE TO 
DX (by Stu Gregg, NF4Z} if: 



a I I -1 



you thifiklRC means International Red Cross 

youVa still working on your DXCC 

you think WAC means a femala army person 

yOijVe not a BIG GUN (yet) 

you think the 'BUREAU' Is where you put your 

socks 




The Idiot^s Guide puffs no punches and doesn't ^snow' you 
with nonessentials, but it does unlock some DXers' secrets: 
lor example: How to QSL, What to say. Where to place your 
antenna. How much power to use, Whose awards can you get. 
Why and When to use SSB or CW. and much more. , . things 
that you need to know, and information that Honor RoH mem- 
bers had to learn the hard way. 

Dozens of DXers have been interviewed and their suggestions 
have been included here. Take a tip from the "Big Guns" and 
use their secrets and tricks. 

THE COMPLETE IDIOT'S GUIDE TO DX Is available at dealers 
nationwide for on fy$12,95p but if you can't stand to wait, rush 
Dick $15.45 (which will cover First Class postage). If you live In 
Caiifornia, please include 84(c forSalesTax. Telephone orders 
accepted 10 AM-6 PM Caiifomia time, 

BASH EDUCATIONAL SERVICES, INC. 



P.O. Box 2115 

San Leandro, California 94577 

(415)352-5420 



1^26 



B/IRKER &NNlLLWA1SON'S 

PORMBLE 



/WODEL 
370-10 



BW 



kNTENNM 




Designed for 
AWRTMEh^S — MOTELS 



NEGATIONS 



Quick Simple Inslallation, Operates on Z 4 
10, 15, 20 and 40 meters, All coifs supplied 
Only 22-1/2 inches long. Weighs less than- 
2 lbs. Supplied v^ith 10 ft RG 58 coax and 
counter poise. Whip extends to 57 Inches- 
Handles up to 300 watts. 

VSWR— 11:1 when tuned 

Write fof more details and ottier S&W products 

BAi^KE]^ h WIUiAMSOlSL INC 
,10CANALSTWEET ^^^^ "^^^ 




ORDER 

TOLL 

FREE 



MARCH SALE 

1-800-336-4799 

ORDER HOURS: 11 am • 8 pm M-F 

9 am - 4 pm Saturday 



Bonus: 2% Discount for Prepaid Orders 
(C^shier^s Check or Money Orderj 



^^453 





I '*»"T ■* w 



Closed Tuosdav^ 



TEN'TEC SPECIALS 

51 B Argonaut HF XCVR 399 95 

526 Argosy HF XCVa , . . 46900 

580 Delia HF XCVR ,.*;,,,,,,. 748.95 

546 Omni'G HF XCVR 1 040.00 

TEN' TEC Ace e:$S ones 
in stock al {JisccHjnl prices 

MFJ PRODUCTS (Call fof othw MFJ rtemsj 

9S9 N«w 3KW Tufief,,^,,,,,,,. ,„_- 287 75 

982 1 5KW Tuner mtf/swltch 1 99 95 

949S 300 watt deluxe tuner ! 22 00 

941 C 300 wati tuner 5*1 ich/mtr _.... 78 42 

940 3O0 watt tunef switch/ mtf 69.70 

484 Gr««idma$i:ef mfimory h^yer 12 msg - . . , 1 21 72 

482 4 msg Mettiory kevar ..... ... 67 96 

422 Pacesetter Keyer w/Benctier BV1 ..,.,. 67 1 5 

408 Deluxe Kever with spe«d mtr 6969 

496 Kevbo.afd U ..... . . . , 296 95 

752 6 Dual tumable flltef 78 42 

Tf>2 24 -hour clpgk ^ . . . *».,*,.* ^ ^ .. . 30,95 

DAIWA/MCM 

CN 520/Crg 540 Watt Meters &9.95/69.95 

CNW41B/CNW51BAntennaTLjnBra. , . 169.95/279.95 

CNA 2002 Auto 2.5W Turter. 399. 95 

ASTRON POWER SUPPUESflB 8 VDQ 

RS7A 5 amps ci&mjni.*ous, 7 jirtip tCS 46-60 

RSI 2 A 9 amps continuous, 12 amps ICS. . . 66 35 
RS20A 1 6 ampg continiuoiis. 20 #mp£ ICS. ■ ■ ■ 87.20 

RS20M same as RS20A + meters 105 50 

fiS35A 25 amps continuous. 35 amp ICS 131.95 

RS35M same as RS35A + meten. . . ... 1S1.35 

MINIOUAD HQ-1 T29.95 

ALKANCE HD73 Rotor. 91,35 

COE HAM IV nOTOft 16S 9S 



V Hi It » 



VoCam AiitannAA/2rn Amps 

5/a wave 2 m hand held An I 

2 Watts in, 25 watts ouT 2m Amp . , 

200 mw m, 25 watts out £m Amp:.,,,,, . 

2 wstts m, 50 watis out 2m Amp 

MIRAGE AMPS h WATT MfTEl^S 

MPJ HF/MP2 VHF SWR/Walt Meter 

823 2 \n. 30 out. AW Mode 

61 08 10 in, fiO out. All Mode. Prc-Amp. . 

61 OT 6 10 m, 1 60 out. Att Mode. Pre Amp 
BENCHER PADDLES SlaGk/Chrome. . . 35 
BUTTERNUT NBWI H FG V 1 - 60m Vert ica I 



19.95 
89.95 
., 82. 9S 
.,105.95 

. . . , CALL 
... CALL 

CALL 

. . CALL 
25/42 95 
. . 99 95 



SUPER SPECIALS 

AEA Tsopote Ant . Ki^yfl^fs. Code Readers CALL 

AST HON POWER SUPPLIES 
V535M 25 amp continuous ad|ustabfe _ .... 1 7 1 .00 
VS20M 1 6 amp conlinuous adjustable ...... 124*00 

AZDE H PCS 300 handheld. 2m. . . ..,.,*. CALL 

PCS 3000 2m KCVR .,......,, 284.00 

SANTEC H71 200 2m handheld. .... .... 269 00 

S7-7/7 440-450 handheld 284.00 

A^FW SANTEC 2m & 440 MHz handhelds , Call for Quotes 

KDK FM 2025A 35 watt FM XCVR 269>95 

BIG DISCOUNTS 

KENWOOD. ICOM. VAESU. AZDEN, KDK 
— Call tor CMif i|uote — 



HY-GAtN AKTENNAS 

NEY^JH7 DXX T rrba nd Beam - U si S499 00 
THJ MK3 3- Element 6eani^ *.»«..«*.,,.. . 

TH3 JR 3-Bemeiit Tn|»«nd 

1 8AVT.'WB 10-60 Verticat ... ...... 

l4Ava^WB 10-40 V©n,c#l . 



CALL 

1 79.95 

138 95 

62.95 

50.77 



CUSHCRAFT |oth#r antennas in stock) 
A4 New Triband Beam 1 0-1 5'20m ....... 205 95 

A3 New Triband Beam 1 0- 1 5'20m 165.95 

AV3 New TO-15-20m Vertical. 41.50 

ARX 2B New RinflO Ranger 2m 33.95 

A32-19 2m Boomef" OX Beam. 75.95 

2200 220 MHi Boomer...... 68 95 

214B Jr Boomer 144-146 MHz..... . .. 61 95 

214FB Jr, Boomer 144 5-148 MHz. ...... 61 95 

A147'T1 11 ^Element 2m. 34.50 

TELEX HEADSETS' HEADPHONES 

CI 2T0/C1 320 Headphones . . 22.95/32 95 

PROCOM 200 Headset^ tfuat Imp MiC ^ . , . 77 50 
PROCO M 300 It/ wt H eadsel/ du a I Jmp m ic 69,95 

CABLE RG8/U Foam 95% Shietd 26C/fiL 

B wire Hoior 2 P18, 6 #22 IBC/ft. 

KLM ANTENNAS {other antennae in stock) 

KT34A 4-Etefiianl Tnband Beam 32075 

KT34XA 6-Elemont Triband Beam . , , 469. BO 

144-148 13LB 2m 13Elgment with balufl. , 77,95 
144-148 leC 2m 16-Element for oscar .... 93. 55 
420-450 14 420-450 MHz 14' element beam. . , 37.54 
42 0-450 1 8 C420-4 SO W N2 1 8- el em en t oacar ... 58. 70 
4 32 1 6 LB 1 B a I e m 4 30-434 M Hz beam/ ba lo n . . . 60. 70 

HUSTLER 5BTV lO-BOm Vertical 92.50 

4BTV 10'40m VarlFcal 73. 95 

3TBA New 10-15-20m Beam 166.95 

HF Mobile Resonators Standard Super 

1 arid 1 5 metef 7 95 12,50 

20 meters 10 9S 14.95 

40 meters 12.50 1 7 30 

75 meters 13. 50 27 95 

Avarfti AP 151.3G 2m on glas^ ant 27.95 



ORDER INFORMATION 
Orders: 1*800 336 4799 

Informafion 

and Virginia orders: (703} 643^1063 

Store Hours: M-W-F: 12 noorvS pm 

Saturday; 9 am- 3 pm 



Mailing Address: 2410 Orexel St 

Woodbridge, VA 22T92 
Store Location: 1 441 5 Jefferson Davis Hwy. 

Woodbridge. VA 22191 



— CALL FOR QUOTES — 

Send s!amp fof a flyer. Terms: Pnces rto not incfude 
shippmg. VISA and Master Charge accepted. 2% 
dfscount for prepaid orders {cashiers check or 
money order}. COD fee $2.00 per order. Prices 
subject to change without notice or obligation. 



^See Usf of Advert isBfs on page 130 



73 Magazine • March, 1982 113 



of DX, finding things of mutual 
interest to discuss, i've found 
that most hams in rare spots are 
patheUcaIfy eager to talk. They 
are always running up against 
hams who want their QSL for a 
country, a prefix, etc., and it gets 
to be an expensive bore in a 
short whiie, driving many of 
them off the air. The more you 
can get mto rag chews with 
these chaps, the more they wili 
enjoy amateur radio . , . so you 
are performing a public service 
at the same time that you are en- 
joying yourseff. You know, not 
every ham in the world fives and 
dies over the ARRL Honor Roll, 
or even over a DXCC certificate. 
Some are in it for the fun of talk- 
ing . , , $0 give them a chance. 
You 'II rarely hear me fighting the 
pileups. I tend to look for longer 
contacts, talking about how it is 
to live where they are^ what 
there Is to see, the skin diving, 
the photography, things like 
that. — Wayne. 




As an aspiring Novice, I 
naturally subscribe to the better 
publications such as 73. I read 
and re-read each issue, with the 
hope that I can somehow begin 
to make sense of some of the ar- 
ticles and projects. I have been a 
kit builder for years (Heath), and 
just recently I decided to venture 
again into the world of ama- 
teur radio. 

While I have received much in- 
formation from 73, I think that 
many of the construction ar- 
ticles go fight over the heads of 
the less sophisticated in elec- 
tronics construction. Many of 
the equipment designs would be 
fantastic for the Novice just get- 
ting started, but the schematics 
scare them away. If the projects 
were presented with circuit 
board layouts with parts place- 
ment and wire directions, that 
would be a real boon to the 
Novice, both educationally and 
in the pocketbook. 

There is one other problem 
that I would like to discuss with 
you briefly. As an ''outsider" 
looking to get in, I have no- 
ticed a few idiosyncrasies of 
the amateur operator that 
perhaps have escaped the eye 
of those "inside/' 

t use the words '"outsider" 
and 'Insider" because this Is 
the way I have been made to feel 
by some of the amateurs I have 
come in contact with. They have 
made me feel as though my 



questions were stupid. They 
seem to lack the time to answer 
questions, and can't be 
bothered with a person who 
can't read schematics but only 
Heathkit'^'^ diagrams. It would 
seem that unless you are a 25- 
wpm Extra with a 2-kW station 
with super quads, membership 
in clubs is discouraged. 

Your editorial in the 
December, 1981, issue of 73 was 
of particular interest to me. You 
bemoan the loss of potential 
amateurs, the loss of new tech- 
nical manpower, etc. You also 
stated that the youth of our na- 
tion should be made aware of 
the future In electronics and the 
fun of ham radio, through local 
clubs. This reminded me of 
when I was 16 and my Imagina- 
tion was first sparked by the lure 
of amateur radio. I was met with 
the same Indifference as I am 
experiencing now, 20 years 
later I had forgotten my bad ex- 
perience and was just reminded 
of H recently when I again at- 
tempted to join the fraternity— 
or should I say clique. 

I don't mean to sound 
negative, but it is easy td ^ee 
why most potential Novices are 
turned away from amateur 
radio. The amateurs should be 
looking more to themselves 
rather than rattle sabers at the 
FCQ License requirements are 
tough, but not insurmountable. 
But if left to the clubs, I dare say 
even fewer would be licensed, at 
least through my experience, 
anyway. For the last 7 months I 
have been searching for that 
elusive ''Elmer" I've heard 
about, who is always ready, will- 
ing, and able to lend a hand. In- 
stead, I've received indifference, 
ambiguous information concern- 
ing membership in most clubs, 
infrequent or non-existent 
schedules for meetings, and 
what seems like a total lack of 
interest in helping a newcomer. 

No longer a child, I refuse to 
give up this time. Til make it on 
my own, through your excellent 
tapes and books. Maybe some- 
day I can offer myself as an 
Elmer and perhaps revive what 
appears to be a lost tradition. 

Willidm J. Naughton, Jr. 
Philadelphia PA 

SURVIVAL 

I have Just finished reading 
Marvin Solomon WBSVNP's let- 



ter, "Survival,'* which appeared 
In the December, 1981, issue of 
73. I agree with his concern for 
the caliber and amount of scho- 
lastic training our children are 
receiving, but I think It goes 
further back than high school, 
all the way to our grade schools. 
Committed teachers are re- 
warded by moving them up into 
administration and replacing 
them with less competent 
educators who are interested 
only in the financial gains and 
not the education of our chil* 
dren. Vm not saying they are ail 
like this, but the percentage of 
teachers who would rather pro- 
mote a child with whom they 
had trouble instead of assuming 
the responsibilities of their jobs, 
namely to teach them the 
basics, is way too high! 

I have a business where I'm in 
constant contact with children 
from grade school to college 
(I'm a barber) and it's amazing 
how many cannot even fill out a 
check properly, let alone do the 
basic fundamentals of math. 

I have had a running battle 
with the school system here for 
almost twenty years, with four 
children In different levels of 
schooling. Sometimes I'm not 
sure whether I'm winning, but I 
urge every parent to be aware of 
the quality of schooling his 
children are receiving and if 
there is the smallest doubt that 
they are getting an adequate 
education, fight. Don't let them 
tell you what to do— you tell 
them. Otherwise the gap will get 
even wider, 

Barry Vlerra WB6GZK 
Fair Oaks CA 

You're right, Barry. Education 
has changed a good deal in the 
last 50 years. In the third grade I 
was taking courses in art appre- 
ciation, complete with the fun- 
damentals of composition. This 
was invaluable to me when I got 
into photography . . . and later, 
when I went to work as a tefevi- 
sion cameraman, I was the only 
one in the crew who had had thts 
sort of training. They taught us 
how to read music in the third 
grade, too . . . later valuable to 
me when I started singing in 
church and then in choruses. As 
far as I know, those subjects are 
long forgotten in most schools. 
Then there was a class in recog* 
nizing classical music, another 
one I'll bet they've stopped. That 
was in Brooklyn, New York, of alt 
places . . . in the public schools. 



The art and music classes were 
in New Jersey. Later, in high 
school, the art classes were 
even better. My mother got so 
enthused by them when she 
went to the same high school 
that she went into art for a 
career. There is much to be done 
about education. If we can't get 
the schools to improve we still 
may be able to pull it together 
with video/computerized teach- 
ing systems which will be along 
in a few years.— Wayne. 



CRIMINAL BAND? 



After reading the letter by 
A. E. M. Spence VE7DKY, I felt 
compelled to voice my disagree- 
ment. First of all, I did not ap- 
preciate the insinuation that 
most of the lids on the air were 
from the 4th and 5th call areas. 
Since being licensed in 1976, I 
have heard very few hams from 
the 5th call area that would fall 
Into the lid category. As for the 
New Mexico hams, I believe 
them to be of the highest caliber 
in the country. 

The other statement that 
bothered me was the one on 
wanting the rest of the 
^'Criminal Band'* fraternity on 
the air. First of all, the proper 
name is "Citizens Band," Sec- 
ond, I as well as probably most 
of the amateurs don't want the 
average CB operator in the 
ranks, but there are a lot of 
CBers who would be an asset to 
the Amateur Radio Service. 
After all, they are humans just 
like everyone else^ and every- 
body must start somewhere, 

I got my start because of CB, 
and I don't consider myself a lid, 
I have an Advanced class 
license for which I worked very 
hard, and am into VHF, HF, and 
into the extra modes of RTTY 
and OSCAR, 1 am very active in 
building, and work with in- 
tegrated circuits. I am also into 
computers. 

Now, If it were not for CB, I 
probably would never have 
entered the world of amateur 
radio and electronics. Now, of 
course, I have a very marginal 
use for the Citizens Band radio 
service, but let us place credit 
where credit is due- 

I do think that Mr. Spence 
should do a re-evaluation of the 
entire basis of his opinions. 

Stan Ganti WB5TGL 
Silver City NM 



114 73 Magazine • March, 1982 





ORBIT is the Official Journal for the 
Radio Amateur satellite Corporation 
(AMSAT), P.O. Box 27, Washington, DC 
20047. Please write for application. 

For a FREE SAMPLE COPY please 
send S1 to cover First Class Postage 
and handling to: orbit, 221 Long 
Swamp Road, woicott, CT 06716. 




FAST 
SCAN 



f$249J 





A modular approach. . Jor your own custom-designed ATV 

system Here^S how TXAS4ATVEXCiTER/IMODULATQfl.ta9p|>d 

TiMi mn«] and ipattd mcKlule is dnignad lo Ofnm itiv 

mofiic* Qvi Q* twtt mn««rs lor UA tMKL Thir widMl 

w Aaguim U A «dc nfli * »fli«. Ttfiad wmi 4ta4 on 
«» ^ 434 or 42629 rriHx. PPOr^tOti lor lync (S^ 

PAS 10 WATT ATV POWER MODULE UB ppd 

TrM PAS «rill PUT DUI ID warra flhlS l>0««r on th« ifnC 

filinft m tfid out P^us EMndwidth t^ in* itnoi* baf>d 
wjiti good i»n«arfir for color and sound Riouifn 13..I 
■rtfc r4iguiij|i«i:t -at 3 ampi. 

^ FMA5 AUPrO SUBCARRIER GENERATOR 

-**♦** 139 ppd 

P\jlt tudiD at> with your came-ra vid#o lust ai broad- 
cast TV djgfls at 4 5 mHz. Puis am up to 1 vp-ptodnwi 
|h* Tx^S Of VM-J, ;j, or 4 TTioduiaiofa.. F)ef|u»m lo* Z 
rrriq |1B0 to 6(KI Dhms), and + 1? tq 18 wdc O 25 (Hi. 
WorKi vtHh any itmilr witH 5 mHi vid«n Ci«ndwi-dih 

TVC-2 ATV DOWNCONVERTER. ... 155 ppd 

SiriplHfiffl MRF9C11 (1.7 dtjfrJF) praamp And dtju&le bal^ 
• rtc<ed mixer module digs ouj thewaak gnns biji resims 
mlirmodft and overlaact. Connecia bAlwvan i,iht inl«n- 
fi4 arid TV p«l lurtfrd To channel 2 Qf 3, ViMcap lun?^ 
420 Id 450 mHi ReK^Mire^ + 1 ? to iB ^dc itt 10 rna 
Supf r »naJ1i™ JVC 2L mrlh NEMU5 preamp ^ 9dt> NF| 
ttaga IflU ppd 

*TXA5, PAS, FMA5 and TVC Basio Moduie Pkg. 

Cilf or wrHe for our complaiA li>t of specilicatlons, statkm s<e!ii|> diagfams. and 
optional accessones which mcEud© antennas, modulators. deiecrorSp t««t 
ganisfaiors. cameras, etc, WE ARE A FULLUHE SUPPUER OF AU. YOUR ATV 
NCEOS. 

TERMS; VISA or MASTER CARD by telephone or mail, or checkor mcsoey ofd«r by 
mall. AN prices are derivefed m USA Allow three weeks after ofder fof dollvQiv. 

(213) 447-4565 Charge card orders only 





P.C. ELECTRONICS 2522 Paxson Land. 
Tom W60RG Maryann WB6YSS Afcadfa, California 91006 



SPECTRUM INTERNATIONAL INC. 

THE MORSE TALKER 

THE PRODUCT THAT SPEAKS FOR ITSELFl! 





Spectrum ^^ 
In ternat ional 
^^= Inc-i 



FEATURES 

if Complete self-contained Speaking Morse 

Tutor 
■k Latest state of the art microprocessor 

speed synthesis system 
■k Suitable for beginners and proficient 

operators aiiite 
■k A "must" for novice classes 



-k Wide speed range: 2-20 wpm 
-k High speed option: 12-48 wpm 
-k Variable group length and single 
character facility 

PRICE $225.00 
Shipping $5.50 



.^436 



P.O. Box 1084 S, Concord, Mass, 01742 USAf 



'Sp# tisf ef AjSvmu$«fs qr page }:Mf 



73Magazine * I^archj9e2 115 



RTTy LOOP 



Marc /. iBBwey, MM. WA3AJR 
4Q06 Winiee Road 
Randailstown MD 21133 

One of the most enjoyable 
and at the same time most 
rewarding aspects of writing 
this column Is answering ques- 
tions posed by readers. Be- 
cause of the volume of mail re- 
ceived and my rather tight sche- 
dule, \ am not a&ways able to an- 
swer each one individually. Let- 
ters containing requests for a 
specific circuit or part are often 
urianswerable when received, 
and normally are held until such 
time as the requested informa- 
tion becomes available. 

On the other hand, questions 
of general interest, such as 
those relating to RTTY prin- 
ciples or techniques, frequently 
wind up here in the pages of 73. 
Not everyone is an expert, or 
even weiJ versed, in everything. 
Questions from novice RTTY 
users as well as meaty tidbits 
from oid pros provide an inter- 
esting and varied fare for the 
readership. Hungry? Let's see 
what's on today's menu. 

Emil Guerrero, a "prospective 
ham" living in Portchester. New 
York, wants to add RTTY to his 
SWL (shortwave iistening) 
shack. Emil notes that he is "no 
speed reader" and is Interested 
In using a code converter to 
allow display of ASCII data on a 
Murray (Baudot) machine. Spe 
cjficalty, he asks about the fea- 
sibility of using a Murray printer 
running at 60 wpm (45.45 baud) 
to copy an ASCII transmission 
being sent at ISO or 300 baud. 

Converting the eight-level 
ASCII to five-level Murray is no 
problem, Emil, and several hard- 
ware and software schemes 
have been covered In this column 
and within the pages of 73 over 
the past few years. The problem 
comes in when you try to build 
the reservoir. 

*■ Reservoir/' you ask? Well, tt 
breaks down like this. ASCII 
transmission coming in at 300 
baud, the most commonly used 
speed, represents about 30 
characters every second. In, 
let*s say, the first minute, that 
represents about 1800 charac- 
ters. On the receiving end, that 
teieprinter is atile to handle five- 
level input at 45.45 baud, which 



represents about six characters 
per second, or about 360 
characters per minute. Not 
counting stop-over, this repre- 
sents about 1440 characters per 
minute that must be stored. In a 
ten-minute broadcast, you 
would have to provide a reser- 
voir, such as with a computer- 
style read/write memory, of 
some 14.400 characters. That's 
roughly 14 kilobytes* Now you 
need some means of stuffing 
data into that memory, pulling It 
out, keeping track of where you 
are, and doing a code conver- 
sion (ASCII to Murray, remem- 
ber?) all at ihe same time. You 
need a computer. 

Now. It can be done, and cer- 
tainly individual characters can 
be converted from one code to 
another without all this hassle. 
But in order to receive auto- 
matic transmission, that is, 
transmission at machine speed, 
a buffer and some machine 
'"smarts" are needed. Hopefully. 
some of the articles published in 
the past will help. 

Emil is not alone, by the way. 
A similar letter was received 
from Larry LeMone K7IHI, out m 
Provo, Utah, who is also inter- 
ested In such a conversion 
scheme. 

Along the same line, but with 
an interesting variation, comes 
a letter from Curt Heuberger 
K1CH In Seekonk, Massachu- 
setts. Curt is interested in using 
an IBM Setectric typewriter for 
a RTTY 1^0 device, i see no 
reason why such a code conver- 
sion could not t>e implemented 
using a Murray ■to-correspon- 
dence scheme similar to those 
which implement ASCII on the 
Selectric. I am using such a 
scheme here with an unpublished 
program that turns an I/O Selec^ 
trie into a "smart" printer* It 
would be simple to take a 
scheme like that and change the 
code tables to convert to Murray 
rather than ASCII, Curt men- 
tions that he has the "'fixin's" for 
a small Z-80 computer sitting on 
the shelf. Either that or a small 
single-tKjard computer like the 
•'Kilobaud Klassroom Kom- 
pyter" described here a few 
months back would be ideal 
to implement a RTTY Selectric 
system. 

Emil, along with Richard Flink 



WB2S0U, out In Hillsdale, New 
Jersey, wonders about where to 
find stations broadcasting 
weather or press information. I 
again refer to Tom Harrington's 
book. World Press Service Pre- 
quenctes, available from the 73 
Radio Bookshop for S5.95 (order 
book number BK1202). This 
book, along with its periodic up- 
daleSj comprises one of the 
most complete listings I have 
seen and includes a wide spec- 
trum of International RTTY sta- 
tions, It is, by the way, only one 
of the good books to be found 
on a tour through the Bookshop. 

Merging computers and RTTY 
continues to be a popular topic, 
George Gadbois W3FEY is con- 
fused as to why« with several of 
the schemes I have described to 
input RTTY into a 6800 computer, 
J have resorted to a software 
UART rather than configuring 
the serial port Into the five data 
bits needed for Murray code. 

Well, George, this all relates 
to the type of chip used for input 
into this series of computer. 
Rather than a general-purpose 
UART. the 6800 series of com- 
puters—that is. most computers 
based on the Motorola M6800 
CPU— commonly use a Motorola 
6850 ACIA (Asynchronous Com- 
munications Interface Adapter) 
chip. The ACIA is more "power- 
ful" than a UART in thai it allows 
more control to be passed in 
and out of the computer and 
interfaces with the bus and 
serial communications line very 
well, but lacks the ability to be 
configured in other than a 
seven- or eight-bit format. 

It is this failing, as it were, 
that forces us into using an 
alternate scheme, other than 
the serial ACIA, that is, to input 
five-level Murray into a 6800 
computer. There are two ways to 
go. Either use a UART, which 
means building an interface 
board and software, or use a 
parallel port, which Involves on*y 
new software- For a frugal fel- 
low like me, the "software 
UART" is the logical choice. 

Once selected, the software 
approach suddenly offers all 
kinds of other advantages. 
Speed changing or code ctiang- 
ing is trivial to accomplish. Aux- 
iliary lines are avai Sable to key 
the transmitter, turn on lights, or 
brew the coffee. All kinds of nice 
things fail into place, and you 
even save a few bucks: Neat! 

It is for this reason that 
another scheme, posed by Paul 
Pennington of Martinez, 



Georgia, will fall through, Paul is 
using an SWTPC 6800 computer 
with a video t30ard display and a 
modem connected to the com- 
puter's former input board, an 
ACI based interface, Paul feels 
that feeding receiver audio into 
the modem and then through 
into the ACIA for input would be 
a viable way to implement RTTY 
on a shoestring. 

There are a few problems with 
this idea, no matter how attrac- 
tive it seems- First of all, the 
common modem receive fre- 
quenctes in originate mode, the 
■'normal" state of affairs, afe 
mark = 2225 Hz and space = 
2025 Hz. Contrast this to the 
RTTY ^'Standard" of mark = 
2 125 Hz and space = 2975 Hz 
used on VHP links. Not only is 
the degree of shift different (200 
Hz vs, 850 Hz), but the direction 
is wrong also. Now, if you were 
on HF and used the wrong side- 
band to tune in a 170'Hz shift 
signal, you might get the 
modem filters to recognize the 
signal, but then another prob- 
lem arises. 

The usual mode of transmis- 
sion on amateur circuits is still 
five-level Murray, and here you 
are with that ACIA board just as 
t led as ever to seven- or eight -bit 
codes. Sorry! I am afraid that you 
would either be limited to receiv- 
ing ASCII or would have to 
replace the ACIA with a UART in 
order to input the Murray code 
unmolested. As a kluge you could 
try to interface the modem to 
the one-bit parallel port software 
UART we have been talking about, 
but \ can*t recommend that. 

The other problem is in using 

that modem itself. The extra 
tiucks that a RTTY demodulator 
costs buy quite a bit in selec- 
tivity, function, and features 
when compared to a landline- 
style modem. You might look 
into a small demodulator, such 
as the iRL FSK-500 highlighted 
here a few months back, to com- 
plete a RTTY station at minimal 
expense. 

Boy, this has been a depress- 
ing column, so far! Ail 1 have 
done is tell this fellow or that 
one that this scheme or that will 
not work. How about something 
encouraging? 

Nicho»as Oland W3DSE of 
Reading. Pennsylvania, is look- 
ing for a way to convert a 
surplus ASCII video terminal to 
Murray. Nick states that he is 



116 ?3Magazm • MarohJ982 



We've cornered the market! 



^^ - . . . . ^,^^ MH57Sfi»l 

USB PHDGflAMMABi£ CHIP 

• Anv hey sequenct, including consr5nt& 
and {tats entry poinu, may b^sdfKrMt 
auHirnatirtUy m (hc iMd Wode and 
pjiecined Jn tiw Run Mode 

• 102 itijf slorage capacity i3F up lo 47 
iSiflerenl ke^ arraftgied m a iSx^ matfi* 

Its possible to bupld mjifiv pr(tjErci5. wi1h Ifiis 
cnip. Prn auts snd siKCs supplied with wdef. 
<»C10OO3l t4.as 



WATCH 
GUTS 




PLUG INTO SAVINGS! 



luiriEStid) ,75 

S 113011} 1 Co WATCH GUTS 

(unlesied) .7S 

SPEClAl.. Mijt and WfliGh. BUY fatjr watdi guls 

torS£.M 



SV lif. 4MH2 (kit. FTL C^uripgEiblf. 
W/pJn flirfs 4,93 



P 14X103 color Burst Crftlal 

3579&45MHZ 




.50 
OH 1ty/4.7S 



^?.-%:. 



t«« 



■O O- "J" ■*■ ^^C"i& -^^ \^ "X/ ^ ■■ \^ \^ ' 



JA-O'-L'- 



SltXlQI 



iVIKTS iQARDS 

Ihe perlisi:: I vi^-\f I D 111 I up your parts 
tlin on e budgel- We iaund al I sfif ts at 
nea( reaistofs. (tiscreles. caps. pes. 
elc. MM 



^l«06 



mSvgfiifflilLE.. D.Bar 
Graph \i2fMji\ 150 



1 W iiM tm 



riYTTTTni"Yti''"i 1 1 iij 



Z 10009 4 Digit ^S ' CUrc« 

Oi£|>t»y#.'cojcin, 

Cf:. Rfld TBS 



_J_LLl-IJ,...-eW 






L rf.nY;i^rt.y ■^mti .-mimTTr.JFi-j'rufiirth 



■^■vL^■: • ■ 



^■^ 




AIDDZS Solder Il>s&Ll^ 

AssrtilmEnt50fti[iuktr 
Si^eiJvMS21° 



LINE PRINTER 
HAMMER DRIVER BOARD 

Ea:(] bo^rd cnniaina apgrojf. tao 
each =rMJEBOG |■S^^^c^m Oarling- 
lan rePN hFj; 7&0 15A( Atwtil 
5130 00 woflh. OMier 100 rW4Mll 
fliofles ptus- support chips The 
rthijle package « vours f^r tinfv 
HOB. ^1QD:23 



SHOCKING 
SAVINGS 



K 1 001 5 
BIDD04 



HI 0000 



N 1 0000 
N 1 0001 



AuflaiTO-3 
Sockets .59 

iSV'N'Celi 
(Eve ready) This 

wifl run your 
watchguTsa 
lot longer than 
a button ceN 
$ .25 

Right Angle 
Phoao Jack 
(P.C. Mourn) 
20iteach 

Acid Brush 25(t 
each.5/Sl.OO 

SolderBrush 
9D«each,3/ 
S1.00 



6-PACK 

CALCULATORS 

S6J5 

UnOeiievabtfi A-ssofSmenlh 
FKlory lemam - mo-si are easily 
repair&d. hatlDiial $&micw)diiirti>r. 




■€:-ji;:ai:s^«s:i 



[AK1014t 




GUARANTEED 

DEFECTIVE! a ^pmpleie If 
hour digital clock. SiMiii an m^n- 
yt.^Ulur'* line rejecls. &wne ar* 
neiurns, anfl s<»rTiB 416 just 
scratched Features: hours mm- 
utss. alarm snooze lalarm Pa^ts 
value 3\QiK ^VQirid i^hI S^D QO. 
yCHJ pay inlf 16.00 Ci. iSTDOiai 



ADAPTOR 




M^iia 



XI 0003 

S?.^ ea. 



INSTANT 
REBATE 

When youf ordti' tai^i^ $50 'W nwre. 
you may tak« t$ o^ liie toEai oi ywir 
order 

H's alnH95t Nke fiisdmig a fi ve doFl^ 



Electronic Sales. Inc. 

Phone (206) 682-5025 (in Wash. State) 
2300 First Ava. Seattle, Washington 981 21 



MARCH SPECIALS 





SHOCKING SAVINGS 
CONT 




nW42 



tO00MFX25V 
fleclrolyhcJfll 



35G ea 



B1.HK PflfCf 10^3.00 



Mare Ijclorif Iftmeas Um HH-inniiil 

Stminnilui::lar! 

Prpnung Ca'Cu'lalors - Mdje are easily 

nepaifed. These uiiir& h^ve ini3iti6n. 

siitil"facEt(in. (liu-ision. nnj|Tiplicathon. tnn^ 

liinclmn jin@ntory, EloMing decimal aid 

p^Tceni key. , . 

^lam Mode 1 312r Table Tcii:)Mo(tetw.< 

Green FFiiDiE^cgm Display 
S 1 003^ Moiid 1 36D table Tcn^ ModeJ w.-'(Jo 

Display 
SI 0034 Model 410 Tai>lFTdp Mdi:1cIiw - 

LC.DDiiipl^^ 
Si WIS Vl[7dcl^>DDPnr>;eiMDtieltv>'£reen 

Fill 5reFLcen3 Display 
YOUR CKaiK E9.9S aicii 




C.E.I. IfilchRiaElar 

Tfte CEI ^lAl CHWlASTER 15 designed to 
nwajoTe [he slsndir^ wave ratio Ci«tH««n t 
08 trfljisnuicer ano the anlenna (FiKBd gi 
Mobile). Ttieirmque and 9i]n^v^iii.r.t>circuM 
design requires m catibratFOn and hAs 
iiflgNL|iijle Ijne njiBaes It car^ theretore. be 
telftin Line" all Ihelime 
JUST E9.9S 



WIDOlIll 1B./3. 6'LnieCofd5^.a5. 
2/S5.W] 

filBOn? ?2.i'« 156. Tin Edge 
Cofinector 9^c 



? 



For Phone Orders: 

TOLL FREE HOT LINE 
1-800-426-0634 



VISA 



For Areas Outside Of Washingtort State 
(jnclyding Alaska &. Hawaii) 

TERMS: MinimuTn order $10.00 /U.S. Funds Ori^y / Open ac- 
count to schools and government agencies / At I orders 
shipped U.RS. or P.P. .-' Add 10% (postage & handling) for or- 
ders lender $100.00. For orders greater than 5100.00. we'll pay 
the freight .' Back-Ofdered items shipped prepaid .■ Washing- 
ton State residents add 5.4% safes tax / MasterCard &. Visa 
accepted ..' CO.D.'s add S2.00 extra. 

We reserve the right to Ifrnrt quantities / All items subject to 
prior sale ./ We reserve the right to substitute manufaciurers. 



The Electronic 
Breadboard 

Computer Aided Design (CAD) is one of the newest 
of the applications of microcomputer technology. 
THE ELECTRONIC BREADBOARD penults the 
design and analysis of analog circuits. It can be 
used to evaluate voltages, currents, impedance 
and the frequency response of any circuit. 




This package is ideal for audio component repair- 
men, ham radio technicians, hobbyists* electrical 
engineers, telecommunications engineers, audio- 
philes and students of electronics. Plug it in and 
slice away a lot of guesswork. 

0287R-37 Model I & III Level II 16K $49.95* 




Inslant Software 



^-445 



PETERBOROUGH, ISI.H. 03458 




*Plus 82.50 shipping 



TO ORDER: See your 
local Instant Software 
dealer or call Toll-Free 

1-800-258-5473 orders ontv 

In New Hampshire 1 '603-924-9471 

Mon.-Fri. 8:00 am -4:30 pm EST. 




^See List of Adverttsers on page 130 



73 Magazine • March, 1982 117 



not looking for buffers or other 
bells and whistles, but just for a 
straight ASCII/Murray scheme 
for nnanual operation. 

Well, as long as the display 
termtnat Is able to operate faster 
than the inputs as it would be 
with a 300'baud terminal receiv- 
ing 45,46-baud code, the reser- 
voir problem detailed above 
would not be a factor. Similarly, I 
presume few of us can type at 
machine speed for any length of 
time, and if you can, you could 
not go any faster on an old 
Model 15, so let's accept that 
constraint also. Fig* 1 is a block 
diagram of what you need» a 



simple hardware ASCll-to-Mur- 
ray duplex converter. Several 
such schemes have been pub- 
lished in 73 Magazine in the past. 

Nick also relates difficulty in 
finding specialized chips, 
UARTs, and the like needed for 
building projects such as this. I 
have found that most of the 
firms who advertise right here in 
73 do a fine job of providing just 
about any imaginable part. 
When I have needed a particular 
chip or part that is not listed in 
their ads or catalogs, a phone 
caii or letter to selected firms 
will usually turn up one able to 
supply the item from stock. Not 



ClOCK 




MURRAY- 
ASCII 
1/2 PROM 



ASCII ^ 

MURRAY 
1/2 PROM 



I 











UAT?T 




V 
e CtATA BITS OUT J 


OUT ^ 






SEfllAL 
ASCH 


f « DATA BITS IH 


IN 









CLOCX 



r 



Fig. 1. ASCf I/Murray conversion block diagram. 



all stocked items are able to be 
listed, you know. 

Above aiij know the firm witin 
which you deal, either through a 
friend's recommendation or 
with the endorsement of the 
publisher of the ad. Don't send 



W2NSD/f 

NEVER SAY DIE 

editor! al toy Wayne Green 



frorr) page 8 

cians, and electronics e>cperts. 
Well, the recent emphasis on 
skipping theory in the getting of 
a ham ticket, with the use of the 
ARRL Q&A and Bass cheat 
books instead of an understand- 
ing... using only an ability to 
copy code as the filter... has 
reduced our ranks to a mere 
handful of technicians and elec- 
tronics experts. By using the 
code as the only serious 
test - . . if you can call five words 
per minute serious. . .and 
throwing out any real need for 
technical knowledge, we have 
thrown out most of our value to 
the country. . .and to ourselves. 

Yes, a few of you reading this 
have taken the trouble to use the 
73 license study course and you 
have a good understanding of 
the fundamentals of elec- 
tronics. You are In the minority, 
sad to say. And how many clybs 
take a haif hour or so at the 
beginning of their meetings to 
run through some aspect of 
radio or electronics theory? 
Maybe a dozen out of several 
thousand. 

Reservoir of operators? Sure, 
but for what? Not for any mili- 
tary need today. The military 
rarely uses code today. They 
use phone for local communica- 
tions and automatic encrypted 
systems for longer ranges. Fortv 

118 73Magazine * March J982 



years ago, it took a few months 
to train a ham to be of value to 
the armed forces. During WWII, 
80% of the hams went into the 
services and helped out*., 
mostly as technicians, not as 
Morse operators. That was be- 
fore RTTY was really invented. 
Once that was an accomplished 
fact, the use of Morse virtually 
disappeared. Today, with com- 
puters so small you can carry 
them in your shirt pockety no one 
needs a hand key or an old Tele- 
^ypgTM clunker. Computers can 

be used to write messages and 
then they can be plugged into a 
communications system and 
the message can be transferred 
almost instantly, anywhere. 

Indeed, I've recently written 
about a system which I suggest 
that amateurs start developing, 
using currently-available tech- 
nology and equipment, which 
would allow us to communicate 
at 8,500 words per minute. With 
some encoding, that can be 
upped to 26,000 words per 
minute. 

Some reservoir we are at pres- 
entl It could take a couple of 
years to train hams to cope with 
today's military technology. 

Okay, on to 97.1(e), the last of 
the reasons for amateur radio to 
exist as a service. International 
goodwill. Boy, can we stand to 
do some work on that one, I sup- 



pose there are a few ops in for- 
eign countries who feel goodwill 
when dumped on by a pileup . . . 
damned few* And how many of 
the DX ops really enjoy our 
5,000-Watt Honor Roll (the irony 
of f/7af)— ops wiping out every 
new and rare country which 
comes on the bands? Is it going 
to be claimed that an exchange 
on GW of signal reports and a 
handle are really generating 
goodwill? Don't make me laugh 
so hard that I break open my 
40-year-old appendix scar. 

Look here, don't get mad at 
me for simply stating the facts 
of life. If you don't like the facts, 
do something to change them 
, , .don't beef at me for having 
the gall to state the obvious. 

Now, you are not going to 
have any problem finding a 
whole raft of hams who swear 
by the Morse code... which I 
admit Is extremely useful when 
you want to blink your eyes in 
code (would it be faster in 
ASCII?). But how many of you 
are going to try to tali me that 
you honestly believe that the 
code requirement has kept out 
the dingbats? Brother, we are up 
to here in psycho cases, so don't 
tell me about keeping out the 
undesirables. When \ see four- 
year-old kids passing the code 
test and getting a ham ticket, I 
have trouble not being terminal- 
ly sarcastic when 1 hear claims 
about it keeping our bloodline 
pure. If you are lucky enough to 
be in an area where two meters 
is sane, please get Bill Paster- 
nak to send you some tapes of 
two meters in Los Angeles. 
You'll never be the same. A zoo. 

And I'm getting a tittle sick of 
hearing that I am for opening the 
floodgates to the loonies. Those 
gates have been open for years. 



cash through the mails, and 
keep a copy of your order should 
problems develop later. 

Next month is April, and every 
year at this time I get the urge to 
write something^ shall we say, 
unique. Want to find out? Don't 
miss next month's RTTY Loop! 



I'm for making amateur radio a 
technical hobby... with re- 
quired courses in theory given 
by clubs... and damned good 
exams given by the same clubs. 
Maybe we can stem the tide of 
CB outcasts. 

By golly, that felt good. Well, 
now back to being mild- 
mannered, lovable old Wayne 
Green. 

CODE COURSES THE PITS 

A recent call from Larry 
Home, who runs a school in 
New York which teaches code in 
a matter of a few days, prepar- 
ing people for their ham tickets, 
brought out that tests of the 
many code cassette courses on 
the market had shown most of 
them to be disasters. One of the 
very worst, oddly enough, was 
one of the best selling, put out 
by a national ham organization. 
And, yes, the organization 
knows that the course is bad 
and is losing us hams by the 
tens of thousands, but ap- 
parently it feels that it is too 
much trouble to change it... 
and, after all, it is selling well. 
Dealers, interested in making a 
buck any way they can, allow 
this travesty to be sold. Pity, 
when there are some very good 
code courses available. 

Larry is running some tests 
for the Coast Guard to show 
them how fast some of the mod* 
ern systems are .. .systems 
such as the 73 Code Course. The 
Coast Guard, which I under- 
stand has been quite hostile to 
amateur radio in the past, has 
been putting their trainees 
through a five-month, forty-hour- 
a-week course in which about 
20% get to a speed of 18 wpm. 
Then, after a year on the job, 
another 20% qualify for 18 wpm. 



Wayne Green Books 







Acomss. 

CWOIGrTAL 

VfVff^JtMA 

build jnur 




*TRS"80 is A frad^mafk of 



Annotated BASIC— A New Technique for Neophytes. 

BASIC programming was supposed to be simple— a beginner's progfamming 
language which was so near to English that it coutd be easily understood. But, in re- 
cent years* BASIC has become much more powerful and therefore much more dff* 
ficult to read and understand. BASIC sjmply isn't basic anymore. 

Annotated BASIC explains the complexities of modern BASIC. It includes com- 
plete TRS-dO* Level II BASJC programs that you can use. Each program \s annotated 
to explain In step-by-step fashion the workings of the program. Programs are 
flowchaiied to assist you in following the operational sequence. And— each chapter 
includes a description of the new concepts which have been introduced. 

Annotated BASiC deals with the hows and whys of TRS^ BASIC programming. 
How is a program put together? Why is it written that way? By observing the pro 
grams and following the annotation, you can develop new technfques to use in your 
own programs— or modify commercial programs for your specific use. 

Annotated BJkStC Vo^me t contains Prowling Pfotits, Surveyor. Things lo Do, Taa Slidtef. Inttoduciion to 
Digitap Logic. Cameioi. The Soundex Code, Deduction, Op Amp, Contfactof COsi Esiimaiirvg. 

Annot^t^ BASIC iTofi/m* 2 contafns Rough Lumber List. Trip Mileage, Right Ran, OSCAR Data. SWR/Antenna 
Design, Supermaze, Retail Around the Rose, iVurnenc AfiaJy$ift. Demons, Air Raid. Geograpfiy Test. Piyrnbing 
System Design, (availab^ Ma^rch^ BK73B5 SI 0.95 ISBN aseOO&C3i37 9 

Order Both Volumes and Save! BK738402 $18.95 

Kitobaud Klassroom — 

A practical course in digital electronics 

by George Young and Peter Stark 

Learning electronics theory without practice isn't easy. And it's no fun to build an 
electronics project that you can't use. Kitobaud Klassroom, the popular series first 
published in Kilobaud Mfcrocomputing, combines theory with practice. This \s a practi- 
cal course in digital electronics. It starts out with very simple electronics projects, and 
by the end of the course, you*ll construct your own working microcomputer! 
Authors Young and Stark are experienced teachers, and their approach is simple 
and direct, Whether you're learning at home or in the classroomp this book pro- 
vides you with a soiid background in electronics— and you'lJ own a computer that 
you built yourself! 

KJIobaLjd Klassroom contains Getting Iha Bell RolHng, Gales and Flip-Flops Explained. J.K. Flip-Flops and 
ClocKed Logic, PC Boards and Power Supplies^ Hardware LogicaJ Functions, VoEtage. Current and Power Sup- 
pties^. Transistors, Diodes and OP Amps, Pulses and More Pulseg. Counters and Registers, Bus Traffic Con- 
trot. ROM and BAM Memories. I/O Clfcultry. Parallel and Seflat I/O Ports. Computer I/O III, Computer I/O IV, 
Computer f/O V. Processor Connections, Finally. . ,The Kilobaud Krescendo, Eproma and Troutsfeshooting, 
EnpansFons and Programming, MachJne-Langyaga Programming. Asssmbiy-Language Programmmg, Con^ 
necting to the Outside Wor^d. 

isBNo-88ooe-o27-i (available March) BK7386 $14,95 

The New Weather Satellite Handbook 

By Dr Ralph E Taggart WB8DQT 

Here is the completely updated and revised edition of the best-selling Weather 
Sat&ftite Handbook — containing all the information on the most sophrsticated 
spacecraft now in orbtl. Dr. Taggaft has written this book to serve both the ex- 
perienced amateur sateJJita enthusiast and the newcomer The book is an introduc- 
tion to satellite watching that terts you how to construct a complete and highly effec- 
tive ground station. Not just Ideas, but solid hardware designs and all the instruc- 
tions necessary to operate the equipment are mctuded. An entire chapter is devoted 
to microcomputers and the Weather Satellite Station. And for the thousands of ex- 
perimenters who are operating stations. The New Weather Satettite Handbook 
details aN the procedures necessary to follow the current spacecraft. 

Weather Satellite contains Operational Satellite Sysiems. Antenna Systems, Weattier SateJIite Aecetvers, A 
Cathode Ray Tube (CFTH M-oniio>r for Satellite Picture Display. A Direct-Pnfitrng Facsimile System lor Weather 
Satellite Display. hk>w to FirHJ trve Satellite. Te^t Equipment, MicfOCompuLers ard tr>e Weatr>ef Satelhte Station, 

Station op€.at,oniL ISBN (H58w&«is6 available Row! BK7383 $8.95 



FOR TOLL-FREE ORDERING CALL 1-800-258-5473 
WAYNE GREEN BOOKS • PETERBOROUGH NH 03458 



WG02 



Use the order card or rtfiiTii2e your order on 3 separate piece o( pspef amf mail to Wayne Green Books All: Sales • Peterborough KH 03458. 
Be sure to incl^ude check or detailed credit card in format ior>. (Visa, Master Charge or American Ek press accepted.) 

No C.O.D. ord«fS accepted All orders add (1.50 fof the first boo^. postage and handlmg; Si 00 each additMiiinal book. $10.00 per booh foreign air mail. 
Pfp^f^e ^fiow 4-6 weeks after publication lor delivery. Questions regarding your order^ P^©ase wr^ie to Customer 5eF¥JCe at the atjowe ^skAress. 



JSMagazine • March, 1982 119 



60% wash out. So much for the 
old code-teaching system. 

Would you believe that H Is 
possible to start rank begin- 
ners out at 20 wpm? In fact, 
tests are being made a\ 35 wpm 
for starters,,, yes» from the 
very start. And the tests are 
very promising. It seems it is no 
more difficult to get the feeling 
of the pattern of a character at 
35 wpm than It Is at 5 wpm. Bet- 
ter; instead of setting up a look- 
up table in one side of the brain 
and transferring the sound pat- 
tern from the other halt of the 
brain for comparison, every- 
thing is done in the same side 
of the brajn. This avoids the old 
plateau syndrome. . .a disaster 
which has washed out hun- 
dreds of thousands of prospec- 
tive hams. 

Tentative tests seem to in- 
dicate that women, in particular, 
benefit from this avoidance of 
the left to right to left brain- 
shuffle problem. Perhaps it is 
the more intense competitive 
dedication of men that finally 
overcomes this mess rather 
than anything inherent. At any 
rate* setting up a learning 
system which uses one side of 
the bram only cuts the learning 
time to shreds, avoids much of 
the agony and sweat, and 



almost guarantees 100% suc- 
cess for anyone trying. It's 
almost fun. . .but not quite. 

Td like to see how tar this con- 
cept can be carried. I don't see 
any reason why code can1 be 
taught using this system and 
starting out at 50 wpm. ..and 
possibly even up to 100 wpm. 
Once you stop having to send 
the signals back and forth 
through the slow brain circuits 
and set up an operation which is 
largely done in the super*fast 
subconscious part of the brain, 
we're not sure what speed can 
be attained. 

So^ if you are asked about 
code-learning systems by new* 
comers, their fate is in your 
hands. You can recommend the 
best sellers. . .and doom them, 
for the most part. . Jf not to fail- 
ure, at least to agony. Or you 
can give them a real boost by 
recommending one of the only 
two (as far as I know) courses on 
the market which train the brain 
for automatic character recogni- 
tion. That's the 73 Blitz Code 
Course. 



rrs UP TO US! 

Don KA7DTP sent me a copy 
of an article from Science which 
said that the government has 
now terminated all efforts at 



listening for aiten radio 
messages. The $2M a year pro- 
gram was shot down by Senator 
Proxmire, saying that, "It's hard 
enough to find Intelligent life 
here in Washington." 

NASA scientists were 

building a muHichannel spec- 
trum analyzer to detect non- 
random signals from space. 
That's down the tubes now and, 
according to a scientist from 
Stanford University, "The impor- 
tant contacts with extrater- 
restrial life will be left to radio 
hams.** That's hardly a man- 
date, but if any readers are inter- 
ested in pursuing the project, I 
can assure you thai 73 
Magazine is most interested in 
providing the needed communi- 
cations via articles and news. 

What a pity that Sam Harris 
W1 FZJ/KP4, who was a scientist 
on the big dish at Arectbo, isn't 
around to help get this started. 
Sam was one of the real ham in- 
ventors and pioneers. . .which 
is how he got the job at the 
research laboratory in the first 
place. It was Sam who built the 
first working parametric ampli- 
fier. He built it at home for use 
on six meters, and when I pul> 
lished the article on it most 
readers thought it was a humor 
piece. Who ever heard of feed- 



ing an oscillator into an 
amplifier? 

As a piece of further l>ad news 
for VHP old-timers. Sam's wife, 
Helen Wt HOY, a true pioneer on 
six meters, passed away a few 
weeks ago. She was living in 
Puerto Rico in Arecibo. Both 
Sam and Helen will be missed 
by all of their friends. . .and by 
f titure hams who will not benefit 
from the many inventions that 
Sam might have produced if he 
had lived. 

Getting back to listening for 
signals from space.,. Tm in- 
terested in some articles on this 
and perhaps an organization of 
ham pioneers to systematically 
scan space for coherent sig* 
nals. With the recent progress in 
digital circuits, we should be 
able to come up with some 

relatively inexpensive circuits 
for detecting non-random 
signals. The next step is to 
choose the best frequen- 
cies. . .get all of the help from 
the satellite TV technology we 
can for dishes* low-noise front 
ends, downconverters. . .and 
start listening, 

NASA and Senator Prox- 

mire, . J say that amateurs ac- 
cept the challenge. Now, let's 
hear it from those readers who 
want to be involved with this 
project. 



OSCAR ORBITS 



The tables of orbital infomnation for OSCARs 8 and 9 were 
prepared with the assistance of Project OSCAR. Inc., PO Box 1t3€. 
Los Altos GA 94022, Due to the low orbit of OSCAR 9, its orbit is 
changing rapidly, making accurate long-range orbital predictions 
very difficult. Therefore, the OSCAR 9 information in these tables 
may be in error by several minutes and several degrees of longitude. 



THE RUSSIAN SATELLITES 

The last days of 1981 were exciting ones for amateur satellite 
fans. On December 17, the Soviet Union simultaneously launched 
six new Radio Sport (RS) amateur radio satellites, designated RS-S 
through RS-8. The new birds were placed into orbit by a single 
launch vehicle and each takes about two hours to orbit the Earth, 
Although they are in similar orbits, the RS satellites are toy no means 
identical, and some of them have quite unique capabilities, Beiow is 
a brief description of the various features. Tables t and 2 summarize 
some important information for each satellite. 

Beacons 
Each satellite has one or more 10-meter beacon frequencies, as 



oecKp I oKBiTu. tprroHHATioei roji njuicb 



o^a^m V oHBiTUi. iHPcifwvriDtt rop mauch 



OSOJi g ORStTM, tNrCfVIATIQTJ rOl fifiWtL 



{^CME 5 ORBITAL ] NrailKA.T l&h rOft A^KIL 



awn » 


DATl 


TIME 


EQ, CKDSSIHG 


QABIT t 


DATE 


TIME 


EO, CP0S3IWG 










-r"*r-^B — - — - — - 




■» ^^T^PITH HVPn 


m :h=fv -iwai f^h ^ 






IQHT) 


(DEGREES tfEST] 






(GHTf 


[DEGREES HEST] 


qiiB.iT 1 


D^TE 


TIME 


EQ. CibPSStKC 


ORBir 1 


DATE 


TINE 


SO. CROBAlt)^ 


2I319 


1 


0106 111 


S5 .3 


ai99 


I 


e0fl^t4^ 


1)3.1 






(GMT) 


(D£GPEEG Vttt) 






(QNT) 


LDE(SR&ES ^£T| 


aim 


2 


Ul0i4^ 


Be. 4 


22ia 


3 


B132j5t 


153.1 


20752 


1 


B143:«2 


$S.4 


36SQ 


1 


I9iai0» 


lZi.9 * 


113 47 


E 


»115il3 


67.* 


22%i 


3 


!011fl:i4 


149.5 


2t7es 


2 


t«»4[33 


70.6 


2tA* 


t 


tlJtf3B 


14G.4 


2iXfil 


4 


011^144 


ae^a 


3241 


4 


aiihilt 


]4fi«4 


3B779 




§••8:14 


73. • 


2G»4 


1 


fill 1 56 


143. • 


»]T5 


5 


ti24slj 


B$.S 


22til 


£ 


■ if56j45 


143.2 


3*7 9 J 




ttl3i2f 


71.1 


3714 


1 


41151 14 


139.6 


21119 


fi 


fiutn 


§1.1 


327S 


« 


B044;J9 


UB^i 


31SP7 




IB17l5e 


74*3 


3739 


9 


f9S2t39 


13ti.l 


2M» 


7 


tl33]|7 


H,J 


32M 


7 


t*nti2 


136. a 


21921 




BBZ2iZ7 


75,4 


3744 


f 


•931 1 41 


133.7 


2I417 


« 


Ii:i7]4| 


tl.4 


nts 


i 


tl3t:33 


U3.i 


2i£3% 




•i3Ci5i 


7|«« 


27 5f 


7 


• •24iia 


139,3 


IMll 


9 


J142:1I 


94. t 


3331 


» 


tiisas 


1IB.4 


2t849 




•■31^29 


77.6 


2774 


• 


•tHilt 


125,1 


U4U 


If 


*li3i3t 


($.9 


23lf 


If 


•Oil 13 


151. B 


2BB«3 




B«»MB 


79. t 


17Bi 


f 


1991131 


122,4 


2tiS« 


11 


Mtfitli 


71.1 


2351 


11 


•119 : Bl 


U7.B 


2iB77 




Bt4B:3l 


Bta 


iat5 


li 


1123: 4f 


142.7 


£14? 2 


12 


ill2i4l 


73.2 


23«< 


11 


9LM : 47 


144.C 


2»eti 




•t45tt2 


«K3 


1B2B 


11 


1119141 


139.3 


lU9t 


13 


MlliU 


n.* 


23fti 


13 


•BS4:33 


141. 1 


2tttS 




•t4f[33 


93.4 


HM 


13 


99^71 51 


US.* 


3 IS 11 


14 


Mill 41 


74 ,« 


239* 


14 


•B42:U 


13B.1 


3t919 




• tMtt4 


Bl.f 


295^1 


13 


••45tll 


1^3,1 


1I314 


IS 


il»<iU 


T*.7 


2411 


IS 


BBlftSB 


134. • 


2i933 




•t5i:35 


14.7 


tll^ 


U 


•*32]^« 


lli.l 


»S2i 


If 


Vi]il4C 


7f.9 


243* 


1« 


••I7t4f 


lll^f 


2t947 




Blf3:ti 


11. * 


3aif 


U 


••19j9I 


115 >4 


3»43 


17 


ii»^]J7 


7i*| 


2441 


17 


iB15]^3f 


131.3 


3»9«1 




•It7i37 


17. • 


39 §5 


u 


tttiiu 


131.1 


2§m 


It 


ftn»i4t 


7f.l 


24^7 


U 


ilXftlf 


14t.C 


2t»7> 




•ii3^te 


lia 


39 U 


17 


tl3till 


141,} 


3i&Tt 


If 


if44af 


11,4 


2471 


If 


BU^i4f 


US, 5 


2*949 




•11«;3» 


t1*4 


393t 


la 


tllSiM 


iiB^ 


3«5» 


2f 


lit till 


•13 


2*B7 


n 


Bli3^23 


142.3 


2iat3 




• 131: It 


••,5 


3941 


19 


fltlrlt 


13^SJ. 


2esia 


21 


iP&3i31 


ta-7 


25 13 


21 


itMj5i 


I3»,j 


21«17 




•135:41 


fUT 


a9i( 


21 


•f4ttU 


131.fi 


2iiL3 


23 


tm 1 53 


ft3.a 


2517 


23 


•§36:31 


lis, 7 


21^31 




•13t:13 


92.1 


3971 


21 


•«34$il 


12B.^ 


2H2« 


23 


ilttliSl 


B&.f 


253J 


23 


If3&:i4 


13},} 


21B49 




•134144 


94a 


1946 


31 


•133itft 


124.5 


3t»4i 


24 


• li«i?4 


it. 2 


3517 


24 


••13i35 


139.1 


2Xt59 




•I3»il& 


95.3 


3Bli 


23 


llB9i5» 


133.^ 


iii54 


2t 


tnit29 


*7.3 


2542 


35 


••tilts 


13S,t 


21^73 




•••tt3S 


79. S 


3917 


14 


•131 t §9 


141,1 


ai£fii 


76 


lU^iH 


Sfl.^ 


^57 J 


H 


II33i43 


Ufa 


21 tM 




•••Stt6 


71.7 


3932 


u 


•Uitsa 


J 37. 6 


2iie2 


27 


till: 27 


69.6 


2193 


27 


till til 


143. e 


2114 a 




•t99t37 


73.1 


3947 


zi 


•It 5 lit 


li4,« 


2I49« 


29 


1124] )l 


si*a 


2ei« 


31 


BBSSt37 


13».4 


211U 




•114 tia 


74,9 


3962 


27 


••53t2T 


13l,4 


2ITli 


23 


»l29i29 


».i 


2623 


a» 


BI4«tfZ 


131.1 


2112a 




•ilBl}^ 


7ia 


3177 


It 


««39il4 


126.9 


21734 


ii 


0U4ill 


»3.I 


2e3ft 


31 


Be33t25 


133.7 


31.143 




tt23tl« 


7t,l 


Itn 


29 


■a2iitP 


123.3 


21731 


31 


043bjJl 


94*3 


2653 


ai 


§i2§ti9 


139.3 


31156 




••37i4l 


77,5 


1147 


It 


D^13i41 


119*7 



120 73MaQazme • March, 1982 





BEACON AND ROBOT FREQUENCIES 






COMMUNiCATION PASSBANDS 








tMHscl 








(MHz) 




»atQlIJi« 


Biaacdw 




Hoboi 


Robol 


Salslllte 


Uplink 


Downlink 


Name 


Frequency 




Uplink 


Downiink 


NafTi« 


PiiAbtfnd 


Pif^bifMt 


BS4 


29.320 




— 




RS'S 


145 910^146 950 


29 410-29.450 


RS-« 


29.360 




^ 


.^ 


R&e 


145.910^1*5960 


29410-29.450 


ttS^5 


29.450 




145.030 


29.330 


RST 


145 960-146 000 


29 460-29 500 


ns« 


29.450 




— 


— 


R&« 


145.960^146000 


29.460-29,500 




29.5nn 
29.500 




145840 


29.340 




Table Z 





Tabie 7. 

sho^n in the Table T. When you hear oneof theRSsalellites, the fre- 
quency of the beacon can be a guide as to which bird it is. The 
beacon frequencies of RS-5 and RS-7 change when the satellite is in 
the "robot" mode, See below. 

The beacons transmit telemetry information in a coded format. 
The information is sent in Morse Code at 20-30 words per minute. 
Each telemetry frame consists of the satellite identifier plus seven 
pieces of data- A typical telemetry frame might consist of "RS5 KOO 
DOO 076 GOO UOO S15 W17." As this is being written, the only chan- 
nel thus far interpreted is the K channel, which Indicates the output 
power of the transponder. When the value for K is 00, as in the exam- 
ple above, this means that the satellite's transponder is presently 
turned off. A K vaiue other than 00 indicates that the transponder is 
in operation. 

Transponders 

At press time. RS-5, 6. 7. and 8 were known to contain 
transponders for two-way communication. These operate in Mode 
A, which means you transmit to the satellites on 2 meters between 
145,910 and t4€.Q00 (the uplink), and listen for returning signals on 
10 meters just below the beacon frequency {Ihe downlink). Table 2 
summarizes the transponder upiink and downlink frequencies. 

Since a popular class of Soviet amateur license allows only low- 
power operation on VHP, these latest birds have very sensitive re- 
ceivers. Therefore, it is recommended that you use no more than 10 
Watts effective radiated power (erp) when attempting to com- 
municate through the RS satellites. 

Robots 

The most unusual feature of the new RS satellites is the "'robot/' 
an automatic CW QSO device present on RS-5 and RS-7. When 
operating, the robot calls CQ on one of the beacon frequencies and 
then listens for amateurs to respond on a specific 2-meter frequen- 
cy. If you make the proper response, the robot then sends a short 
confirmation message contatnmg your callsrgn. assigning a number 
to your contact, and thanking you for the QSO. 

If I am trying to work the RS-5 robot, for instance, the response ex- 
pected by the robot Is "RS5 OE WBSBTH AR"' or '^RSS DE WB8BTH 
AR K" (lt*s not yet clear if the final "K"' is necessary). Of course, you 



must substitute your own callsrgn as well as send the proper 
satellite identifier. If the robot has copied your complete response 
correctly, it will confirm the contact by sending "WBSBTH DE RS5 
QSO NR XXX OP ROBOT TU FR QSO 73 SK." The XXX is a serial 
number assigned by the rotrot to your QSO. Sometimes the robot will 
^'listen" to several callers and then send several confirmation 
messages in succession. 

The uplink frequencies for robot operation are given in Table 1> 
The best success has been achieved when transmitting slightly 
{perhaps 4 kHz) below the frequencies in the table. Sometimes the 
beacon and robot frequencies are Interchanged, so be sure to tune 
around- 



Experlments 

According to the Soviets, RS'3 and RS*4 are intended for ex- 
perimental use, explaining why no transponder or robot activity was 
heard on these satellites during their early life. By the lime you read 
this, these two satellites may have produced some surprises. 

Orbital Parameters 

The first rough estimates for the orbital periods of the new 
satellites range from T18.52 minutes for RS-3 to 119.77 minutes for 
RS-S, The corresponding per orbit longitude increments vary from 
29.76 to 30.07 degrees. When the six satellites were first launched, 
they were quite close together. However, since they are in slightly 
different orbits, they quickly began to drift away from one another. 

Summary 

The new RS satellites are very easy to hear. In the mid* to late 
evening^ and again in the late morning hours, the six satellites have 
been solid copy, even on inexpensive shortwave receivers. A dipole 
or other simpte 10-meter antenna will be perfectly adequate for good 
reception. 

At this writing, the new satellites were only two weeks old, and 
their orbital parameters were not known with sufficient accuracy to 
permit the preparation of reference orbit tables, such as those 
published for OSCARs 8 and 9. More up-to-date information on the 
RS satellites can be found in ARRL bulletins and on the various 
AMSAT nets. Thanks to WB1EYI and W9KDR at the ARRL for their 
assistance in providing information used in this article. — WB8BTH. 



APARTMENT BLUES? 

GeiontneoirMOW! 

with 

HANDBOOK OF APARTMENT OPERATION 

byDonFox, W2IQD. 

Everythmg you need to Know aboul operaiing from tt\ese 

tough spois. Over 150 foO-tiUed poges cover 

every aspect of apoTtmenf/condo operation, 

MONEYBACK GUARANTEE 

only SI 2.50 + $1.50 p&h Check, MC, VISA (card#-date) 
to Wessex Publishing Co. Dept. B9 
POB 175 N. Chelmsford, MA. 01863 



Two-meter HX Amplifier Kit 






IS watts in— 20 out 
COR BNC In— SO 239 out 
small size: 13/16 " x 3* x 4-lS' 
Class C or ABI 



"H 




1 



ask about 
◦ur other 
UHFi VHF 
amplifier kits 

*^459 1398 Edwards Ave. 

QRO ENGINEERING (216)2219500 



M 



w^See Usf i>f Aav^ftiMts on pdf e t30 



73 Magazine • March. 1962 121 




NEW from 





BY DR. RALPH E. TAGGART 

Here is the completely updated and revised edition of the b€St- 
selling Weather Saleliitt Handbook — containing all the infor- 
mation on tne most sophisticated and effective spacecraft 
now in orbit. Dr Taggari has written this book to serve both the 
experienced amateur satellite enthusiast and the newcomer 
The book Is an introduction to satellite watching, providing all 
theinfofmation required toconstruct a complete and highty ef- 
fective ground station. Not just ideas, but solid hardware de- 
signs and all the instructions necessary to operate the equip- 
ment are included. For the thousands of experimenters who 
are operating stations, the book details all procedures neces- 
sary to modify their equipment for the new series of space- 
craft. Amateur weather satellite activity represents a unique 
blend of Interests encompassing electronics, meteorology 
and astronautics. Join the privileged few Jn watching the spec- 
tacle of earth as seen from space on yoyr own monitoring 
equipment. Order 8K7383 Sa.9S 

SAVE $2.9S 



WEATHER SATELLITE 
HANDBOOK (first edition) 

By Dr. Ralph E. Taggart WBaDQT. Valuable information in this 
first edition ^s not included In Dr. Tagg art's just published 
book, The New Weather Satellite Hindbook (see above). 
Chapters such as ''How to Build an Electric Timer for SatelUte 
Tracking" and ''Building an Automatic Control for the Satellite 
Receiving Station'* will no longer b© available when this edi- 
tion IS out of print. This is a good entry level text for those 
discovering the exciting new use of weather satellites. Regular 
price: $4 95. SPECIAL PACKAGE PRICE-BOTH BOOKS FOR 
ONLY $1 0.95. SAVE S2.9&! (This offer available only while sup- 
plies Jast.) Order WS7300 and receive both editions of the 
Weather Salelliie Handbook for only $10.95 (plus $100 shipp- 
ing and handlmg charge)* 



'Use the order card in this fnagaztnd Of itemUM your order on 3 s^arate pFece of paper 
afid mail to: 73 Radio Bookshop • Petefborouflft NH 03458^ Be sure to include check or 
deiaF^^ credit card Infofmation. Add $1.50 Tint book, Sl.OD each additional book^ 
$1000 per book fo feign aiFrriaJI. Note: F^rices «ub|ect lo change on books no I published 
by 73 Magazine. Questions re^garding your ordar? Please write to Customer Servrlce ai 
the above address. Ptease allow A-B weeks lot delivery. No C.O.D. orders accepted. For 
Toll Free ordering call t-iO0-25&-5473, 



> 



>^I 



^M 



_ ^ 



tfiWI 



10 



^Nw 



i^^ 






MAKE 
MONEY. . . 
$ELL 
MAGAZINE 

Seliing 73 Magazine, the ham radio 
magazine that offers quality and 
quantity, brings the ham into your 
store. Once through the door you 
can sell him anything. 

Our dealers are telling us that *73" 
outsells them all. . .so call today 
and join the dealers who make 
money with 73 Magazine. 

For information on selling 73 
Magazine call 603-9249471 and 
speak with Ginnie Boudrieau, our 
Bulk Sales Manager. Or write to 
her at: 



MAGAZINE 

80 Pine Street 
Peterborough NH 03458 



122 ?3Magazine • March, 1982 



HAM HELP 




I would like to correspond 
with someone who has us&d a 
Cyshcraft R-3 halKwave vertical 
antenna. 

Marvin Rosen N3BQA 

20 W. Madison St. 

Baltimore MD 21201 

(301)^685-6303 

I am looking for a vfo to 
accompany my Hailicratlers 
SR-42 receiver, 

Ben Kronnick We6REN 

2539 Thayer Court 

Riverside CA 92507 

I am in need of a copy of the 
owner's manual and schematic 
for a Robyn MT701 CB 
transceiver tester. 

aE Hess W7CW 

6540 Chico Way N.W, 

Bremerton WA 98310 

1 would like to hear from otd 
members of the 136th Radio In- 
telligence Corps, especially 
those operating at Section 



Efght: Nadzab. Hollandia, Leytep 
and Tokyo. 

Donald E, Head K8NCZ 

8190 Wright Road 

Broadview Heights OH 44$47 

I am in need of an assembly 
manual for a Knighlkit dc oscil- 
loscope, model KG-035. I will 
copy and return your original* 

R« Weinberger K8STI 

14130 AltaVista 

Saratoga CA 95070 

I am looking for a used com- 
munications service monitor, 
preferably a Cushman or IFR. 

Tommy S. Evans NE4J 

401 East Vance St. 

Wilson NC 27893 

1 am In need of a schematic 

and Instruction manual for a 
Gonset G-151 FM Communi- 
cator* 

James Leathern K76TB 
48 Pine Cone Dr 

Williams AZ 86046 



ALL NEW 

1 5 Meter Mobile CW & USB 




21,000— 2K450MHZ 

High JOW (PEP) low 2W (PEPji VfO tunir^g: noise blanker^ Fine- 
tune SB. KHz « CW off-se(: digital frequency counter: I 3.8V dc 
® 3 A, negAhvegroundaO.S' X W9*- x H23'i weight (23 kg) 
S.7 lbs,; mobile mounting bracket. UNOCP S^OO 

SERIOUS DIALER LISTS AVAJLABLl 



•KC-O- 



NCG 



»^3ia 




1275 N. GROVE ST, 
ANAHEIM, CALIF. 92806 (714) 630-4541 

NOTE: Price, specifications subject to change without notice 
^ri6 obligation. 



J 



SLEP MAIL-ORDER SPECIALS- 



ins mu'tscBVEMtent wootx soud stat^ digital 

F4eA(MXrr. IAD-IOM. full break ily CW. 12VDC. U5.1 

Tfl-?A TRAi^SCElVEP-NEW MDOiL WITW MOfSE BLAWNLEfl 
500h2 CW FILTER, letHQM PLUS GENERAL COVERAGE, 
□IGltAL REji^OOtlT MAS MANV IMPROVED FEATURgS, 

P&7 POWER SUfVLY. IZVOC OUTPUT 25 AMP 

OONTINUOUSt REQLUjftTtd FOR TnTAfTm LIST KmOO. 

SALE 

PS-T^ POWER SUPPLY i5 *MP CONTINUQIl^ ^A )CA& 

FOH THrATTRi LlSTS19&ClQ tALE 

fl-?A neCilV^ l«ir l«>0€L VWm HC»E BLANKS SO 

Hl0fll ^lER. 0-30 MHZ DiOlTAL f%A&CK/T AM 

BtCELLf Nt G&^tAt OOWtftAGE f^a^^VER USiT 

St^MiOQ SAL£ 

LJ UMEAR AMPUF^2 KW nTTn PG. TWO S^DOZ. USt 

UTS UNEAPt AWPURER T2 KW WTH PS. OWE WOQZ, 

USTVG4.K.SUJE 

THETA TfXXX VUGRDPROCESSOR CONTBOLLED 

COMMUMCAIION TERMINAL., J'ERFORMS WiTM ANY 

AMATEUH RADIO INSTALL>TlOWS LIST Jt.O&S. SALE 

m.93Q VIDEO WONfTOR, 9" POfl WCDE LIST ItgSOO SALE 

MN-2rOQ ANTE N MA fUNER ?KW iflO-lOM. LIST S349QQL 

SAJJ 

MN.75AAirENMA T\tPg£R20CMV tei>ieNyl. USiT taSO OD SALE 

ElSfOi TVno EAFVTH STATION PECEtVCR 

SCfSn SiNGLf CC*lVEF«SlO*4 0OW« CONVEfTTW ^Ofl 



t w&m 



t.4a&oo 



(X) 



li^QD 






74&JOO 



31100 
29000 



14200 
72jOD 

nm 

ULOQ 
3&.«] 
1ILIH 
17-55 

EACH SSOO 

EACH &fijdQ 

MJOO 

41100 



2U$ 

£ACf1 35110 
ELOO 



^f'Kld SPLASH PfGOF HOUSiMG FORS&ESR 

a*.7 FAH Fon TR-r -m^ ps-r Oi^iooo 
SMS s«Ei>i pwooesson 

CW F5 Ei.eCTI*>«C CW RErfR 

P.75 PNONE PATCH 

LA-7 BALANCE LIME AMPLrf^l£R ffO OHM 

TV-330O LOW PASS FILTER 

TV-300 HIGH PASS BLTER FOR »0 OHM TWIN LfAD 

TV-75 HIGH PASS FILTER FOfl 7fi OHM COA^C 

SL-300. SL-&OC. SL-iaOO, SL^flOQ, SLflOOO FILTERS FOR mt 

TR-7 R.? 

R-4C FILTERS FL-250. FL-SOO. Fl «500 

AK-ra QIPOLE ANTtJSMA i6&1QM £KW 

PL-300 DRV DtjMMT UDAO 3QCh^ 

DL fOOO Cf^ OUMHIT LJQAD t PSW 

7077 DESK MiCftQI^«D«e TIVS. TR7 

l&e AMTENI^ HF/VHR^^ SU*40E SiUnT FOH ALL 

mAMSCEIVEfS RECeVEflS MASSING UP ^aOlWV AN 

BCC£LLENT PROTECTION DEVCE 

3001 ilEI>UlCCMEHT PU. ELEMENT «K3R 15« BUT A 

SPARE 

Se«VlCE MANUALS T«-5. TR T TfL^A fVr ft^TA 

N&l' NOlSE BLANKS TR7 

AUX-7 RANGE PROGRAM QOARED TR 7 Tfl.?A 

RV-7 ftEWOTE VFOTFt7rrH.7A 

iCGW 

^3Q HF TRANSCEIVER !£V, LIST 182^00 SALE 

raO HF TRANSCEIVEFI 13 V. LIST $1,3*900. SALi 

ZSl^ rflANSCEIVEP! 3M AC'lJV lL^T S 7*900 SALf 

3^ 2M FH MOBILE 12V LiST kH9 OG SALE 

2»A 2M FM6$BGW uST tS«aOO SALE 

2AT HAMO HELC WOH TOUCH TQ^E 3M UST taMLOa 

SMJE 

Vkl HAI«a-H£LO WTtM royCH-TONE 2B WKL UST 

12^ OC! SALE 

4AT HAM&HtiO WTTM TtlUCi^tt)Nf 450 MHZL im 

PS-ti KJWER SUPPLY FOR TTOAfTSd UST %i*Uf» 
SALE 

AH 1 FtVE BAND MOBILE ANTENNA WriH tUNEA 

3.» za h^HZ LIST s£es oo sale 

eP-3NJCAD PACK 

eP-4ALM LINE CASE 

BPS KtCAD PACK 42&MA AT 10JV 

aC-30 DROP IN CHARGER FOR ALL BP SERIES 

CPl CJQAflETTE LIGHTER PUWCORD 

D&t DC OP PACK FOR 2AT 

EltSRELAYBOXTgt ?» 730 

EX as AUTO BAND swrrcHJHO rm 

BI 203 CM AUCMO F^TEH ISO tl£«pa 730 

PL» SSB PASS BAMD rUNE CmfSTAl FllTEl^ TM 

FvajCW FILTER 72QA 

^34 All FILTER 7SA 

FL-JI* 4e6 KHZ SSS CRYSTAL ^ ILTj^ 730 

FI.-4S CW NAnnow City ST AL FiLtf n 730 

HM4I M1|C£ a PiN WjTONE ENCODER 

KM-9 SPEAKER MIKE f OR CI. 3 1 

HMtOSCANNlNSMlKC 

SM.eSASE hAlKE^ PIN 

MB'5 MOBILE MOUNT ?30 

aC-lQA IVIEMORV BACK-UP L/NIT 

T^N'TEC 

525 ARGOSY lOCWtQW 3 5-30 MHZ TRANSCEIVER LtST 

&mm SALE 

S4e 0Mf4t c Te&iOM digital rea&out UST t1 J«9jQ0. 

SALE 

SflD DELTA lea TOM DIGITAL READOUT IRANSCElVEn 

UST 06400 SALE 

444 HEACULES AMPLiFtER SOUO STATE IKlA^ LUT 

fUST&WiAtE 

225 J&PS FOP ABGOSY 5^ LIST iT29 00 SALE 

25S AOPS FOfI OVmi UST f 199 00 SALE 

7&a A&ps Fon peiTA. list tiw oo sale 

JISPC MiCROPHaNE W(TM COIL£D CORO^PLLHJ 

228 ANTENNA TUNEB W/SWH BHiDGE lOOW PEP 

229 ANTENNA TUNER, NEW MODEL SNlSViR BRIDOE 
2HW P£P 

Z43 REMOTE VFO OWNIC 
217. 2T6, 219, FILTERS 52a54a EACH 
22C f liTER i* KHZ B POLE )29 
2BZ. 2fl& FILTERS FOR 580. EACH 
2iS NOISE BLANKER: SKI 
2 M06ILE MOUNT 52S 
«« tILTViA HATIC DUAL P ADOlE fLEYEA 

em stNOLE PAixxf keyer 

EJCTfU ftONUS-^E =A* $HtPP4KG TQ 50 STATES. APO FPO «AST|R CAflO 
VISA Ofl C^ECXS ACCET^O SAVE MONEY BY OAOCniNG TODAY AT THESE 
LOW DISCOUNT PftJCfS MAIL OH PHOI^fE BLL SLE^ 7tJ*-5i*- 75li. 



17EM 

706,00 
1,iaE.0O 

anaoc 
4mfsa 

3SiO0 

3«t.l» 
11U» 
2Sa.0D 

4i.D0 

u.oo 

ISO 
17.S0 
34 00 
27 ±0 

U.00 

sa^ 
4aiM 

45j00 

J2M 

19.&0 
10.W 



4«a.H] 



I^IA.00 



1J2i.OO 

nftoo 
leado 

iD,QO 

229,00 
16fi,00 

4i.oo 

49Q0 
45,00 







Slep Electronics company 



Electronic 
Distributors 



P. O. BOX lOO, HWY 441. DEPT. 73 
OnO, NORTH CAROLINA 28763 



--S** Lis? O/ AcfYprfiiers on page T3£? 



/SMagaztne • March. 1982 123 



r 
P 



r MO VIN G ? 

I Let u£ know 8 weeks in advance so that you won't 

1 miss a single issue of 73 Magazine. 

Attach old label where indicated and print new ad- 
dress in space provided. Also include your mailing 
label whenever you write concerning your subscrip- 
tion. It helps us serve you promptly. Write to: 





magazine 



Subscription Department 

P.O. Box 931 

Farmlngdale NY 11737 



n Payment enciosed 



n Address change only 
D Extend subscription 

D Enter new subscription □ Bifl me later 

D 1 year $24.97 (Canada S27.97, Foreign surface $44.97/US funds.) 
Foreign air mail, please inquire. 

If you have no label bandy, prim OLD address here. 






Call 



^ 



Address 



t City. 



State 



Zfp_ 



print N[LWaddre^:> hvre 



Name 



Address 



Call 




City 



State, 



Zip 



M3Bb^ 



From 



mGAHNE 



THE 1982 EDITION 

GENERAL LICENSE 
STUDY GUIDE 

by Timothy M. Dantet N8RK 



nils is the complete guide to the General License. 

Learning rather than memorizing is the secret. This 

Is not a question-and-answef guide that will gather 

dust when the FCC issues a new test. Instead, this 

book will be a helpful reference, useful fong after a 

ham upgrades to General Includes up-to-date FCC 

rules and an application form. 

ORDER yours today and talk to the world. 

SG7358 $6,95 

The 1982 edition will be ready to ship in March. 

*Lfse the order card on ti^e Reader Service page of thfs magazine or 
Itemize your order on a separate piece of paper and mail to; 73 Radio 
Boohs hop* Pet erborougli NH 03458. Be sure to Include ctieck or 
detailed credit card Information. No C.O.D. orders accepted. Add 
11.50 handling charge for the first book; $1.00 for each additional 
book, Questions regarding your order? Please write to Customer 
Service at the above address. Please allow 4-6 weeks for delivery. 



ran TOLL FREE ORDERINO 
CALL 1-8Q0-25D-5473 




Can 20% Be Wrong? 

A recent survey showed thai 20% of the 73 subscribers also read 
Kilobaud MtC ROCQMPCJTJING mjigazine . . . a^nd enjoy U. This is the best wa^ 
to learn and keep up with ihe rapidly devetopintj *orld of mkrocompulers; 
There's nothing to be aTraid of^ you )ust have to read an interesting 

magazine and you'll learn. Try a subscription to Kilobaud WICRQCOMPCTIMG 
and stt for yourself. 

D Mew Kybscriptton D Renewal □ tZ issues for S 24,97 

n Payment enclosed S 

D VISA D MC □ AE □ Bill me 



Card # 



Signature 

Name 



Interbank # 
_f xp. date 



Address 
City 



State 



Zip 



— for even faster order mg service Gait ioH free (8001 258-54 73 

Canadian: S27.97, one year only^ G.S. funds. Foreign sur- 
face* S44i97, one year only, U.S. funds. Foreign air maili 
please inquire. Please aJlow 6 weeks for delivery. 3Z3B6 

WICROCQMPaTirNG • POB 997 » Farmingdale flY 1 I 737 



.t> 



Arise and subscribe to 8Q M ICRO COMPUTirSG , the 
newest and fastest growing microcomputer magazine. This 
is full of news about programs, accessories and theory on 
the world's largest seliing computer, the TRS-80*— 
definitely beginner level and includes lots of program 
lisUngs. Find out what a\\ the fuss is about. 



r Mew ftubacHpUon 
I jPaynfent enclosed $. 
Li VISA LIMC 

Card n^ 



Q Rcflewal 



□ 12 Issues for S 24.97 



IJA£ 



[J Bill me 



Interbank #_ 
Signature _ 
name _^ 



Exp. date. 



Address 
City 



State. 



microcomputing 



Please aUow 6 weeks for delivery 
Canadian: l yr. only^ 127.97 in US Funds 
Foreign: I yr. only/$44.97 In GS Funds 



• P.O-B, 981 • Farmingdale IN,Y. 1 1737 

*TRS-80 is a tfademark of Tandy Corpofation^ 



323B6 



124 73Magazine • March J982 




llfilverfAl ConmiiuiicAtloru 

A DIVISION OF INNOVATIVE LASS, INC. 

P.O, BOX 339 

ARLINGTON, TEXAS 76004-0339 




SUPERVERTER I $99,95 

The ultimate in converter technofogy! Dual-stage selec- 
tive preamp, mixer, LI amplifier and no-drift crystal-con- 
trolled oscillator- We recommend this unit for exp«ri- 
encod kit builders. 12v Stationary Power 
Supply. . ,$24.95 for Superverler L 

SELECTIVE PREAMP, ... $44-50 

This new unit Is not like other wideband preamps. Ex^ 
perlenced kit builders can easily add this umi to our ex- 
isting boards or to other manufacturers' boards to Im- 
prove overall performance. 

2300 M HZ CONVERTER KIT. $35.00 

Complete with PC board, parts and 10-page instruction 
book. 



VARIABLE POWER SUPPLY- $24.95 

Complete kit rnciudes all components for working uniti 
Including deluxe box and overlays. 

DISK YAGI ANTENNA. $25.00 

Complete kit with PVC and mounting bracket. Stronger 
than loop yagi, and equal in gain. 

4F00T DISH ANTENNA $54.95 

Overall 25 dB gain. Partial assembly required. Shfpped 
UPS (ground) only. 

DL 2000 SATELLITE RECEIVER $749.95 

Fully assembled receiver— this is not a kit, 

120^ LNA.... $650.00 



TERMS: COD, Money Order, Bank Cards 

HOURS: 8:30-4:30 COST; MON-FRI (817) 265-0391 INFORMATrON 



Our product may be copied, but the performance fs never equalled. p n Dnv «q adi iMr^TrMu 

VUNIVERSAL COMMUNICATiONS ^7^^* °™'' 



THW/IOli^ 



$499.00 



tQ^ 



Simplicity of Operation — Superior Performance 
What are you waiting for? THIS IS THE WAY TO GO! 

• TERIVIINALL is a iiardware and software system which converts your 
TRS-80* (model I or ill) into a state of the art communicatfons termlnaf, 
TERMINALL worlds with a general purpose computer, is expandable, has 
superior performance and is simple to use. TERIVliNALL lias it alJ! 

• Simpjlcity. TERMfNALL is easy to connect to your radio and easy to use. 
Plug Into your receiver headpiione jack and copy Morse code, Baudot or 
ASGIi. Plug rnto your CW jacl< and send Morse code. Attacii a microphone 
connector and send Baudot or ASCII using audio tones (AFSK)- Tliafs all 
there is to hooking ft up. You will be on the air and transmitting m nntnutes! 

• Software on cassette and disk, assembled and tested hardware and exten- 
sive instruction manual. Specify Model I or ill. Level BASIC, 16K required. 



E COMMUNICATIONS TERMINAL THAT DOES IT ALL! 



Software mgy b& lo^d^d intd yQur computer Oft cassette 
or disk. Enter your cafEsign and ^ he time and you wiEl start 
receiving imm^fiiiPtsily. No adjustments are netid&d to 
receive Morse code. It's fully automaTic, It works. Vou will 
b^ on th^ a'ti Snd transmitting in m mutes. 

FuH ASCII capabilities. Upper and lower case^ control 
codes, ev&n/&dd/no parity, 6, 7 or 8 data brts, 75 to IfO 

baud. 

Buffered ASCII parallel printer outputL any or all text, 
or WRU activated iAUTO START*;/ 



Hardware dock maintains correct timfl durmg all opera- 
tions. Proorammabfe time /date format. 
Flexible Ir^terfHctngs: Separate CW an^ RTTV 
demodulators., AFSK, CW and PTT keying, 60 mil loop in- 
terconnect RS232 tN and OUT, hand i<ev input, and aide 
tone Output. 

Multrieval DlApfays^ Edit WFndow to ent&r transmit text 
or progr&m messages. Status Window displays mode, 
operating parameters, prompts and error messages. 
Dialogue Window displays received and transmitted text. 
Review window tor examining and editing historital text, 

Fantastic Morse Receptions Six stage active filter 
demodulator and auto adaptive Morse etgorrthm copies 
the weak and sloppy ones. 



Multiple user defined WRIi- Four WRU functions You 
can. seEect any combination of H) initiate sequence, (2) 
Terminate sequence, 43) what to transrnit back (if 
anything), (4} whether to aave on tape or not. WRU func- 
tions work in all modes (Morse> Baudot or ASCJl}. 

Word wrapping, word mode editing, dSdd^e, ignore car- 
riage returns, user prckgrammabia end of line sequence, 
adjustable carriage width, transmit delay (fixed, none, 
auto adaptive), breefe mode, keyboard selectable: baud 
rate, sinrft, CW keying, unahift-on-space and signal invert. 

General Purpose v» Dedicated: TERMINALL works 

with a general purpose cornputsf so the malorlty of youf 
investment has many different appiications. 



We discount Epson Printers 
Cail Now! 



i414CROrRONICS. inc. 



® 



1125 N. Golden State Blvd. 
Turlcx;k- California 95380 



1^44 



C.O.D. 



USE OUR TOLL FREE NUMBER TO ORDER 

(800) 344-7493 

In CA & fof service (209) 667 2888 or 634-8888 
15 DAY MONEY BACK TRIAL PERIOD 
T Yr. Parts and Labor limited Warranty 

•TRS'90 is 3 registered trad am ark of Radfo Shack 



M^See U&t of Advertisers on p&ge 130 



73 Magazine • March, 1982 125 



THERE IS A 
mFFERENCE 
INOiniRTZ 
CSCVSTALS 

Internationars leaderstiip in crystal design and 
production is synonymous with quality quartz crystals 
from 70 KHz to 160 MHz. Accurately controlted 
calibration and a long list of tests are made on the 
finished crystal prior to shipment. 

That is why we guarantee International crystals 
against defects, material and workmanship for an 
untimited time when used in equipment for which they 
were specitjcally made. 

Orders may be placed by Phone: 405/236-3741. 
TELEX: 747-147. CABLE: Incrystal ■ TWX: 
910-831-31 77 ' Mail: International Crystal Mfg. Co., Inc., 
10 North Lee, Oklahoma City. Oklahoma 73102. 



*^3e 



ORSia 




tOE] 




Write for information. 



E[ui 



DHDufl 



INTERN ATlONAi CRVaTAi MFG. CQ., INC. 

3Q MCirlh tee G»!la»»amE Cily OkhahcHtiB 73102 



Iowa's Only Icom Dealer 




ICOM 



G&K Amateur Supply 

2920 East 9th St. 

Des Moines, Iowa 50316 



7:00—5:00 Mon-Fri 
7:00— 1:00 Sat. 



Leroy WDOCZO 



^ 101 



CALL NUMBER ONE! 

CARLOAD INVENTORIES • ROCK ROTTOM PRICES 

SUPER-FAST SERVICE 



LINES: AEA 

AVANTI 

ASTRQN 

ALlfANCE 



ALPHA 
BEARCAT 
BIRD 
BENCHER 



CUSHCRAFT 
COLLIMS 
CDE 
DRAKE 



DENTRDN 
H¥ GAIN 
HUSTLER 
ICOM 



KANTRQMICS 
KLM 

KENWOOD 
MICROLOQ 



NIINI-PRODUCTS 

MOfl urn 

MIRAGE 
MFJ 



N¥E 

PALOMAR ENG 
REGENCY 
SWAN 



nn TEC ^ 
I UNIVERSAL 
UrJARCOaOHN 
VIBROPLEX 

IN MISSOURI 




CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-325-3609 314-961-9990 

MiD-COM ELECTRONICS • 8516 MANCHESTER ROAD • BRENTWOOD, MO 63144 






■^- T- 



r 



V 52 



126 73 Magazine • March, 1982 







ANTENNA BOOKS 



Otpote anc 
Antennas 



NEW BTH i^lTfOHl 

BEAM 

ANTENNA 

HANDBOOK 



CUBICAL 

QUAD 



■"ITS*.*- 




!-■ .' 4 



.^^ 



PRACTICAL ANTENNAS FOR THE RADIO &MATEU 
*A manual cfescrlbing how \o equip a ham station with 
a suKable antenna. A wide range of antenna topics, 
syatems, and accessories are presenled QivJng the 
reader some food tor thought and practical data for con- 
st ruci (on. Designed to aid the experienced ham and 
tKfViQB as well Only BKtOt & £9.95, * 

VHF ANTENNA HANDBOOK— The new VHF Antenna 
Haf^dbook details the irieory. design, and const ruction 
of hufkdreds of different VHF ajid UHF antennas, . .a 
praciical book wtitf^n for tfve average amateur wtio 
takes joy in building, not full of cx>niplex forrnulAS tor the 
deston engineer Packed with fabulous antenna protects 
YiM can build. S5.95 " BK7368 

73 01POLE AND LONG-WIRE ANTENNAS-by Edward 
M. Noll W3FQJ. This IS the hrst coMectlon of virtually 
every ty^^pe of wire antenna used by emaieyrs. Includes 
dimensions, configurations, and detailed construction 
data for 73 different antenna types Appendices 
describe the constructkon of noise bridges, line toners, 
and data on measuring resonant frequency, velocity 
factor, and swf. S5.50 * SKI 01 6 

• ALL ABOUT CUBICAL QUAD ANTENNAS (and fldl* 
tlonii — &K1196 — The "Clessic" on Quad deaign. 
theory, construction, and operation. New 2nd odilion 
tonlains new feed and matching systems sml new 
data. S5,9S.* 

• BEAM ANTENNA HAND600K (New Sth edmon)- 
BH 1 19' — Yagi beam iheor^.. construction and Qp^ratjon 
Ifilofmatfeon on wire beams, SWR curves and matching 
Systems. A "n^st" for sencttis DXers 55 95"^ 

• VHF HANDBOOK FOR HADfO AMATEURS- BKIl 98 
—Con tarns EdfofmatFoni on FM theory, opeiaiion and 
equipment. v4tF antenna cJesign an<t const ruciJ on, sate!- 
tite-EME. ancLIhe newest solid-state cifcuits. $6 95* 

• THE RADip AMATEUR ANTENNA HANOBOOK- 
BK1199 — All about wire antennas, beams, toners, 
baiuns, coax, riaqiais, SWR and lowers. Clear and com- 
plete Information S6 95' 

• SIMPLE. LOW-COST WIRE ANTENNAS FOR RAOlO 
AMATEURS— BK 1 200— All new data and every! hi ng you 
wani 10 know aboul low-cost, mulliband antennas, inex- 
pensive beam^. 'invisible' antennas for hams in 
' toiK?^*" locations. $6.95* 




THE WELL 
EQUIPPED 
HAM SHACK 



COOK BOOKS 

TTL COOKBOOK— by Don Lancaster. EKpiams what 
TTL is, tiow il wor>[*, and how to use it, Discusses prac- 
tical applications, sycn as a digital coiint^r and 
display system, «yen1 3 counter, electronic stopwatch, 
digital voltmttter and a digital tachometer. 
fg.SO/ BK1063 

CMOS COOKBOOK— Ely Don Lancaster. Details tfie 
application of CMOS, the low power (ogi£ family 
suitable for most appHcalions presently dominated by 
TTL. f^equired reading for every serious, digital eK- 
perimenteri Si 0.50.' BK1011 

TVT COOKBOOK— by Don Lancaster. Describes the 
use of a standard television receiver as a micropro- 
ceasor CRT terminat EKplalns and describes charac- 
ter generation, cursor control and interface informa- 
tion \n typical, easy-to- understand Lancaster style. 
59.95.* BKH>S4 




SPECIAL OFFER 

Cti&rt of 

UNITED STATES AMATEUR 

RADIO PRIVILEGES 



by class of tlcrnae, caiiaslaii tvpc, and £re^ 
quency frotn 160 thru 2 meters, fncludln^ pro- 
^nlon for the new 30, 17, aad 12 metH bands. 
This 22 K 2Q in, twelve-color cbArt ta the fket 
of Its kind to be iMih InformatJTc And decora- 
tive. 83.00 value, only $1.95 with the pur- 
cbaae of l qt more booiti from the Radio Book- 
shop. tSuppUes limited* order naw,J 
CH7300SL95. 



«HOW TO DEFEND YOURSELF AGAINST RAOAR— BK1201— Dy Bruce F E - : James R Bodnar. a lawyer 
and radar expert. Itiis Dook gives iQu ihe ammumtFon to ctiAll<aftgie the i^aaar ifv-jcn&e that usuaily lead^s to a 
speeding conviction The maior part of the &ooi( details the innar wortdngs ol radar — you1l become more ot an ex- 
perl than most poEice officers and judges. The remaindef of the book outlines how to defend yourseit agamst a 
speeding ttcftcet— the obsecvat ions, measures and testimony you must obtain to def€»nd yourself v^thout the tielp of 
a lawyer. The price is a lot tess than a hne! S6l95' 



WORLD REPEATER ATLAS— Qompieteiy updated, over 
230 pages of repeater listings are indexed by location 
and frequency. More than 50 maps pinpoint 2000 repeat 
er locations throughout the USA. Foreign listings in- 
clude Europe, the Middle East, South America, and 
Africa. 14.96" BK7315 

THE MAGIC OF NAM RADIO— by JefTokJ Swank WSHXR 
begins with a brief hisiorv of an^ew radio and of Jerry's 
InvoEvefnent in IL Pftrt Z details mar^ of h«m radio's 
heroic n>onienl5. Hamdom's close tees with the conti- 
nent of Antarctk:a are ttve subject of Pan 3 In Part 4 tt>e 
strange and humoftHi^ sides cf ham life get 1t>eif due. 
And what of the fyture? Part 5 peers into the crystal bail, 
S4 95.' BK73ia 

A GUIDE TO HAM RADIO— by Larry Kahaner WB2NEL 
What's Amateur Radio all about? You can learn the 
basics of this fascinating hobby wilii this eKcefient 
beginner's guide. It answers the most frequently as^ed 
questions in an eB ay-going manner, and it shows the 
beat way to go about getting ^n FCC license A Guide to 
Ham Radio is an ideai introduction to a hobby enjoyed 
by peof^ie around the world. V4.95/ aK732l 

WORLD RADIO TV HANDBOOK 19K2; 2STH EDfTION 
—This book IS the bible of mten^ational broadcasters, 
providing tt>e only aulhontative source of evact in forma 
tion about broadcast ing and TV stations world wkte. 
This t96i editkin is completely revised, glyii>g corn- 
prehensive coverage of stiort, medium ano fofig wave. 
wO pages of vital aspects of world listening. 
1 16-50. BKT184 



MICRO COMPUTER BOOKS FROM 7 3 




• SOME OF THE BEST FROM KILOBAUO/MICROCOM- 
PUTINQ-BK7311 — A collection of the best arilcfes that 
have recently appeared in Kilobaud/ MICROCOMPLFT- 
irslG, included is materiai on the TRS-BO and PET 
systems, CP/M. the 8060/B0a5/ZBO chips, the ASR-33 t<r- 
minali. Data base management, word processing, text 
editors and (ite structures are covef ed too. Programming 
techniques and hardcore hardware construction pro*- 
scts tor modtfns, h^gh spe^:3 cass-etie tnteffaoas and 
TVTs are at^ incluwd in ttiis large format, 200 plits 
page edition. S10.95.* 

• 40 COMPUTERQAIIES—BK7391— Forty games In all 
in nine different categories. Games for large and &maJI 
systems, and even a section on calculator games. Maiqr 
versions of BASIC used and a wide variety of sysi«na 
represented. A must tor the sefious computer games- 
man. S7.95* 

• THE NEW HOBBY COMPUTERS- BK7340- This 
booh takes It from where "HOBBY COMPUTERS ARE 
HER El" leaves off, with chapters on Larae Scale Integra- 
lloa Now to choose a microprocessor cnip, an introduc- 
tion to program mi ng. low cost I/O for a computer, com- 
puter arithmetic, checking memory boards... and 
rnuch^ i^uch more! Dcm't miss t^is tremendous value! 
Only Um* 



• UNDERSTANDING AND PROGRAMMING MICRO- 
COMPUTERS— BK73a2— A valuable addition to your 
computing library. This Iwo-part text Includes the be^t 
artl^cles that have appeared in 73 and Kiiobaud 
Microcomputing magazines on the f^ardware and soft- 
ware aspects of microcomputing. Welf-Hnown authors 
and welhstfuctuired text helps ttie reader gel involved, 
ltO.95* 

HOW TO BUILD A MICROCOMPUTER-^AND REALLY 
UNDERSTAND fT— by Sarn Creason Ih^ elect ronics 
hobbyist who wants to build his own microcomputer 
system noMr has a practical 'How-to" guidebook. This 
book is a combination techr^ical manuaF and program- 
ming guide that takes the hobbyist atep-bystep through 
the design, construction, testing, and debugging of a 
complete microcompuier system. Must reading for 
anyone desiring a true understanding of small computer 
systems. $9.95.* BK7352 

l-IQBBY COMPUTEHb ARE KEREIIf you want to come 
up to speed on how computers work — hardware and 
software- this is an excellent book It starts with fun- 
damentals and explains the circuits and the basics of 
pfogrammino, along with a couple of TVT construction 
pfofflcts. ASCII. Baudot, etc. Ttiis book has tfie highest 
tecommendations as a teaching aid. $4.96.* 6K7322 



' Use the order card in thfs magazine ontemi^e your order on a separate piece of paper and mail to: 73 Radio Bookshop • 
PetertxKougtt NHQ3458. Be Sure to include check or deta^^ed credit card information No C. 0.0. orders accepted. All orders 
add SI 50 handling first book, $100 each additional book, $10.00 per book foreign aimiail. Please allow 4^ week,s for 
deiivery Ouestions regarding your Ofder? Please wrde to Customer SefVice at the above address. (Pnces subject to change 
on tiooKs not published tjy 73 Magazine.l 



FOR TOLL FREE OROERIiVIG CALL 1-800-258-5473 



I 



THE © TECHNICAL LIBRARY 



BEHIND THE I>lAL— by Bob Grove. Gel mor& im ovt of 
stioflwave listenlr?o with this intereM^no guJde to 
Ptceivers, antei^naa, rr«<^ifencle5. and intQtlerertcB. 
$4.95/ BK7307 

THE CHALLENGE OF imi^is me newest book in th« 73 
tectinicai Nbrary. dedicated lo 160-iTieter operating Si 
Dunn provides ^it necessary Irttormatioo to gel sterteid 
on this unique band. The alMtnporianl antenna and 
ground systems are described In beta I L The Introduction 
contains Interesting photos of Stew Perry's (the King of 
t60l shack. This reterenq« is a musl for new and e>e- 
pertenced "Top Band" operators. Pnce: S4,9S.* BK7309 

SSa THE MISUNDERSTOOD MODE— by James B 
Wilson. SirvglQ Sideband Tfam^TTiission . . thou&anda of 
w* use it every day, yet it fematns one of the least 
understocxl f^ceti of amateur radio. J 6. Wilson 
presents several methods of sidebamJ grenerat^orr, am- 
ply illustrated with chants and scherriAttcs. which wi^l 
enabte Itie ambitious reader to cort struct his own si4&- 
land gerHeraitor. A must fof !f«e technical iy-serious ham. 
S5.50.- BK73S1 

PROPAGATION WlZABO'S KAWMOOK^ by J, H. 

Nelson. When sunapots riddled ttie wcftdwl<Sa com- 
munications networks of the 1940s, John H^nry N«tson 
looked to the planets for an answer The result was a 
theory of propagaliiort I ore casting based upon lin- 
terplanetary alignment that made the author the most 
reliable forecaster in America today. The tjook provides 
an enlightened look at communications past, presenl, 
and future, as well as teaching the aft of propagation 
torec as ling. 56.95/ BK730Z 

• TOOLS & TECHNIQUES FOfi ELECTRONICS— 
BK734a-'t>y A.A. Wlcksisan e as /-to- understand book 
written for the beolnning Kit builder as weLI as the ex- 
perienced hobbyist. It has numerous pictures and 
descriptions of the safe and correct ways to use basic 
and specialised tools for electronic projects as well as 
specialised metal working tools and the chemical aids 
whicii are used in repair shops. $4,9&.' 




WORLD PRESS SERVICE FREQUENCIES-by 
Thomas htarrington, Cant wait to hear the evening 
newSp or are you wondering about the news thai you 
AretJ't hearing? flecelve by Radio Teletype (RTTY) aff 
the world news and financial happenings from the 
world capllols on a 24 hour a day basis th^s book gives 
you the freOuencms arid times of broadcast of such 
news services as AP, UPI. Reuters. TASS, VOA and 
London Press Also mcluded is an Iniroduction to 
RTTY with information on equipment, an ten n as. abbfo- 
viations — everything yoo need to get started in HTTY. 



kewi 



FOR 

THE 




Tf g - 

kOHTEfr 

KOOKBOOH 



CONTESTEiR 

lb=— 




THE COf^TEST COOKBOOK— reveafs the secrttS Of the 
fpontest winnej's fdom-estic, Dx, and specialty oon^iasta), 
compete with photos and diagrams of equipment used 
tjy the top scorers Find out how to make iWconiacis In 
one hour. $5.95" BK730e 



THE NEW WEATHER SATELUTE HAHDSOOK— by 
Dr. Ralph £. Taggart WB8DOT. Here is Ihe compietely 
updated and revised edition ccntainlng all the informa- 
tion on the most sophisticated and effective 
spacecraft now in orbit. This book serves both the en- 
perl enced amateur satellite enthusiast and the new- 
comer. It Is an introduction to salelllie watching, pro- 
viding at! the information requked to construct a com- 
plete and highly effective ground station. SoNd hard- 
ware designs and ail the InstruotJons necessary to op- 
erate the equipment are included. For experlmeri'tefS 
who are operating stations, the book details ail proce- 
dures necessary to modify equipment for the new ser- 
ies of spacecraft Amateur weather satellite activity 
represents a unique biend of interests encompassing 
electmnics, meteorology and astronautics Join the 
j^rivite^ed tew in watching the spectaci^e of earth as 
seen from vpace ori your own monitortng equipment. 
Sa 9§.' BK7383 



INTERFERENCE HAN0600K-by William R Nelson, 
WA6E0G— This lintety handbook covers every type of 
RFJ problem end gives you ttie solutions based on 
praclical e^cperience. Covers interference to TV. radio, 
hi-fi, tetephone, radio amateur, commerclat and CB 
equipment. Power line inierfefS'nce is covered in depth 
-— how to locate it, cure it, work with the public, safety 
precautions, how to train RF;i investigators. Written by 
an RFI expert with 33 years ol sjtperience, thhS profuse- 
ly illustrated book is packed with practical easy-to- 
understand information. aK12ao $3.93 

IC OP'AMP COOKBOOK— by Walter G, Jung, Cowers 
not only the basic theory of the IC op amp in great 
detail, but also includes over 250 practical circuit ap- 
pNcatiorts, liberally illustrated 532 pages, 5Vi xSyi, 
softbound. 514.95.* BK1028 



OWNER REPAJR OF RADtO EQUIPMENT-by Frank 
G^ass K6R0 Here's a book that will teacti you an ap- 
proach to tfoubleshootmg wtlhout a stiack full of test 
equipment. Whiten in a narrative, non mathematical 
styie, it will encourage you to stJcce^fuHy U% your own 
rig probJems 80 to 90". = of the lime. Even If you don i 
want to fix, you c»n learn a ioi about tiow lhing:s wortc 
an{) fail, Aod to your library and persor\ai e;(pertise 
S7.95 ' BK7310 



HANDBOOKS 

FOR THE 
HAMSHACK 

THE TEN WETER FM HANDBOOK-by Bob Hel! K9EID, 

This fiandbook has been published to help [tie ten meter 
enthustast I earn more about the' many meThods of con- 
versions and tricks that are used to make existing units 
work better. Join the great ■tinkefers"' of the world on ten 
FM and enjoy the tantastic amount ot tun In communi- 
cating With pmaieur siat^or^s woridwidt on ten meter 
FM,f4,95,'BKil90 

THE PRACTICAL HANDBOOK OF AlWATfUR RADIO FH 
REPEATERS— by Bill Pasternak WAetTF (euttior o\ 73 
Maga2ines monthly column "Lc>Dk.tng West") This is the 
book for the VHF/UHF FUet. com pilled from material 
submitted by over a hundred indtvlduats. dubs, 
organizations ar^J equipoient manufacturers A "must 
have fof youf ham shack shelf. $1295 " SKI 185 



The 75 



Test Equipment 
Library 




VOL t COMPONENT TESTERS-How to buitd tran^ 
Sistor testers (fi), diode leslsrs 0\. IC testers (3J, 
voU meters and VTVMs {9}. ohm meters (8 different 
kinds), inductance (3), capacity 19). O measurement, 
crystal checking |6). temper ature (2), aural meters tor 
the bEtnd (3}. and all sorts of miscaflaneous data on 
met«r9. ..using them, making them more versatile, 
making standards InvoJuablt book. %*95* LB735S 

VOL II AUD^O FREQUENCY TESTERS— Jam-padtfd 
wtlh all klnd5 of audio frequency test equipment If 
you're Into SSB, RTTY. SSTV, etc. this tsook is a must for 
you . a good book fof hMi addrcts artd expenmenters, 
too" M.95 ' LS7360 

VOL III RADIO FREOUENCY TESTERS- Radio frequen- 
cy waves, the common denominator of amateur radio. 
Such Items as swr, antenna impedance, line impedance, 
rf output, and field strength: detailed Instructions on 
testing these items includes sections on signal generat 
ors, crystal calibrators, grid-dipoecillators, noise gener- 
atora^ dummy ioads^ and much more. $4,95.' LB7361 



VOL, IV !C TEST EQUlPMENT-Become a 
tfOubleshOQting wizard! In this louflh volume of the ?3 
TEST EQUIPMENT LIBRARY are A2 home construction 
projects for buftdlng test equipment to work with youi 
ham station and in servicing digNai equipment. In^ 
etudes a cumuiatrve indeM for all four volumes for itm 
75 TEST EOUIPMENT LIBRA ft¥ S* 95 * LB7362 

RF ANt3 DIGITAL TEST EQUIPMENT YOU CAN 

BUILD— BK10W—R! bursty function, square wave gen 
erators. vari'aijie length pulse generators' 100 kHz 
merker, if and rf sweep gerteraiora. audtoosc. af/'rf sig- 
nal injector, 146 MHz Synthesizer, digital readoutftfor 
counters, several counters, prescalei. microwave 
me1«r, etc. 252 pages. SS.9&.* BK1044 



'Use the order carcf tn this maga^^rne or itemize your order on a separate piece of paper and mail to 73 Radio Bookshop • 

Peterborough NH 03458 Be sure to include check or detailed credit card information No COD. orders accepted. Ail orders 
add Si. 50 handling (irst book. Si. DO each additional book, SlQ.OO per book foreign airmahi Please allow 46 weeKs for 
delivery. Quest ions regarding your order? Piease write to Customer Service at the above address, (Prices subject to change 
on books not put^lished by 73 Magazine.) 



FOR TOLL FREE ORDERIIMG CALL 1-800-258-5473 




t 



THE NOVICE 



4J» 



STOW 



g^TMW*Tf^^tf«L 



NEW, UPDATED 

EDITIONS OF OUR 

FAMOUS NOVICE LICENSE 

STUDY GUIDE AND 
NOVICE STUDY TAPES 



• NOVICE STUDY QUIDE—SG735?— by Timothy M. Danlei NSRK. Here )s the most gp to dale novice 
gujde avaiiatite, U is complete with Intormation about learning Morse Code, has Ih© latest FCC 
amateur regulatior^s and the currenl FCC application forms. Tnfs guide i& ftot a questlon/answef 
memorization course bui rather it emphasises Ihepfaciicai side of getting a ham license and pulting a 
station on the air It reflects what the FCC expects a Novice to know without page after page of dull 
theory. The most current Intormattpn still available at la^t year's price £4 96 

• NOVICE STUDY TAPES— CT730O— If you are just getting staned in ham radio, you'll tif*d these 
tapes indispensable' This up-to-the^ninute rwision of the 73 Study CoMrse is the perfect way to leajn 
everythtng yDu need to breeze through the Novice *ffitten exam. Theory, FCC recuiat*ona, and 
opetatdnto skills are all oovered, and you'ti be aimazed ai how fast yog leom t^tng these taiNss! 

Once tm test is beh ind you. these tapes wi I i go ng ht on bei ng useful, beciuse nisy are packed with 
tfie latt^ tn formation on setting up your own ham staiton, and getting on the air 

Thousands of p^)ple have discQv<^ed how easy learnina ttom ca&s^tte can be — ordef now and 
enter th^ fascinating world of ham radio!— Sei o1 3 — 515.95/ 

Scientists have proven thai you learn taster by listening than by reading t^ecause you can play a oa^ 
selte tape ov^r and over in your spare time—even while you're driving! You get more and more into 
each time you hear it. You can't progress without solid fundamentals, mem three hour-long lapeg give 
you alMhe basics you "I I need to pa as the Novice exam easily, You'll have an underaiandlog of the ba- 
sics which will be invaluable to you for the rest of your life! Can you afford to lake your Novice exam 
without Of St listening to these tap^? 

SPECIAL OFFER! Both Novice License Study Guide and Novice Study 
Tftpe^ $l9.d5. Order NF7300. 



ne>N 



C^neral License Study Guide 



FROM WAYNE GREEN BOOKS 



GENERAL LICENSE STUDY GUIt>E-by Timothy M. 
Oantei MS RK. This «s the compreie guide to the General 
License. Learn mg rather than memorising is the 
secret- This ^s not a quest ion-and-answer guJde that 
will gather dust when the FCC issues a new test En- 
stead, this book will be a helpful reference, usetui long 
after a ham upgrades to General. Includes up-to-date 
FtX rules and an application form Order yours today 
and talk to the world. SG735d $6 §5 



• ADVANCED CLASS LICENSE STUDY GUIDE- 
SGI 081— Ready to upgrade your iicanse? To prevent 
retaking the FCC theory exam, you need the 73 Advanc- 
ed tbeory guide. SSB, antenra theory, traii$itii1ter$, and 
electronics measurFug techniques are cowered m detail 
In th^s eesy-to-follow study guide. Special n'KXJes and 
techniques, such as RTTY, are also treated. An engineer- 
ing decree is not riecess-ary to master the Advanced 
thioiy— try this book before visit ir^g tfW &camirwf^ of' 
fice! te.95 ' {Published by TAB Bool^s previous to recent 
chaoQes in FCC exam rrtaterial^ 




FOR YOUR HAMSHACK 



CODE TAPES 

ANY FOUR TAPES 
FOR $15.95! 
$ 4.95 EACH 



"GENESIS" 

5 WPM— CT7305— This Is the beginning tape for people 
who do not know the code at ail. It lakes them through 
the 2& letters. 10 numbers and necessary punctuation, 
complete with practice every step of the way using the 
newest blit2 teaching technEques It is aln^ost mirac- 
ulousT In one ho4jr many people — ir^ctudinokidtsol' ten — 
are abfe to master tne code. The ease ot learning gives 
cOfflfidhaiKe to beginner^ who m^ghl otherwise drop out. 



THE STlCKLEir 

6 -I- WPM— CT7306— This ts the practiice tape for the 
Novice and Technician licensee. It rs made up of one 
solid hour ol code, sent at the official FCC standard (no 
other tape we've heard uses these standards, so many 
peopJe flunk the code when they are suddeniy-^under 
pressure— faced with characters sent at l!3 wpm arrd 
spaced lor 5 wpm) This tape is not mamorizabte, unlike 
the ;an/ 5 wpm tape, since the code groups are entirely 
random characters sent in groups of rive. 



''BACK eR£AKER~ 

t3+ WWi— CTTSia— Code groups agatn, ai a bf^sk t< 
per so you wiW be at ease when you s>1 down in front of the 
steeiy-eyed governmenj mspector and Tie starts sending 
you plain larvgyage at oniy ^3 p&r You naed this extra 
margin to overcome the panic wtirch is universal in the 
lest situations When you've spent your money and lim^ 
to take the test, you'll thank heaven you had this back- 
breaking tape. 



"COURAGEOUS" 

20 + WPM— CT73ao— Coda is virnai gets yoti when you 
go for the £)ctra class license, it is so embarrassing to 
panic out lust because you didn t prepare yourself with 
thia tape. Thouph tfiis is only orte word fas.tef^ ttie code 
groups are so difficult that you'll almost fall asleep copy- 
tng tne FCC stuff try comparison. Usefs report that thi^ 
can't believe how easy 20 per neaiiy is with this fantastic 
one hour tape. 



^'OUTRAGEOUS" 
2S-i- WPM— CT7325— This is the tape for that small 
group o( overachieving hams who wouldn't be content lo 
simply ^aiisfy the code requiremenis of the Extra Class 
Ncens«- It's tne toughesi tape we've got and we keep a 
pefmanent lite of hams wfio have mastered it. Let us 
knCMr when you re up to speed and we'll mscritje your 
in 73s CW Hall of Fame; 



SSTV TAPE 



*SLOW SCAN TELEVtSION TAPE -CT73S0- Prize- 
winning programs from I he 73 SSTV contest. Excellent 

tor Demol S5.95/ 



• QSL CARDS— 73 turns out a fantastic series of QSL 
cards at about hall tf>e cost of having them done else- 
where tjec ause t t>ey a re run as a f i I f h n bet w een pri nt i ng 
t>oo4is and oitwr items in the 73 Pnm StKip. 250 Style 
W-QVV0250— tor $e 95*; 500 Styie W— QWOSOO-for 
*13.^*; 250 Style X— QXQ250— for 18.95'; 500 Style 
X-QX0500: 250 Style Y-QYC©50— for mM'; 500 
Siyte Y— QYOSOO^ror S13.95.* Allow &-12 wks. for 
dalitrefy. 

• LIBRARY SHELF BOXES- These Sturdy white, cor- 
rugated, dirt-resi slam boxes each hold a f ul f year of 73, 
KfTobaud Microcomputing or 80 Microcomputing. With 
your order, request self-sticking labels for any of the 
following! 73, Kifobaud Microcomputing^ SOMiCfOCom- 
piiimg, CQ. QSL Ham P^dto, Persona f Computmg, 
Raff to EtectfOnics. Inierface Age. and Sy^e, Order 1-- 
BX10OO— for 12 00-; order 2-7-6X2002- for $150 
•ach"'; order 8 or more — BX1002— for S1^ each". 




MAGAZINE 



W2NSD/1 




Style Y 



Style W 




Style X 



• Preserve and proiect yo^sr coll«clion tof a ilfetlrnel 
Order tha$c har>dsome red binders with gokl lettering. 
S7 5D for 1. 3 for S2t 75. 6 for $43jOQ iPostpaid within 
LfSA. please add $2 50 per ordef oufskje USA.) Check or 
mor?ey orders onfy, no phone or COD or<fers. 73 
Binders. P.O. Box 5120. Phriadelphia, PA 19141. 
*MOT&— Above uddresB for Btndexs ooly. 



BACK ISSUES 



• &ACK ISSUES- Comptete your oo^le^ion; many are 
prime coilectables now. classics in the 1i«ld! A full coi 
ieotion IS an invaluable compendium of radio and elec 
Ironies knowledgel 

73300— Before July 1980 $3.00 

73350— July 1950 thru October 19ei„„ $3,50 

73350P— November 1981 to P res ent.„.„,Mi,v. »„„... $3.50 

73005 — 5 you r c h o i ce. ...*,... ., . .„,.»«»««...*,,„„ S 1 . 7 5 

73010—10 your choice.. „..»., .^ ^, ^♦„..,.„„...$16.D0 

73026—25 your cho ice... ,-.,.,.,..,>.M^».?.i.>^^»«t*^.rS2 7,00 

73125—25 your choice,, ..^SU.OO 

Add Si -DO per issue it less than 10 
S7.50 per order if 10 or more 

• FREE BACK ISSUE CATA4.0GS are yours fo^r the ask- 
ing specify 73 Magajme, and/or Kifoti&ud Mtcrocom- 
putmg, back issue catalog when you send your name 
and address to us on a postcard. 



BINDERS 



'Use the order card in this magazine or iiemiieyourorderon a separate pt^Ce of paper and mail to: 73 Radio Bookshop • 
Peterborough NH 03458. Be sure to include check or detailed cr€}ditcard Informatfon. NoC.O.D orders accepted. Ait orders 
add £1.50 handling first book, $1.Q0 each additional book, S10.0O per book foreign airmail Please allow 40 weeks for 
delivery Questions regardl ng your order? Please write to Customer Service at the above address. (Prices subject to change 
&n book?^ ■*^:' published by 73 Magazine i 



FOR TOLL FREE ORDERING CALL 1-800-258-5473 



List of AdvEmisERs 



To receive fu!i information from our advertisers 
please complete the following postage-pa^d card^ 



lt&N& 



2 AEA/Advanoed Electron ic Applkia- 



3 



5 

331 

7 

97 

356 

71 



439 
11 

92 



12 



92 

102 

321 



59 
26 
382 



AED Elecltfon^cs.... ,■....... .103 

Advanced Communications Intef- 

fiaHOJT«L.„_..*_,.HHr«^^"^.^-. — 43 

AH E)€CtTOfkics. . ^^.^, 4__ QQ 

AJ ph a Oe 1 1 a Comm^. .^.91 

Amateur Eiectrortjc Sup^y 

■ ■■■■■«■«■■ BKB-BBB ■■■■-II ■ ■lava-BHBr^-rV I > ^'1^'t-i l^'i I ^V 

Amateu r-Wholesale El act ronics. . .23 
Amal€ur-Wholesale E Fact ronics „ .33 

Am«r(can Crystal Supply.. «.«, 154 

AM P-Let ter «,»*„«, 1 54 

^^1 rltfuHi I I Ivh ■ ■ ■ ■■■■■■■■■'■¥■■'■■•■■■ -rvB-r-rr^-rHiT + ar-ri E M ' 

Antenna Bank„..„.„,„,.„.„,.„-*„.,J53 

Applied Invention.... — ,..4,^..,. 56 

Asfiocl a led Had I o. .8W 

Aul^k Research.. 103 

BG Carl E I ectronics .,..»..»«!...... «h.. 144 

Barker & WiNiafnson 1 13 

Bas h Ed ucal iona I Se rvices. 113 

Rox Bas^elt Electronics. Inc.... 95 

Bilal Co 1S1 

Brm^s TvtfoWay Radb^AEA .....91 

BuNbI Eiettr&niCS..... 156 

Bu1f«mul El&crrtjnics „♦..«♦ 4 

C 4 A Robens^AEA 156 

Ceco Commun teat ions, lnc,^.-...145 
Cefili/rion Int©mational,..^,„„.„.l05 

Cerlified Intsfnalional ..■■■■„. 15S 

Ctutiarltee Modular Con9a4«B^.„.gS 

Code Ouick......... „„, 155 

Commsott 108 

Corrnmunicstions Cenie*. NE......172 

CommuniJcations Concepts, Inc. 
...107 



H^p Not 

Ditota Microwave.. 
330 Debco Electronics,. 

* Demc^ Elecin>nics/AEA_, 

* Oea^ top Computing. 



P«g« R.5, No. 



P*9» 



■^■■i T I II I ■■PP#¥TTT 



.57 
106 

.-.*.1ll3 



36 Irvtefnationat CrystaL 



P*W¥WWW»W*^P*l"**" 



.126 



481 mtemationat Satellite VitJoo Cor^. 



■ i ■ iipi) ■■■■ 



43 
425 



477 
453 



447 
S2 

400 

* 

56 

91 

22 

85 

439 

323 

23 

101 

37 

■ 

417 
47S 



377 Cofnmuniciitioris Electronics 

157 

462 Communications Electronic 

Specialties ,.., ,,■,..,....„. T4S 

IS Commufiicdtions Specialists 

I i I I ■ ■ ■ 1 T 1 ■ ■ f '. :!! I 1 ■ I r'' --ra ■ n ■■■■ttj-^ i i jj l. i^-M Hlf n -I^ j ■ ■■ 4 iI iV f | V ' 

444 Comptiter Plits.............^,... ...^156 

CrQi^n Micro Products....,„„»„„«,J40 
70 Cubic Communications..,„,..„..^,J7 

484 Curtis Electro Devices t43 

1Q6 Cuahcratt 91 

* Dayton Hamvention 'B2 ...,„„ 137 



345 

31 

p 

33 

460 

16 

309 

34 

72 

320 

474 

76 

6 

414 

445 



Digital Research PatV^.^,,..^, — 175 

Doppler Systems, *„»„.„„.. 105 

R. L Drake Company 

■■■■■■^■.■. .■.■...■■- ■- 10» 11. m %. 107 

OX Prefin UsL- — .*»**t10 

80 Microcomputing,.-.. 124 

Electronic Equipment Bank 150 

Electronic Hobby tnnovationa 45 

Electronic Recy clef sol MAh 1^ 

Engineering Consult (ng..,, „,.. ^56 

Erickson Communications 1S1 

ETCU c lectron Lc b. p+Mtn i^i*! i4H4«ri^ii ■ eh 
ETCO Elect ronics..,*H**.i*WM*v«««..1 51 

Fair Radio Sales ..,„,„-.«»... 155 

Faifscan, inc.. ....♦.,«.*.. 1 45 

Ben Fmnklih Electionlc3..«« 154 

Fox-Tango Corp.. 105 

Fte3^er Corp ^^.*..»«<»«v.«m< . > . .95 

G & K Amateur Supply. ,<*..»«.»»»>■ 126 

Gillaspie & Associaies.....^^^ .57 

Gtot^l Electronics,...-....,. 
Golham Antenna^™.* 

Grove Enterprises 

fH & R Commuinicatkyis,. 
Hal CocnmuTiicaKons,. 

H al Tf onix . 



27 

400 

2S 

36 

39 
354 

81 



.M ■ P T Pw ii i n m ^^ 



■ 'k vJIA rif V ■-'■*■ -w 'fc 



^♦■ -li l l i l-UT '*^*"'**' 



...110 

156 
.....177 

isa 

124 



-ftl-l4il-l49-l-l+9 



■!*■ ill I ■ Bm i 



..61 

150 

.110 

J6 

.,15,106 

._..107 



iscan Entgineefing...- 
JDR Micfodevice^ 

JJTTOisirt bating 

Jafneco Electroni<^a^. 
Jan Crystals. 
Jefisen Tools.** 
KB Microcomputing^.. 

KDK Di St ri but tng..... „, 29 

Kantronics.. **«**►«,«,„...... — .69, 152 

Kenwood... ,„..,.Cov IV, 7. 1 10 

Kirk Electronics. .,..„..,„.. .153 

4 Lacue Communications Electronics 

322 Larsen Antenna........... 97 

452 LewjB Construction Co>........ ,.>..... .57 

Live Via Satellite, Inc .61 

53 Luly Associates 56 

96 M & M Electronics Sales...*, ,,117 

4S1 hflCM Com municallona......... ....... .27 

47 M F J Enterp ri ses. . . .67. 69, 7 1 . 73 

4 79 M F J Enterpti ses.»»»»».»«».»..» ,. Ill 

46 MHz EJectronics, *.^«.*«..1 5^^167 

M-SqLiaresi Engineering.-.. »-....*... 147 

Macrotronics. Inc 125 

Madison Electronics Supply. .....150 

Mtcfo Control SpeelalUMi....... ,109 

Microiog 



R&No. 



61 

397 

105 

62 

54 

416 

95 

376 

65 

111 

64 



Page 

AfnateyrCallCtOOk, Inc. 41 



Radio World- 
Hadios Unlirntl«d/AEJL 
Rantsey Electronics^ 
Robot Research 
RolJn DlstributOfSp., 
S-G-Roscoe 



•*-B»< T^«lT M-g-^^§- 



T l l IlU gg-l 



.145 

174 
.83 



'■n TIP*B"VVPPV" ■ ■ P* 



..43 
57 

1S2 
.61 



S-F Amateur Radio Service,^.., 

Sceptof Comm., Inc ^^.„t_^.. 

Semiconductors Surplus 170, 171 

73 Magazine 

Books 

..^ 119, 122, 124, t2M29, 144, 145 



Dealers M,.,., 



tf*mt^§-f^*aiMi-***A-tA*W» kl-l-fl^UI-r- 



..iza 



*^Movlng".......... 124 

Subscriptions ........131. 132, 145 

University Microfilms 132 

333 Sentry Mfg. Co.,... ,.,.,„,,.„. 19 



Ham Radio Outlet 
Hamtroftics. NY 

Handi-Tek 

H a^t Fngs Antenna... 
Heath Compaiiy„ 
Henry Radio, 
higain Electronics 



■ ■ fTlMTHM ■ Bi ■ ■■ ■i lJ ii 



^■ii n *^ * iii rj I I in I I 



^173 

..105 
60 

m 

67 
Hoosief Elect fonics......*.„^„,...„.., 63 

I IX Equipment„„„ „.. „. . 106 

iRL _. ..,.,.45 

Independent Crystal Supply Ct>. 

, 154 

Indy Amateur Supply 150 

InoteK Engineering...... .......154 

lnstan<t Software 

Amateur Radio Prog ram a .,..117 



77 
44 
4S 
49 
51 
50 
52 
306 



318 
412 
327 
107 



MicrocraTi ijOT p.. .. taniMim .. j » M«Mn. i ..n i*" 

Mid-Com Electronics .«,««««, 126 

J. W. Miller DivJBell Industries 

_^ ^ 1 43 

National Comm. Group.. 1223. 144 

l4aiTial Electronics............ .,, 143 



367 Slep Electronics........ *,.... ....123 

309 Spacecoas i Researc h Co rp„. ..,.,. „61 

* Specifonlcs, Inc ...,.147, 176 

68 Spectrum Communlcat ions, . m .74, 75 

436 Spectrum Ir^ternailona), Inc, ..,115 

32 SteJImaker Enterj>f*ses.«-*..«„^155 

30 Stnj)( Corp.... ,^.....,.^155 

.154 
.111 
-25 
...56 
.147 
.150 
.111 
J1 

.alp 



69 Surplus Electronics Corp.„^.. 

462 Telecofn Industries Co4p.„^.. 

Ten-Tec,.. 

Twinnessee Electronics. 
Texas Microironics*-*— 
The Ham Stiacfc . — .. 



■Tpp****'*'*' 



NOrdlund & Assoc tales.. .„„_.__,.. 61 
North Coast M < cfow a ve... --**«..— 61 

* Ofb4t Mmamsifm^ .»• 115 

P: C. Electron tc5..««*.„« «..77. 115 

* Palomar Engineer3^.p>.HHH-.«N,*i** . .i i ..... . *4 

404 P. B.flad to Service.. ....„..,„,,. ,.73 

421 PtiilUps Tech eiecrfonlcs...,....„...l54 
90 P^owerGain Systems,., „„.„„..„.„. 149 
476 Power Gain Sy stems... ..««.,«»„..,1tO 

459 ORO Engineering MM^.«„«^.,1^t 

60 Quest Electronics...,,., ^*,„.„„iee 



109 

320 

449 

480 

76 

104 

8a 



Tbe Tuned Antenna Cow. 

Trac Electronics. 

Trionyx tnduslrieslinc,„ 

Tufts Electfonica.w.,.^.i».....lOQ. 101 

Universal Communicatlorks.,.5&, 125 



21 R W. D„ inc. 



■ ■■r-ili-it-1ilri-rihhilP^iat + liiri-i-i>H^ 



.153 



* Van Gofden Erhgrneering 
42 Valor Efiten>^ise«,. 

311 Var>guard lMt5 

90 VoGom Producls CorpL< 
302 W'S Engineefing.., 
103 WahlCiippe^^CoFp.. 

We-ssejt Pubhshrng COv 
108 XitekCorp^,. „....„., 
83 Yaegu Elec Ironies D.^ 
483 Yaesu Electronics 0. 




Books. ETC. 



7^ MAGAZINE 



To order, complete tlie following postage-paid card, or itemize your order including 
detailed credi! card information of check and mail to: 
73 Magarine/Mail Order Dept./Petefboroygh NH 03458. 



Cet ttog i 



Frtce CaikNsq t 



Ifain 



^rice CatBlog t 



Itern 



Cattfog I 



n*m 



aKlOl« n OlfOLE: k LOMQ iVtftE MfTEHHAS 

^ isjs 

ifmsm n sj ngl£ issue scrwc julv ttm 

%%» 

vrmer sincle issue mlv mhiom tiso 

iTlOa nB,ACKESSU£&-SOU(ICHOlCE-It4.ao 
SKBQS 73 BACK ISSU£S^3 TOUACHQlCiltlD IS 

snsm n back issues— io your chocg 

— _ — tr«eo 

fTwas n B*CK I5SUE5-25 ToyB enoicf 



SnOQI—Siffgl* bmtti Ifeiil* l»tan .Tuff IBMI.. 

sHd9r"9iinigi*(iK«.i»Li«jmi iseQ« 

STOQQ0 — ftyour -gtMHCfc , .. ., i....,i. 



m 



Add t1 00 EMf nrttgn^ln* tor srspusping 

stocto-iov^Hitdhoi&e. naoo 

STlOZt-aaoyrqtlOlCB, r.,rn-r, tHOO 

ST<JO»-SS yau^ choita ,.„„„,_„,„.. ..12 TOO 

AM 17.^ par ordar lor ^mppiig. 
EiKIlM ALL ABOUT CyBtCAL QUAD ANTENNAS 

ef AM ANTENNA HANDBOOK... 

BEHiiND THE DIAL,, „„ 

CHALL£MC€ OF ISO .™^_--«_ 



BKIiSr 
SK730]r 

CT73D6 



CMOS COOKBDOK...... 



coot TAPE— 5 W(>M .... 



.1 4.g« 

J "195 
HOBO 
4 J 95 



cfTsn 

dTtn 

CTTMS 
CTTSBi 

BK?3(H 

BHTSai 
aK7322 

SKI 201 
BKi23a 

BK73M 

CT730Q 
QtC731t} 



i* 



« 4i& 
J| MM 
-I 4 96 



4 « is 



CODE TAPE-TO + WPH 

COOe TAf>>E~2S + WPM 

COKTAPE5 lAhV fOM AKI¥B— !)&.« 

T>|£ CONTEST COOftaOQK. Ji S» 

40CaMrvTEaGAIIiS^ * ?•» 

QEHEIIAL liCENSE 5TUOT OUIOE f • « 
OlANT BOOK or AMATIUFI nAOH? 

Akr^NM AS -.f ta.Ki 

A QUtDE TO HAIM FIADIO J «.>! 

HOBBT COM PUT^RS AH^ MERE I 4,16 
HOW TO BUILD A MlCHOCOMPUTEfl A 
REALLY ON DE RST AND It t «. B$i 

HOW TO DGFEND YQURSCLF AaAtNST 
FTADAFI ,..•..„„..... 1 6.B6 

I G OP A MP COO K aooft. .;;.„.„.„„..^. ..ii t.aa 

INTERFERENCE HANDBOOK..,. t S.H 

MAGECOFHAM RADIO„i.n ..f 4.09 

MASTER HANDBOOK OF NAM RAOIOCIR- 

CUrT£. t iM 

THE HEW HOB BY COMPUTERS i 4. IB 

THE NEW WEATHEfl SATEUJfTE 

HANDBOOK .11.95 

NOVICE THEOflY TAPES . tl*ll5 

OWNER BEPWROF RAOlO EQUIPMENT 
__„^ *.- 1 7H 



BK71P5 
BRtCI^ 

BKItB 

BKr^CD 

QMoaso 



KJWeftSLtWtVMANOBOOK^^ 1 9i* 
PHACtlCJU. AJ^ENNAS FO« TM£ RAOlO 

AMATtyft . * 9» 

TME PRACTICAL HANDBOOK OF FM 
ftePEATERS 1 995 
PflOfACATlCM MUAfUrS MAND0OOK 
. t US 



oxtasG 
oxosoo 

OTl»SQ 
QTUSHQ 

BK1CI44 

BKlD5d 

BM001 
SKlzOg 
BK7311 
BH7J1 1 

BKrasi 



«Kt CAHDS- SPtlM VW- IM . 
QSL CABOS"ST¥i£ W— MO. 
QSL CAMPS— STYLE X.—3SD 
QSL CARDS— STYLE «- 
OSt CARDS -STYLE *— S 

OSLCAROS-STTLE T-«)0. 

THE HAOlO ANTATEUn AlvTENNA 
NAN DBOOK^..^^.„.,.„» 

BF=&0lGlTALTEST£OUlPMEt4T , 

FITLCOOH&OOK., 

SHELF B0X^1 

SHELF BOX E9-2-f „.,, 

SHE|_F BOXES-B AND UP 



$ 1 iS 

I B9S 

.IQ9S 

I a as 



,..|l4tMillMt»l44l4dt. I 



'■''ii,rn,nnFri,,i,iwi«""J' 



t Q.9& 
I 9 99 

% Q.50 

f 2.m 

SIMPLE, LOW COST WIRE ANTENNAS 

FOR RACIO AMAfEyprS , ...| 5.aK 

SOMEOf TH£ BEST FROM KILOBAUD 

ItOJS 
f TflS 
SSB THE M1SUMDEHST00C MODE t & iO 



■«M»^ II" I'f |««|i| !■>» -.— t 



SOME OF THE BEST, 



^twssi 


BStVTAPf ™ I ^« 


SGniit 


STuDVGtftD€-ADV CLASS J 6» 


SGIOiO 


StUOt awK -. EKt^A CtASS 1 i » 


S073S7 


STUDTOUIOE— iiKmCCCLAS& .J 4.» 


BKH» 


TTCETENMETfR^HAIiOeOOiL « ^95 


ija73sa 


TEST EQUIP tm VT -COMPONENT 




TESTERS 1 ta^ 


LBnso 


TEST EQUIP UB V3-AuOlO TESTERS 




* •W 


LBrai 


TESTEQlltPirBV3-RAinOEaLnP 1 4§§ 


LSTSei 


TEST EQUIP Lie V* - IC TEST EO % 41^ 


&K73«a 


TOOLS *TECMNiOU€S t 4.9S 


SKtEl^ 


TTLCOOHBOOK f 9.50 


BKtO&l 


TVT COO«aOO«, S t95 


BK739S 


UNDERSTANDING Ii PROOFfAMWNG 




MICROCOMPUTERS ItO.M 


CH7300 


U.S. AMATEUR RADIO CHART 11.91] 


BKioea 


VERTrCAl, BEAM A TRlA»iaLE ANTNS 




$ h.m 


BK?3Be 


VMF ANTENNA HANDBOOK J i.95 


BK1i9a 


VHF HANDBOOK FOR RADIO AMATEURS 




. I 695 


BK7370 


WEATHtR aATELLlTI HANDBOOK t 5 50 


flftlZQZ 


WORLD PRESS at(^ VICE FREQUENCIES 




t $95 


BKT1S4 


WORLD RADIO TV H ANDBOOH 1 1 B 50 


BK7315 


WOMt-DnEr>EArEnAlLA$ l *9b 



130 73 Magazine • March, 19B2 




by the dozen . 






NEVER SAY DIE-lf you want 

controversy, Wayne Green W2NSD/1 will 
give it to you. His popular column ranges 
from travelogue to tirade and is guaran- 
teed to entertain, inspire and enlighten you. 

DX— This globe-trotting column keeps 
you informed about the news of the DX 
world from Kingman Reef to Bahrain. 

CONTESTS-You get all the 

news on the contest world from Robert 
Baker WB2CFE. He'll give you information 
on upcoming events and results from re- 
cent contests. 



FUN —Just for fun, John Edwards KI2U 
provides you with wacky puzzles, quizzes, 
and games that test your ham mettle- 
FCC— If you're looking to the future, 
these outtakes from the Federal Register 
chronicle changes in policy and regula- 
tions that relate to amateur radio. 



RTTY LOOP-To keep you 

abreast of radioteletype developments. 
Marc Leavey WA3A|R explains the new 
RTTY equipment, the increasing role of 

computers in RTTY, and other matters of interest to 

digital communications fans. 







10. 






REVlElAfS"' Before you buy, save 
yourself some money check 73'$ in- 
depth evaluation of the latest gear. 

HAM HELP — As a service to you, 
73 prints your questions in our magazine. 
This helps you to obtain hard-to-get parts, 
schematics, and owner's manuals. 

SATELLITES-From phase III to 
TVRO, 73 Magazine covers the news of 
the satellite world like no other radio 
amateur magazine. 

NEW PRODUCTS-This 

brief look at the latest ham equipment 
on the market keeps you on top of new 
developments in amateur radio. 

AWARDS-To find out what 
certificates are available where, read Bill 
Cosney KE7C's coverage of all the ham 
radio awards. 

CONSTRUCTION- 

The builder's 



magazine 

. that's 73 You get 
the best projects from 
the best authors 
every month. 



7$MAGAZINE 



f 



Send me a dozen issues of 

for the dozen reasons listed above! FOR RA9I0 AMATEURS 

m year, USA SI 9.97 

a 1 year, CANADA, US funds $27.97 

n 1 year, FOREIGN, Surface, US funds $44,97 

a Mc a VISA n am. exp, d check/mo 



Address. 
City 



State. 



Zip. 



Cafd# 



Ex Date. 



£ 



Interbank # 

Signature 



Mm^m 





Subscriptjon Department 
P O Box 931 
Farniingdate. NV 11737 

1-800-258-5473 

Foreign air mail, please inquire 



^H 



DX 



AMATEUR RADiO 
m PARADISE 

Cook Islands certainly has a 
lot to offer the traveling ham- 
There are only twenty-five 
amaieyrs. and lis Prime Min- 
Isler. Tom Davis ZK1AN, is very 
active on the air. It is an ex^ 
ceHent location for working all 
types of DX. and when you are 
operating from there, you are 
rare DX yourself. 

If the Cook Islanders are not 
already famous for their friend- 
ly, hospitable ways, It is only 
because the world has seen so 
little of them. Long isolated 
from major travel routes and to- 
day's world of bustUng cities 
and crowded beaches, the Is- 
lands which make up the self- 
governed area of Cook islands 
are possibly the last unspoiled 
discoveries in the South Pacific. 

The fifteen islands that com* 
prise Cook Islands lie scattered 
over 751,000 square miles of the 
Pacific to the northeast of New 
Zealand. There are two distinct 
groups, the Northern and the 
Southern, 

In the north lie the islands of 
Penrhyn, Nassau, Pukapuka, 
Manihiki. Rakahanga, and 
Suwarrow. All except Nassau 
are coral atolls. Amateur radio 
activity there is sparse, often on- 
ly from visiting hams sent for 
research of for United Nations 
work. At the moment, there are 



no permanently active hams in 
the Northern Cooks. 1 was 
recently on Manihiki Atoll for 
two weeks and made seventy 
HF contacts. Unfortunately, 
however. Murphy struck In the 
form of two large lizards which 
shorted out the rectifier board 
and the power transformer in my 
Kenwood 530S transceiver^ lim- 
iting the number of radio con- 
tacts that I could have, (1 will be 
making another trip shortly and 
hope this time to have a spare 
rig avaitable.) 

The Southern Group consists 
of two atollSt Palmerston and 
Manuae, and seven islands. 
These are Mangaia. Aftutaki, 
Atiu, Mauke, Mitiaro, Takutea, 
and the largest island and 
capital. Rarotonga, the most 
developed of all of them» al- 
though it is only twenty-five 
square miles in area. 

Rarotonga is a fertile island 
with the breathtaking scenic 
beauty of white sand beaches 
and a sparkling clear lagoon. It 
has spectacular rugged moun- 
tain peaks together with a warm 
tropical climate perpetually 
tempered by the soft, cool, 
southeast trade winds. The 
highlands are mamly covered 
with tropical evergreen forests 
while the lowlands and valleys 
are used for planting. 

Cook Islands, with a pop- 
ulation of eighteen thousand, is 




fjP 



The author and a Cook Islands friend. 



virtually bereft of natural re- 
sources and is dependent for its 
livelihood mainly on overseas 
trade. It imports over fifty per- 
cent of Its food, all of Its raw 
materials, plant machinery, and 
oil, the main source of energy in 
the islands. The main exports 
are bananas, copra, and canned 
orange and pineapple Juices. \X 
Is completely self-governing, 




73 Magazine does not keep subscrip- 
tion records on the premises, there- 
fore calling us only adds lime and 
doesn't solve the problem. 

Please send a description of the 
problem and your most recent ad- 
dress label to: 



73 Magazine 
Subscription Dept. 
PO Box 931 

Farmingdale, NY 11737 



TnafA you and «fi|Oy your sut>5C«i prion 



this publication 
is QVQiJQble in 
micfofoitn 



Unlverstty Microfilms International 



300 Noiifri Zeet) Road 

Oept PM 

Ann Arbor, Ml ^106 

U.S.A. 



Id afford Bow 
Dept. PM 

London. WCI R 4EJ 
England 



with an elected Prime Minister 
and legislature. 

Aft electricity In the Islands Is 
produced from oil imported from 
Fiji, and, like most other de- 
veloping countries. Cook Is- 
lands is simply reeling under the 
burden of vastly higher energy 
costs and increasing food 
prices. 

Amateur radio equipment for 
use in Cook Islands has a twen- 
ty percent customs duty levied 
upon it. In the case of an am- 
ateur bringing his own equip* 
ment for his own personal use, 
no duty is paid as tong as the 
equipment leaves the country 
with the foreign ham. Local ac 
voltage is 240 volts, 50 Hz. The 
license fee is NZ$6.00 per an- 
num and is issued upon presen* 
tatlon of a copy (or the original) 
of your home station license. A 
very quick way of obtaining a ZK 
license is to forward full par- 
ticulars to Miss Jane Amoa, PO 
Box 243. Rarotonga, Cook 
Islands, South Pacific. 

Miss Amoa also runs an ex- 
cellent service for the visiting 
amateuL This service provides a 
beach house complete with all 
the latest radio gear including 



132 73 Magazine • March, 1982 



antennas for all bands, a 
housemaid, and car or bike ren- 
tal, all for a very reasonable 
cost, in addition, portable gen- 
erators with mufti-voftages, 
transceivers, and antennas all 
can be hired by the nnore adven- 
turous ham who wants to stage 
his own DXpedition to the outer 
or Northern Group of isfands. 

There are no television trans- 
missions in Cook Islands, but 
there is an FM broadcast station 
on 103 MHz, Radio Cook Islands 



broadcasts on shortwave — 
11760 kHz, and ZK4 and 1ZC on 
medium wave— 630 kHz. 

Stuart Kingan ZK1 AA handles 
afl of the intensland telephone 
patching, using modified am- 
ateur equipment. Transmis- 
sions are on 4038.00 MHz USB 
from 1800 hours GMT for the 
Southern Group. Northern 
Group transmissions are on 
12214.00 MHz USB from 2000 
hours GMT. His callsfgn for this 
network is ZKA2. He is also in 



charge of the PEAGESAT net- 
work, transmitting as ZKIXA 
Rarotonga on satellite frequen- 
cy 149.220 MHz and receiving 
on 136,600 MHz from 0200 hours 
GMT. He uses very modest cir- 
cularly-polarized antennas with 
150 Watts output, which give ex- 
cellent results. The network is in 
use daily. 

Shortage of equipment and 
trained personnel to teach local 
youngsters about amateur radio 
and electronics is the main rea- 



son why so few new licenses are 
being issued. 

If you ever have the chance to 
visit Cook Islands, I strongly 
suggest you take out a license 
and operate, as conditions are 
excellent to all parts of the 
world. The local people are 
friendly and very helpfuL 
Kia Oranal 

James Goodger ZK1 DO 

PO Box 64 

Rarotonga, Cook Islands 

South Pacific 



CONTESTS 




Robert Baker WB2GFE 
15 Windsor Dn 
Atco NJ 08004 



QCWA QSO PARTY — PHONE 

Starts: 0001 GMT, March 13 
Ends: 2400 GMT, March 14 

This is the second weekend of 
the 26th annual QCWA QSO par^ 
ty. Contacts with the same sta- 
tion on more than one band can 
be scored only once. Contacts 
made with "captive" stations, 
such as those operating in local 
nets, are not valid. 

EXCHANGE: 

QSO number, operator's 
name, and QCWA chapter identi- 
fication (official number or 
name). Members not affiliated 
with a chapter should use "AL". 

FREQUENCIES: 

Any authorised amateur fre- 
quency is permissible. The fol- 
lowing suggested frequencies 
have been selected to minimize 
interference to others: 3900- 
3930, 7230-7260, 14280-14310, 
21350-21380, and 28600-28630. 
The above frequencies are 
selected as a starting place. 
When pileupa occur, don't be 
afraid to go to either side of these 
frequencies. 



SCORING: 

Each contact made with 
another QCWA member will 
count as a single point. This 
year's contest has two muiti- 
pliers. The first is the same as In 
years past: Each chapter is a 
multiplier of one. The second is 
that DX stations are a multiplier 
of two. DX stations are defined 
as Europe, Africa, South Amer* 
lea, Asia, and Oceania— the 
same as for WAG of ARRL. Con- 
tacts within your own country 
count only as a chapter multipli- 
er. Final score is then the total 
QSO points times the sum of the 
number of chapters and DX sta- 
tions worked. 



AWARDS: 

Plaques for the top phone and 
top CW scorers. Certificates will 
be given for the 2nd through 5th 
runners-up in both the phone 
and CW parties. Standings and 
scores will be published in the 
QCWA News (summer, 1982, 
issue). 

ENTRIES: 

Logs should include the fol- 
lowing information: time (GMT), 
callj QSO numbers, name, chap- 
ter number or name, and state or 
country. It is the responsibility 
of each contestant to provide a 
legible log (no carbon copies) 
and to list all claimed contacts. 
The total contacts for each page 
will be recorded at the bottom of 
each page. The total contacts 
for the party should be recorded 
at the top right of the first page 
of the log. Log sheets will not be 
returned. Make sure you have 
correct postage when you mail 
your logs. Send logs not iater 



than March 31st to: Pine Tree 
Chapter #134, Glenn Baxter 
K1MAN, Long Pond Lodge, Bel- 
grade Lakes ME 04918, Separate 
logs and scores must be submit- 
ted for both the CW and phone 
parties. Work as many QCWA 
members as possible and apply 
for any of the special QCWA cer- 
tificates which you may have 
qualified for: Worked 50 Slates, 
Worked 60 Chapters, Worked 
100 fvl embers, and/or Worked 
500 Members. 

RSGB COMMONWEALTH 
CONTEST 

Starts: 1200 GMT, March 13 
Ends: 0900 GMT, March 14 

This contest is open only to 
members of the RSGB resident 
in the UK, and radio amateurs 
licensed to operate within the 



British Commonwealth or Brit- 
ish Mandated Territories. 

The general rules for RSGB 
HF contests, published in the 
January, 1982, Issue of Radio 
Communication, will apply. This 
contest is a single-operator, 
single-transmitter event. Evi- 
dence of simultaneous opera- 
tion on more than one frequency 
may result in disquaiification. 

AlsOt all contacts must be on 
CW only. Contacts may be made 
with any station ustng a British 
Gommonweaith calistgn, except 
those within the entrant's own 
call area. UK stations may not 
work each other lor points. 

EXCHANGE: 

RS(T) plus serial number start- 
ing at 001. 

FREQUENCIES: 



c 

Mar 6-7 


ALEHOAR 

ARRL DX Contest— Phone 


Mar 13-14 


QCWA QSO Party— Phone 


Mar 13-14 


RSGB Commonwealth Contest 


Mar 20-ai 


YL ISSB QSO Party— CW 


Mar 20-22 


BARTQ Spring RTTY Contest 


Mar 27-28 


Spring VHF/UHF QSO Party 


Apr 3-4 


CW & RTTY World Championships 


Apr 17-18 


ARC1 QRP Spring QSO Party 


Apr 24 25 


YL ISSB QSO Party— Phono 


Jun 12-13 


ARRL VHP QSO Party 


Jun 26 27 


ARRL Field Day 


Jul 10-11 


lARU Radiosport 


Jul 171 8 


International QRP Contest 


Aug 7-8 


ARRL UHF Contest 


Aug 1 4-1 5 


European DX Contest— CW 


Sep 11-12 


ARRL VHP QSO Party 


Sep 11 12 


European DX Contest— Phone 


Oct 16 17 


ARCI QRP CW QSO Party 


Nov 6-7 


ARRL Sweepstakes— CW 


Nov 13-14 


European DX Contest— RTTY 


Nov 20-21 


ARRL Sweepstakes— Phone 


Dec 4-5 


ARRL 160 Meter Contest 


Dec 11-12 


ARRL 10-Meter Contest 



73 Magazine • March J 982 133 



RESULTS 



RESULTS OF WASHINGTON STATE QSO PARTY FOR 1901 

sponsored by 
Boeing Employees' Amateur Radio Society (BEARS) 



Alabama 








*K4ZGB 


91 


29 


5,829 


Alaska 








*NL7D 


38 


15 


1.140 


Arizona 








*W7ZMD 


152 


38 


15,352 


Arkansas 








*KE5B 


122 


31 


9,517 


Calitornla 








*N6PE 


190 


42 


19,740 


Colorado 








*NOCKC 


25 


13 


975 


Connecticut 








^W1TEE 


76 


29 


6,061 


Florida 








*WA4FNA 


43 


17 


2,196 


Georgia 








•KA4BVS 


67 


24 


3,264 


Idaho 








*KA7LBA 


8 


7 


112 


fliinois 








'WB9TBU 


101 


27 


6,804 


Indiana 








*KI9U 


212 


46 


23,368 


Iowa 








*WAOVSW 


29 


16 


1,024 


Kansas 








*WD0CCW 


46 


21 


1,932 


Kentucky 








*N4FCE 


21 


13 


646 


Maine 








*K2QE/1 


75 


28 


5,376 


Maryland 








' N3AC 


21 


11 


506 


Massachusetts 






*W1AQE 


50 


26 


3,900 


Michigan 








*W8WVU 


53 


24 


3,816 


Minnesota 








*WB(SLNO 


44 


18 


1,584 


Missouri 








*K0TBB 


41 


19 


2,242 


Montana 








'N7ATT 


9 


7 


126 


Nebraska 








*WQ)JJL 


25 


12 


660 


New Jersey 








*W2CC 


5 


5 


50 


New York 








*WB2NDE 


107 


33 


7,062 


North Caroiina 






*KB4GZ 


13 


3 


208 


North Dakota 








*N0CZO 


9 


5 


90 



Ohio 
*NeFU 

Oklahoma 
* N5AFV 

Oregon 
*WA7RQS 

Pennsylvania 
*AD8J/3 

South Dakota 
*WA0B2D 

Tennessee 
"WA4CMS 

Texas 
*W50VU 

Utah 
*W7LN 

Vermont 
*N1BRT 

Virginia 
*K40D 

West Virginia 
*KD8K 

Wisconsin 
*K9GDF 



71 25 3,975 



39 15 1,170 



56 18 2,070 



49 19 2,147 



16 10 



27 10 



10 



CANADA 

British Columbia 
*VE7AVN 39 

Manitoba 
*VE4RF 

Ontario 
•VE3KK 



BRAZIL 
*PY1NEZ 

ENGLAND 
*G4HBI 

JAPAN 
'JA7KE 

SWEDEN 
*SM3DXG 



20 8 



WASHINGTON 

Benton 
*K7RF 

Chelan 
*K7GAH 

Clallam 

*WA7YMC 162 38 



320 



45 20 2,180 



82 26 4,264 



800 



120 



60 22 3,344 



48 19 2,090 



107 34 9,350 



21 1,638 



51 22 3,058 



70 27 5,670 



320 



48 



45 20 2,240 



24 16 1,136 



90 32 5,760 



57 22 3,762 



1 5,656 



Columbia 
*W7GHT/M 

Cowlitz 
*KJ7N 

Douglas 

*W7GHT/M 



21 17 1,071 



511 53 70,331 



40 21 2,520 



9 5 



13 9 



13 10 



135 



351 



390 



418 53 54,696 

46 21 2,898 

1,590 103 346,595 

49 25 3,650 

202 37 14,985 



Ferry 
*W7GHT/M 

Franklin 
*W7GHT/M 

Garfield 
*W7GHT/M 

Grant 
*W7WM0 

Island 
"W7GHT/M 

King 
*KB7G 

Kitsap 
*W7IIT 

Kittitas 
*WA7STA 

Kiickitat 

#*VE7ZZ/W7 1,043 109 252,771 

Lewis 

*WA7YFJ 85 SO 

Lincoln 
*W7GHT/M 

Mason 
*W7DF0 

Okanogan 
*KD7H 

Pend Oreille 
*W7GHT/fVI 

Pierce 
*W7BUN 

Skagit 
*W7GHTyM 

Skamania 

#*VE7ZZAA/7 1,043 109 252,771 

Snohomish 

*KB7NU 527 51 54,060 

Spokane 

*KB7UL 637 60 76,440 

Stevens 

*W7GHT/M 35 18 1,890 

Thurston 

*WA7RDJ 86 32 6,144 

Waifa Walla 

*W7GHT/M 31 17 1,581 

Whatcom 

*WB7CLU 1,484 103 305,704 

Yakima 

*N7AEN 264 67 37,252 

*Winner of QSO Party Certitl- 

cate Award 

#Operated from Skamania/ 

Klickitat county line 

Numbers after call letters are: 

QSOs, multiplier, and total 

score. 



42 21 2,646 



122 37 10,323 



233 43 30,057 



25 15 1.125 



900 73 131,473 



31 20 1,860 



134 73 Magazine • March, 1982 



Use all bands, 60 through tO 
meters. In accordance with 
lARU recommendations, con- 
testants are requested to opef- 
ate within the lower 30 kHz of 
each band except when contact- 
ing Novice stations. 

SCORING: 

Each completed contact 
cour^ts 5 points per OSO, In ad- 
ditbn, a bonus of 20 points nrray 
be claimed for the first, second, 
and third contacts with each 
Commonwealth call area. All 
British Isles prefixes (G, GB, GD, 
Gl, QJ, GM, GU, and GW) count 
as one call area. 

4 WA RDS: 

To the winner, the BERU 
Senior Rose Bowf; to the runner- 
up, the BERU Junior Rose Bowl: 
and to the leading UK station, 
the Colonel Thomas Rose Bowl. 
Certificates of merit will be 
awarded to the first through 
third placings tn home arid 
overseas multi-band or single- 
band entries, as well as to the 
leading station m each overseas 
call area. 

ENTRiBS: 

Separate logs are required for 
each band. Each band log 
should be separately totalled 
and should include^ at the end, a 
check list of call areas worked 
on the band- Logs must include 
GMT time, callsign of station 
worked, exchanges, and points 
claimed. Separate band totals 
should be added together and 
total claimed score entered on 
the cover sheet. H is important 
that logs are carefully checked 
for duplicate contacts. Un- 
marked duplicate contacts for 
which points have tieen claimed 
will be heavily penalized and 
logs containing m e?<cess of five 
will be disqualified. 

Entries may be single- or 
multi-band. Single-band entries 
should stTOw contacts on one 
band only; details of contacts 
made on other bands should be 
enclosed separately for check- 
ing purposes. Multi-band entries 
will not be eligible for single- 
band awards. Each entry will 
consist of the separate band 
logs together with a cover sheet, 
summary, and declaration that 
the rules and spirit of the con- 
test were observed. Entries 
should be addressed to: D. J. An- 
drews G3MXJ, 18 Downsvrew 
Crescent. Ucktield, East Sussex 
TN22 1UB» England. All entries 



must be received no later than 
May 17th. 



VIBGINIA STATE QSO PARTY 

Starts: IdOOZ, March 13 
Ends: 0200Z, March 15 

Sponsored by the Sterling 
Park Amateur Radio Club, This 
year there are three categories 
of participation: 1) fixed or pon 
table single transmitter, 2) fixed 
or portable muttt*transmitter. 
and 3) mobile. 

EXCHANGE: 

QSO number and QTH (coun- 
ty for VA stations; state, prov- 
ince, or country for others^. 

FREQUENCIES: 

Phone— 3930, 7230, 21375, 
28575: CW— 60 kHz from low 
end, plus Novice bands. 



SCORING: 

Count one point per QSO. A 
station may be worked once on 
each band/mode. In addition, 
Virginia mobiles may also work 
the same station from each 
county visited. Virginia stations 
multiply QSO points times total 
of states, provinces, countries, 
and VA counties worked to get 
final score. All others multiply 
QSO points times numbers of 
VA counties worked to get final 
score, Virginia counties are de- 
termined by the USA-CA coun- 
ties list. 

AWARDS: 

A plaque will be awarded to 
the highest Virginia score. Cer* 
titicates go to the highest score 
In each state, provmcet country, 
and VA county. 

ENTRIES 

Mail togs and summary 
sheets no later than April 15. 
1982. to A. Ray Massie K3RZR, 
Rt- 1 Box 11 5E, Dunnsville VA 
22454. For a copy of the results. 
please include an SASE. 



YL ISSB QSO PARTY-CW 

Starts: 0001 GMT, March 20 
Ends: 2359 GMT, March 21 

Two six^hour rest periods are 
required. Operating categories 
include: single operator, DXAA/K 
teams, and YUOM teams. All 
bands will be used and the same 
station may be contacted on dif- 
ferent bands for contact points 
but not as country moltipliers. 
Two meters may be used, but 




SOCtMTiO/ll OF 

tp£Mras 



MEWSLETTEIB 



NEWSLETTER OF THE MONTH 

Some clubs have broad membership with diverse interests, 
while others focus much more closely on a single aspect of 
amateur radio. Similarly, a newsletter should contain infor- 
mation relating to the club's specialty. A general-interest club 
shoutdn^t fill its newsletter with DX info, while a DX-club 
newsletter would lose readership rapidly If it concentrated on 
75-meter rag chewing. 

This month^s winner, the Wisconsin Association of Repeat- 
ers newsletter, sticks to its specialty and covers it well. WAR 
is the frequency coordinating body for repeaters in Wisconsin 
and, frequency coordination being the touchy matter it is, 
keeping the members (who are primarily repeater owners^ in- 
formed is very important. The December issue is four letter- 
size pages long and includes an editorial regarding newslet- 
ter policies and an explanation of the new size of the newsletter 
(it used to be printed in half-page sizeK WAR*s chairman 
writes concerning the new regulatory mood in Washington 
and the frequency coofdinator describes in a "bedtime story'* 
a recent problem concerning coordination in the state and 
uses it to point out the repeater owner's responsibittty in the 
coordination process. The bulletin finishes off with minutes 
of the last (quarterly) meeting— particularly important for a 
club which draws its membership from across a large state* 

The newsletter is printed by offset on colored paper with at- 
tractive graphics. Perhaps its nicest feature is the inclusion of 
an up-to-date listing of alt coordinated repeaters in the state, 
arranged by geographical region. One portion of the list is a 
map of Wisconsin showing the regional breakdowns, so it is 
easy to determine in which region a repeater belongs. The list 
is printed on both sides of a separate letter-size sheet, so the 
newsletter needn't be defaced to save the list. 

A newsletter editor needs to keep in mind the audience he 
is trying to reach; if he gives his specialized audience the 
specialized information that they joined together to learn, 
they will be happy both with the newsletter and with the club. 



contacts must be direct and not 
through repeaters. 

EXCHANGE: 

Name, RST. SSBer number, 
country, state, and partner's 
call. If no partner, leave blank. 
If non-member, send "no 
number." 

SCORING: 

Score eight points for each 
member contacted on any conti- 
nent. Non-member contacts 
count one point. Only member 
station contacts count for multi- 
pliers. Multipliers are each 
slate, country, and province, as 
well as each team contacted 



(only once for each team). When 
DX/WK partners contact each 
other, it counts as a doubie mul- 
tiplier. Final score is sum of 
QSO points times the total 
multiplier. 

ENTRIES: 

Logs must show date/time 
(GMT), RST, SSBer number, part- 
ner's call, mode of operation, 
band, and period of rest time. 
Summary sheets show number 
of states, Canadian provinces, 
countries, YUOM teams, DXAA/K 
teams, and partner contacts. 
Send logs, summary sheets, and 
completed YL ISSB QSO Party 
applications to Minnie Connolly 

73 Magazine * March, 1982 135 



KAQALX. Star Rt #1. Crocker 
MO 6S452. Anyone needing 
blank forms or furl her informa- 
lion shoufd send an SASEtothe 
same address. 

BARTG SPRING RTTY CONTEST 

Starts: 0200 GMT, March 20 
Ends: 0200 GMT, March 22 

The total contest period is 48 
hours, but not more than 30 
hours of operation Is permitted. 
Time spent as listening counts 
as opeiating time. The 18 hours 
of non-operating lime can be 
iaken a! any time during the 
contest, but off periods may not 
be less than 3 hours at a lime. 
Times on the air must be sum- 
marized on the summary sheet. 

There are separate categories 
for singleH3perator, muiti*opera- 
lor, and shortwave listener sta- 
tions. Use all amateur bands 
from 80 through 10 meters. Sta- 
tions may not be contacted 
more than once any one band. 

EXCHANGE: 

The message exchange con* 
sists of: 

1} Time in GMT; this must 
consist of a full four*figure 
group aruj the use of thaexpres- 
siofi "same" or ''same as yours" 
wiiE not be acceptable. 

2) RST and message number; 
the message must consist of a 
three-figure group starting with 
001 for the first contact made. 

SCORING: 



All 2-way RTTY contacts with 
other stations within one's own 
country earn two points; con* 
tacts outside your country earn 
ten points. AH stations can 
claim a bonus of 200 points for 
each country worked, inciuding 
their own. Note that any one 
country may be counted again if 
worked on a different band, but 
thecontinents are counted once 
only. The ARRL country list Is 
used and, in addition, each W/K, 
VE/VO. and VK call area will be 
counted as a separate country. 
Final score is (sum of QSO 
points times the total number of 
countries worked) added to (the 
number of countries times 200 
bonus points each times the 
number of continentsK Note: 
Proof of contact will be required 
in cases where the station 
worked does not appear in any 
other contest log received or the 
station worked does not submit 
a check log. 

AWARDS: 

Certificates will be awarded 
to the leading stations in each 
of the three classes, the top sta- 
tion in each continent, and to 
the top station in each W/K, 
VE/VO. and VK area. 

tf a contestant manages to 
contact 25 or more different 
countftes on 2-way RTTY during 
the contest, a ctaim may be 
made for the Quarter Century 
Award (QCA) issued by BARTG 
and for which a fee of $3.00 
(USA) or 15 IRCs is required. 




QSL OF THE MONTH: KASDDT 

Does the design on David Ashenfelter KA8DDPS card look 
familiar? It's based on graphics used by ABC News during the 1980 
presidential election. 

tf you would like to enter our contest* put your QSL card in an 
envelope and mail it, along with your choice of a book from 73"s 
Radio Bookshop, to 73 Magazine, Pine Street, Peterborough NH 
03458, Attention: QSL of the Month. Entries which do not use an 
envelope (the Postal Service does occa$ionaily damage cards) and 
do not specify a book will not be considered. 



Make your claim at the same 
lime you send your log. Holders 
of existing QCA awards should 
indicate and list any new coun* 
tries to be added to their enisl- 
ing records. Make your claims at 
the same time that you send In 
your log^ However, due to the 
high volume ol work, it will not 
be possible to prepare and dis- 
patch any new awards or update 
any existing awards until the 
final results of the contest have 
been evaluated and published. 

Additionally, if any contes- 
tant manages to make contacts 
on 2'Way RTTY with each of the 
six continents and the BARTG 
Contest Manager has received 
either a contest or check log 
from each of the six stations 
concerned, a claim may be 
made for the WAG Award issu^ 
by the American RTTY Journal. 
The necessary information will 
be sent to the Journal, which 
will issue the WAC Award free of 
charge, 

ENTRIES: 

Use a separate sheet for each 
band and indicate ail times on 
the air. Logs should contain: 
date/time in GMT, call sign of 
station worked. RST and mes- 
sage number sent, time RST and 
number received, and points 
claimed. Logs received from 
shortwave listeners must con- 
tain the caltsign of the station 
heard and the report sent by that 
station to the station he is work- 
ing. Incomplete loggings are not 
eligible for scoring. The sum- 
mary sheet should show the full 
scoring, the time on the air. and, 
in the case of multi-operator sta- 
tions, the names and caMsigns 
of att operators involved with the 
operation of the station. All logs 
must be received by May 3tst in 
order to qualify. Summary and 
log sheets are available from the 
Contest Manager at the address 
shown below. The judges' deci- 
sion will be final and no corre* 
spondence can be entered into 
with respect to Incorrect or late 
entries, AH logs submitted will 
remain the property of the Brit- 
fsh Amateur Radio Teleprinter 
Group, Send entries to: Ted Dou- 
ble G8CDW, 89 Linden Gardens^ 
Enfield, Middlesex £N1 4DX, 
England. 

SPRING VHF QSO PARTY 

Starts: 1600 local time, March 27 
Ends; 2400 local trme, March 28 

Sponsored by the Ramapo 
Mountain ARC, The contest 



rules are considerably different 
from the last two contests. 

Classes of entry include 
single- and multi-transmitter, A 
station of the singEe-iransmitter 
class may operate using several 
different transmitters but may 
not emit more than one signaJ at 
any given time. A station of the 
multi-transmitter class may op- 
erate simultaneously with a 
single emission on several dif- 
ferent bands. The number of op- 
erators, loggers, etc., does not 
affect the class of the station 
entry. 

A section Is defined as a geo- 
graphical area one degree in 
longitude by one degree in lati* 
tude. identified by a 4- or 5-digit 
number indicating the next low- 
est degree of longitude and latl* 
tude. Example: RMARC club sta- 
tion WA2SNA, located in Oak^ 
land NJ at 74" 15* west and 4t ° 
3' north, would use a section 
designator of 7441. 

Each QSO has a point of value 
based on the distance between 
stations as determined by the 
larger of the differences between 
the section designators* lati- 
tude or longitude plus 1, with a 
maximum of 10 QSO points. Ex- 
ample: WA2SNA in 7441 works 
W3XX in 7638. The difference be- 
tween 74 and 76 is 2. The differ- 
ence tjetween 41 and 38 is 3. 
Three is the larger difference, 
so adding 1 to it would result 
in 4 QSO points. 

The section multiplier is the 
total number of different sec- 
tions worked per band. The fol- 
lowing band multipliers are 
used to determine the final 
score per band; 50 MHz - x 1, 
144 MHz = X 2, 220 MHz = x 4, 
432 MHe = x8, 1296 MHz = 
X 16, and 2304 -H MHz = x 32, 
The score per band is equal to 
the total of QSO point values per 
band limes the section myltipM- 
er times the band multiplier. The 
total score is the total of individ- 
ual band scores. Each two-way 
QSO must Include an exchange 
of station callslgn, section des- 
ignator, and class of entry (sin- 
gle- or multi-transmitter). 

Prepare a separate log sheet 
for each band. Heading informa- 
tion must include your station 
callsign, section designator, 
and class of entry. Each tndivid- 
ual OSO entry must include 
date/time (GMT), callsign, sec- 
tion designator, and entry class 
of the station worked, and the 
QSO point value. Per band sum- 
mary information must include 
the total of QSO point values 



136 73Magazlne • MarchJ982 



and the total of different sec- 
tions worked. 

Prepare one entry sheet, indi- 
cating for each band: band, QSO 
point total, number of sections, 
band muftiplfer. and band score. 
Also include the total of all band 
scores. This sheet must also in- 
clude your station cailsign, your 
section designator. ARRL sec- 
tion and division, and mailing 
address, and must be signed by 
the licensee or trustee of the 
call used. 

An SASE to the BMARC will 
obtain log and entry forms. All 
who submit the required data 
will receive a copy of their news- 
letter with results. Award certifi- 
cates will be issued to the high* 
est scoring stations on each 
band as well as on a total basis 
in each ARRL section, division, 
and overall. Mail forms no later 
than May 1st tot Ramapo Moun- 
tain ARC. PO Box 364, Oakland 
NJ 07436. 

CW & RTTY WORLD 
CHAMPIONSHIPS 

CW Event: 0000 to 2400 GMT, 

Aprils 
Phone Event: DDOO to 2400 GMT, 

4 



Sponsored jointly by 73 Maga- 
zine and the RTTY Journal Use 
all bands, tO through 80 meters, 
on the specified mode. Cross- 
mode contacts do not count 
The same station may be work* 
ed once per mode. 

Operator classes are: a) 
single operator, single trans- 
mitter, non-computerized; b) 
single operator, single transmit- 
ter, computerized; c) multi-oper^ 
ator, single transmitter, non* 
computerized: and d) multi-oper- 
ator, single transmitter, comput' 
erized. Single operator stations 
may work 18 hours maximum 
per mode, while multi-operator 
stations may operate the entire 
24 hour period. Off times are no 
less than 30 minutes each and 
must be noted in logs. To be el- 
igible for the computerized 
class, your station must be in- 
terfaced with a microprocessor- 
controlled RTTY aod/or CW op- 
erating system such as the 
TRS-80. Heath/Zenith. Apple, 
PET, OSI, Hal, etc. Utilizing a 
memory keyer tor CW does not 
constitute a computerized 
station. 

Entry categories are: a) CW 



only, b) RTTY only, and c) CW 
and RTTY both, 

EXCHANGE: 

Stations within the 48 contig- 
uous United States and Canada 
must send RST and state, prov* 
ince, or territory. All others will 
send RST and a consecutive 
contact number. If your station 
is computerized, add the letter 
■*C" to the end of your exchange, 

SCORiNG: 

Count 1 QSO point for each 
valid contact. An additional 
^onus point is earned if the sta- 
tion worked is computerized and 
sent a "C" at the end of his 
exchange. Count 1 multiplier 
point for each of the 48 contigu^ 
ous United States and each 
Canadian province/territory and 
DX country {outside the contigu- 
ous US and Canada). The total 
claimed score is the total QSO 
points times the total muUipMer 
points. 

AWARDS: 

Contest awards will be issued 
in each entry category and oper- 
ator class in each of the US call 
districts and Canadian provinc- 



es and territories, as well as in 
each DX country represented* 
Other awards may be issued at 
the discretion of the awards 
committee. A minimum of 5 
hours and 50 QSOs must be 
worked on a mode to be eligible 
for awards. 

ENTRfES: 

Entries must include a 
separate log for each event en- 
tered, a dupe sheet, a summary 
sheet, a multiplier check list, 
and a list of equipment used for 
each mode of operation. Con- 
testants are asked to send an 
SASE to the contest address for 
official formsl 

Omission of the required en- 
try forms, operating in excess of 
legal power, manipulating scores 
or times to achieve a score ad- 
vantage, or failure to omit 
duplicate contacts which would 
reduce the overall score more 
than 2% are all grounds for im- 
mediate disqualification. 

Entries must be postmarked 
no later than May tOth and sent 
to: CW and RTTY Champion- 
ships, c/o The RTTY Journal, PO 
Box RY, Cardiff CA 92O07. 




* Technical Forums 

* ARRL and FCC Forums 

* GIANT 3-Day Flea Market 

* New Products and Exhibits 
^ Grand Banquet 



* Women's Activities 

* New! Home-Brew 

Equipment Forum 

* Special Group Meetings 

* YL Forum 



* New! Personal Computers 

Forum 

* Amateur of Year Award 

* Special Achievement 

Awards 



April 23, 24, 25, 1 982 

Hara Arena and Exhibition Center — Dayton^ Ohio 

Meet youramateur radio friends from all over the world at the internationally famous Dayton HAMVENTION, 
Seating vAU be limited for Grand Banquet and Entertainment on Saturday evening so please make reserva- 
tions early. Banquet speaker is Roy Neal, K6DUE, NBC News. 

If you have registered within the last 3 years you will receive a brochure in late February. If net write &dx 
44, Dayton, OH 45401 . 

Nominations are requested for Radio Amateur of ttie Year and Special Achievement Awards. Nomination 
forms are available from Awards Chairman, Box 44, Dayton, OH 45401 , 

For special motel rates and reservations v^ite to Hamvention Housins, 1406 Third National Bids., 
Dayton, OH 45402. NO RESERVATIONS WILL BE ACCEPTED BY TELEPHONE. 
All other inquiries write Box 44, Dayton, OH 45401 or phone (51 3) 849-1 720 



Rates for ALL 3 Days: Admission: $7 in advance, $8 at door. 

Banquet: $1 4 in advance, $1 6 at door 
Flea Market Space: $15 in advance. 



AAake checte payable to Dayton HAMVENTION, Box 333, Dayton, OH 45405. 
Brins your family and enjoy a great weekend in Dayton* 
DAyrON Sponsored by the Dayton Amateur Radio Association, Inc, 



73 Magazine • March. 1982 137 



AWARDS 



Bill Gosney KE7C 
Mtcro-BO, inc. 
2665 North Busty Road 
Oak Harbor WA 98277 

TENMETER FM AWARDS 

• Sponsored by the North Whid- 
bey Island Repeater Associa* 
tiontrsfWIRAK 

• All contacts, to be valid, must 
have been made on;after Janu- 
ary 1, 1981. 

• Crossmode contacts do not 
count. Contacts must be 2-way 
ten-meter FM. 

• Special endorsements can be 
made for all-mobile, all-simplex, 
and single-frequency accom- 
plishments and contacts made 
within a single day, week, 
month, or year. 

• Note: Members of the NWIRA 
monitor 29.600 MHz, as well as 
the area repeater on 29.640 MHz 
(an 1800- Hz tone or whistle \s re- 
quired to access). 

• Do not send QSL cards! For- 
ward your list of contacts show- 
ing the date, time, and frequen- 
cy of each OSO and provide a 
brief station description, along 
with the fee of $4.00 for each 
award, to Ten-Meter FM Awards 
Program, 2665 North Busby 
Road. Oak Harbor WA 98277. 

Worked All Districts Award 

To qualify, applicants must 
work one ten-meter FM station 
In each of the ten US call 
districts. 



mum of fifty US states on ten- 
meter FM. 

Centurion Award 

This award requires the appli- 
cant to work a minimum of 100 
stations on ten-meter FM. 

DX Decade Award 

Applicants must work a mini- 
mum of ten DX stations outside 
the fifty US states and Canada 
riq ten-meter FM. 

North American Award 

To qualify, applicants must 
work all ten US call districts, a 
minimum of six Canadian prov- 
inces and/or territories, and at 
least four DX countries within 
the North American continent 
(other than the US and Canada) 
on ten-meter FM. 

OPERATING 

ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS 
FROM A 5 MAGAZfN£ 

Fast-Scan ATV Award 

"Getting the amateur televi- 
sion station operating is an 
award in Itself!" This award cer- 
tificate recognizes the "first*' 
amateur television two-way con- 
tact. Endorsements for DX mite- 
age and color ATV are available. 
Contacts via ATV repeaters are 
allowed. Award inscriptions are 
made around the border of the 
A5 block. Black/white, 6" X 10". 

Master Scanner A5 SSTV Award 



Worked All States Award This award certificate recog- 

Applicants must work a mint* nizes the serious SSTVer. Entry 



level is 100 two-way SSTV con* 
tacts. Endorsements for 500, 
1000. 1500, 2000, etc.. are avail- 
able. Special endorsement for 
color SSTV available with veri- 
fied print copy. A must for every 
SSTVer! Gold, e'^X 10^'. 

Specialized Communicafions 
Achievement Award 

This award recognizes ac- 
complishments in ATV, MSTV, 
NBTV, SSTV, fax. RTTY. EME, 
microwaves^ and satellites. En- 
try levels are contacts over 100 
miles on ATV* Special -event ATV 
projects, 25 DX country con- 
tacts on SSTV, reception of HF 
MSTV or fast signals via ama- 
teurs, micfowave DX. 10 DX for- 
eign countries vta EME, 10 two- 
way contacts on an amateur 
satellite, and 25 DX countries on 
RTTY are required, with special 
endorsements available for ad- 
ditional contacts. Certificates 
are numbered as received. Gold, 
8'* X yQ*\ suitable for traming. 

Viforked All States SSTV 

Work all 50 states (Including 
Hawaii and Alaska) wtth ex- 
change of callsign and signal 
report in video. A special WAS 
map Is available to co^or in the 
states as you get them. This is 
an ongoing award not limited to 
the annual contest. Special en- 
dorsements available for multi- 
band WAS. 

Worked All States RTTY 

Work all 50 states (including 
Hawaii and Alaska) with log 
copy verification. This is an 
ongoing award not 1 Imited to the 
annual contest, Special en- 
dorsements available for multi- 
band WAS. 



"Good Image** Award 

Awarded at the Dayton Ham- 
ventlon each year, the Good Im- 
age Award is presented to the 
individual or group of individu- 
als who contributed to the ad- 
vancement of the A5 code of 
communication by technical 
achievement or putilic aware- 
ness. Top-of-t he-line award! 

All A5 Magazine awards re- 
quire subscription label infor- 
matron date codes. Enclose 
$1.00 for the cost of the award 
certificate and 50« postage tor 
return mailing (envelope is pro- 
vided). AHow 2-3 weeks for verif i- 
cation and mailing. Send all re- 
quests to Awards Manager. A5 
Magazme, PO Bo)< H. Lowden lA 
52255-0408. Winners of awards 
will be published on a regular 
basis in A5 Magazine. 

CENTRAL STATES VHF 
SOCIETY OPERATING AWARDS 

At the 1981 Central States 
VHF Conference in Sioux Falls. 
South Dakota, in August, the 
Central States VHF Society for- 
mally announced its new operat- 
ing awards program with three 
colorful awards for VHF/ 
UHRSHF bands. 

Each award was designed to 
stimulate activity on the bands 
above 144 MHz. The differences 
in the awards as well as the 
variety of endorsements avail- 
able provide challenging but 
achievable goais regardless of 
the station's geographic loca* 
tlon or capabilities. 

The awards are open to all 
amateurs— not just CSVHF So- 
ciety members> To receive rules 
and application sheets, send a 
legal-size SASE (with two 
stamps) to Bob Taylor WB5LBT, 




faHtatntV-Of^ 



% 



AMATEUR TELEVISION 
HA6A2IHE 



Ar-! 



FAX 







_.-4flV\ 




m 



T* 






138 73Magazme • March, 1982 



107t5 WaverJand, Baton Rouge 
LA 70815. 

General Rules— All Awards 

• The awards described below 
are available to all amateurs 
worldwide who submit details of 
the required contacts (on the 
separate award Application De- 
tati Sheet) and have the accura- 
cy of the application certified by 
a local member in good stand- 
ing of the CSVHF Society, In ad- 
dition to the basic awards, cer- 
tain optional endorsements are 
available as described below 
and on the Application Cover 
Sheet. 

• For all awards, direct two-way 
communication must be estab- 
lished on amateur radio bands 
of 144 MHz and above. Minimum 
contact requirements are the ex- 
change of callsigns, signal 
reports (or other mutually under- 
stood information), and receipt 
of acknowtedgement that both 
stations have received this infor- 
mation. All contacts for each 
award must be on the same 
band. 

• Contacts must be made from 
the same location or from other 
!ocation(s) licensed to the appf[- 
cant, no two of which are more 
than 50 mites apart. 

• Contacts for the VUCC and 
WHG awards may be made over 
any period of years, with no 
starting date, but numbered cer- 
tificates will onty be issued to 
those who have made all the re- 
quired contacts after August 1, 
1981, 1K Coverage Award con- 
tacts must be made during any 
two consecutive months after 
August 1, 1981. 



• Contacts made through "re- 
peater" devices or any other 
power relay method do not 
count toward any of the awards. 
In addition, no crossband con- 
tacts are permitted. 

• False statements on the Ap- 
plication Cover Sheet or on the 
Detail Sheet{s) shall result in im- 
mediate disqualification for any 
of the awards. 

• Remember, you do not have 
to be a member of the CSVHF 
Society to apply for an award. 
However, If you wish to join, 
send the $5.00 membership 
dues to: Ted Mathewson W4FJ, 
CSVHF Society Secretary, 1525 
Sunset Lane, Richmond VA 
23221 . Please do not send dues 
with awards applications. 

VUCC 

The VUCC (VHF/UHF Century 
Club) award simply requires 
contacts with 100 different ama- 
teur stations. Optional endorse- 
ments for working additional 
stations in increments of 25 
(e.g., 125, 150, 175, etc) or for 
making all the contacts during a 
single calendar year (Jan. 1 
through Dec. 31) are available 
only if all the contacts were 
made on the same mode of prop- 
agation (sporadic E skip, EME, 
meteor scatter, or aurora). 

1KCA 

The IK Coverage Award re- 
quires contacts of sufficient 
number and distance such that 
the sum of the QSO points for all 
the contacts during each of any 
two consecutive calendar 
months is equai to or greater 
than 1000. The QSO points for 



any given contact are the band 
points multiplied by the dis- 
tance points. The band points 
are determined as foHows: 
144 = 2, 220 = 5, 432 = 4, 
1295 = 5, 2300 = 10, 3300 = 15, 
5650 = 25, and 10 GHz and 
up =50. The distance points are 
simpiy the number of 1°x1" 
^'grids'' (see definition under 
WHG Award) you are away from 
the other station's K x 1 ' grid. 
For example, if the station is in 
the next grid over from yours, 
the distance points for the con- 
tact are 1; if it is two grids over, 
the distance points are 2, etc. 
Contacts in your own grid have a 
distance point value of 1. For 
stations which are not in a grid 
directly north, south, east, or 
west of yours (i.e„ off at s^n 
angle), the distance points have 
to be calculated. In such cases, 
the distance points are equal to 
the square root of the sum of the 
latitude difference squared an^i 
the longitude distance squared, 
where the differences in latitude 
and longitude are measured in 
numbers of whole 1 * x 1 " grids. 
The resulting distance points 
are to be rounded off to the 
nearest tenth. Oniy one contact 
with a given station per GMT day 
counts toward this award, and 
EME contacts do not count. 
There are no additional en- 
dorsements available for this 
award. 



WHG 

The WHG (Worked Hundred 
Grfds) award requires contacts 
with stations in 100 different 
1 °x 1 ° geographic "grids/' The 
1 * X 1 "^ grids are defined as the 



area bounded by integral vaiues 
of latitude and longitude. For ex- 
ample, a station whose longi- 
tude is 112" 32' 15" west and 
latitude is 37' 25' 16'" north 
would be in the grid 112W37N. 
All stations are urged to Include 
their latitude and longitude 
and/or equivalent recognized 
QTH locator code on their sta- 
tion cards to assist others in 
determining their grid. If you 
have to determine the other sta- 
tion's grid yourself, it can be 
easily done by looking up the 
town location in any good road 
atias and the locating the posi- 
tion on a larger map which 
shows the l " lines of latitude 
and longitude. Two such maps 
are: 

1. ''Map 2-A," which comes in 
two halves (54"x80" assem- 
bled) and is available for $3.00 
postpaid from: Branch of Distri- 
bution, U.S. Geoiogical Survey, 
Federal Center, Denver CO 
80225. Shown are counties, 
county seats, capitals, and 
cities larger than 500,000. 

2. Rand McNaffy's "Contem- 
porary United States," which 
measures 36" x 54" and is avail- 
able through bookstores for 
$2.95, The map does not show 
counties but does include major 
highways, a number of cities 
and towns, and 3* more latitude 
in Canada than the USGS map. 

Optional endorsements are 
available for working additional 
V X 1 * grids in increments of 25 
{e.g., 125, 150, 175, etc.) or for 

working ali the different grids in 
a single caiendar year. 



FUN! 




John Edwards KI2U 
78-56 86th Street 
Glendafe NY 11385 



HOW HAMS VIEW THEMSELVES II 

Here we go again. One year and two postal increases later, it's 
time once more for the famous Fun! polL 



For those who missed last year's event, the Fun! poi! is not a 
scientific survey. What it represents, though, are the gut feelings of 
amateurs as they answer questions ranging from their personal 
lifestyEes to how they view emerging trends in our hobby. Last year 
we discovered, for instance, that t2percentof our respondents used 
a *'cheat book'' to upgrade, 54 percent felt that ham radio interfered 
with their personal relationships, and 61 percent would give up the 
hobby for a million dollars. 

This time around we're keeping many of the old questions and 
adding some new ones. I hope that you'll take the time to fitJ out the 
response sheet and mail it to the address at the top of this column. 

Last year, some club officers wrote in to say that they made the 
poll a meeting activity, Photocopy ballots were passed out and 
members were encouraged to voice their opinions on the various 
topfcs. I think that's a great idea. Anything that can get hams think- 
ing and talking can't be ali bad. Just be sure to mail in those ballots 



1)Sex: 



ELEMENT 1 — BACKGROUND 

A) Male 

B) Female 



73Magazfne • March, 1982 139 



2) Age: 

A) 15 or below 

B) 16-21 

C) 22-39 
D} 40-59 

E) 60 and above 

3) Lfcense class: 

A) Novice 

B) Technician 

C) General 

D) Advanced 

E) Extra 

4) Number of years licensed: 

A) 1 year or tess 

B) 1-5 years 
C)6-10 years 

D) 11 -20 years 

E) 21 years and up 

5) Do you have a new (post-March 78) call? 

A) Yes 

B) No 

6j How many hours a week do you devote to amateur radio? 

A) 0-1 hour 

B) 2-5 hours 

C) 6-10 hours 

D) 11-20 hours 

Ei 21 hours or more 

7) Which HF band do you mosl use? 

A) 80-75 meler s 

B) 40 meters 

C) 20 meters 

D) 15 arvd/or 10 meters 

E) Donl operate HF 

8) Which VHF UHF band do you most use? 

A) 6 meters 

B) 2 meters 
Q 220 MHz 

D)420 MHz and/or up 
E) Don't Operate VHF-UHF 
9} Which mode do you most use? 

A)SSB 
B)CW 

C) FM 

D) RTTY 

E) Other 

10) How much money have you spent on amateur radio within the 
past year? (Jnciude QSL expenses, magazine subscriptions, club 
dues, and other incidentai expenditures.) 

A) 0-S250 

B) $251 *$500 

C) $501 -SI .000 

DJ SI ,001-52,500 

E) $2,501 and up 



ELEMENT 2-SOCIAL CHARACTISTICS 

11) Has amateur radio influenced your career choice? 

A) QreatJy 

B) Somewhat 

C) Not at all 

12) Do you answer QSLs with no return postage? 

A) Yes 

B) No 

13) Politically, how would you define yourself? 

A) Conservative 

B) Middle-of-road 

C) Liberal 

14) Do you think amateur radio will exist 20 years from now? 

AJYe« 
B) No 



15) Have you ever had a fight with a family member over amateur 
radio? 

A) Yes 
B)No 

16) Do you have any relatives who are hams? 

A) Yes 
B)No 

17) Are most of your friends (more than half) hams? 

A) Yes 
B)No 

18) Dfd you ever use a "cheat book'* (not counting the ARRL License 
Manual) to upgrade your license? 

A) Yes 

B) No 

19) If someone offered you five mfllion dollars, tax free, on the condr- 
lion you give up amateur radio forever, would you? 

A) Yes 

B) No 

20) Do you belong to a local ham radio club? 

A) Yes 
B)No 

21) Have you ever attended a ham flea market? 

A) Yes 

B) No 

22) Have you ever attended the Dayton Hamvenlion? 

A) Yes 
6) No 

23) Would you pay five dollars to join the ARRL if they offered no 
magazme, QSL services, awards, or technical and mstructional 
help? 

A) Yes 
B)Nq 

24) Would you like to see another national organization compete 
with the ARRL? 

A) Yes 
8} No 



ELEMENT 3— OPERATING HABITS 

25) Would you favor a licensing system that had only two classes: 
Novice and General of Communicator and General? 

A) Yes 
8) No 

26) Would you like to see the FCC turn over amateur testing respon^ 
sibilily to clubs? 

A) Yes 
B)No 

27) Do you think religious and politically-oriented nets have a place 
in ham radio? 

A) Yes 
B}No 

28) Should cor^tests be outlawed? 

A) Yes 
B)No 

29) Do you think the FCC should assign exclusive freqi/encies and 
times to nets? 

A) Yes 
B]No 

30) Do you think the FCC should assign exclusive frequencies to 

repeaters? 

A) Yes 

B)No 

31) Should there be a no-code. VHF and above, "digftal-class" 
license? This license would require a heavy theory test and carry no 
plione or CW privileges (except perhaps for ID purposes). 

A} Yes 

B) No 

32) Should there be a no*code, 220 MHz, *' communicator-class'' 
license? This license would require a moderately difficult theory test 
and carry only F3 privileges at a maximum of 50 Watts. 

A) Yes 
B)No 



140 73Magazfne • March J 982 



33) Do you own a microcomputer? 

A) Yes 
B}No 

34) What sort of CW sending device do you most often use? 

A) Straight key 

B) Keyer 

C) Bug 

D) Keyboard 

E) Never operate CW 

35) (f required, could you solidly copy CW at the speed at which you 
were ficensed? 

A) Yes 
B)Nq 

36) Have you ever purposely operated in an arriateur subband you 
weren't licensed to use? 

A) Yes 
B)No 

37) Do you think the FCC affects amateur radio in a positive manner? 

A) Yes 
B)No 

38) Do you ever speak to foreign, non-EngNsh-speaking hams in their 
own language? 

A) Always 

B) Sometimes 

C) I attempt it 

D) Rarely 

E) Never 

39) Do you feel yourself competent to replace the finals rn a tut>e' 
type rig? 

AjYes 
B)No 

40) 1^ you feel yourself competent to replace the finals fn a 
transistor-type rig? 

A) Yes 

B) No 

41} Have you ever built an electronic project from a kit? 

A) Yes 

B) No 

42) Have you ever "home-brewed" an electronic project from a book 
or magazine? 



A) Yes 

B) No 

43) Have you ever designed your own electronic project? 

A) Yes 
B)No 

44) What do you think of contesting? 

A) Great 

B) Good 

C) Okay 

D) Don't like it 

E) Despise It 

45) What do you think of DXing? 

A) Great 

B) Good 

C) Okay 

0) Don't like it 
E) Despise it 

46) What do you think of repeaters? 

A) Great 

B) Good 

C) Okay 

D)Don1 like them 
E) Despise them 

47) What do you think of traffic handling? 

A) Great 

B) Good 

C) Okay 

D) Don t like it 

E) Despise it 

48) Do yoy plan to use Phase 111 OSCAR within a year of its launch? 

A) Yes 
B}No 

49) Do you plan to use the new 10,1 MHz band within one year of iis 
opening? 

A) Yes 
B)No 

50) Do you believe amateurs should have the right to build, use, and 
sell equipment intended for the reception of subscription television? 

A) Yes 

B) No 



RESPONSE FORM 

Instructions: Read each question and mark your response by 
circling the appropriate tetter next to the number of the question. 



Element 1: 



t) 
2) 
3) 
4) 
5} 
6) 
7) 



9) 
10) 



A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 



B 

B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 



C 

c 

C 
C 

c 
c 
c 
c 



D 
D 
D 

D 
D 

D 
D 



E 
E 
E 

E 
E 

E 
E 
E 



Elem 


ent 2: 






11) 


A 


B 


C 


12) 


A 


B 




13) 


A 


B 


c 


14) 


A 


B 




15) 


A 


B 




16) 


A 


B 




17) 


A 


B 




18) 


A 


B 




19) 


A 


B 




20) 


A 


B 





21) 


A 


B 


22) 


A 


B 


23) 


A 


B 


24) 


A 


B 


Element 3: 




25) 


A 


8 


26) 


A 


B 


27) 


A 


B 


23) 


A 


B 


29) 


A 


B 


30) 


A 


B 


31> 


A 


B 


32) 


A 


B 


33) 


A 


B 


34) 


A 


B 



35) 


A 


B 








36) 


A 


8 








37) 


A 


8 








36) 


A 


B 


c 





E 


39) 


A 


B 








40) 


A 


B 








41) 


A 


B 








42) 


A 


B 








43) 


A 


B 








44) 


A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


45) 


A 


B 


c 


D 


E 


46) 


A 


B 


c 


D 


E 


47) 


A 


B 


c 


D 


E 


48) 


A 


B 








49) 


A 


B 








E 50) 


A 


B 









Comments: 



Send to; John Edwards KI2U, ^-56 86th Street, Glendale NY 11385. 



TSMagazme • March. 1982 141 



REVIEW 




THE YAESU FT-eeOR 
TRANSCEIVER 

The Yaesu FT-6S0R is a com* 
pact, six-meter, multi-mode 
transceiver designed for both 
mobile and fixed station use. It 
is part of a rather complete line 
of nearly identical VHF^UHF 
transceivers which includes the 
FT^SOR two-meter and the FT- 
780R 430-MHz multi*mode rigs. 

The FT^eOR is tuHy synthe- 
sized, with a four-bit NMOS 
microprocessor-controlled op- 
eratmg frequency, scanning. 
priority channel selection, and 
the various memory functions. 
Frequency coverage is from 50 
to 53.99999 MHz, in steps of 10 
Hz. 100 Hz, and 1 kHz in SSB 
(CW and AM modes) and 1-kHz, 
20-kH2, and 100-kHz steps in the 
FM mode. These steps corre- 
spond to one click on the main 
tuning knob, or one press of the 
up or down buttons on the mi- 
crophone. 

Of the sixteen controls on the 
front panel, eleven are as- 
sociated with frequency se* 
lectton. The other five are 

volume and squelch controls, 
high/low povwer swilch, and a 
noise-blanker on/off switch. The 
microphone jack Is an elght-ptn 
affair Identical to that found on 
many Icom rigs and provides for 
microphone-mounted up/dovwn 
scanning switches, a "Call" but- 
ton for lone*burst operation, and 
a microphone lock switch, in ad- 
dition to the obligatory PTT, 
signal, and ground tines. 

Underneath the front panel on 
the right-hand side are three 



switches: SAT, which allows the 
operating frequency to be 
changed white transmitting, a 
repeater offset selector, and a 
busy/clear scanning selector. A 
miniature connector Is located 
near the back of the bottom 
panel, allowing tone burst on six 
meters. The unit's speaker is 
also on the bottom panel 

The rear panel is mostly heat 
sink, but squeezed into the cor- 
ners are jacks for antenna, pow- 
er, and CW key. The entire unit 
measures approximately SVz*' 
high, TV*" m<ie, and 97*" deep. 
A hefty mobile bracket is includ- 
ed, as is a wire bail for home 
use. The bail fs necessary be- 
cause the speaker housing pro- 
hibits the rig from sitting flat on 
a table without It. 

Other Features 

Upon first unpacking the FT- 
680R, I decided that the front 
panel was the most confusing I 
had ever encountered. This is no 
smaii distinction, considering 
the needlessly complex panels 
on some of the competition! 
However, my opinion was mod- 
ified considerably after reading 
the instruction manual In retro- 
spect, the 680 offers a thought- 
ful layout. What need work are 
some of the labels over the 
switches. For example, use of 
the switch marked OIL is not ex- 
actly obvious. A glance at the 
manual explains everything. The 
switch ". . , transfers frequency 
control from the memory chan- 
neJs to the main tuning knob/' 
That makes perfect sense, but 
please donl ask me what it has 























5C / r- IB 




m 








nu »T 


.'r ^^^\ 


i 


WTMAl 






•* — i r 

^1 




^^^HFr j^u^^P^^^^^l 








m 




■ 


1 


1 


• 



The Yaesu FT680R six-m&ter transceiver. (Photo by KAILR) 
142 73 Magazine • March, 1982 



to do with DIL! Once you under- 
stand some of the confusing la- 
bels, the front panel is a lot 
friendlier. 

There are four memories 
available as well as a priority 
channel. These function in the 
generally accepted manner. An 
interesting and extremely useful 
twist is the clever programming 
of the up/down switches on the 
microphone. At first, they ap- 
pear to operate just like the mike 
switches on countless other 
rigs, but It you hold down one of 
the switches for more than half 
a second, the automatic scan^ 
ner is activated. Even if you 
release the switch, the unit will 
continue to scan up or down the 
band. To stop, simply press 
either the up or down buttons or 
the PTT switch. Surprtsmgly, 
pushing the PTT switch during 
scanning will not result In a 
transmission. The next time you 
press it though, it will behave 
normally and you'll be on the air. 
Nice touch! 

The controls on the underside 
of the transceiver are inconve- 
nient and their labels impossi^ 
bie to read without turning the 
rig over. Yaesu's engineers cor- 
rectly assumed that most users 
would rarely need access to 
these controls, but they failed to 
consider how easy it is for an 
operator unknowingly to change 
the position of the switches 
while moving the rig. Hopefully, 
Yaesu will not mount switches 
here on future rigs. 

Particularly useful to the six- 
meter DXer {s the inclusion of 
seml-break-in operation on the 
CW mode. Also included is an 
800-Hz sidetone. Missing is an 
amplifier-keying jack. With 
4GX250 amplifiers so easy to 
home*t>rew for this band, such 
a jack is sorely missed- For- 
tunately, adding one should 
prove to be easy for anyone on 
familiar terms with a soldering 
iron. 

On the Air 

The FT-680R spent several 
weeks accumulating dust on the 
shelf after its arrival because 1 
couldn't find the time to install a 
proper six-meter yagi. One Fri- 
day evening as my wife and I set- 
tied in to view our favorite pro- 
gram on Channel 2, we found it 
had been pre-empted. The Bos- 
ton station we had planned to 
watch faded in and out of the 
hash, and then for a few minutes 
a Florida news broadcast cap- 
tured the set completely! 



Without so much as a word, 
Alyson went to the ham shack, 
got the FT-680R, and dropped it 
at my feet. We found a spare 
T2-voit supply and then hooked 
up the rig to a Radio Shack TV 
antenna on the roof. The swr 
was about 3:1 , but the rig put out 
almost full power and didn't 
make any funny noises, so I 
started tuning up the band. 
Among other things, we heard a 
Georgia station calling CO, and I 
gave him a quick call. Wonder of 
wonders, he came back with a 
59 report! Over the weekend, I 
worked 21 states in the south 
and midwest, using 10 Watts 
PEP and a TV antenna fed with 
75-Ohm coax. Bob Cooper in the 
Turks and Caicos came in 
59-h20 Saturday morning, but I 
apparently couldn't be heard 
over the pileup of kilowatts and 
stacked arrays. I did manage to 
make several contacts else* 
where using the fow-power posi- 
tion (one Watt PEP), but signal 
strength reports at this power 
level were not uplifting. 

When the band finally went 
dead and I reconnected the TV. 
it occurred to me that I had 
forgotten about the lossy 
300-Ohm to 7&-0hm transformer 
installed at the antenna. Close 
examination revealed it to be un- 
damaged, but Tve always won- 
dered how much power 1 lost In 
the darn thing! 

All things considered, the 
680' s performance is outstand- 
ing. Receiver sensHlvfty is more 
than adequate for all but the 
most demanding weak-signat 
work. After a couple of hours 
with most multi-mode rigs, one 
usually begins thumbing the 
catalogs in search of a suitable 
preamp, but no one who used 
the S80 ever telt the urge. Re- 
ceiver audio quality was very 
good — better than that found on 
other Yaesu transceivers. Trans- 
mit audio reports were ex- 
cellent, and Tm just as glad the 
680 doesn't include a speech 
pfocessorl The Monadnock re- 
gion of New Hampshire is not 
exactly bursting with FM six- 
meter activity, so about all I can 
say about the FM section is that 
it works. 

The instruction manual is very 
complete. Several other well- 
known manufacturers would do 
well to offer the sincerest form 
of flattery— imitation. As well as 
the usual specifications and op- 
erating instructions, the FT- 
680R owner is furnished with 
alignment and service instruc- 
tions, a parts list, a theory of 



operation sectton, and three 
poster-sized schematics. An 

amateitr radio operator 6e* 
serves nothing less. 

A rather complete line of op* 
tionaf accessories is offered for 
the 680. For those of us too lazy 
to build our own, there is the 
FP*80 dc power supply. The AD-1 
antenna coupler permits a sin- 
gle mobile antenna (the RSL-50) 
to be used with tx>th stx- and 
two-meter rigs at the same time. 
One less hole in the old crate. 
Home-station operators will ap- 
preciate the choice of stand 
mjcfophones, including one 
with scanning push-buttons in 
the base. Finally, for owners of 
the 680 and one of Its twins, 
there istheSC-1 station console 
which makes the figs into a 
smgle compact package and in- 
cludes a power supply, digital 
clock, le-button DTMF pad, and 
some convenient switching. 

Conclusion 

Six meters remains one of our 
Interesting amateur bands. 
Propagation is often unpredic- 
table and wild, rewarding the 
aJert operator with dizzying 
tours of the country. On occa- 
sfon, it is rather tame, behaving 
tike a mischievous 10 meters, of< 
fermg long, solid rag-chews 
before sweeping your friend off 
tfie S-meler. As solar activity 
provides fewer opportunities to 
sample the thrills of six*meter 
DX, the FM position on the mode 
switch wl[f offer a bastion of 
tranquility and camaraderie, 
free from the crowding and 
ctrcus-like atmosphere that 
prevails on other, more pop- 
ulous FM bands. Six meters of- 
fers some of the very 5est of the 
HF and VHF worlds, and the FT- 
6dOR provides an excellent 
means to sample the action. In 
features, price, and perfor- 
mance, it stands with the best. 
Yaesu has a winner! 

For information, contact 
yaesLf Electronics Corp., 6&5f 
Walthaff Way, Paramount CA 
90723, Reader Service number 
483. 

FaulGrupp KA1LR/4 

Casselberry FL 

THE CURTIS K5 KEVER 

The Curtis keyer IC has 
seen used in countless keyer 
nodels offered by a wide range 
)f manufacturers, and with 
}00d reason. The chip offers 
ilmost every feature a radio 
jperator could require in a non- 



\ 



super SP«^ 



NEMAL ELECTRONICS 

COAXIAL CABLE SALE 

RG8X (mini 8)95% shield $16.95/100 ft 

100 ft, RG8U with PL*259 on each end. . , . $19.95 

BELDEN Coax in 100 ft rolls 

RG58U#9201 ...$11.95 

RG8U #9208 , $24.95 

Grounding strap, heavy duty tubular braid 

3/16 in. tinned copper. lO^/ft 

3/8 in. tinned copper. .SO'^/ft^ 

3/16 in. silver plated. •*.-*- .15*/ft. 



POLYETHYLENE DIELECTRIC 

RG5SCW ironcoritaniinating 96% shield . . 1 2»/K 

RG2l3norhcontarninating96% shield mil spec . .36'Ht, 

FK3174/U mil spec 96% shield V, m*m 

RGI 1U 96% shield TSohmmri spec __.,2&«m 

RG8U 96% shiald mil spec ^ViH 

RG6A/U double Shield 75 ohm . . Z5'/fl 

RG55AU (RG223)double silver shlefd 50ohm e6*/ft 

RG58Um(lspec96% shield ir/tt. 

LOW LOSS FOAM DIELECTRIC 

RG8U 80% shterd . m'ift 

RG5SU 80% shield . . ...... -- , : , . . . .07'/H, 

RG58U 95% sriifilii . ^0'm 

RG59IU 100% toil shield TV typ« 07VII 

RGSU 97 % shield 1 1 gage , ..2vm 

Rotorcable2 iega&22ga l9-/ft 



CONNECTORS MADE IN USA 

PL-259 push^n adapter sh«ii 10^13 69 

PL-259 & S0239 . . 10«6 89 

Double Male Con nectof .11 79 

PL 25fl Doiible FemaJe Connector , , , - 98' 

1 ft. patcti cord w/RC A type plugs each emJ. . . .3f$T 00 
Reducer UG'175 Of 176 lO/Sl.99 

UG 255 (PL 259 to BNC) S3 50 

Elbow [M359) Silver Prated Sl79 

F59A (TV type) lO/t1 99 

UG 21 D/U Amphenol Type N Male ror RGB S3.00 

Double Female N Chassis Mt UG-io £475 

3/T8 inch Mike Ptuo fof Collins etc ST 2S 

Gcmnectors— stt^ppmg 10% add! SI M minFmum 

FREE CATALOG 

COO Add SI, 50— FLA. Res. idd4% Sales Ian 



Cable— shipping $3 00 1s1 100 t| , S2 00 eat^h ad^ i lOO U 

5685 SW SOItl. Strati Oept RLO Miami, R. 33143 Call (305) 6ei-5&34 
Come 5«« Us At The Tropical Hambore^ Feb 6th A 7lti 



^412 



memory keyer, and very few ad- 
ditional components are needed 
to produce a complete unit. But 
while everyone was building 
keyers around the chip, almost 
all ne^Eected Its most obvious 
use. Since the component count 
is so small, why not produce a 
tiny keyer that could go any* 
where, anytime? Well, that's ex- 
actly what Curtis did! 

The K5 keyer measures only 
M/2'" square by 3-1/t6" deep. A 
tiny glass-epoxy circuit board Js 
securely screwed to a U-shaped 
piece ol .062" heavy aluminum. 
This assembly slides into a rec- 
tangular case, also made of 
.062'* aluminum, and is held in 
place by friction fit. 

On the rear panel are a phono 
jack for transmitter keying, a 
submini phone jack for power, 
and a submini phone jack for 
sidetone output. Four eight- 
inch-long lugged wires exit 
through a plastic grommet. 
These are for connection to 
keyer paddle and straight key. 

Correctly, the Curtis en- 
gineers judged that the only 
control that most users would 
need immediate access to is the 
combination speed control and 
on/off switch. This Is mounted 
on the otherwise bare front 
panel. By mounting seldom- 
used controls inside the boK, 
enough space was saved to al- 
low room for a standard 9-volt 
transistor battery. 

The internal controls are all 



miniature trimpots. Sidetone 
frequency is set to 1000 Hz and 
volume to a nominal level The 
stdetone output is really only 
designed to drive headphones 
(there is no internal speaker}, 
but the instruction manual 
points out that a 500-Ohm to 
8-Ohm miniature transformer 
will bring up the volume to a 
usable speaker leveL 

There Is also an internal con- 
trol for weighting, factory-set to 
3:1. Curtis discourages the use 
of nonstandard weighting, but 
provfdes complete instructions 
on the use of the control for 
hams with special requirements 
as well as tor those diehards 
who insist on making a perfectly 
good keyer perform something 
like a grossly maladjusted Vi- 



broplex bug. If you can't resist 
playing with the weighting, rest 
assured that it is easily reset to 
3:1 by turning the control fully 
counterclockwise. 

A particularly useful control is 
the maximum-speed trimmer. 
The keyer is factory-set for a top 
speed of 50 wpm, but this can be 
raised or lowered appreciably by 
adjusting the maximum-speed 
trimmer to taste. For example, I 
never send faster than 25 wpm. 
By setting the trimmer for this 
slower top speed, I enjoy a much 
wider range of adjustment with 
the front-panel speed control. 

In the Real World 

Curtls's years of e?{perience 
producing keyers are evident in 
the design of the K5. It*s no use 




The Curtis K5 keyer with Bencher paddies. (Photo ty KAILR) 

73 Magazine • March, 1982 143 



having a portable keyer if it 
places an unseemly demand on 
available pov;^er. The K5 draws 
less than SO-uA quiescent cur- 
rent and about 20 mA while key- 
ing with an average sidetone 
leveL Turning the sidetone off 
completely reduces dram some- 
what. 

The K5 ts designed to operate 
at 9 V dc, but can be operated at 
up to 20 V dc as long as the bat- 
tery is removed before the high- 
er voltage Is applied. For lower 
voltages, Ihe relay's current 
limiting resistor can be shorted 
out, which will permit operation 
with as low as 3 V dc input. The 
voltage range recommended for 



most retiable operation is 5 to 15 

Vdc. 

Because of the K5's seated 
contact tungsten relay, keying 
incompatibility problems are a 
thing of the past. Tlie touchiest 
solid slate keying circuit {like 
the one in my Icom IC-701) ts 
keyed without complaint. No 
more changing polarity when 
switching rigs^ either! The max- 
imum contact rating of 500 V, 1 
A at 15 VA should handle your 
swishing clobber from the fifties 
with ease. And if you are worried 
about getting along with a noisy 
retay. relax— this one makes less 
noise than the contacts on my 
Bencher paddle! 



AVAiLABLE NO^ 



^' AZDEN PSC-300 



TWO-METER HANDHELD 



PCS 300 HT 
PCS-3000XCVR 
Remote cable 
Phase II ant. 
Other ace. 



KDK 



$290.00 

285.00 

37,00 

2^*^° also: 2D25A Mk II 

(W/TT micj 

$285,00 



Call 



Free shipping in U.S.A. 
for all XCVR or HT orders 

B. G. CARL ELECTRONICS 

11128 Claire Ave, 

Nonhridge. Calif. 91326 

Call: {213) 363^1216— anytime 



»^4m 



DOLLAR SAVER/SPACE SAVER 

WELZ SP-300 SWR & POWER METER 

1.8 to 500 MHZ/1 W to 1 KW 




I 



WlLl 



Exclusive cross over frequency range 

3 TransmiUer/.! Antenna Connectors. 

OneSWR/Fowur for the serious amateur who operates all baudb, HF 

to 450 MBit 

Serious Dealers Listing Available, 



NOG 



^318 



1275 N. Grove St. 

Anaheim, CaL 92806 

(714)630-4541 

NOTE: Price, Specifications subject to change withouf notice and 
obligation. 



Importantly, the circuitry Is 
well -protected against the harsh 
electrical environment amateur 
radio equipment often faces. A 
diode in the power-input line 
protects the keyer from reverse 
polarity. Both sides of the out- 
put relay are protected agamst 
inductive-kickback spikes. Any- 
thing and everything that could 
suffer from rf pickup Is by- 
passed and/or equipped with a 
ferrite bead. The paddle Inputs 
include debouncing circuitry, 
and two pairs of germanium di- 
odes protect them from acci- 
dental application of voltage. 

One potentially confusing 
feature of the K5 is its avail- 
ability In two different models. 
The K5 offers iambic keying that 
bandies like earlier Curtis 
keyers. The K5B offers iambic 
keying with characteristics 
similar to the Accukeyer. AEA, 
Heath, Nye, and Ten-Tec units. 
Make sure you order the model 
that provides the char- 
acteristics that you are familiar 
with. If this is to be your first 
keyer, the K5B would be your 
best choice since you won't 
have to retearn anything when 
you use a keyer from a different 
manufacturer, tf you ever wish 
to try an alternate method of 



"paddlrng," you can simply 
unplug the chip and replace it 
with the other version. 

It is hard to imagine a better 
keyer for the ham who doesn't 
require a unit with memory 
oapabilittes. It should be 
especially popular with hams 
who use portable multi-mode 
VNF and UHF gear. No more 
sending CW with the mike but- 
ton to make a few contacts dur- 
ing a meteor shower 1 

Whenever you use it though, 
you'll find that the K5 produces 
code that is indistinguishable 
from its more expensive and 
bulkier competitors. And as a 
ham who frequently tests new 
transceivers, I find the relay- 
driven transmitter keying par- 
ticulariy useful. I own several ex^ 
cellent keyers from a variety of 
manufacturers, but because the 
K5 never needs rewiring to make 
it compatible with a new trans- 
ceiver, It's always the first keyer 
connected to a new addition to 
the shack. 

For more information, con- 
tact: Curtis Efectro Devices, Box 
4090 Moumain View CA 94040. 
Reader Service number 484. 

Paul Grypp KA1LR/4 
Casselberry FL 




MAGAZINE 



'WtSiLD 
c^TLAS 






From 

THE 

MOST 

UP-TO-DATE 

REPEATER 

ATLAS 
AVAILABLE! 

INCLUDES: 

• LISTINGS BY STATE AND COUNTRY 

• LISTINGS BY FREQUENCY 

• MAPS FOR EACH STATE 

• 28 MHZ THROUGH 1296 MHZ 

• PERFECT FOR MOBILING 

• WORLD REPEATER ATLAS-BK7315-Complctely 
updated, over 230 pages of repeater listings are In- 
dexed by location and frequency. More than 50^ maps 
pinpoint 2000 repeater locations throughout the USA. 
Foreien listings include Europe, the Middle East. South 
America and Africa. S4. 95. 

IN STOCK AND READY TO SHIP 

'U&^ (He ordfif caret on fh« Rffacfer Service pa^ of this tnagarine 

Of itemize your ortiet on a separare pi&c« ot papier atid mail to 

73 B^am Bo€ikihop • Peter Do rou^rt HH 03458 Be sur9 to include 

chock or del ailed cfedii card mformaiion Mo Q O O orcf&rs accepted 

Add 11 50 Kan tiling charge Fcir ihe first boo4(, $1 00 tof each athtilionat tioa4( 

Ouestians regarding ytJtif ardet? Please write lo Gusloinef Service 

at Ihe above adc^ress Plf^ase <iiiow 4-6 wnekii }or delivery 

FOR TOLL FREE ORDERING CALL 1-BOO 256-5473 



144 73 Magazine • March, 1982 



HAM HELP 



UNSCRAMBLE 



I am in need of a schematic 

and manuaf for a Hammarlurid 
FM50a business-l^and radio, 
1960s vintage. I would like to 
convert this to 50 MHz. 

Leonard W. Martin WD5DN0 

po Box tsees 

Baton Rouge LA 70693 
(504)^342-6933 

( need technical manuals for 
the following equipment: Boon- 
ton Radio Corporation type 
202'S FM stgnaf generator; Kep- 
CO model KR'4 power supply; 
General Electric model 4ER25 



high- band receiver strip (also, 
crystal formula); Multi-Elmac 
(Multi-Products Co.) model CM-1 
Conelrad receiver; military sur- 
plus C-1012^FRR control moni- 
tor: and CU-997/URR coupler 
antenna. I will purchaae manu- 
als or copy and return. 

James LincoTn K1NQf 

12 Cresivtew Terrace 

WailEngford CT 06492 



SCANNER ACCESSORIES 

FREE LITERATURE 

501-623-6027 

DNE, INC., RT. 7, BX257 ^4$ 
HOT SPRINGS, ARK. 71901 



POLICE CODE 



PRESERVE 

BINDERS & 
FILE CASES 



Keep yotir issues ot 73 Magaiifie tooeih^r. handy 
and protected in handsorne and durable Mbrary fllss 
Of brnders BoH^ styles bound in fed lealherelte witJi 
the magazine logo siamped in gold 
Files. Eacti file t^olds 12 issuas. spmes visible 

for easy reforenc*, 15 96 each^ 3 lor $17 00, 

G lor $30.00 
Binders: Each binder holds 12 issues and opens 

flat for easy reading, $7.50 aach, 3 for $21.75, 

6 lor 342.00 
{Postage paid in USA. Fofsign orders irictude $2.5Q 
per ijem) 

Please stale years; 1977 lo V9&3 
Send Check or money ofder to: 
JESSE JONES BOX CORP. 
PO. 60x5120 
Phiiadelphta, PA 19141 
Allow 4 to 6 weeks for delivery 



EFFECTIVE 
IMMEDIATELY; 



Canadian subscriptions, $27.97 
1 year only, U.S. funds 
Foreign surfacet $44:97 
1 year only, U.S. funds 

Foreign air mail, please inquire. 



(Ail previous subscription 

offers void as of 

February 1, 1982.) 



Your Ham Tube 
Hcadqttartet«i 




MONTHLY SPECIALS 

3-40OZ »a5.«) 

3-5O0Z.. ...as-oo 



*GX2S0B,,.......SO.0O 

"So . ..,:.:•■•■«>■>*. 3€.SC 

811A 12.00 

ai3. , ...........45.00 

et4BB 6.50 

6360 4JIS 



6W3B, 
7360 .. 
7T35A. 
S122.., 
S15« 

se73 

8674 



A * -i' ■ 



. . 6.75 
. .©.IS 

.2S.50 

. 1 1 1 . .t 0.ftS 
17S.00 



B877t3CXl500A) 
6906 ...... 



fa ri: B d- 



450.00 
.10.50 

E.F. JOHNSON Sockets For 3-500? 6 4-4O0A ^ S9J5 

LARGEST ElMAC DISTRIBUTOR— CALL 
BRAMD NEW *-•• FACTORY GUARANTEED 

TOP BRAND Popular l^eceivlng Tube Typat 

FACTORY BOXED 75/80% OFF LIST 

FREE LISTAvflimble 

fnciudesfull Una of RF Power Transistors. 

Minimum Order $25, 

Allow $a00 Minimum for UPS Charges 

40 watt RF power transistor 2N6084-$ia50 

Linear RF transistors in stoclt. 

Write or phone for frae catalog. 

TUBES^BOUGHT.SOLD AND TRADED 

Prsmlum Prices Paid tor ElMAC TUBES 




CeCo 



BEEPER III 

The Professional Tooc^i 
Comes To Amateuf Badio 

See our review In the Aug-81 Issue of 73 
Magazine. Add "'The Beep" to your 
transcerverl 
BP-3A Complete Willi case, cable. 

Standard ^-pin connectors 39.95 pp 
BP-3B As above except without 

connectors. Add your owix 36.^ pp 
BP-3C Circuit-board version for 

custom installation. 29.95 pp 

AD-3 

Real-World Apple* 
InterTace Card 

A/D. D/A Conversions, 16 10 Ports, 2 Pro^ 
grammable Timers. With Diskette, Rib^ 
bon Cables, Manual. 
$199 pp 




Use tolf free no. 
eOO- 221 0860 



«P 



Equipment 
Fans 

Factory Fresh 
From $22.30! 
Write for a listl 



COMMUNICATIONS, Inc. ^92 
2115 Avenue X 
Brooklyn, NY 11235 
Phone (212) 646-6300 

SERVfNG THE fNDUSTRY SfNCE f922 



Dealer inquiries Invited. All Items 
Postpaid in U.S. Oh lo Residents add 6% 
Sales Tax. Apple is a TM of Apple Com- 
puter, Inc. 



WF^XS ™ 



INC. 



3l4a Dort Omr« • Oaylon, Ohc 4&4I8 



Tm 



CENTRAL NEW YORK*S MOSTOOMPLETE HAM DEALER 

ICOM IC-T30 



»feNAGHDO rgyjOb 



ROBOT soa 



ORAlUiL lfi7URi 



v*ESU FTTH? 



Featuring Kenwood. Yaesu, Icom, Drake. Ten-Tec. Swan. Dentron, Alpha, Robot, 
MFJ. Tempo, Astron, KLM, Hy Grain. Mosley, Larsen. Cushcraft, Hustlef. Mini 
Products, Bird. Mirage, Vibroplex, Bencher, Info-Tech. Universal Towers. 
Call b ook, ARRL, Astatic, Shure, CoMins, AEA We service everything wese//,' 

Write or call for quote. You Won't Be Disappointed. 
We are just a few mmutes of* the MYS Thru way (1-90) Exit 32 



out OF StATE 
OROEftlOLLFfitE 

800-44S-9338 



ONEIDA COUNTY AIRPORT TERMINAL BUILDING 
ORISKANY NEW YORK 13424 



Bob- WA2MSH 

A»^WA2MSI 



m-'See it St of Adveftmers on paga f3Q 



73Magazme • March. 1982 145 





Are you on the verge of drowning in the flood of 
technical information about computers in the 
marketplace? Wayne Green Inc. can help! 
Desktop Computing is here, and each month will 
explain all about computers without the "com- 
puterese/' 

Desktop Computing will cut through the tet^mi- 
cal hocus-pocus to bring you all the 
information you need to take advantage 
of the computer ajje. Thousands of 
businessmen, like yuurself are saving an 
amazing amount of money as they find out 
that CKjmputers du things faster, provide 
access to more information, 
and allow a smaller staff 
to do more work. 
You can provide 
more services at a 
lower cost than 
you have ever been 
able to do before, 
Now^ is the time for 
you to get in on the 
savings with the "plain 
language" information that 
onK Desktop Computing 
can offer vou. 




323B6 




The real bargain is that all the "plain language" 
information you need about computers is available 
lor only $24.97 for a 12 issue, year subscription 
that is tax deductible! 

To order, fill in the coupon below. A photocopy 
of the coupon is acceptable. Introduce your friends 

to D^ktop Computing — it 
makes a great gift! We accept 
Mastercard, Visa, American 
Express and personal checks or 
money orders. If you're not 
delighted with Desktop 
Computing, we'll refund 
^ the unused balance of 

your subscription. 
Take advantage of this 
no- risk offer today* 
After all, bow- 
often does your 
own personal 
oasis come along? 

Mail coupons to: 

Desktop Computing 

Subscriptioas 

Box 917 

Farmingdale, NY 11737 

Ont" year, 12 iSJiU«i of Desktop Computing, only 

$24.07. Your first issiif will arrive after ruct'ipt of pay- 

nit*nt, Canadiiin. Qni' yfiir,'U,S. funds finly S27.97. 

Fort'ipi surfatv ime year 'U.S. funds only S44.97. 

Forcit^ air It mil « please inqiitiiv 



'^j '**^ 





^^■ 



Desktop Computing 

ForYtaii: 

n Checb money tirckr D Majstcrcard D Visa 

O Amerieafi Express 



Desktop Computing 

For a Friend £ 



32306 t 



NifiM 



Ptease enter a subscription as my gift toi 






SUte_ 



yjp. 



Address 
Qtv _ 



iUte. 



2^. 



I 



SlgnAturc 



£ip D*te. 



J[it«tniik| 



I 



1^ IDO 



my SOT WANT A t ll-T CARD EN CLOSED IS Ml N AME. 



Bm 917, Farmingdale, m* 11737 PLEASE SEND IN BOTH COUPONS WHEN ORDERING FOR A FRIEND. 



1 



146 73 Magazine • March. 1962 



KD-44'* 

P^rflboht Reineclot Kit 



$54.95 




A low coflt, high quflliTy 
alternative To snd'W sleds 
and vagia. 44'" drameffir. 2 
piQf^r durable lig^ifMcjtjht 
sieef csnst Includes Imd 
^>"^T' n-i3c*wet. IPS— an hard- 

i}(C9^i|en>l tCK weathef salel- 

hm and 1296 MHi expen 

Our kit aUo cQmea in 
a 2 ft. ftife with 19 db 
gain- ONLY f 24, 50 



TERMS: L>- fc . Money OfCtef. Visa '. 
iiRflCOD fAd[li2l m^m 
•z^^mitaf on dhsckA StupfiPin^ 
g ctwfges COD by UPS 



PHomt 



QnoiBB 



I efCard 



VISA 



post ijtiifT^s p<^e-paid ^irH bank cards AJi 
WELCOME ptft*js &ub|ect to chon^je without notice. 




AMATEUR KfTS 

MH2 COJVVEHTEH KIT. , , ^,-.. ♦, 

jririuriasi PC r>iTjfTf pni«! h I'lfiUMuTion menual 



00 



9£l£CTlVE PJIEAIWP,. 

Fnr use wtTti aboM conveficr Tfiifi tire 



,, 144.50 

•n J!t30 blT LL'tfLxd ^!lt' 



■''•'.^^nJtn iMi L:£p'n^pyi<4E^uj&, <GA3^ '-TV^ :^y|, tf^ [jii'- 



OELUX£ 2a» MK2 COPfVEHTEfl KIT 
4rt« , rtuicir. ■ t «mi3iiher aru) no ' 



»49S 

1»^ 



larV STATIOfVARV POWEFi SUPPLY , . $24M 

pQt Him vwtti rj^iNnff CiJJWBrlif* scj.ri ^Oc i[ir piodurt Irnjct^iu'* 

COMtlSIG SOOIM 
101 MMZ WEATHER SATEUlTI CONVERTED KFT NOME TWRO 
STATIOM WITH POLAR MOUNT 




TEXAS MICROTRONICS 



PO BOX 14116 

A«UNGTOW, TEXAS 76013 

B17-S60'5440 



^328 



[b¥IR 70 lIAiOsWLftND^ MOBILE, 
IN STOCK M RADIO 



Ful Service Shop •Spectrum Analysis •Antennas 
New amf Used Equipment •CW-SSB*FM. Elc^ •Towers 
FCC Study Guides aCode Tapes •Books 'Accessories 



ICOM 



SHORTWAVE 



CLOSED 
SUNDAYS. 
HQUDXrs 



HOURS 

MON.TUES, WED. 
9:30-6:00 PM 



THURS. Fill. 
S 30aDOPM 



Specialists in Amateur Radio, 
Short-Wave Listening 
And Contemporary 

Electronic Gear. 



SAT.: 9:30-3iM] PM 



T7TTT 



INC 



1009 GAUFIELD ST. oak PAPK, IL. 60304 



(312)848-6777 



« 




HANOI 

CON 

V 




MONITORS 
154 158 
159 -" 163 



EXPAND YOUR HORIZONS 
WITH 



VHF H.T. 
CONVERTERS 



DOUBLE BAND COVERAGE 
MULTI-BAND & MULTI-CHANNELLED 

MONITORING WITH SCANNING H.T 'a 
2400 CHANNEL CAPABILITY 
SINGLE 3«- POSITION CONTROL 

OFF" RETURNS TO NORMAL 

TRANSCEIVER OPERATION 
LOW LOSS COUPLING TO ANTENNA 
STANDARD MALE/FEMALE BNC 

CONNECTION 
USES SINGLE AAA CELL 
fil- LATERAL PROTECTION AGAINST 

ACCIDENTAL TRANSMISSION 
FOR UP TO 5 WATTS 
size - 2,25 X 1.5 x 1.4 inchfts 
weight - 4.5 ozs. 



M- SQUARED 



#^ 



>5 



HAND! 
CON 
U2 



u 




$ 47.45 

IncL shipplrig 
Calif. S.5% tcj 



ENGINEERING, 

1446 LANSING AVE. ^ 
SAN JOSE, CA. 95118 



JNC 



it 



DEALER PACKAGES 
AVAILABLE 



LOOK FOR US IN 
DAYTON" 



^77 



MONITORS 
460-464 
480-404 

Introducmg «t 

DAYTON 
HAMVENTION 



CLUB 
DISCOUNTS 




YAESU I 

Sup&i 

450 FM 

Chwwt 

SAVE 
$125 



YAESU FT'404R 450 MH/ Hirat-li€ld S»k cryy 
channels wittiin a 3 MHz (lij of 5 UHi (ne| spread. ^ 
to 450 MHz. 2'ti^/2CK)mw output Wth NiCad hatte . 
pac^i. wall charger, flex antenna, case, strap, earptione 
& 446 mHz simplex. 7^'i"h * 2H V « n'% 1 lb. 

Regular $299 - Closeout$f79^^ 

FT-404R/TTP same features as FT'404R above, plus a 
factory instaM t&bu^n ToucfitDne pad. 

Regular $325 - ClOBeout$199^^ 

NC-IA i5^hr drop in charger Saie S44.95 

NC 3A DropHn chgr /AC adaptor ..Sale 79.95 

FBA 1 (^srtery sleeve for NC 1A/3A ...8.00 

FP4B4 Extra NiCad battery pack..„„ 23.00 

PiC-9B Extra Ib-Ut walkhafgir .„„. , 10.00 

?k-l Mobile DC-DC adaptor & charpr 39.00 

YII-24A Speaker/microphone 39,00 

FTS^3ZE 32 tone CICSS encoder.. ,.. 40.00 

RS-SZEO 32 lone CTCSSenc/dec 75.00 

Le^tn 8 r ca rryi (i£ cas^ .^....,,.,^,,«.^,, «»,«,«.,.,. s^smj 
MMBIO Mobile bracket....,..,,.....,. 15.00 

Crystal Certificates (2 per channel required) 
are $5.00 ^i h when purchased WITH FT-404 
or FT-404R/TTR Purchased separately they 
are $8.00 each (no exceptions}. 



NEW FT-208R 

Synth. 2m FM HT 

SAVE $59 

Reg. $359 
Sale $29995 

Accessories.* 

KG-? DesltchargEf ..,.......$53^1 

NC-8 Qyickd€S*schtfgef,... «?" 
PA'3 MotJile adapter chgr... 39^ 

fNB'Z Extra battery 29"° 

F8A-Z Ban. sleeve -NC-7/8.. 6** 
fBA3Sleeve;20SR/W3A.„.lP| 

iCC-8 Carrying case 39^- 

VII-24A Speaker/mic. .39'^ 




Quanttty Umrted Stnd Chech or Money Order. For 
prompt shiprrtent. call TOLL FREE l-flOO SS8 0411 
and use MASTERCARD or VISA: COD orders O.K. 
Allow ly^^ for UPS shippini charges ■ 4S States 

AMATEUR 

ELECTRONIC SUPPLY^ 

4828 W. Fond du Uc Avenue 

Milwaukee. Wisconsin S3216 

Phone: (414) 442-4200 

Wisconsin WATS: %800- 242-5 195 

Nationwide WATS: 1-800-558-0411 

A£S BfwfKtf &tofn tfK Clearwater. FL • 
Qrjando. f L * Wrcktiffe, OH * L35 Vegas NV 



K'nSee Uif of Advertisers an page 130 



JSMagaime * March, 1982 147 



TEN-TEC Solid-state Transceivers - Low AES Prices 










« I 



TEN'TEC Model 546 OMNf/Seriei-C Ali solid-state. 
ZOO Witt SSa/CW Hf Tramceiver 9 HF bands. 160-lOni 
mduiJing 10. 18 & 24.5 Mhz & 10 MHz WWV- 40 KHz VFO 
overrun. Instant band chan|e^ no tune-up. 100% duty 
cycle, 2D min, Digital readout, m 0.43" LEDs - reads to 
100 Hz. Mosfet rf amp,, sensitivity 0.3 uV for 10 dtj S + 
N/N fatiD. 90 dB dynamic range; 18 dB attenuator for 
strong local signals 8-pole lA KHz SSB lilter. 1.7 shape 
factor @ 6/60 dB and audto active filter Select standard 
SS8 filter, optional 1.8 KHz SSB filter m optional CW fitter 
plus 450 Hz or 150 Hz of audio fillenng 50 d6 notch rifter , 
± 500 Hz & ± 4 KHz offset tuning. 2-speed QSK mslanl 
bfeakin. VOX or PTT, adjustable thresfiold ALC, S/SWR 
metef, sidetone, Hi-Z mic input, built m spkr= 12-14 
VDC/ \Zk 5V'h « Wn"m « I4"d. 14^ lbs. 

Regular $1289 - Safe Price $1059 




6e 



OMNi Accessones: 

280 ISA power supply /fte^ $169) 

255 Delune ps w /speaker iReg $199)... 

217 500 Hz 8 pole CW fill (Reg $55}.... 

218 IB KHz 8 pole SSe ftH (Reg. $55) .. 

219 250 Hz S-pote CWfMter fA^, $55) .. 
243 Remote VFO (Reguiar $J89)....^.... 
1140 DC Circuit breaker, 



SALE S152« 
SALE 179** 
SALE 4y* 



SALE ler* 




TEN-TEC Model 444 HERCULES All So«id^SlitE. KW 
Uneaf Ampiiher lor 160 to 15 meters - 1.8 to 21,5 MHz 
with provisions fot 4 Aun bands Broadtianded. no tune^ 
^p, instant break-in, 1000 watts input, 500-600 watt^ 
output typfcalp all bands; 50 watts drive. Duty cycle - SSB 
Continuous voice modulation; CW/RTTY: 50%, 5 minutes 
ma)(imym key down. Manual bandswitchmg. or automatic 
when using the OMNI. Separate 45 VDC @ 24 A power 
supply and built-m control power supply, forced air 
cooled, automatic line voltage correction and exciter by 
pass, two meters \m collectof l-^E and lorward/reverse 
power, ad| ALC, 6 LHD monitors AmplifitrS^'h" 16"** 
ISb'd. 22 lbs: Supply: Iri'h - 15^^'w ^ I34"d, 50 lbs 

Regular $1575 - Sale Price $1349 



TEN-TEG Modil 580 DELTA All soiidstale. 200 watt 
SSB/CW Hf Transcei^r 9 HF binds. 160- 10m including 
10. 18 & 24.5 Mhz & 10 UHl WWV. 40 KHz VFO overrun, 
Enstant band change, no tune up 100^ duty cycle. 20 
minutes Oigilal readoyt si)( 0.3* L£Os - reads to 100 Hz. 
Sensitivity 3 uV for 10 db S + N/N. B5 dB or better 
dynamic range. 8poleZ4KHz SS8 lilter and audio active 
filters. Select the standard SSB filter, standard SSB filter 
with one section of audio litter, optional 250 Hz or 500 Hz 
CVrf ftlter Of CW filter with four audio active filter sections, 
50 db notch, 1 1 Kfiz offset tuning. QSK instant break-in, 
VOX o: PIT. adj. AGO & drive, 20 db atten , S/SWR meter, 
extra receiver jack, sidetorve. Hi I mic. input builtm spkr. 
1244 VDC/ ISA. 4^i"h - 11 Vw* 15'd. 124 lbs 

Regufar $869 - Sale Price $769^^ 

DELTA Accessories; 

280 1 8A power supply {Reg, S J 69) .... 

255 Delu)te ps w/speaker (Reg. $199). 

283 Remote VFO fReg. 57 a9j 

285 50D Hz 8 pole CVy filter) 

282 250 Hz S'pok CW filter ...,....„.*,,. S0°° 

289 Noise blanker. .,,..«««..«<««.*«*.N.....^<t.>>-' 3!9' 
645 Dyal paddle l^yer (Reg $85) .-,... Sate 79* 
1140 DC circuit breaker .^^ 10" 



5a/e f 52" 

jew 




TEN- TEC Model 515 ARGONAUT All solid-state. 5 watt 
{QflPp] SSB/CWHF Transceiver 5HF bands, 80 10m plus 
10 & 15 mi vmv m tune, broad banded fmal - mstant 
band change Analog diaL 4-pole 2 4 KHz crystal SSB titer. 
Typ^cal receiver sensdivrtv 35 uV fof 10 db S * N/N 
'a^o Buillin SWR/S meter QSK insUnt CW break-ifi and 
PTT on SSB + 4 KHz offset tuning, adiustable sidetone. 
builtin speaker, Hi-Z mic input, LED output and offset 
indicator. 12-14 VOC @ lA. AW ^ 13"w - n% 6 lbs, 

Regular $469 - Sale Price $399^' 

ARGONAUT Accessor ies: 

210/E nO/230v - I^/IA power supply...... 39^ 

206A Eitefnal 25 KHz caftbiator... ..,.Z^^ 

208A Eiternal Notch & 150 Hz CWhtter. .......... Iff" 

212 'S^l^b MHz crystal ,.,..,„ 5" 

213 29.5-30 MHz crystal ...,., ^ 



SAVE $800 ^ TEN-TEC P^i€4afe t>mlf 

546C OMNI-D (C) • 255 Power supply/speaker • 243 Remote 
VFO • 234/214 Processor/microphone •217 500 Hz CWf filer • 
218 18 KHz SSB filter • 645 keyer « 444 HERCULES linear 

Joial Regular Price $3625 - Package Price $2825 




Tf N'TEC Model 525 ARGOSY All solHf-state, 10/100 
watt SSB/CW Hf Transceiver 6 HF bands SO'IOtti 
mcludingthe new 30ffl band & 10 MHz WVtfV; 40 kHz VFO 
overrun on each band edge. Switchable, 10 watts or 100 
watts input lOO'^i duty cycle, 20 minutes. Instant band 
change, broad banded, no receiver front end or final 
tuning. Analog djal accurate to + 2 kHz. 4 pole 2.5 KH; 
crystal SSB filter, sensitivity 03uVfor lOdb S+ N/N ratio. 
Meter shows for ward/ reverse power, SWR and received 
signal strength. Offset turning ± 3 KHz, notch filler, QSK 
instant CW break m and PTT on SSB, sidetone, adjustable 
Ate 12^14 VOC @ 9A. 4^h « 9b"w- ird. 8 tbs 

Regular $549 - Sate Price $499^ 

ARGOSY Accessories: 

22S 9A power supply (Regutaf $129).,.. SALE $119*= 

2 17 500 Hz a pole CW fiit (Reg. $55).. .... SALE 43«^ 

2! 8 IS KHz 6-pole SSB filter (Reg. $55).. SALE 

219 bOO Hz 8 pole CW filter fReg $55) .,, SALE 

220 2.4 KHz 8 pole SSB filL (Reg. $55)... SALE 
222 Mobile mount,.... 



49fl^ 

49^5 

49»^ 
2509 

223 Noise blanker , _.., 34« 



■ * * « t p ■ ■ ***m ri ■ ■!■ »« ■■■««'«- 1 



W'm ■* r m f- »'* * * m * * w 9 9 *<r* t 



34* 
3y» 



224 Audio CW filter..,,. 

226 25 KHz crystal calibrator.... ....>., ,. 

1125 OC circuit breaker 

1126 Linear amphfaef switching kit 

Of her >^ccessor/es; 

234 Speech processor fReg, 5T39J. SALE S124« 

^4 Electret microphone for 234 39^ 

20S 300 watt dry dummy load *.,.., 26*° 

215 Ceramic microphone with plug,. 29" 

215PC Ceramic mic w/plug & coil cord 34" 

227 18-30 Mhz. 2l}0w !yr>er (Reg. S79/,...SAL£ 72*^ 

228 Tuner, as abv w/SWR (Reg $95)...- SAU «5»* 

229 2 KW tuner/ SWR br (Reg $229) ...SALE 224'^ 
645 Dual paddle keyer (Reg $85) .„„.., SALE 79** 
670 Single paddle keyer„..... .....„, l^ 

AES has Over 24 Years of 
Experience in Mait Order 




Wast crCofd 




Ordei direct from lliis ad. Send Check or Honey Order. To 
tMpedite prompt shipment Call TOLL FREE l-tOO-SSS- 
04 ir and use Mastercard or VISA,: phone COD orders 
accepted. Prices do not incltidt shipping chargis. 

•Milwaukee Headquarters will answer the 
Nationwide WATS line 1-800-556-0411 until 
8 pm CST Monday thru Thursday. 

New AES Branch Store: Clearwater, FL 
1698 Drew St. • Phone (813) 461-4267 

HOURS: Mon, Tue Wed & Fn 9-5:30 Ttiurs 9^8; Sat 9-3 

ii*i V^^^ A C'e^'H jfer j>rore^ f>ot open Jhundt^ cvemitf^J 



Call Toll Free: 1 -800-558-04 1 1 '" *""''" '''Sm.^Tenr """ '"" 

AMATEUR ELECTRONIC SUPPLY.. 

4828 W. Fond du Lac Avenue. Milwaukee. Wl 53216 - Phone (414) 442-4200 

AES BRANCH STORES ASSOCIATE STORE 



Inc. 



WICKLIFFE. Ohio 44092 

28940 Euclid Avenue 

Phone (Z16) 585-7388 

Ohio Wats 1-800-362-0290 

Outside Ohio 1-800-321-3594 



ORUKOO Florida 32803 

621 Commonwealth Ave. 

Phone (305) 894-3238 

Fla. Wats 1-800-432-9424 

Outside Fla. 1-800-327-1917 



LAS VEGAS. Nevada 89106 

1072 N. Rancho Drive 

Phone (702) 647-3 U4 

Pete. WA8P2A & Squeak. AD7K 

Outside Nev 1-800-634 6227 



ERICKSON COMMUNICATIONS 

CHICAGO. Illinois 60630 

5456 N. Milwaukee Avenue 

Phone (312) 631-5181 

Outside ILL 1-800-621-5802 



148 73Magazme • Marcnj982 




■ JS^ Bfflg g 



•*•••• 



STAR IS BORN 



• *•••* 



ii IcIeaJ lor H&vh:s^, SWL's 

and seasoned amateurs 
if 8uJU-in code practice 

Osciliaror St speaker 
* 12 VOC Operatfon or 

120 VAC wkh adapcer 
provicfed 
^ Opijon&l serial /p^r^l lei 
ASCII o VI put port 
CaM or write for brochure or 

CODE+STARTMKit 

CODE* STAR Wired , , . , 

Optional ASCH Output Port Kit . . - . 
Optional ASCM Output Port Kit Wired 




# Copifri MOfie, Bmidot 
ai ASCII codes 

Two opiirntied Mofse 
ranges 

Digital & Analog fOtaring 
ivith T6dbAGC 

# Automatic spti#d tracking 
3 ^ 70 WPA* 

. . CS-K $169.95 
. . CSF $249.95 
. CS'IK $ 69.95 



fSpecrfy 110 or 300 Baud and 20mA or TTU level) ....*,.,,.. .CSiF % 89,95 
Send check or mor^ey order. Use your VISA or MasterCard. Add S5. 00 shipping and 
handling for continental U.S, Wisconsin residents add 4% State Sales Tax. 






Corporation T«l«phone: (414k 241 8144 

P, O. Box 51 3G, Thiensville, Wisconsin 53092 



DOUBLE BAZOOKA 
COAXIAL ANTENNA 

Injection Molded Plastic Fittings for Strength, 

Durability and Weatiier-proof ing. 

Broad Banded Low VSWR 

No Tuner or Balun Required 

Feed With Any Length 50 Ohm Coax 

Power Handling Capacity - Two Kw 

Not A Kit - Beady For Use - Made in USA 

Steei Eyeietts For installation and SO-239 

Fitting Are Molded Into Antenna 

80 or 40 Meter ,.,. 49.95 aa. 

20, 15, or 10 Meter.„, ..»- 44.95 ea. 





^imHP gain systems 



D P^ytnent enclosed J 

D VISA CMC 
Card no . Enp. 

Sig nat ure 

N erne 



date. 



10-07 Cyptss ^9g 

Wesi MoflfC)*. La nasi 






Add re Be. 
City 



, State- Zip. 



■^ 




RTTY/C\A/ 

For theTRS-BO 



' A Trademarh of the Tandy Corp 




ROIVI-116 

RnV/CW Operating System 

Detatied brochure a^aiiable on request 



1200 BAUD OPERATION. Not limited lo HObaud be- 
cause of timing loops. 60, 56, 75 & 100 W.PM. 
Plus 1 10. 150. 300. 600 & 1200 baud operations 
possible. 

FLEXABILtn OF OPERATION- Instantly change Baud 
Rates. Program Mode (ASCII/baudot), Program Status. 
SPLIT SCREEN VIDEO. Transmit & receive data dis- 
played separately, 

REAL TIME. Automatic CW/ID withoul user interven- 
tion. Automatically updates ^* - - 
at end of month or year, 

nicroPrcKlucts 



Othen featLjr^s 
inctude: 

Two Serial Pons 

Fourteen Buffers 

Automatic CW ID 

Transmit Control 

Selective CaJ I Feature 

Error Correction 

Word Wrappmg 

Easy To Interface 

30 Day Unconditional Guaraniee 

Hardware requirements: TRS-30 

ModeMorS 16K 
External terminal unit. 



606 State Street. P.O. Box 892-R» Marysville, WA 98270 • (206) 659-4279 



See LiBt of Advertisers an pag* 130 




INTRODUCtNG THE 

CES 500SA 

SIMPLEX 

AUTOPATCH 

The First Affordable 
Private Pfione Patch 



As ilescrlbed In 73 Miguine. G/81. 



Now, tor me first timef Every amatdur 
operator can enjoy the unpafalieiled freedofu 
of a private phor)B patch in an economicaf 
package^ 

JM dramatic new CES 500SA Autopatch is all 
the equipment you need to patch an FM base 
station to youf tome or other telephone line, 
without expensive repeater, ca/Hies. or other 
equipment. Connections with any standard 
FM base statior^ are rapid and simple. 

Bypass the congestion and expense of shared 
repeaters — break through to greater privacy 
and convenience wjlti the new CES 500SA 
Aiitopatch. 



COHERENCE IM 
COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLO<iY 



CES 

COMMUNICATIONS ELECTRONICS 
SPECIALTIES^ Inc. 

RO. Box 507 

Winter Park. Florida 32790 
Telephone: {305} 645-0474 



73f^3gaime * March, 1982 149 







ICOM 



WINTER SALE 

Now! EEB Is The Only 

ICOM Authorized 

Service Center 

In The 

North 

East 




Buy With 
^ Confidence 

AT YOUR SERVICE 



Dick 

Oartny 

Curtis 

Scott 

Larry 

Ned 

George 



ICOM 

fC2AT 

IC 3AT/4AT 
IC25A 



'K4EIH 

-WA4SDE 

^WB4K2L 

'WB2YSY 

-MLB 

'K4SYF 

■W4EV 

Mary Ellen 

Cheryl 

FULL ICOM 
LINE ON SALE 

NiT SALE 

% 269.50 S242.55 

S 299.60 $269.55 

S 349 $314.00 

% 629 S729.00 



IC 730 DC 

$40,00 factory rebate eip. Feb 27th 

Your cost win t>e S689.00 

IC 720ADC $1349 Si t99.00 

fC251A $ 749 5669,00 

IC290A S 549 5489.00 

IC451A I 899 5779,00 

FULL YAESU LINE ON SALE 



FT2O0R 

FT708R 

FT 707 

FT 101MKJII 

FT290R 

FR7700 

FT902DM 

FT-ONE 



$ 
$ 
$ 
5 

$ 
% 



359 95 

359 95 

dio 

92S 
399 

549 
51535 
12995 



$323.00 
S323.00 

S729,00 
$799.00 
5359.00 
$479.00 
$1379.00 
S2J9&00 



Becoming your^l Amateur Store. 
Visit us on your nex t trip to 
Wasliingtoa. DC. 



order desk 

(800) 336-8473 

prices subject to change 

Tue-Sat 
10am-4pm EST 

Technical information, 
VA orders (703) 938-3350 
Store opens 10dm Tues-Sat 
Close 5pm Tues, Wed, FrI, 
Close 9pm Thurs, 4pm Sat 




Ob 




516 Mill Street, N.W. 

Vienna, Virginia 22180 

ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT 
BANK 



GOTHAM 
ANTENNAS 

(81 3) 584-8489 

SMALL tor TBAP DIPQIES 

MODEL BAN OS LQTH 

TSL 8040 10.40 71' 

TSL4020 40,20.15 *fl* 

SMALL LOT SHOHTENEO DIPOLES 



mmtt* itiMqt 




BO.49,20. 

15.10 

110 



7i" 



SI-8D10 

SL IftO 

SLIO 

SL-40 40.tS tT 

FULL SIZE PABALLEl DIPOLES 



FPO A010 
FPO-4010 



80 10,20. 130' 



PRICE 
149 95 
S47.3S 



SS9JS 
S35,95 



S49 9S 
S44,95 



NEW' PORTASLE VERTICAL? ^DE AL FOR 

APARTWENTS. CAMPINO>TRAIL£ftS! 

FqI4i to S' Piehigi No Ri^itli Rtqgirad 
Fu»ty Ats«mbiid Full Ltgil Liniit. M VSWR 

MOOEL iA^^DS KQHT PRICE 

PV'«atO M-10 ia 159.95 

PROVEN DESION-QOTHAM ALL BAND 
VERTICALS 



V 160 

veo 

V40 



180e0.40.a0, 23' 
15,10,8 

8DJ0.20 33' 

15.10 6 
40.20,15.10 8 2T 



S3995 
137 JS 
S15JS 



FAMOUS GOTHAM QUADS 
^ 2 El •mint! — 3 Off rid t CofTiplatt ft t§:95 

CHAMPIONSHIP GOTHAM BEAMS 
Full Sill Compltti from 170.95 

CALL OR SEND LARGE SASE FOR CATA^ 
LOG Shipping Dipatts i VtrtfcAli 
S2.50 ySA.S7 DO C^mdi: 15,00 FPO. APD 
B*»nif & Ouidf Shipptcj UPS or Frtigni 

Corrtct fit- HS6 <''e Siiit t»a 
P.O. Sox 776 • Largo> FL 33540 




803 N. Main 
Evi ntirillt J N 47711 

TEN^TEC 

546 0mnl^CXcvr SIOSO 

580 Delta 760 

525 Argosy 460 

280 Power Supply 150 

255 Power Supply/Speaker 170 

243VFO-OmnJ 169 

2Q3 VFO-Deita t69 

2 34 Speec h Proc 6 ssor 1 25 



SANTEC 
HT 1200 2m Hand Held 



249 



.-:^-<. MBA R&ader 

A£Alsopole144MHz 

A2DEN PCS* 3000 

AZDEM PCS'300 2m Hand Held 

BUTTERNUT HF6V 

HALCWR-665A 

HY-GAINTH7 

HY-GAINHamlVRoiator 

HYGAlNTairtwisisf Rotator 

I00M2AT 

ICOM 3AT 

ICOM4AT 

KLMKT34XATrlbander 



270 

36 

290 

call 
call 
call 
obH 
169 
239 
235 
270 
270 
475 




812-422-0231 -**' 

MON-FHI flAM-^FM • SAT 9AM-3PWI 



■p* 4' 2 rirc *5_ Z' 



I 



look here 



call toll free:nights 
1-800-231-3057 

6-^10 PM CT, M.W.F. 
days 1-713-658-0268 

ICOM IC 3AT/IC 4AT 269 00 ea 

IC 25A 309.00 

IC 730 699 00 

IC 2AT 249,00 

IC 22U ..,...,.. . 269.00 

Santec HT 1200 , 269 00 

ST 144UP.,.,,,, 299,00 
Tolrax 10% Off Ltsi on Stock ftems 
Drake TR5 995,00 



. 1 299.00 
-.169.00 
..115.00 
. . 269.00 



R7/DR7 ...... , 

Morsematic 

OKI Contest 

MBA-RO Reader 

Order KWM380 . «3095 00 

& 2 Free Filters 
High Serial Numbers, AJl Mods 
HygainTQ7DX .399 00 

Amphenol Silverplate 

PL259 ..,. I.OOea 

Antique ^ rare Tufc^es ..,,., Call 

Timex 24 Hoyr Walldocfc 24 95 

Robot 800A 749.00 

400 675 00 

Hal Ct2iao 699 00 

KB2100 ,,, , .159 00 

NawCWR6a5A Teiereader S75 00 

Cubic 103 1195 00 

Sird 43, Siugs ..,.,, Stock 

Drake Theta 7000 ..,..*;.,. 996,00 
Balden 9405 Heayy Duty Rotor 

Cable 2^16. 6ff18 45C/ft, 

Befden 8214 RG-8 Foam 36C/ft. 
Balden 9258 RGBk Mini'Coax19C/ft. 
Batden S267 RG 213 
Non Contam Jacket , . - 43C ft 

Alliance HD73 1 09 95 

Large Bookstore 
10^0 Off Curtis. Sherwood. PaJomar 
Call Quotes Kenwood TS830S« 

TSS30S. TS130S. New 

We Want Special Orders! 



Yaesu 
Spvciali 

^4i 



ill ■■.....>>^i... ^w ^3 -J \J\J 

FT 707 ,.,., .,649 00 

FT lOIZD/Mark 3 ., 749 00 
FT 208R 289 00 

MASTERCARD VISA 
AH Dr«ces fob Houiiion. e«.ceprt Mhe^e tndicaied Fricvs 
subttd to changv wtt^ouT ncnicii. all lieTis guararitMd 
Somfl rt»ms ftubtsct pnor s«f« ^enas reiic]«nis add 6% 
tan PloB^e add sufficient postage, balance cottact 




Etectronics Supply 

1508McKinney 
Houston, Texas 77010 



150 73 Magazine • March, 1982 



For the best deal on 

AEA* Alliance* AmecD* ASP* Bslden 
BBncher«Blr(l»CDE*CES* Collins 

Communications Speciallsls*Cub)c 
Cus)icralt*Dalwa«OenTrori« Drake 
HAL*HusJfer»Hy Gain^lcom^IRL 
KLM«Kantronics*Kanwood 
LarEan«MaGrotronics*MFJ 
Mlni-Proeiycta* Mirage^NPC* Nye 
Panasonlc^Patomar Engineers 
Hflgancy*Bobot«Shur9*SDny 
Standard* Tempo* Tan-Tac 
• Transcom*Yaesy 

MARCH'S 
BEST BUYS 

DRAKE TR7/DR7HFxcvr 
timited quantity $1299 

DRAKE R7/DR7 HF rcvr 
limited quantity SI 299 

DRAKE'S new TR5 all 
band xcvr $985.95 

YAESU FT-208R compact 
2-m hand-held $299.95 

HALCWR-685Atelereader 

terminal $899.95 

ICOM IC-2AT 220 MHz 
hand-held $269.95 

Quantities limited,., all prices subject to 
change without notice 

Wb always have an exceHent 
assortment af fine used eguip- 
mant in stock... Come in or call 

CALL TOLL FREE 

(outildt IIHnolt onljf) 

(800) 621-5802 

HOURS: 9:30-5:30 Mon., Ttiti.. W«d. & Ffl, 



nv* 



9:30-9:00 Thuridty 
9:00-3:00 Saturday 



ERICKSON 

COMMUNICATIONS 

Chicago. IL 60630 

5456 North Milwaukee Ave. 
(3t2| 631 5181 iwtitimimnoisi 




• CB 

I Standard 
2 meter 
Scanners 
, Amateur Bands 
v\J ' General Communication 
yfy^* Industry 
y^* Marine VHF 
^ • Micro processor crystals 

seno 10* for oun^iESi cara/og, writB or 

pnonB for more aewis. 





RO.iox 06017 

Ft Mvers. Florida 33906 

ail phones (813) 956-2397 



4l0fR0N ANTENNAS 

THE BEST THINGS 
come in I if tie packages... 

FOR 80-40^20 METERS 






NEEDS NO RAOIALS OR 
MATCHINQ DEVICES 



isoTftONao 

54 IMHIGH 



tSOTftON 40 
31 IN. HiGH 



fSOTRON 20 
T7 IN- HIGH 




ON PERFORMANCE 



►•ii-^i 



SMALL ON SPACE 

BILAL COMPANY 



K-1 



STAR ROUTE 



(303j 687-3219 ^10 

FLOftfSBANT CO 80616 



E^QSE 



CABLE TV 
CONVERTERS 

AND OTHER 
GOOD STUFF T 



*^9t 



SMASHir^G ALL SALES RECORDS - OUR NEW 
30 CHANNEL CA8L£ TV CONVfRTIR' 






^''" »-?i" 



HOt fitVt IMPORT- REMOTE CONTROL 
30 CHANNEL CABLE TV CONVlftTER! 

If CliS*! ♦•moM TV 

ri« 'i ^ f** 1jni-ip ccirnll 

IM n N ° ' IE4V AJTA 

ITCOMKSTWmfLISS- 

THE ULTlMATf CABLE TVCONVlRTEH' 



^ 3t*i*om 



I s^^^y 



lOO 



V^DCOR 2000 CONVERTER fUlMlMATESPROSLEMS 
WHEN VIOEOTAPINO FROM CABLE TV 



will in h«rEti-r^ toothm 
^14 JNVJiSEiD 



VlDCOR 
tOQB 



hBHU-CC 



UNUSUAL FACTORV SURPLUS 
MrO BAND - SURIR BAND CABLE TV TUNER 



-. fc 



nKPHa t 9bn« ukr« cif^m 

IPWPV i: H* IMVAW 



I It J IK 



mn V^L JVH 



AMMl^^' II M 



FACTORY SURPLUS UHF TUNEIIS 

95 



lino 



nnvt'irt, rtc Ma. WlUOH 



MINIATURE FM WIRELESS MICROPHONE 

.95 






QUARTER -MILE WIRELESS MICROPHONE 
h RECEIVER SVSTEM 



I 'ft 






FACTORY SURPLUS VHF / UHF 
"TWIIV' VARACTOR TUNSRS! 






miM^INGi NORELCO ENDLESS LOOP CASSETTES 



■;-iti ■ * 



•-- J. j,^.^ 






9 mntiw ^ N9 JUvMOfli 



1^ 



]N STOCK -THEMURA 
CORDLESS TELEPHONE SYSTEMT 



\ 






SALE OF OUARTZ BATTfRV 
OPE RATI C LOCK MOVEMENTS' 



^rj^- 



95 



■<b* 



^*ln Of-"*'* '*-i iJ-L ft»- St 



I n tfl-iii h 



20 AMf REOULATED 12V0C FQWER SUPPLY* 



Tur-r* 'iU'B. S&& 



J14Vi*gS ■! ir--ir ■; r^-ei ISJ ^ Si* g «■ l|^ 



OUR LATEfT li ^ACf 
CA5C(:NiATtKQ CATAtfXi 



N 



ETCOELECTflOhlCS 

PtORTJH C-OUMTHV SHOPf^Flva CINTIB 



CTitik nPih nfdir, |»l«MPi Vni & JVlitiH'tartI OK Iftjprv, Hi C.aO.'i- A«li1 IS' 
roF U*l *■ rfinfliiif iti«*N nfur<rini\ fn V fm* ■•iiiwi'li HdiJ T' uf !n 

Of 411' & 'ilK^I inqu>i'i4l i»iiiii4t Gwr tEFaphdn^ fl^M' ll*tk -rtii«r fiBin 

t^. 1 Sift 5*1 BIDCI 




n 



CW-tO-RTTY 

and 
Hard Copy Too! 



I 
I 




WKantroirKs 





Micro-RTTY 

$299.95 Suge.f>rice 



T.M. 



Kantronlcs brings you 
the newest development 
In RTTY send /receive 
devices with the Micro- 
RTTY.- 

Micro-RTTY can in- 
stantly convert CW from 
any Keyer or CW key- 
board Into standard afsk 
two-tone RTTY or two- 
tone CW ID, 

Micro-RTTY supports 
hard copy: MX-80, Cen- 
tronix, Paper Tiger or 
even model 1 5 si 

Micro-RTTY sends and 
receives RTTY at 60. 67, 

75, and 100 WPM plus 
ASCI1 110 baud. 

Micro-RTTY will receive 
any shift of RTTY and 
display the message on 
ten big, bright f iorescent 
displays. An active 100 Hz 
fitter at 2295 Hz and a 
"tuning eye" make tun- 
ing fast and easy. Power 
is supplied by a 9 Vdc 
adapter thats Included. 

All these features, and 
more, are pacl<ed into a 
small IVi' by 5'* by 5V4" 
enclosure, 

see your Authorized 
Kantronics Dealer for a 
demonstration or write 
for a FREE brochure. 




£ Kantronics 



(913)842-7745 

1202 E. 23rd Street 
Lawrence, Kansas 66044 



at last - eveiythlng at your 

fingertips III 



*r»(» ■ 



$184 



Radio Equipment 
NOT Included 

F,O.B. Culver City 
(CA Residents add 6% sales tax) 



Bring ORGANIZATION & 

CONVENIENCE to your 
HAM Station! Eliminate 
clutter and provide lots of 
space for everything you 
need - Tuners, VFO, CW 
Keyers, Filters, Telephone, 
Log Book, Etc,,, 



ANGLED REAR SHELF 
ALL PARTS FITTED 
STURD Y CONSTR UCTTON 
WALNUT or PECAN FINISH 

Floor space: 39"w by 30'U 
Also: SV'w by 30"d - $199.50 

Dealers Inquiries Invited 



A Finely Crafted Piece of Fwnlture 

With a REAL Purpose . . . 

Call : (213) 837-4870 or Write for Information 

S-F Amateir Radio Services 

4384 Keystone Ave., Culver City, CA 90230 



^65 



Portable Communications 
Antennas 



For amateur and commercial services, 
the Val-Duckie communication anten^ 
nas boast 46 different modetSf from 
144 to 512 MHZ. Encapsulated in high 
gloss PVC plastic for weather re- 
sistance, all Val-Duckle antennas are 
100% factory tuned for mtnitnym 
VSWR and have a power rating of 35 
watts at 50 ohms. 




>^422 




S Bjwer-charger 

Valor*s New HT POWERCHARGER aliovtfs mobile 
amateurs to operate and recharge their hand held 
"- radios from the vehicle eleclrical system. 

The HT POWER^CHARGER ^ is not )ust a drop 
i ptng resistor and diode— but a pair of silicon tran 
^ sistors in a variable current regulator that is self 
\ adjusting, depending on the battery charge state. 



Model TR: 
Model FT- 
Model IC: 
Model TP: 
Model SA: 
Model WL: 



For Kenwood TR-2400 
For Yaesu FT 207R 
For loom 1C-2A 
For Tempo S1, S2, S4, S5 
For Santec HT^1200 
For Wilson Mill, MK-IV 



J 



leS ^. Hamilton St„ West Milton, OH 45383 

PH: (51 3J 698^4194, Outside Ohio: 1^800-543^2197, Telex 724-389 ATT: Valor 



152 ISMagazine • MarchJ982 




Introducing 



Mobile Connection 



YOUR OWN 
AUTO PATCH FOR 
SIMPLEX OPERATION 




ONLY 

$14995 



KIT 



Wired and Fully Tested 
SI 99.95 • Shipping S3,50 
inU SA •N YS. 
Residents add appropnate 
sales tax 

Hundreds already in operation * Call anyone— anywhere— anytime 

NOVAX interfaces your standard 2 meter; 220; 450; etc base station and DTMF 
(Touchrone^ Telephone, using a high speed scan switching technique so that you 
can direct dial from your aulomobile or with the HT from the backyard or poolside 
— aulDmalically. Easy mstailation Rtngfjack (reverse autopatch) option available 
for S29.95 k(t— S39 95 factory wired. 



• SMALL SIZE -(5" x 6" x 2") 

• STATE OF THE ART 
CIRCUITRY 12''16 VD.C. 

• ADJUSTABLE ACTIVITY TIMER 
(clears out tf mobile is out of range) 



EASY INTERFACING with radio audio 
& squelch circuit 

SINGLE DIGIT CONTROL 
(connect and disconnect) 

3 MIN. CALL DURATION TIMER 



TO ORDER— SEND Check— Money Order (MasterCard or Visa accepted) to: 
R.W.D. Inc., Orlskany. N.Y. 13424 or call (3l6)-829-2785 ^ 21 



^ 




HIGH STRENGTH 

FIBERGLASS 



AVAILABLE IN A COMPLETE 
RANGE OF KITS 

Sp«Cfal Instruction Mtnuil on 
Kirk's "Super Quads" $2.75 




• 2 3 4 EL£MEhHTfll BAND 
10 15 20 METER AMATEUR NET FROM $308.00 

• 234 ELEMENT DUAL BAND 
10 15 OR 10 6 METER AMATEUR NET FROM SI 80-50 

• 2 ELEMENT 40 METER AMATEUR NET $62B.20 

• VHF 4 ELEMENT 2 OR 6 METER 
AMATEUR NET FROM SI 16.10 



superIquad 

KITS 



2-3-4 
ELEMENTS 
OR MORE 



WRITE FOR FULL INFORMATION. PRICES DO NOT INCLUDE POSTAGE. 

PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. 



KIRK ELECTRONICS DIVISION 

VMUHO INSHtUMENTS, INC 




73 F»rrv Rd.. Ch»itsr, CT 06412 



•Tet«phof>*'. (2031 526-5324 



EAST COAST #1 GOES 
NATIONAL 

THE ANTENNA BANK is 
East Coast's #1 supplier of 

ANTENNAS — TOWERS 

ACCESSORIES 



CUSHCRAFT; 

A3 New Et^mcnl T rrba nd Beam 

A4 Neuh A E!em«r>t Tr ibaml Beam 

AV J Ptew 3 BAtVS V«r{M:,st Ifr Mm 

AV4 N»w 4 Band V*fticat i(MOm 

AV5 Ne* aeana V«ftic«l iMOm — 

RS 20^ 1 S-tOm MolOf Twwct Vmtt»C*i 

^ ^9^9Ben^^2mBoo^lmO^B*trrl. 

2^*B 14 Elwnvfii 5*Ti jf. Bocme* 144.146 — _ 
4147 11 ti £ien>«nt2rM - -.,.„ _ 

ARX2B2m"RinodR«n^flr H 

—COMPLETE LIWE ON SALE- 



t 4000 
I SI 00 
S BTQO 
%2Q200 
% 740D 
1 6000 

I 33.00 



MiNfcQUAD HO 1 (HCHS-aOm 



HYGAIN: 



$12900 



T H 3M«3 3 E iemenr f nfiwvl eMiti 
TMSDX Nem 5 Eitm#ni TrttBTK) Beiim 

lOSBASEiemefiil! 10m 'Ldt^ij Jon" 
15$&A 5 Bemenr l5rn "Long JoHn 
?05SA 5 ElQTnenl 20m "Loiiia John 

l4AV0<6and V^rUcal Ta^4f)m ,,,., 

IfiAVT 5 Barttf lO-SOm Trap VerTiC«l. 
-COMPLETE UNE ANTENNAS ONLY ON SAlE^ 



iraaflo 

19500 

S14&00 

I flfl.DO 
£ 7fl.00 



ROTORS & CABLES: 



HAM iv ^tj^!j! i ■ 
Attitnce HDT^fOO 

nG2i3Mil Bpec 
M^ini-$ 



il650GS4CIO 

2H'n 

2mifl 

_. laerti 



Ptiiltv Stf^n Guy Cub^ m alocK— tor pnee £ dftFiv«ry 

#1 ROHN TOWER DISTRIBUTOR 



20G i€ Tow^ Svctmn 
a^Q iQ T0ii«T Sactkon — 
45G lOTiMrttSeetiOfl 
nDBK 40 Free Siihi^^rig Tc^^e^ 
f R?^«6 4ff 2SG Foie hovw Tofvei 



1 »50 

s mm 



w*«i ot R&c**i^ Moyniflinaj 

Wo Si-dHiN; Rr?hn Accessories— *or price & d&lrv«ry m^D^ 

mm ion calf (703) 569- 1300 

HUSTLER SPECIAL COMPLETE 
LINE: 



M&T'«a2HFMolKl«l 



sn 



1 ' =:' 4JiJ 



HF MOB- HES 

lDor I5m , 
20rTt 



STp 4NW 

$ a. DO 

111.00 
SI 3.00 

$1400 



SUPER 2 0km 



%1t 

SI 5 

sia 

S2Q 



00 
QO 
00 
00 



SF2 2TiS^eWhi.o 
MOT Has^tejf* 



Mount 



G'M 1 Bum{Xf MOtiiit <*tth Aai; 



AvANTi AP151 3G Glass W5^,n{ 



S 

s 



g.'Oo 

14 00 



f UOD 



t £735 



,'.2AU' Baiun-— — — 



--117 55 LisUSaii % 13^^ 



VAN GORDON: 

PO aOlO lO-BOm Wjth OipolS- 
PD 4010 ^Q-AQm V^ir^ Dlpd^ti. 
PQ B040 4{>aCtm Wir« D»pole 

SD 40 *Ofn S^ion Dioole 

h D 8Q SQJTi Sfto*t D<pofa 

*i tO Cen wr . — .. 



7Bm 
2&4a 

22 90 
^ S,95LiSVS*£« S 49S 



I 
I 



ORDERS ONLY 
(800) 336-8473 



ALL OTHER CALLS {703) 569-1200 

ShKOpmg cost not mcluded— Pncfls su&^ec! to ctiangc 

ALLOW 2 WEEKS FOR DELIVERY 

No COD— We Ship UPS 

We reserve the ngtit to limit quantities 




THE AKTENNA BANK 

6460 General Green way 

AiQX«ndHa,VA 22312 




See Lrst Qf Adv^rtf^ers on page t30 



73 Magazine • March J982 153 



AMP LETTER 

(AMP LET TER) n. 1. fin Amateur P^dio 
publ icaticjn devoted to the design, ccmstruc- 
t ion, and op&raMon of Amateur Acn pl 1 f ter s . 
Z. A newsTetter tti&t can tave you money art 
your next ampllfter construction project. 
3. A. source of pirts and 1 nf offfla ti on . 

Tlie /\MP-LETTEH Is published arid maUoJ First 
Class :^V«ry three weeks [tJ. times/ year} - 
It is organized Into fi ve departinent^ 

I .E.d iter's Comir 
II Letters 
in Tech Topici i Tips 
IV F^stjre Article 

V AMP-tETTER THADER 

X^^e AMP-IETTER bellevev that ^omebrewing 
■an amp can pe fun^ educational, and half 
as :^9.s.t!y as tiyying a •censpiercial amp, 

A one year subscription to the AMP-LETTER 
is $ig,flO/ytar (17 ^saufiiK Went ion "73" 
Nagaifne and you may sutfscribe at the specinl 
one time rat& of Slf-OO/year. 
DON'T mS% A SINGLE I55U£ OF TH£ AMP-LETTER 



Have parts to seU ? 
Run an ad in tht 
AMP-LETTER TI^ADER. 
Siibiscriber rate i^ 
lot per^ word. 



^^97 



AMP-LETTER 
KR? Box 3SA 
Ttionpstjnvine, IL fc289Q 



Place an 

ad, iOd/word 



Send $2.00 for a sample copy» or $15.00 
for a ftiTl year of the AMP-LETTER. 



INOTEK ENGINEERING 

PRESENTS 



RTTY! 



The "SS-y' RTTY DEMODULATOR 

featyfing: 

• 5uperfor sensitivity 

• uart regeneration 

• copies any shift 

• copies 60, 66, 75, and 100 wpm baudot or 
a^ii 

• normal or inverted data detection 

• simple LED tuning indicatton 

» serial and p^ralt^f TIL output ports 

• onboard loop keyer transistor 

• easy upward sp<?ed conversion 

• board measures only 4 x 5.5 inches 

• exceHent noise immunity 

• requires simple +5 and ±12 volt regulated 
power supply 

• v^ry low cost 

ONLY $69.95 

DriKed PC Board With Documentation 519,95 
Complete Kit $60 00 
492 East Cent«^r Siteet • PfovOp UUh 84^1 
(801)373^249 



QUALITY MICROWAVE SYSTEMS 



2100 TO 2600 MHz ANTENHAS 
MINIMUM 34 db GAIN OR GREATER 

Complete System as pictured SI 49.95 

(6 month wirrantyy 
Down Converter (Probe Mntd-) 

assembled a tested $59.95 

Down Converter (Chassis Mtnd.) 

assemt^led & tested $59.95 

Power Supply, assembled & tested $49.95 
jSown Converler PC board^ 

with parts, unas^mbled A Data $39.95 
Data InformaUon (Plans) S9.§S 

Send cash, check 
or money order to: 

Phillips-lech 
Electronics 

DeptSP-73 ^421 
P,a Box 33205 
Phoenix, 
Arizona 85067 

^^^ ^ Fo f spec/a/ q uafttfty 
pricing, C.O.D.'s, 
MssterchdrgB, 

. ''^»>^" ''!!!S>aHH and ¥{SA catt: 

(602} 274-2885 



AulDmatlc 
TR'2400 Bind S^cannflF 

lojr Kenwood TR-240D ^tops and lochs on bu$y, or alops 
and resumes wlnun carrier drops. Controlled by key- 
board, no BWftcJies Jd add. InslaNs easily inside rig, sin 
simple connections, no modlflcatiofiG. Does no! use 
space provided for PL 
A ssem b I e d — $24 , &5 Ml— 41 J^.95 

TH-9000 Mflm^ry Scinrivr 

fof Kenwood TR-gOflO scans 5 memory clianneE? Slops 
on busy artd resumes when carrier drops. UsesflxisUng 
{iJQntrols, He switches tc^ add. Ifiatalls easily inside rig. 
See product review Sep I issue ?3 Ma^&zine. 

A s sem b I sd — $39. 95 

IC'2B0 Eland &cdnr]ar^f29,f & 

Momoiy Scanner— $39.dS both tor ^^^M 

' Scannefs do not atfecj normal rig operation, 
' Digital readouts display scanned frequency. 

* Ail scanners are easy !o Install using corrvplete and da- 
Isj^ed in^UlialiOfi mslructions. 

'An scanners ASSEMBLED & TESTED (except l(+tj 

* Satisia.ctton Guaranteed' 

Send cKBOk Of monev" order lo: 



« ^SC<^N 



2614a W. tylsry Ann Rtj.. Artioch, IL 60002 



jhcJudB $1.50 postage &. handling! 
IMinoJ5 re^- mclurfe 5Vt % slate tax 



1^27 



SYNTHESIZED 

SIGNAL GENERATOR 



MAOEIH 
USA 




MODEL 

SG10QD 

$349.95 

plu£ shipping 



• Covers 100 to 185 MHz in 1 kHz steps with thumb- 
wtieel diat • Accuracy i par! per 10 million at all tre- 
quencies • Internal FM adlustabte from to 100 kHz 
at a 1 kH^ rate • Spurs atid noise at Eeast 60 dB be- 
low carrier • RF ouipul adjustabta from 5-500 mV at 
50 ohms • Operates on 1 2 Vdc @ 1 /2 Amp • Avails 
abEe for immediate delivery • $349 55 plus shipping 

• Add-on Accessories avaHabie to extend freq. 
range, add intinite resolution, voice and sub^audible 
tones, AM. precision 120 dB calibrated attenuator 

• Call for details • Dealers wanted worldwide. 



VANGUARD LABS 

19ft-23 Jamaica Av«., Hoiils, NY 114313 
Phons: (21 a) 46^-2720 



.^311 



C.B. SPECIAL 

(Repeat of a sell out) 

CONVERT THESE TO 

10 METER FM 

New HyGain 40 channel prinT&d circuit 
boards assembly iSquelch pol, .volume 
conitroi and channel awiich not lnc^uded^ 
Boards sold as is Otmenslon 6"X6" 

1-9 pc« $7^50 «B. 

10-49 pcsSe.SO sa. 

(While quantfties last) 

REMOTE 40 CHANNEL C.B. 
ftecnotes have a metal frame Speaker, 
piastre case, and control m^c not included 
Sold as is SI 4.95 ea 

C.B, BARGAIN 

C B beards missmg parts or damaged. 

Can be used for spai-e parts Buy s^veraM' 

S3. BO «a 
Ofder In format -on: Ptea^e add 14.00 lor 

S/H vca Uf=S CODs accepred 'or orders 
totaling $50 00 or more Honda reaidenits 
add d% sales taw Minimum order St5.0Ci 
Foreign orders US funds only add 20% tor 
S/H MASTEfi CARD and VISA acceoied 

Surplus Elactronics Corp. 

7294 HW 54th St, 

Miami FL 33166 ^^^ 

P.H J 305-887-e22& 



RED HOT SPECtALSM 



AZDEN PCS-3000 

S-meter Transceiver $285,00 
AZDEN PSC-300 

Handheld Transceiver 288.00 

KDK2025A MK II W/TT mike 269.00 

JANELQSA-5 2-meterPreamp 36.50 

BEARCAT 20 20 Scanner 27B,00 
KANTRONICS FIELD DAY II 

Codereader 360.00 
AIIMFJ 12% off list price 

TEN-TEC Argosy H F Transceiver 469.00 

TEN'TEC Delta HF Transceiver 738,00 

TEN-TEC Omni C HF Transceiver 1040.00 

New SANTEC 144 2'meter Handheld 315.00 

New SANTEC 440 Handheld 345.00 

AEA MORSEtVlATiC Keyer 167.00 
KANTRONICS 

MINI CODEREADER SET 249.00 

KANTRONICS MICRO RTTY 255.00 



Ben Franklin Electronics 

irSVi N Main Hillsboro KS 67063 
316-947-2269 



^^439 



CB TO TEN IMETER 
CONVERSION KITS 

KITS for AM — SSB— FfVl 40 Channel PLL 
chassis conversions 
DETAILED INSTftUCTlONS for easy in- 
stallation with minimum time and equip- 
ment 

BAND COVERAGE flexibfllty provides 
up to 1 MHz coverage for most PLL 
chassis. 

PRICES Low cost prices range from 
$8.00 to $50.00 

All kits are in slock including 
several different FM liits. 
FREE CATALOG Write or call today. 

^78 INDEPENDENT 
CRYSTAL SUPPLY COMPANY 

P.O. Box 183 

Sandwich, Ma, 02563-0183 

(617) 888 4302 



mm 



C.B* TO 10 METER KITS 

AMERICA'S # 1 SOURCE lOl 
FM — SSB ^ AM 



IN STOCK— Kits for most C.B. Models 

NEW— I O-meter FM Discriminator Board 

— fits most PLL rigs. Kit — Assembled and 

tested. 

NEW AND USED— FM 8. SSB converted 

C.B. 5 now In stock — from $90. 

LOW COST— Prices range from $10 

to $50. 

ORDEK BY PHONE— (6 i 7) 77 1 -4634 

VISA ft. MASTERCARD— accepted 

FREE CATALOG— write or call today) 



AMERICAN CRYSTAL SUPPLY COMPANY 
P,0. iOX AIR 

WEST YARMOUTH, MA. 02671 
(617)771-4614 ^T 



^ 



154 73Mngazme • March. 1982 



WE'VE GONE NATIONAL 

Stmx Corporation manufactures and 
distributes National Radio, Inc. Com- 
ponents: Chokes, inductors, coils, and 
hardware. We also distribute fixed and 
roJfef inductors, contactors, mil-spec 
and designer knobs. For all your elec^ 
tronic needs, contact Strux Corpora- 
tron, 100 East Montauk Highway* 
Linden hurst. New York 11757. 



ISTXUXt 

CORPORATION 



100 EAST MONTAUK HrGHWAY 
LJNDEMHURST, NEW YORK 11757 



C:KR TIFIHU INTKKNA J ION \L 



VQU WHL BE OLftD 'VOU CHECKED WITH US FOR 

CUSHCRAFT AND MUSTLEH flull line at 25%aff|, LAflSEM. 
UWAOILLA, BELQEN, COPPEHWELQ, S I GNALC RAFTER, 
f^ALCJMAR. NVEVKINQ. TRJONV>;..TRAC,JAHEL, 
BENCHER, VIBROPLEX.AMFHEHOL. GOULD, WELlKR, 
EVE READY AND OTHERS- 



WE STOCK EVERY KIND OF WJRE THE AMATEUft NEEDS, 
BY BEI-DtW. Olliefi 

CRYSTALS FRESH CUT TO VOUR OROeR FROM *4.0C 



QSfs CLiS lOM MADL FOR YOlJ 



CB TO IS MEIER CONVrRSlOiNS f HOM THE STAND ARO SETTER 

CERTIFIED COMMUNICATIONS 

WE CON V E RT OVER 150 MODELS S15 AND UP-, 
AND SELL filEW 10 METER RIGS WrTH DOUBLE 
WARRANTY FfiO^^ SI moo ^■^21 

ASK FOR QL/OtE, eATAUOG. CONWEftBJOiN BOOKLET. 
QSLSANVLES^INCLLip-E iff mntiJ. DH iNFOHMATION. 



we BRING OUR STORE TO YOU AT OVER 70 HAMFESTS PER YEAR 
SEE YOU IN OAVE^JPORT, TOLEDO- OHLANOO AND CHARLOTTE 

**^^ irSWOPtTH VOUf^ iVHi LE TQCALL Oft WRi TE 

mnmTfliffCinnmm 



*[.35Soup!Hi F*Jii 



!eiti aH 45&1 



Fmntaur M; irHnvi 




irs 

INCREDIBLE! 



ODE*' qi^ie 



Master code or upgrade in a matter of days. 
Code Quick is a unique breakthrough 
which simpiifies learning Morse Code. 
Instead of a confusing maze of dits and 
dahSj each letter wilt magically b^gin to call 
out its own name! Stop torturing yourself! 
Yout amazing kit containing 5 power- 
packed cassettes^ visua] breakthrough 
cards and original manual is only $39,95! 
Send check or Tnoney order today to 
WHEELER APPUED RESEARCH LAB, 
P.O. Box 326L City of Industry, CA 91744. 
Ask for Code Quick #103, California 
residents add 6% sales tax. 

One User Comments: 

"First new idea in code study and the darn 
thing works! So much fun you don't realize 
how much you're learning." 

M.S. Greneda^ Miss. 

Hundreds of satisfied customers! 

You can't lose! Follow each simple step, Vou 
must succeed or return the kit for a total 
immediate refund! 



fc 



S-LINE OWNERS 

ENHANCE YOUR INVESTMENT 



FREE CATALOG 



with 



TUBESTERS 



TM 



Plug-rn. solid state lut>a rapiacfiments 

* S'line performance— solid state! 
• Heat dissipation reduced 60% 
• Goodbye hard-to-find tubes 
• Unlimited equipment life 

TUBESTERS cost iess than two tubes, 
and are guaranteed for so tony as you own 
your S-line. 



jr% T I Wmm^ Write or phone for 

Box 535 specs and prices. 

Talmage, CA 95481 (707} 462 6882 



You can pay more — 
But you can't get more! 




Model III 1GK 

$839 

Model III 46K 
2disc&RS232C 

$2100 




Color Computer 4K 

$310 

iv/16KExt. Basic 

$459 



BUY DIHECT. Tliese am lust a few of our great 
oftgrs which incluile Printers, Madem&, Com- 
puters, Peripherals, Oisc DrEves, Software and 
more. caiiTOLtFREi l-aOO- 341*0124 

We have tite lawesl ^ 444 COtTipt/teT 
fiossi b le lully ^^^-J mA\ ht 

warranted prices ^^'^^ ^f^^^^ fJl W» 

of l^adiD Shack Software, yttieton. maoi*6Q 

617 - 454 " 3193 






O 
O 
CO 

S 



o 

o 

UJ 



YAESU FT-207R OWNERS 

AUTO SCAM MODULE AND BATTERY 
SAVER KIT 

15 minutes to in- 
stall ; scan restarts 
when carrier drops 
off: busy switch 
controls automatic 
scan on-off; in- 
cludes module and 
instructions. 

Model AS-1. $25.00 

^^ FT 207 R BATTERY SAVER KIT 
«Sr MODEL BS-1 $14.95 




*No more dead fiaitt^ries due lo memory back^ 

up 

*30''/o less power drain when sc|uefched 
'Simple to install; step-by-step instructions 

and parts included 

M mA memory backup reduced lo 500 AA, 
*45 mA receiver dram reduced to 30 mA. 
'Improved audio fidelity and loudness 

ENGINEERING CONSULTING 

P. 0. BOX 94355 ^ ^^^ 

RICHMONa e. C. V6Y2A8, CANADA 




NEW! 

CATALOG OF 

HARD'TO-nND 

PRECISION TOOLS 

1^354 



Alm^ contains test equiptn^nt 

piuA wide seiecHon of 

toai kits and cases 

Jensen's new catalog is jam-packed with 
more than 2000 quality It^ms, Vour single 
source for hard-to-Hnd pred&loii tooJs and 
lool kits used by electronic technicians, 
sclent ist$| engineers. Instrument naech^n- 
ics, schools^ laboratories anrf government 
agencies. Send for your free copy today! 



JGNSeN TOOLS JNC 

12 JO s pmesT DR Tempe az 85281 




400 W TRANSMITTER 

T^368/URT TRANSMITTER rated by ine gov t dl 

400 watts AM or ^50 watls 
CWover 1.5 10 20 Mhz. Unil 
is VFO Euriea, power ^rnp 
has 4-400A linal and 1 MO pi 
and 300 pi 10 KV vacuum 
vambie capacimrs Modula- 
tor uses two 4-l26's. Iiipui 
signal ieveis 3-5 Volls FSK. 
Requires n"] or 230 VAC 60 
Hz 1&7n W (CW). 2200 W 
(AM). 41I/2k32x31". BbO 
(bs net: -940 lbs sti m wood craie. Used-good condttion 

hul nol operationally utiecKed: $495, 

Manitai. partial repfo: $15 when purchased WFth T-368 

BC-939/TN^339 ANTENNA TUNER designed tor use 
■MTh T-363 ctr BC-610; fl5 lbs. ah Gov"!, recond $100. 

8' DIA, DISH — AS-554/TRC ANTENNA 

8' diameter dish with aiumiiium mesh paiaboiord 
suilace designed lor 1700-2400 Miiz with 30 dbgain. 
Venscaf or horizon ial poiarjzatmn. 4.^"= bandwidllv 
20 db maj.Of to mirror robe ratio. Anlenna is stiipped 111 
sections and mcJudes mounting yoke and teedhorn 
600 lbs. &h. wt. Used $525. 

Prices F.O.B. Lima. 0. • VISA. MASTERCARD Accepted 
Allow lor Shipping • Write lor New 1382 CATALOG 
Address Dspl, 73 • PHore: 419/227-6573 ^22 



!016 E. EUREKA ■ 8qm HQS > LIMA. OHIO ^ 45B0t 



ETCH BOARDS FAST 




Tills Power Etching System will 
hdndle PC boards up to &' x h'^ 
The pump keeps acid agitating for 
faster, more even etching 

Send $34 50 plus $3,50 for 
postage and handling to: 



STELLMAKER ENTERPRISES *^ ^^ 
250PEQUOTTRAII 
WESTERLY, R. 1,02891 



List of Aiivertissrs on psg^ 130 



73Magazine • MarchJ982 155 



BiLLET iLICTB«IICS 



P.0.B0H4D1Z44E eftRLANp.JII^7504fl 214/27B-35S3 

7 Watt Audio Amp Kit $6.95 



t^l2 




I 



ftlMLL. S IPCOL t HTf B fli IC AND COMPOh-f N T 6 FIT ON A 3 
k 3 PC BOAflDtlNCl-UOiO^llUMSCN 1}\^t}C CHEAT FOR 
ANr fROJtCT THAT he^Of AH iMExPEhillVE AiMP. LE$S 
THAN as THO J i WATTS COUPATiSlE WTM M-OT 
50UKD KIT 

Doaitttday Alarni Kit M^VS 

It you <^d-« uij3ib>« t'lHFptngi •n4 you w^u'O Mhtf xn« tettol 
Ihf ntighborftood lo itt^rtf fov* T^t^mf Uwrt lht« littiUt lui 
iftill Q#for Y^Su^ Ttvt** tt no W4^ lo tCXurdtNy dMCntwthv 
unur^iy hottiit icf ««^s ind Toi«» iMil cotii« out ot mn 
kt^t P<iur twptetatm ion* OKriiiimt irv miiad {ancfflliisd 
■nd fl^it)*^ tl a vvying rii* 1{} W^tQ. Ql ^uy iQundO- A 
greit fun ktt of ■ prAcJdl t»urgtft' Uinn ComcMt* iiiiin 
PC toafti gn4 iH ngSBWltY co»wpqf»enE i leu tpgiktf For 
S-^£ VDC Or%0€R DA-A? 



Sound Effects Kit 
$18.50 

Th« SC-in Bwnd Eltacu Klii hai ill <^qu 
n*Kl la biiild tproig'mfnmji&tesourwfttictt 
imctitna «i4»p^ * bMlAy and spa^if Onry 

catvilry tlUi bnciiHlBS ■ Put» OeiMnlvr. 
Hm Oadlfl^v pri OwifMlitlor ro -r^itf 
jnQF* c^mpltx tOurtdi a snap. induAH 
TIIKTT iMf^HEil - WMi l M lf knsHui^NHn 

Crtil* DiMrito^ Eaplai^m. Sttwn Tffift«, 



)TZ Ttmc Zone Cfocft Kit 






1 

J Overvoltdgt Proteetlon Kit §*-« 

ft P^Ol«£< vCm* 



ELECTRONIC iMUSIC MAKER 



THIS UNIQUE Kit CONTAINS. A 

mcnoPKOC£S&aii cuff with jroit. 

IT HJI^ BEEN PnOGRAUUEO TO PtAV 

THE wmsj * ro m mot^S of the 

lUHES LigTEO «€iOW eOf^STItUC' 

TxtM IS $mnr£^ woHns wfT>* awv # 
(^ ifi OHM ^^fLimoT mcLtmtm. 

THE Krr WPLl. O-PEflJtTE CM 

STOc on rf^i^AC with o^t^mai 

nrit«5FOJt*f*, ICOI4V£RT5 TO 

XJ1 Sl6,5STr«tti.rw»f$t^ 



<y^i«d OC 



»»urt* 



^S>T<Mtt 





Regulator Card 
Kit $14.95 



3^1 fvwvr 114^ It4t. Arthtfggh «» rm Rwl 0^ 
lit* tnntfiiKmHn intf PHHtilnit nuiny 
^idfOHW^i !hM« b«*R ittt* 10 locdtrNM o*n 
Tht rtouWar ctftf ptrtwfnt ii^ KI1441 
MMttpt r«aui4tion 4^ p*«t HiHiiiiiri* lotd 

IMmCVVnl llrniClng. Qurput tONiif)* lifWH* 
•» MMV frvm Iv » Aippi »fvd i4lMifltx> 

«4i^ I Th« urttT 111 I i\wm fiuicary inctuMO 
«r« i^l m* on Bticrd Ai>iiAd«n«Ht MeJuitAd • 

iiinr Dariisn^ baicmk di>ain to ailondi' ^ 

qudMir P(H«4 ^ C«4 «■ >l<^ < * iff 

Mini 



mOH CUKHthT JiJJITl 

CHfTTVri ff^ 1»JP«EI T«| 






tnt SU^R MUSIC MAKER KIT 














# CA3CtI^ TflASS COf^D AMF 
S TLO-aZ DUAL at^IT AMP 






CD45«6 CMOS 50 «) CNTR 



i MCJM1 QUAD OP AMP fHS€ •] 
J FPT5QG PHOTO TRAMSISTOfl 
i TIP IQQ MPS DAftL ?A JC 



4« 

M 



Start the ttntj^eorrighf.^. the ta^in^iP&yi 

&UJU. PHOTO RESISTOfI 3 9 DiA. 3. .44 

3 I OHM SPKR ^ tftf 2n.g8 

A¥ 3-1910 SOmND EFFECTS t1Ji 

m PAGE MAfiU^t FOR ABOVE 2^ 

JUWBO flEO LED ASST STYLES ZO 1.88 




i» fC M ee aebBi 



1-^*4 ■ 



ORDER IN G iNFOawATlON, 
C«ir or Wrrt9 For f r«* Cfff^lo^ 



J 



8i 

t 10 



TEMP COHinOLtEO HOTPLATI 5 

i 'EMPEREo Glass no f 10 twr i-n 

J 3«5Q iFS\ MiCPiO ^ Ct4ll> l.fi 

^ 10103 5E^slS^T*yE GAtf $CP S'ii 



SliPER $I>ECIAL DEAtt 

OniQ uS£D •^J DJUkTAi. APP 
1.39 «t 3;3.fil} 



I 

> CC'D MiHiiiUH G«aa < ADp ».» pon CDDt C 
- U»5 E>e.lvEMr AOlHltti I^UbT AC^^dlM^Ahlf AU. COD I 

ORDERS 
t II jtt HANdUMt^ ON OflDEnt tAOttt IIAOB 

> VISA, UC CAAS-t Dfl CMEGll 
^ AOO iS FDR 1H1PP4ND 
< TEXAS Ri&I'DEHf S ADO f% VtATf fALCt TAI 

* AIL fOqerCN OHDER5 ADO 2f-i ^DA i+if^tP-HMl 
jCAhACA IS^tNO fOtlElflN COD* a 

* C*LL |Z1»1 i7I^3&!,3> TO PLACE CnEDIT CARD 0m COO € 
DFtDER m 



[the last word I 

READERS 



THE NEW 



.p* -^^s^r;::;:-"^' 



tnQHSi 



,pnin3' 




BE*^. 



MBA-RO 

FEATURES: 

• 32 CHARACTERS FOR EASY HIGH SPEED COPY 
OF MORSE 

• ASCII and BAUDOT RTTY 

• NO RECEIVER MODIFICATION NECESSARY 

• INSTANT SPEED TRACKING FOR MORSE CODE 
OVER WIDE SPEED RANGE FROM 2 TO 99 WPM 

• OPERATES FROM 12 V.D.C. 



For AEA Readers or other 
AEA Products, call or visit 

AEA 

Brings you the 
I Breakthrough! 



C + A ROBERTS, INC. 
2201 So. Wilmington Ave. 
Suite 105 Carson, CA 90745 
CALL: (213) 834-5868 



RF MODULATORS 





SfltiliSili' 
3*^,t 3 t V* 



Only 



49.95 



• CRYSTAL CONTROLLED FOfl STABILITY 

• rC CiftCUlTfty FON EXCELLENT RELIABILITY 

• EXTEBNALLV SWITCHED FOR CHAr«tNEL$ 3 qt 4 

Trie VM-t{lOa RF MoeSijIatof <s ine sam^ type and 
qiiiirfy Df Tliose found in ^{>ddys tudeo taipe r^CD'dt^ II 
h^S convfrnnent prto no lacksTor video and audio tnputUNtd 
nas A stgrvflartf "F" type connector for RFculpul PoKWf rt 
■uooi^eo D> an AG To DC ixjwrer pacK mtnct^ >i mckided 
Call NOW lor mofe mfomraition and fOr aijafiiity d^ifCOunts 

JJT OlSTRmUTING *^25 

17210 Yukon Ave,. Suile «r1 

Torrance. Calil. 90504 

Call COD Orders to: (213) S15-6B00 



MICROWAVE 
DISH 




• 24" True Parabolic 
Reflector 

• 12" Focus 

• Made from .050" 
Spun Aluminum 

• Approximately 
21 dBI Gain 

$18.95 



+ S5,Q0 B^ipplng A hitidllnc 
IndliTifl rBildtnii pif itt 



INDY AMATEUR SUPPLY 

P.O. Box 421 
Indianapolis, IN 46206 



*^6 



FINALLY. . . 

A SQUARE DEAL 

ON YOUR 

ELECTRONIC 

SCRAP 



Many "broke tv" pay flat rate^ on temp, not 
paymtnt on the taltie afyifar mat£rmL All 
mgnpnai teni tu u^ is ifidiLidiiaUy refined and 
aagavfd for nvaximum rttum. Takm a look of 
tome tvpictd vu Ids: 



PCB^rdA 
Coruvrlar* 

Gaid plnted puiM 



5Qe to S7ptr Ik 
2oC to $5 per Ih. 
S3 to $20 pwr Ih 
$l2tQ$5Qp€rlb. 



For funhtr tnfQrmatiGn^ circle aur neaiffr *«f tic* 
fsit m ber tw call' write: 

" ELECTROSIC HECYCLERS 

OF MASS., INC 

2€3A S. Main Street. Box $ 

Middleton. Mass. 01949 

Tall Free ^800/ 343 8308 

In Mass. f6I 1} 777'04&S 




t^E2 



< •P^'WV ''^l A 



t^^ttrf^^t Hmm.tm 



156 73 Magazine • March, 1982 




on 

Scanners! 

NEW Rebates! 

Communications Electronics^ the 

world's largest distributor oi radio scan- 
ners, celebrates 1 982 with big savings on 
Bearcat scanners. Electra Company, the 
manufacturers of Bearcat scanners Is 
offering consumer rebates on their great 
line of scanners, when purchased be- 
tween February 1 and March 15, 1932. 

With your scanner, you can monitor the 
exciting two-way radio conversations of 
police and fire departments, intelfigence 
agencies, mobile telephones, energy/oil 
exploration crews, and more. Some scan* 
ners can even monitor aircraft transmts* 
Sionsf You can actually hearthe news before 
it's news. If you do not own a scanner for 
yourself, now's the time to buy your new 
scanner from Commun^cratlons Electron- 
ics. Choose the scanner that's right for you, 
then calf our tothfree number to place your 
order with your Visa or Master Card. 

We give you excellent service because CE 
distributes more scanners worldwide than 
anyone else. Our warehouse facilities are 
equipped to process thousands of scanner 
orders everyweek We also export scan ners 
to over 300 countries and military instal- 
lations. Almost all items are m stock for 
quick shipment, so if youYe a person who 
prefers fact to fantasy and who needs to 
know whafs rBatly happening around you, 
order your scanner today from CE! 

NEW! Bearcats 350 

Thm Uitimate Synihesixed Scanner! 

List price $599,95/CE price S 399. 0O/$5O.O0 rebate 
Your final cost is a low $349.00 
7-09 fid, 50 Chmrtn&i * Alpha'Numeric * No- 
cry siBt scanner * AM Aircrmfi and Public 
Service bands. * Priority Channel * AC/ DC 
Bands: 30-50. U 8-1 36 AM. 144-174,421-512 MHz. 
Tlie neuv Bearcat 350 introduces an incredible 
breal<through in synthesjzed scanning: Alpha- 
Numeric Display, Push a button— and the Vacuum 
Fluorescent Disptay switches from "numeric" to 
word descriptions of what's being monttored, 50 
channels in 5 banks. Plus^ Auto & Manual Search^ 
Search Direction, Limit & Count, Direct Channel 
Access. Selective Scan Deiay. Dual Scan Speeds. 
Automatic Lockout, Automatic Squeich. Non-Volatile 
Memory. Order your Bearcat 350 todayf 

Bearcat® 300 

List pric^ $549 95/CE price S349.0O/$5O.O0 rebate 
Your final cost is a low S299,00 
7-Bandf SO Channel • Service Search * Nc 
crystal scanner •AM Aircraft and Public 
Service bands* « Priority Channel « AC/OC 
Bands 32-50, 11 8-1 36 AM, 144-1 74A21-512 MHz. 
The Bearcat 300 is the most advanced automatic 
scanning radio that has ever been offered to the 
public. The Bearcat 300 uses a bright green tiuo- 
rescent digital display, so it's ideal for mobiie 
applications. The Beafcat 300 now has these added 
features: Service Search, Display intensity Control, 
Hold Search and Resume Search keys, Separate 
Band keystopermitlock-in/Eock-outof any band for 
more efficient service search. 



Rebate Offer BearcaP Four-Six ThinScan 



TM 




NEW! 



Get 3 coupon good for a $50 rebate when you purchase a 
Bearcat 350 or 300; $25 r^bale on modei 250 or 20/20; S 1 5 
rebate on nnodef 210XU S10 rebate on mocfel ISO or 4-6 
Jhin Scan. To get your rebate, mail rebate coupon with your 
Ofigirial dated sales receipt and the Bearcai model numtjer 
from the carton to Eleoira. You'li receive your r^bal^ m four 
to six weeks. Of^er valid only on purchases made belwen 
February 1, 1^92 and March IS, 1 9B 2. AU requests must be 
postmarked by March 31, 1982. Lirrbit of one rebate per 
household Coupon must accompany all rebate requests 
and may not be reproduced. Offer good only in I he U.S.A. 
Void wh e re taxed or pr oh i bit e d by fa w. R e se Hers, oo m pa n i es. 
clubs and organizattons-both profit and non-profit-are not 
eligibly for rebates. ErnpJoyees of Electra Company, their 
advertising agencies, distributors and retailers of Bearcat 
Scanners aie also not eligible for rebates. Please be sure to 
send \n the correct amount for your scanner, Pay the tisled 
CE price in this ad. Oo rjo^ deduct the rebate amouni since 
your rebate wJN be sent directly to you from Electra. Orders 
received with insufficient payments will not be processed 
and willbe ret Limed. Offer subject to change without nottce. 

Bearcat® 250 

List price S429.95/CE price S279.00/$25.00 rebate 
Your final cost is a low $254.00 
B^Band, 50 Channel • Crystalless • Searches 
Stores • Recalls « Digiiat clock e AC/QC 
Prior iiy Channel • 3-Band • Conn I Fmaiure. 
Froquency range 32-60, 146-174, 420-512 MHz 
The Bearcaf 250 performs any scanning function you 
could possibly want. Witfi pusfi button ease you can 
program up to 50 cfiannels for automatic monitoring. 
Push anoth&r tiutton and search for new frequencies. 
There are no crystafs to limit wfiat you want to hear. A 
special search feature of the Searca? 250 actually 
stores 64 frequencies and recalls t hem, one at a time, at 
your convenience. 

NEW! Bearcat® 20/20 

List price $44a95/CE price $289,007525,00 rebate 
Your flna^ cost ts a low $264.00 
7'Band, 40 Channel • Crystalless • Searches 
AM Alrcrafi and Public Ssnfic& bands • AC/DC 
Pffority Chann&l • Oirect Channel Access • i^lay 
Frequency range 32-50, } 13-1 36 AM, U4-\74, 420-51 2 MHz- 

The Bearcat 20/20 automatic scanrting radio 
replaces the Bearcat 220 and monitors 40 frequen- 
cies from 7 bands^ including aircraft A two-position 
switcti, located on the front panel, allows monitoring 
of 20 channels at a time. 

Bearcat® 21 OXL 

List price $349.9SyCE price $229.00/$ 1 5. OO rebate 

Your firiat cost is a low $214.00 

S'Band, iS Channel * Crystalless » AC/ DC 

Freqoency range: 32-50, 144-174, 421-5t2 MHz 
The Bearcat 2 1 OXL scanning radio is the second gener- 
ation scanner that replaces the popular B&arcat 210 
and 211. It has almost twice the scanning capacity of 
the Bearcat 210 with 13 channels plus dual scanning 
speeds and a bright green Huorescent display, Auto- 
matic search finds new frequencies. Features scan 
deiay, single antenna, patentedtrack tuning and more! 

Bearcat® 1 60 

List price S299.95/CE price S1 94.0O/$1O.0O rebate 
Your final co^t is a low $1 84.00 
S^Bandf f 6 Channol * AC only * Priority 
Dual Scan Speeds • PIrect Channel Access 

Frequency range: 32-50, 144-174. 440-5 i 2 MHl. 
The Sea rear 1 60 is the least expensive Searcaf crystal- 
iess scanner. Smooth keyboard. Mo buttons to punch. 
No knobs to turn, instead, finger-tip pads provide 
control of aff scanning operations. 

NEW! Bearcat® 100 

Thm first rHrcryslalproBTitirtJTJflWe h^rtdhmfd ACftnrt^r^ 

Aiiow 30-t20 days for delivery after receipt of 
order due to the high demand for this product 
List price $449.95/CE price $299.00 
B-Bandf IS Channol • Liquid Crystal Display 
Search * Limit « Meld • L&ckQui * AC/BC 
Fr&quency range- 30-50, 138-174, 406-512 MHz. 
The world's first no- Crystal handheld scanner has 
compressed into a 3" x 7" « 1 V^" case more scanning 
power than is found in many base or mobile scanners. 
The Bearcat 1 00 has a full 1 6 channels with f requeficy 
coverage that includes aM public service bands (Low, 
High, UHF and "T bands), the 2-Meter and 70 cnn. 
Arrrateur bands, pius Military and Federal Government 
frequencies. It has chrome-plated keys for functions 
that are user controlled, such as lockout, manuai and 
automatic scan. Even search is provided, both manual 
and automatic. Wow.. .what a scannerl 

The 6 ea re a f 1 00 prod uce s au d to power o u t p u t of 300 
milliwatts, is track-tuned and has seJectivity of belter 
than 50 dB down and sensitivity of 0.6 microvofts on 
VHFand 1-0 microvolts on UHF. Power consumption is 
kept extremeiy Jow by using a fiquid crystal dispiay and 
exclusive low power integrated circuits, 

Included in our lowCE price isa sturdy carry ing case, 
earphone, battery charge r/ AC adapter, six AA ni-cad 
batteries and flexible antenna. For earliest delivery 
tfom CE, reserve your B&arcaf 100 today 

TEST ANY SCANNER 

Test any scatter purchased from Communications 
Electronics" for 31 days before you decide lo keep it. If for 
any reason you are not comp3eteJy satisfied, fetum IMn 

original condi(<on with all parts in 31 days, for a prompt 
refund Mess shippFng/hand ling charges and rebate credJIsS. 



List price$1S9 95/CE price $124,00/$ 10. 00 rebate 
Your f inaJ cost is a low $1 1 4.00 
frequency range' 33-4 7, 152-164. 450-508 MHz. 
The incredible, Bearcat Four-Six Thin Scan'" is like 
having an information center in your pocket. This four 
band, 6 channel crystal controlled scanner has patented 
TrackTuning on UHf . Scan DeEayand Channel Lockout. 
Measures 2% X 614 X 1:' Includes rubber ducky antenna, 
O rde r crysta i cert i f icate to r each cha n nel. M a de i n J a pa n 

Fanon SlimMne 6-HLU 

List price $169,95/CE price Si 09,00 
Lew Cost B-channelf B'band scanner! 

Ttre Fanon Sliinline e-HLU gives you six channels of 
crystal controlled excitement. Unique Automatic Peak 
Tu D tn g C ircu it adjusts t he rece i ve r f ro n t e nd f or max tmu m 
sensitivity across the entire UHF band, Individual chan- 
nel lockout switches Frequency range30-50, 1 46-1 75 
and 450-512 MH^. Size 2^4 X6V4 x i:' incEudes robber 
ducky antenna. If youdon'f need the UiHFband, get the 
Panon model 6- HL for $99.00 each, and saue money. 
Same high performance and features as the model HLU 
without the UHF band. Order crystal cerlifacates for 
each channel. Made in Japan. 

OTHER SCANNERS ft ACCESSORtES 

WfW; Regency t 0810 Scanner S319.00 

NEW! Rgencv D30O Scanner $21 9.00 

WCW/ Regency Dt 00 Scanner $16900 

W£W.' Regency M604 Scanner . , $129.00 

R«9«ncy' M400 Scanner $259.00 

Regency' Ml 00 Scanner $19900 

Regency' Hi 040 Scanner _,. .$149,00 

SCIUIA 6 Fanon Mobile Acta pter/Battei^ Charter $49.00 

CHB-6 Fanon AC Adaptef/Batlery Ci^arger . . . $1 5.00 

CAT-fi Fanon carrying case wi^th belt Clio $1 5.00 

AUC-3 Fanon auto lighter adapter/ Battery Charger. , . $1 5..00' 
PSK-6 Base Po^er Supply/ Bracket tor SCMA-6 . . S20.00 

SP50 Bearcat AC Adapter ■ •._;.. . $9 00 

SPSl Bearcat Battery Charger S9.00 

SPSS Bearcat 4-6 ThinScan' carrying case $1 2.00 

MA506 Regency carfvin^ case tor H604 St 5.00 

FB'E Frequency Directory for Eastern U. S. A. Si 2.00 

FS-W Frequency Direclory for Wtjstern U.S.A. .. S12.O0 

FFD Ft^der^l Frequency Directory for U,S.A $1 2.00 

TSG "Top Secret" Registry of U.S Govern men I Freq, , . , $10,00 
ASD Frequency Directory for Aircraft Band ....... . $10.00 

B'4 1 .2 V AAA Nt'Cad batteries (set of fourl $9.00 

A-1 35cc Crystal certiMcate ..,.,... $3.00 

AddS3.00 shipping for all accessories ordered at thesarrletinf^e- 
/WCIIEASED PERFORMANCE ANTENNAS 
If you want the utmost in pedorniance from your 
scanner, itisessentialthatyou use an external antenna. 
We have six base and mobile antennas specifically 
designed for receiving all bands Order #A60 is a 
magnet mount mobile antenna. Order #A61 is a gutter 
clip mobile antenna. Order #A&2: is a trunk-Jip mobile 
antenna. Order #A63 is a ^^ inch hole mount. Order 
#A64 is a ^M \ nch snap- in mount, and #A70 is an all band 
base station antenna. All antennas are $35.00 and 
S3 00 for UPS shipping in ttie continental United Slates. 

BUY WITH CONFIDENCE 

to gef t/ie lastBst d&liv&fv from CE of any scanner, send 
or phone your order directly to our Scanner DJsiribytFon 
CenteTr Be sure to ca Ecu I ate your price using theCE pnc6:3 
In this ad, Micliigan residents pfease add 4% sales tax. 
Written purchase order$ are accepted Irom approved go-^- 
ernnient agencies and most welf rated firms a1 a 10% 
surci^arge ^or net 10 btllmg. AM saies are subject to avajfa- 
biUty, -acceptance and verification. All sales on accessories 
are final. Pnces, terms and specifications are subject to 
change without notice, Out ol stock items wiii be placed ori 
backorder automatically unless CE ts irt^tructect ctifferervtiy. 
Most products Ihat we seM have a manufacturer' 5 warranty, 
Free copies of warranties on these products are available 
prior to pgrcha&e by writing to CE. intern a lionaJ order$ are 
invited with a S20.00 surcharge for special handling in 
^ddfttorr lo shipping charges. AU shipments are F.O.B. Ann 
Arbor. Mi;chig.an. Wo CO D's pfease. Wo n-certif led and foreign 
checks require bank clearance. Minimum order $35.00. 

MaiF orders to: Comnnunications Electronics^' 
Box 1002, Artr) Arbor, MiCtiigan 48106 U.aA. Add 
$7.00 per scanner or phone product for U.P.S. 
ground stiipping and handling, or $14.00 for faster 
UP.S. a^rstijpping to some locations. If you have a 
Visa or Master Card, you may cali anytime and 
place a credit card order. Order toll free in ttie 
US.A. Dial 800'521'4414. If you are outside the 
U.S. or in Michigan, diaE S'i 3-994-4444, Dealer 
inquiries Invtted. Order without obligation today! 

Scanner Distrtbutton Center" and CE togo5 are trade- 
marks ot CommunicatJons ElecKonics!" 
t Bearcat is a federally regtstered tradernark of Electra 
Company, a Oivision of Masco Corporation of indiara. 
t Regency fs a federally registered trademark ot Regency 
Electronics J nc. AD*11210S1 

Copyright '1962 Communicatmrts Electronics'' 





VKS4 



».-:'i->.<> ■ ■■■ ■ ■,'(■■■ * ■ ■ ■ ' 





TM 



,^^77 



COMMUNICATIONS 
ELECTRONICS" 

654 PhoenJK n BOK lO02 D Ann AftKSr, Klichigan 46105 U.S.A. 
Cal \ TOL L- FREE (SOOj ftH ^44 1 4 or OwKid* \t. &. A. pi 3] Wt4 -4444 



f^M-Wz 



Introducing 



(602) 242-3037 
(602) 242-8916 

2111 W. CAMELBACK ROAD 
PHOENtX, ARIZONA 85015 



TVRO CIRCUIT BOARDS 

Satellite Receiver Boards— Now in Stock 



DUAL CONVERSION BOARD $25.00 

This board provides conversion from the 3J-4-2 band first to 
9Q0 MHz where gain and bandpass filtering are provided and, 
second, to 70 MHz, The board contains both local oscillators, 
one fixed and the other variabie, and the second mixer. Con- 
struction Is greatly simplified by the use of Hybrid IC amplifiers 
for the gain stages. 

SIX 47pF CHIP CAPACITORS 

For use with dual conversion board $6-00 

70 MHz IF BOARD $25.00 

This circuit provides about 43dB gain with 50 ohm input and 
output impedance. It Is designed to drive the HOWARD/ 
COLEMAN TVRO Demodulator. The on-board bandpass filter 
can be tuned for bandwidths between 20 and 35 MHz with a 
passband ripple of less than Vi dB. Hybrid IC's are used for 
the gain stages. 



SEVEN .01 pF CHIP CAPACITORS 

For use with the 70 MHz IF board. . 



$7-00 



DEMODULATOR BOARD. $40.00 

This circuit takes the 70 MHz center frequency satellite TV slg* 
nals In the 10 to 200 millivolt range, detects them using a phase 
locked loop, de-emphasizes and filters the result and ampli- 
fies the result to produce standard NTSC video. Other outputs 
Include the audio subcarrier, a DC voltage proportional to the 
strength of the 70 MHz signal, and AFC voltage centered at 
about 2 volts DC. 

SINGLE AUDIO $15.00 

This circuit recovers the audio signals from the 6.8 MHz fre- 
quency. The Miller 9051 coils are tuned to pass the 6.8 MHz 
subcarrier and the Miller 9052 coil tunes for recovery of 
the audio. 

DUAL AUDIO. $25.00 

Duplicate of the single audio but also covers the 6.2 range. 

DC CONTROL $15.00 

SPECIAL SET OF FIVE BOARDS $100.00 

INCLUDING DUAL AUDIO (2 single audio boards) 



1900 to 2500 MHz MICROWAVE DOWNCONVERTER 

MICROWAVE RECEIVER This receiver is tunable over a range of 1900 to 2500 MHz approximately, and 
is intended for amateur use. The local oscillator is voltage controlled, making the I.F. range approximate- 
ly 54 to 88 MHz for standard TV set channels 2 thru 7. 

P.C. BOARD with DATA 1to5 $15.00 6to11 $13.00 12to26 $11.00 27-up $9.00 

P.O. Board with all parts for assembly $49.99 P.C. Board with all chip caps soldered on. . .$30.00 

P.C. Board with all parts for assembly P.C. Board assembled & tested $69.99 

plus 2N6603 $69.99 P.C. Board assembled & tested with 2N6603$79.99 

HMR II DOWNCONVERTER with Power Supply, Antenna (Dish) & all Cables for installation. 180 Day Warranty. 

1to5 $150.00 6 to 11 $140.00 12- up $125.00 

YAGI DOWNCONVERTER with Power Supply, Antenna (Yagi) & all Cables for installation. 90 Day Warranty. 

1to5 $150.00 6to11 $140.00 12- up $125.00 

YAGI DOWNCONVERTER as above but Kit. (NO CABLES) With Box. 

1to5 $125.00 6 to 11 $115.00 12 -Up $100.00 

HMR II DOWNCONVERTER as above but Kit. (NO CABLES) With PVC. 

1to5 $125.00 6 to 11 $115.00 12 -Up $100.00 



SPECIAL NEW STOCK OF CARBIDE DRILL BITS-YOUR CHOICE $1.99 



1.25mm 
1.45mm 
3.2mm 

3.3mm 

1/8 

3/16 

■5/32 

7/32 



13/64 

19 

20 

24 

26 

29 

30 

31 



36 
37 
38 
39 

40 
44 

45 
46 



47 

48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 



55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
62 



63 

64 
65 
67 
68 
69 



158 73 Magazine • March, 1982 



"DOWN CONVERTERS" 

1900 to 2500 MHZ Microwave Downconverters 

In Regards to your request for information concerning our microwave receiver* This 
receiver is tunable over a range of 1900 to 2500 MHZ approximately, and Is intended 
for amateur use. The local oscilVator is voltage controlled (i.e.) making the KF* 
range approximately 54 to 88 MHZ For Your Standard TV Set Channels 2 thru 7. 

P. C, Board with Data 

1 to 5 $15.00 6 to 11 $13.00 12 to 25 $1LOO 27 up $9*00 

P. C. Board with all chip caps solder on, $30.00 

PX. Board with all parts for assembly. $49.99 

P. C. Board with all parts for assembly plus 2N6503 $69,99 

P. C. Board assembled and Tested. $69*99 

PX. Board assembled and Tested with 2N6603, $79.99 

HMR 11 Downconverter with power supply ^ antenna (Dish) 

180 Day Warranty . 

1 to 5 $150,00 6 to 11 $140.00 12 to up $125X0 

Yagi Downconverter with Power Supply , Antenna (Yagi) and all cables for 
Instalation, 90 Day Warranty. 

1 to 5 $150X0 6 to 11 $140X0 12 up $125X0 

Yagi Downconverter as above but Kit. (NO CABLES) With Box. 

1 to 5 $125X0 6 to 11 $115X0 12 up $100X0 

HMR II Downconverter as above but Kit* (NO CABLES) With PVC. 

1 to 5 $125.00 6 to 11 $115.00 12 up $100X0 



Special New Stock Of Carbide Drill Bits . 

1.25nin 20 40 53 63 

1.45mm 24 44 54 64 

3.2nini 26 45 55 65 

S.Smm 29 46 56 57 

1/8 30 47 57 58 

3/16 31 48 58 69 

5/32 36 49 59 

7/32 37 50 60 Your Choice $1.99 

13/64 38 51 61 

19 39 52 62 

Toll Free Number (9VI^ Z eleCtrOlllCS 

800-528-0180 ^ K^ « 

(For orders only) 



73Magazine • March, 1982 159 



"FILTERS" 



CoTlins Mechanical Filter #526-9724-010 Model F455Z32F 
455KHZ at 3.2KHZ Wide. 



$15.00 



AtTas Crystal Filters 

5.52-2.7/8 5.52MHz/2.7KHz wide 8 pole 

5.595HHz/2.7KHz wide 8 pole upper sideband 
5. 595MHz/. 500KHZ wide 4 pole CW 
5.595I'1Hz/2.7KHz wide 8 pole lower sideband 
5.595MHZ/2.7KHZ wide 8 pole upper sideband 
5. 645MHz/ 2. 7 KHz wide 8 pole 
9.0MH2/ 8 pole sideband and CW 



5.595-2.7/8/U 

5.595-.500/4/CW 

5.595-2.7/LSB 

5.595-2.7/USB 

5.645-2.7/8 

9.0SB/CW 



Your Choice 

$12.99 



Kokusai Electric Co. Mechanical Filter #MF-455-ZL-21H 

455KHZ at Center Frequency of 453. 5Kc Carrier Frequency of 455Kc 2.36Kc Bandwidth 



$15.00 



Crystal Filters 
Nikko FX-07800C 

TEW FEC-i03-2 

Tyco/CD 001019880 



Motorola 


4884863B01 


PTI 


5350C 


PTI 


5426C 


CD 


A10300 



7 . 8r4Hz 

10.6935 

lo!7MHz 2 pole 15KHZ Bw. Motorola #48D84396K01 

Thru #48D84396K05 

ll,7MHz 2 pole 15KHZ Bandwidth 

12MHz 2 pole 15KHz Bandwidth 

21.4MHz 2 pole 15KHz Bandwidth 

45MHz 2 pole 15KHz Bandwidth (For Motorola 

Communications equipment) 



10.00 
10.00 

4.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 

5.00 



Ceramic Filters 



^urata 


BFB455B 




455KHZ 






CFM455E 




455KHZ +- 


5.5KHZ 




CFM455D 




455KHZ +- 


7 KHz 




CFR455E 




455KHZ +- 


5.5KHZ 




CFU455E 




455KHZ +- 


1 . 5KHz 




CFU455G 




455KH2 +- 


IKHz 




CFW455D 




455KHZ +- 


IKHz 




CFW455R 




455KHZ +- 


3KHz 




SFB455D 




455KHZ 






SFE10.7 




10.7MHz 






SFG10.7MA 




10.7MHz 




Clevite 


TO-OIA 
T0-02A 




455KHZ 

455KHZ 




Nippon 


LF-B4/CFU455I 




455KHZ +- 


IKHz 




LF-B6/CFU455H 




4 55 KHz +- 


IKHz 




LF-C18 




455KHZ 




Tokin 


CF455A/BFU455K 




455KHZ +- 


2KHz 


Matsushira 


EFC-L455K 




455KHZ 




ROTRON MUFFIN FANS Model Mark 4/MU2A1 




These fans 


are new factory boxed 


115vac at 14watts 


CFM is 88 . 


at 50cps and 105 at 


60cps . 





$ 



2 
6 
6 
8 
2 
2 
2 
4 
2 
2 

10 
5 



40 
65 
65 
00 
90 
90 
90 
35 
40 
67 
00 
00 



5.00 
5.80 
5.80 

10.00 
4.80 

7.00 



Impedance Protected- F 



$ 7.99 



SPECTRA PHYSICS INC. Model 088 HeNe Laser Tubes. 

Beam Dia. .75nni. Beam Dir. 
lOOOvdc +-100vdc 3.7ma. 



Power output 1.6niw. 
68K ohm Iwatt ballast 



2.7mr. 8Kv starting voltage 
TUBES ARE NEW $59.99 



a 



160 73 Magazine • March, 1982 



=1 



"AMPLIFIERS" 



AVANTEK LOW NOISE AMPLIFIERS 



Models 

Frequency Range 

Noise Figure 

Voltage 

Gain 

Power Output 

Price 



UTC2-102M 

30 to 200MC 

1.5dB 

+15vdc 

29dB 

IdB Gain +7dBra 

$49.99 



AP-20-T 

200 to 4aOMC 

6.5dB 

+24vdc 

30dB 

IdB Gain +20dBm 

$49.99 



AL-45-0-I 

450 to 800MC 

7dB 

-6vdc la +12vdc 

30dB 

IdB Gain -5dBm 

$49.99 



AK-IOOOM 

500 to lOOOMC 

2,5dB 

+12vdc & -12vdc 

25dB 

IdB Gain +8dBm 

$69.99 



Mini Circuits Double Balanced Mixers 

Model RAY- 3 

Very High Level (+23dBni LO) 70KHz to 200MHz LO,RF,DC to 200MHz IF 

Conversion Loss.dB One Octave From Band Edge 6Typ./7.5Max, Total Range 6. 5Typ./8Max. 

Isolation,dB Lower Band Edge To One Decade Higher (LO-RF/LO-IF) 55Typ./45Min. Mid. Range 

(LO-RF/LO-IF) 40Typ./30Min. Upper Band Edge To One Octave Lower (LO-RF/LO-IF) 30Typ./ 

25Min. 

Price $24.99 

Model TSM-3 

Standard Level (+7dBiT5 LO) .IMHz to 400MH2 LO,RF,DC to 400MH2 IF 

Conversion Loss.dB One Octave From Band Edge 5.3Typ./7.5Max. Total Range 6. 5Typ./S.5Max. 

Isolation, dB Lower Band Edge To One Decade Higher {LO-RF/LO-IF) 60Typ./50Min. Mid. Range 

(LO-RF/LO-IF) 50Typ./35Min. Upper Band Edge To One Octave Lower (LO-RF/LO-IF) 35TYP./ 

25Min. 

Price $11.99 

Hewlett Packard Linear Power Microwave RF Transistor HXTR5401/3583iE 



Coi lector Base Brakedown Voltage at Ic=100ua 
Collector Emitter Brakedown Voltage at Ic=500ua 
Collector Cutoff Current at Vcb-15v 
Forward Current Transfer Ratio at Vce=15v,Ic=15ma 
Transducer Power Gain at Vce=18v,Ice=60ma,F=2GHz. 
Maximum Available Gain at Vce=18v,Ic=60T?ia,F=lGHz/F=2GHz 
Price S29.99 



35volts min. 
30volts min. 
lOOua max* 
15min,40typ,125max 
3dBmin,4dBtyp 
14dB typ,8dB typ 



Motorola RF Power Amplifier Modules 



Model 

Frequency Range 

Voltage 

Output Power 

Minimum Gain 

Harmonics 

RF Input Power 

Price 



MHW612A 

146 to 147MHz 

12.5vdc 

2Dwatts 

20dB 

-30dB 

400mw 

$57.50 



MHU613A 

150 to 174MHz 

12.5vdc 

30watts 

20dB 

-30dB 

SOC^iiw 

$59.80 



MHW710 

400 to 512MHz 

12. 5vdc 

13watts 

19.4dB 

40dB 

250mw 

$57.50 



MHW720 

400 to 470MHz 

12.5vdc 

20watts 

21dB 

40dB 

250mw 

$69.00 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 
(For orders only) 



(fVI^lj[z electroi|ics 



73Magaztne • March, 1962 161 



F 



"TRANSISTORS' 



WATKINS JOHNSON WJ-M62 3.7 to 4.2GHz Communication Band Double Balanced Mixer 



$100.00 



SSB Conversion Loss 4.9dB Typ. 6dB Max. fR 3.7 to 4.2GHz 

5.5dB Typ. 6.5dB Max. fl DC to 1125MHz fL fR 

fl 880MHz fL fR 
fR 3.7 to 4.2GHz 
4.9dB Typ. 6dB Max. fl 30 to 1125MHz fL fR 
5.5dB Typ. 6.5dB Max. fl 880MHz fL fR 



SSB Noise Fiqure 



Isolation 

fL at R 
fL at I 



30dB Hin. 40dB Typ. 

25dB Min. 30dB Typ. 

20dB Min, 30dB Typ. 

15dB Hin. 25dB Typ. 
Conversion Compression IdB Max. 



fl 2.8 to 5.35GHz 

fL 4.5 to 5.35GHz 
fL 3.6 to 4.5GHz 
fL 2.8 to 3.6GH2 



fR Level +2dBni 
Flatness .2dB Peak to Peak Over any 40MHz Segment of fR=3.7 to 4.2GHz 

Third Order Input Intercept +lldBin fRl=4GH2 fR2=4,01GHz Both at -5dBm fL=4.5GHz 



Group Time Delay 


.5ns Typ. 


.75ns Max. fR3.7 to 


4.2GHz 


fL 3480MHz @ +13dBm 


VSWR 


L-Port 


1.25:1 Typ. 2.0:1 


fL 


2.8 to 5.35GHz 




R-Port 


1.25:1 Typ. 2.0:1 


fR 


3.7 to 4.2GHz fL fR 






1.4 :1 Typ. 2.0:1 


fR 


3.7 to 4.2GHz fL fR 




1-Port 


1.5 :1 Typ. 2.0:1 


fl- 


=100MHz 






1.3 :1 Typ. 2.0:1 


fl^ 


= 500MHz 






l.B :1 Typ. 2.5:1 


fl = 


-1125MHz 


SGS/ATES RF Trans i 


stors 






Motorola RF Transistor 


Type. 


BFQ85 


BFU92 




MRF901 2N6603 


Collector Base V 


20v 


25v 




25v 25v 


Collector Emitter 


V 15v 


iSv 




15v 15v 


Emitter Base V 


3v 


2.5v 




3v 3v 


Collector Current 


40ma 


25ma 




30ma 30ma 


Power Dissipation 


200mw 


190mw 




375mw 400mw 


HFE 


40min. 200niax. 20min. 150max. 


30min. 200max. SOmin. 200max. 


FT 


4GHZ min, 


. 5GHz max. 1.6GHz Typ 


ii 


4.5GHz typ. 2GH2 min. 


Noise Fiqure 


IGHz 3dB 


Max. 500MHz 4dB 


Typ. 


IGHz 2dB Typ. 2GHz 2.9dB Typ. 


Price 


$1.50 


$1.50 




$2.00 $10.00 


National Semiconductor Variat 


3le Voltage Regulator 


Sale <n!l!l!! 


LM317K 


LM350K 


LM723G/L 




LM7805/05/08/ 12/15/ 18/24 


1,2 to 37vdc 


1.2 to 33vdc 2 to 37vdc 




5, 6, 8,12,15,18,24vdc 


l.SAmps 


3Amps 


150ma, 




lAmp 


TO-3 


TO- 3 


TO-100/TO- 


116 


T0-220/TO-3 


$4,50 


$5.75 


$1.00 $1.: 


25 


$1.17 $2.00 



P & B Solid State Relays Type ECT1DB72 



*May Be Other Brand Equivalent 

Toll Free Number 
800-528-01 80 
(For orders only) 



5VDC Turn On 120VAC Contact 7Anips 

20Amps on 10"xl0"x.062" Alum. Heats ink with 
Silicon Grease $5.00 



(fl\I*l|z electroiyes 



162 TSMagazmB • MafCh. 1982 



"MIXERS" 



WATKINS JOHNSON WJ-M6 Double Balanced Mixer 



LO and RF 0.2 to 300MHz 
Conversion Loss (SSB) 

Noise Figure (SSB) 

Conversion Compression 



IF DC to aOOMHz 
6.5dB Max. 1 to 50MHz 
8.5dB Max. .2 to 300MHz 
same as above 
8.5dB Max. 50 to 300MH2 
.3dB Typ. 



$21.00 



WITH DATA SHEET 



NEC (NIPPON ELECTRIC CO. LTD. NE57835/2SC2150 Microwave Transistor 



NF Min F=2GHz 
F=3GHz 

F=4GHz 



MAG F=2GHz 


dB 12 Typ. 


F=3GHz 


dB 9 Typ. 


F=4GHz 


dB 6.5 Typ. 



$5.30 



dB 2.4 Typ. 
dB 3.4 Typ. 
dB 4.3 Typ. 

Ft Gain Bandwidth Product at Vce=8v, Ic^lOma. GHz 4 Min. 5 Typ. 
Vcbo 25v Vceo llv Vebo 3v Ic 50ma. Pt. 250mw 

UNELCO RF Power and Linear Amplifier Capacitors 

These are the famous capacitors used by all the RF Power and Linear Amplifier maniifacutures ' 
and described in the Motorola RF Data Book. 



lOpf 
13pf 
14pf 
20pf 



22pf 
25pf 
27pf 
27.5pf 



30pf 
32pf 
33pf 
34pf 



40pf 
43pf 
62pf 
80pf 



lOOpf 
120pf 
ISOpf 
200pf 



250pf 1 to lOpcs. .60ii: each 

820pf 11 to 50pcs. .50(i each 

51 to lOOpcs. AOi each 



NIPPON ELECTRIC COMPANY TUNNEL DIODES 



Peak Pt. Current ma. 
Valley Pt. Current ma. 
Peak Pt. Voltage mv. 



Iv 
Vp 



Projected Peak Pt. Voltage mv. Vpp Vf=Ip 



Series Res. Ohms 
Terminal Cap. pf. 
Valley Pt. Voltage mv. 



rS 
Ct 
VV 



MODEL 1S2199 

9min. lOTyp. Umax. 

I.2Typ. 1.5max. 

95Typ. 120max. 

480min. 550Typ. 630max. 

2.5Typ. 4max. 

1.7Typ. 2max. 

370Typ. 



1S2200 ^ 

9min. lOTyp. Umax. 

1.2Typ. l.Bmax. 

75Typ. 90max. 

440jnin. 520Typ. 600max 

2Typ. 3max. 

5Typ. 8max. 

350Typ. 



FAIRCHILD / DUMONT Oscilloscope Probes Model 4290B 

Input Impedance 10 meg.. Input Capacity 6.5 to 12pf . , Division Ration (Volts/Div Factor) 

10:1, Cable Length 4Ft. , Frequency Range Over lOOMHz. 

These Probes will work on all Tektronix, Hewlett Packard, and other Oscilloscopes. 

PRICE $45.00 



MOTOROLA RF DATA BOOK 

List all Motorola RF Transistors / RF Power Amplifiers, Varactor Diodes and much much 
more. 



PRICE $7.50 



Toll Free Number 
800-526-0180 
(For orders only) 



(fVf *7(z etectroi|ic§ 



73Magazine • March, 1982 163 



"SOCKETS AND CHIMNEYS" 



ElMAC TUBE SOCKETS AND CHIMNEYS 



SKllO 


Socket 


SK406 


Chimney 


SK416 


Chimney 


SK500 


Socket 


SK506 


Chimney 


SK600 


Socket 


SK602 


Socket 


5K606 


Chimney 


SK607 


Socket 


SK610 


Socket 


SK620 


Socket 


SK620A 


Socket 


JOHNSON 


TUBE SOCKETS 



$ POR 
35 
22 
330 
47 
39 
56 
8 
43 
44 
45 
50 



00 

00 
00 
00 
50 
00 
80 
00 
00 
00 
50 



SK626 


Chimney 


SK630 


Socket 


SK636B 


Chimney 


SK640 


Socket 


SK646 


Chimney 


SK711A 


Socket 


SK740 


Socket 


SK770 


Socket 


SK800A 


Socket 


SK806 


Ch 1 mn ey 


SK900 


Socket 


5K906 


Chimney 



$ 7.70 
45.00 
26.40 
27.50 
55.00 

192.50 
66.00 
66.00 

150.00 
30,80 

253.00 
44.00 



124-115-2/SK620A Socket 
124-116/SK630A Socket 



$ 30.00 
40.00 



124-113 Bypass Cap. 
122-0275-001 Socket 
(For 4-250A,4-400A,3-400Z, 
3-500Z) 



$ 10.00 

10.00 

2/515.00 



CHIP CAPACITORS 

430pf 

470pf 

510pf 

560pf 

620pf 

680pf 

820pf 

lOOOpf/.OOluf* 

1800pf/.0018uf 

2700pf/.0027uf 

lO.OOOpf/.Oluf 

12,000pf/.012uf 

15,000pf/.015uf 

18,000pf/,018uf 

IS A SPECIAL PRICE: 10 for $7.50 

100 for $65.00 
1000 for $350.00 

wave Oscillator $110.00 

Frequency range 3.6 to 4.2GHz, Power ouput, Min. lOdBm typical. 8dBm Guaranteed. 
Spurious output suppression Harmonic (nfo), min. 20dB typical, In-Band Non-Hannonic, min. 
60dB typical. Residual FM, pk to pk, Max. 5KHz, pushing factor. Max. 8KHz/V, Pulling figure 
(1.5:1 VSWR), Max. 60MHz, Tuning voltage range +1 to +15voUs, Tuning current. Max. -O.lraA, 
modulation sensitivity range, Max. 120 to 30MHz/V, Input capacitance. Max. lOOpf, Oscillator 
Bias +15 +-0.05 volts @ 55mA, Max. 



.8pf 








lOpf 






lOOpf* 


Ipf 








12pf 






llOpf 


l.lpf 








15pf 






120pf 


1.4pf 








18pf 






130pf 


1.5pf 








20pf 






ISOpf 


l.Spf 








22pf 






160pf 


2.2pf 








24pf 






iSOpf 


2.7pf 








27pf 






200pf 


3.3pf 








33pf 






220pf* 


3.6pf 








39pf 






240pf 


3.9pf 








47 pf 






270pf 


4.7pf 








5 Ipf 






300pf 


5.6pf 








56pf 






330pf 


6.8pf 








68pf 






360pf 


8.2pf 








82pf 






390pf 


PRICES: 


1 1 


to ] 


LO - 


.99c 


101 to 


1000 


. 60c * 




11 


to 


50 - 


■ .904 


1001 & 


UP 


.35c 




51 


to 


100 


- .soc 








WATKINS 


JOHNSOh 


1 WJ- 


V907: Voltage * 


Controlled Micro 



Toll Free Number 

800-528-0180 

(For orders only) 



(fM^^I^ electroi)ic$ 



i 



104 73Magaifne * March, 1982 



£C 



TUBES 



J5 



TUBES 



PRICE 



TUBES 



PRICE 



TUBES 



PRICE 



2E26 


$ 4,69 


5721 


$200.00 


8462 


$100.00 


2K28 


100.00 


5768 


85.00 


8505A 


73.50 


3B28 


5.00 


5836 


100.00 


8533W 


92.00 


3-50QZ 


102.00 


5837 


100.00 


8560A 


55.00 


3-1000Z/8164 


300.00 


5861/EC55 


110.00 


8560AS 


57.00 


3CX1000A/8283 


200.00 


5876A 


15.00 


8608 


34.00 


3X2500A3 


200.00 


5881/6L6 


5.00 


8624 


67.20 


4-65A/8165 


45.00 


5894/A 


45.00 


8637 


38.00 


4-125A/4D21 


58.00 


5894 B 


55.00 


8647 


123.00 


4-250A/5D22 


68.00 


6080 


10.00 


8737/5894B 


55.10 


4-400A/8438 


71.00 


6083/AX9909 


89.00 


8807 


1000 . 00 


4-400C/6775 


80.00 


6098/6AK5 


14.00 


8873 


260.00 


4-1000A/8166 


300.00 


ens/A 


100.00 


8874 


260.00 


4CS250R 


69.00 


6146 


6,00 


8875 


260.00 


4X150A/7034 


30.00 


6146A 


6.50 


8877 


533.00 


4X1500/7035 


40.00 


6146B/8298A 


7.50 


8908 


12.00 


4X1 50G 


50.00 


6146W 


14.00 


8916 


1500.00 


4X2 50 B 


30.00 


6159 


11.00 


8930/X651Z 


45.00 


4CX250B/7203 


45.00 


6161 


70.00 


8950 


10.00 


4CX250F/7204 


45.00 


6291 


125.00 










4CX250FG/8621 


55.00 


6293 


20.00 


6BK4C 


5.00 


4CX250K/8245 


100.00 


6360 


4.00 


6DQ5 


4.00 


4CX250R/7580W 


69.00 


6524 


53.00 


6FW5 


5.00 


4CX300A 


99.00 


6550 


7.00 


6GE5 


5.00 


4CX350A/8321 


100.00 


6562/6794A 


25.00 


6GJ5 


5.00 


4CX350FJ/8904 


100.00 


6693 


110.00 


6HS5 


5.00 


4X50GA 


100.00 


6816 


58.00 


6JB5/6HE5 


5.00 


4CX600J 


300. 00 


6832 


22.00 


60B6A 


5.00 


4CX1000A/8168 


300.00 


6883/8032A/8552 


7.00 


6JM6 


5.00 


4CX1500B/8660 


300.00 


6884 


46.00 


6JN6 


5.00 


4CX3000A/8169 


300.00 


6897 


110.00 


6JS6B 


5.00 


4CX5000A/8170 


400. 00 


6900 


35.00 


6JT6A 


5.00 


4CX10000D/8171 


500. 00 


6907 


55.00 


6KD6 


5.00 


4CX15000A/8281 


700.00 


6939 


15.00 


6K66/EL505 


5.50 


4E27/A/5-123A/B 


40.00 


7094 


75.00 


6KM6 


5.00 


4PR60A 


100.00 


7117 


17.00 


6KN6 


5.00 


4PR60B/8252 


175.00 


7211 


60.00 


6LF6 


6.00 


KT88 


15.00 


7289/3CX100A5 


34.00 


6LQ6 


6.00 


DX362 


35.00 


7360 


11.00 


6LU8 


5.00 


DX415 


35.00 


7377 


67.00 


6LX6 


5.00 


572B/T160L 


44.00 


7486 


75.00 


6ME6 


5.00 


811 


10.00 


7650 


250.00 


12JB6A 


6.00 


SUA 
812A 
813 


13.00 
15.00 
38.00 


7843 
7868 
7984 


58.00 

4.00 

12.00 


"WE ARE ALSO LOOKING FO 
TUBES NEW/USED EOT." 


4624 
4655 


100.00 
350.00 


8072 
8121 


55.00 
50.00 


WE BUY SELL 


OR TRADE 


555 lA 


100.00 


8122 


85.00 






5563A 


77.00 


8236 


30.00 






5675 


15.00 


8295/PL172 


300.00 


, 





NOTICE ALL PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE !!!!!!!! 1! !!!! M !!!!!!!! U !!! M !!!! 1 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 
(For orders only) 



(f\I^^[^ electrof|ics 



73 Magazine • March, 1982 165 



P 



TEKTRONIX OSCILLOSCOPES 

MODEL ASZ PorUbb 50 MHz 

Dual Trace, 

MOOEL 453A Portabl» 60 MHl 
Dual Trace. 

MODEL 434 Porta btB 150 MHz 
Dual Trace. 

MODEL 454A Portable 150 MHz 

Dual Trace. 

MODEL 455 Portabb SO MHz 
Dual Trace, 

MODEL 4T& f^orlable 200 MHz 
Dual Trace. 

MODEL 4r5A Portable 250 MHz 
DuaHrace. 

MODEL 7514 Storage Oaclllostiopa 

wltha7A15A and a 7A15AN-11 Amplifier 
and a 7B50 Time Base. 

MODEL 577D1 Storage Curve Tracer 

with a 177 adapter 

MODEL 577D2 Curve Tracer 

with a 177 adapter, 

Tektronix Lab Cart Model 3 



PR^CE 
$1200.00 
11400.00 
$1800.00 
S2000.00 
$1600.00 
12640.00 
$2940.00 

S3&00.00 

$3233.00 

$2796.00 
$ 316.00 



MODEL 547 SO MH2 Bench Scope. 

With a1A1 DualTrace. 
With a 1A2 Dual Trace. 
With a lA4QuadTraGe. 
With a 1A5 Differential 
Wilha 1A6 Differential. 
or wi t h 1 of each above 

MODEL 545 30 MHz Bench Scope 
with aCA Dyai Trace. 

MODEL 545A 30 MHz Bench Scope 
with aCA Dual Trace. 



$ 722.50 
I 637.50 
$ 872.50 
$ 722.50 
S 612,50 
$1667.50 

$ 412.50 

S 437.50 



MOOEL 544 SO MHz Bench Scope 

with a GA DualTrace. S 650.50 

MODEL 543A 33 MHz Bench Scope 

with aCA Dual Trace. 

HEWLETT PACKARD OSCILLOSCOPES 

MODEL 180A Main Frame. 

MODEL 180E Main Frame. 

MODEL 1B1A Main Frame. 

MODEL ie2A Main Frame. 

MODEL 1B3A Main Frame. 

MODEL 160 SERIES FLUQ^INS 
1601A DLialTrace 50 MHz. 

1803A Differential. 

1804A Quad Trace 50 MHz 

1B07A Dual TraceSO MHz 

1815A TDR/Sampler with a iai6A DC to 4 

GHz. 

1B21ATimeBase& Delay Generator. 

1622A Time Base ^ Delay Generator. 

18S1A Direct Access 600 MH2.' 

1840A Time Base & Delay Generator. " 

1841 A Time Base & Delay Generator.* 

*For 183A Only. !!!!!!!! 

TELEQUIPMENT MODEL 063 Oscliloscope 

Dual Trace Portable 50 MHz. Wlttia V4and S2A Piugln. $1200.00 

DUMONT MOOEL 1062 Oscilloscope 

DuarTrace66MHz. $ 750.00 

TEKTRONIX 

MODEL RM565 Dual Beam OscinoscoF>e 

10 MHz witn a 3A6 Dual Trace and a 3A72 Dual Trace. S1107.50 

MODEL 549 Storage Oscilloscope 

Bench 50 MHz with aCA Dual Trace. $1000.00 

MODEL 647A Oacilloscope 

Bench 100 MHz with a 10A2 Dual Trace 

and a 1 1 B2A Time Base- S1200,00 



$ 47S.S0 


PRICE 


$ 675.00 


$ 750.00 


$1000.00 


$ 900.00 


$1000.00 


$ 495.00 


$ 77S.OQ 


$ 795.00 


$ 375,00 


$1 500.00 


S 495.00 


$ 525.00 


$ 200,00 


$ 450,00 


$ 675.00 



ORDERING INSTRUCTIONS 
DEFECTIVE MATERIAL: All claims for defective material must be made within sixty (60) days after receipt of 
parcel. All claims must include the defective material (for testing purposes), our invoice number, and the date 
of purchase, All returns must be packed properly or It vtflil void all warranties. 

DELIVERY: Orders are normally shipped within 48 hours after receipt of customer's order. If a part has to be 
backordered the customer is notified. Our normat shipping method is via First Class Mail or UPS depending on 
size and weight of the package, On test equipment It is by Air only, FOB shipping point. 

FOREIGN ORDERS: All foreign orders must be prepaid with cashier*s check or money order made out In U-S. 
Funds. We are sorry but C.O.D. is not available to foreign countries and Letters of Credit are not an acceptable 
form of payment either. Further information Is available on request* 

HOURS: Monday: 8:30 a.m. — 1:00 p.m., Tues. thru Friday: 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Sat. 8:30—4:00 p.m. 

INSURANCE: Please include 25o for each additional $100.00 over $100.00, United Parcel only. 

ORDER FORMS: New order forms are Included with each order for your convenience, Additional forms are 
available on request. 

POSTAGE: Minimum shipping and handling in the US, Canada, and Mexico is $2.50 all other countries is $5.00. 
On foreign orders include 20% shipping and handling. 

PREPAID ORDERS: Order must be accompanied by a check. 

PRICES; Prices are subject to change without notice. 

RESTOCK CHARGE: !f parts are returned to MHZ Electronics due to customer error, customer will be held 
responsible for all e^tra fees, will be charged a 1 5% restocking fee, with the remainder in credit only. All returns 
must have approval. 

SALES TAX: Arizona must add 5% sales lax, unless a signed Arizona resale tax card is currently on file with 
MHZ Electronics. All orders placed by persons outside of Arizona, but delivered to persons In Arizona are sub- 
ject to the 5% sales tax. 

SHORTAGE OR DAMAGE: All claims for shortages or damages must be made within 5 days after receipt of 
parcel. Claims must include our invoice number and the date of purchase. Customers which do not notify us 
within this time period will be held responsible for the entire order as we will consider the order complete. 

OUR 800 NUMBER IS STRICTLY FOR ORDERS ONLY 
NO INFORMATION WILL BE GIVEN. 1-800-528-0180. 



166 73 Magazine • March, 1982 



FAIROHILO 

95H90OC 
95H91DC 
11C900C 
t1C9lDC 
11C060C 
11 COS DC 

11C01FG 
BaS90 



11C24DC 



11C44DC 



VHF AMD UHF PRESCALER CHIPS 
350MC Prescaler divide by 10/1 1 
350MC Presca ler divide by 5/6 
650MC Prescaler divide by 1 0n 1 
650 MC Prescaferdiwide by 5/6 
UHF Prescaler 750MC DType Flip Flop 
AQHz Counter Divtde by 4 
(Regular price S75.00) 
High Speed Dual ^M rnput MO/NOR Gate 
Pre&ettabie High Speed Decade/Blr\ary 
Counter used with ttie 11C9C/91 or the 
95H90/91 Prescaler can divide by 100. 
(Signetics) 

This chip is the same at a Motorola 
MC4024M324 Dual TIL Voltage Control 
MultivJbralor. 

This chip is the same as a Motorola 
MC4044/4344 Phase Frequency Detector 



PRICE 
$ 6.50 

15 so 
15.50 
12,30 

50.00 
15.40 



HEWLiTT PACKARD 
MIXERS MODELS 

Frequency Range 

tnpui/Output Frequency L & ft 



Mixer Conversion Loss (A) 

<B) 
Nol&e Performance (SSB) {A) 

PRfCE 



1051 4A 

2MHzto5O0MC 

200KHZ to 

50QMC 

DC to 500MC 

7dB 

9dB 

7dB 

9dB 

$mm PRICE 



10514B 

2MH2 to 

500MC 

200KHI to 

SOOMC 

DC to 500MC 

7dB 

9dS 

7dfi 

9dB 

$39 99 



S.OO 

3.37 
3.37 



GENERAL ELECTflIC CO, GUNN DIODE MODEL Y-2167 
Freq. Gap (GHZ) 12 lo 18, Output (Min.) lOOmW, Duty {%) 
CW, Typ. Bias (Vdc) a.Q. Type. Oper. (MAdc) 550, Max, Tfires, 
{mAd0 1000. Max, Bias (Vdc) 10.0. $39.99 

VARIAN GALLIUM ARSENIDE GUNN DIODES MODEL VSX 9201S5 
Freq. Covefage 8 to 12.4GH2, Output (Min.) lOOmW, Bias 
Voltage (Max.) 14vdc. Bias current (mAdcj Operating 550 Typ. 
750 Max.. Threshold 850 Tup. 1000 Max. S39 9i 

VARl-L Qo. Inc. MODEL SS^43 AM MODULATOfl 

FreQ. Range 60 10 150MG. Insertion Loss 13dB Nominal. 

Signet Fort Imp. SOohma Nommal. Signal Port RF Power 

+ lOdBm Max., Modulation Port BW DC to tKH2« Modulation 

Port Bias 1 ma. Nominal. $24.99 



FREQUENCY SOURCES, INC MODEL M&74X 

MICROWAVE SIGNAL SOURCE 

MS-74X: Mechanically Tunable Frequency Range (MHz) 10630 to 

11230(10.63 to 11.23GHz) Minimum Output Power (mW) 10, Overall 

Muittpller Ratio 108, Internal Grystaf Oscillator Frequency Range 

(MHz) 98.4 to 104.0, Maximum Input Current ^mA) 400. 

The signal source are designed for applications where high stability 
and low nolsa are of prime concefn. these sources utilize fundamen- 
taJ transistor oscillators with high Q coaxial cavities, followed by 
broadband stable step recovery diode muttipliers. Thia design 
allows single screw mechanical adjustment of frequency over stan- 
dard communications bands Broadband sampling ctrcuits are used 
to phase lock the oscfikator to a high stability reference which may 
be either an internal self-contained crystal oscillator, external 
primary standard or VHP synthesizer: This unique technique allows 
for optimization of both FM no»se and long term sta&rltiy Lfsl Price 
la S1 158.00 (THESE ARE NEW) OuF RHea— $289* 



AVANTEK CASCADABLE 
MODULAR AMPLIFIERS 



Model UTO^504 UTQ-511 



Frequency Range 




5 10 500 MHz 


6 to 500 MHz 


Gain 




6di 




15dB 


Noise F ggre 




lldB 




2.3dB to3dB 


Power Output 




+ 17dB 




-2dBto 
-3dB 


Gain F atness 




IdB 




1dS 


npul Power Vdc 




^24 




+ 15 


mA 




100 




10 




TOICE 


$70.00 


PRICE 


$75.00 



HEWLETT PACKARD 1N5712 MICROWAVE DIODE 

This diode will replace the MBDlOI. 1N5711, 5082-2800. 

5062-2835 ect. This will work tike a champ in all those 

Down Converter projects. $1.50 or 10/S1 0,00 

MOTOROU MNW1t72R LOW DISTOHTION 

WIDEBAND AMPLIFIER MODULE 

Frequency Range: 40 to 300 MHz,. Power Gain at 50MHz 

16,6min. to I7.4max., Gain Flatness ±0.1 Typ. ±0.2 

Max. dB.. DC Supply Voltage - 28vdc, RF Voltage Input 

+ 70dBmV PRICE $29.99 

GENERAL ELECTRIC AA NICADS 

Model #41B905HD11.G1 

Pack of 6 for $5.00 or 60 Cells, 10 Packs for $45.00 

These may be broken down to Individual cells, 

ORDERING INSTRUCTIONS 

TERMS: DOMESTIC: Prepaid. COD. or Credit Card 

FOREIGN: Prepaid only, U.S. Funds— money order or cashier's check only. 

C.O.D.: Acceptable by telephone or mall. Payment from customer will be by cash, money order or cashier's 
check. We are sorry but we cannot accept personal checks for C.O.D/s, 

CONFIRMING ORDERS: We would prefer that confirming orders not be sent after a telephone order has been 
placed. If company policy necessitates a confirming order, please mark "CONFIRMING'' boldly on the order. 
If problems or duplicate shipments occur due to an order which is not properly marked, customers will be 
held responsible for any charges incurred, plus a 15Vo restock charge on returned parts. 

CREDIT CARDS: We are now accepting Mastercard and Visa. 

DATA SHEETS: When we have data sheets in stock on devices we do supply them with the order. 



gM^ 



elect roiyc;^ 



i>'4B 



<602} 242>3037 
<602) 242-691 6 

2111 W. CAMELBACK ROAD 
PHOENIX, ARIZONA 65015 

Toll Free Number 
800-528-01 80 

(For orders only) 



••Sta LW of Adwiatrt en pag€ 730 



73 Magazine • Marcti, 1982 167 




FULL LINE ALL PARTS & COMPUTER PRODUCTS 



P.O. Box 4430M 

Santa Clara, CA 95054 

Will calls: 2322 Walsh Avt. 
(408) 988 164D 

Same tfay sli^prn^nt. Ftr^ line parts only. I^ctory tested. Guaranteed 
money back. Quality IG"s and othei cmirponents at factory prices. 



IHTEGRATEP CIRCUITS 



PhofiB ortlfirs only (800) 538-81 96 



lanrti 




74O0N 


i^ 


lAHiti 


.19 


P4d4N 


.a 


7«9H 


19 


7tim 


ID 


WW 


.vs 


74ZDN 


.IB 


riWi 


Vi 


TM3H 


.JB 


7^4aH 


.n 


;^^r1| 


.&g 


744Shl 


ee 


7i74N 


35 


n?SH 


>d 


r*8h}i 


.65 


TiMN 


i.;n 


MBON 


.35 


Pi^gaN 


M 


r^i-oflct 


}.m 


r^inm 


■X 


J4121M 


55 


Mi!«j 


.*& 


7*U*M 


.w 


t^iSON 


1,i(^ 


741S1t| 


.«^ 


M1S*N 


1.25 


ifna^N 


.IS 


T4161N 


.^n 


f4162N 


«5 


}4q«aN 


.«s 


U17JN 


flB 


?*175N 


BS 


7*1«H 


1 15 


741 B!N 


Jt 


741t3H 


t3 


7*i2\n 


1 2S 


7*39^ 


B5 


T*iiSM 


Si 


TASK* 


.B5 


rt'i&m 


G» 



T4UKTn 

74LJSDQN 

74L£0^ 
74L5D414 

741J5ZDH 
T4iBKN 
7+LSZfiN 

74L53lflig 

74i574N 

7ilS7bN 

7*1,^N 

7iLSS3N 

7.iLE^N 

74LS1D7h 

7i4LSl1»l 

74L51t3H 

74LSl-32« 

74US1'3«'4 

?4LStKN 
Jf4u5cS7H 
74t.St6?N 
T4LSt»^N 
744517414 
74LSP»h 1.04 
r4LS^1N t (Si 
J41SSMN .&9 
74LS3«7N .S^ 



.2$ 
.35 
.a 
.25 

35 

*s 

M 

;34 
S5 
.54 
.S5 
4:5 
.iS 
M 
,65 
.^b 
ID 
.t5 
.45 

n 

43 
75 



(U3irr 1 fi5 CC-W17 

LMllfi 1 49 CD4il& 

|.M32P«.:^ i.Ji 1^0403)0 

Lm320K-lE I.JJ CfHt]?l 

iH33crr-5 45 zsmii 

LilKOT-B ^5 LC41U4: 

LM32UT--S2 ^5 CD4af^ 

iMjgn-li 95 CD4Difi 

LMS24N B9 CD402& 

LMSJffl 9S CD4dEa 

LM3iDK-& t S* CD^OSP 

LW34Wt2 *35 eD«4B 

LM34IM-15 lis C0404? 

LHS4(yE;4 (35 C&«M3 

LH34CfT-B .83 OMiB 

LMJ4{lT-f2 B& mM49 

LM3<WT-t5 6b COMSO 

l.MS4flT-.1S 85 m4D51 

LM3*dT'2* .fli m4Q6n 

tH350 5.5Q CD4IW6 

iM37T i 3» CP4Des 

LNOSON 19a CD40«S' 

lU^I 1.$!) CD4D71] 

LKB! l.M CD40II 

LM^U»i S9 C:D4072 

LM723«,'N <a i!;moJ3 

LM733M .B5 cOiOJi 

LM741W 3i j;xm'i6 

lM7A^M 35' CD4QT& 

Un-47H'fi .IS cwTOi 

LMJJWI 5(J CD40*? 

iMriJah 1.75 CB4rifi 

i.yfmA -.10 CD44W 

LMiaia V?? C134E07 

LMJW7 s.ia CD4Sefl 

L-Ml3ll> 1,75 CQ451B 

I.M145B .&S COASIt 

LMlBi: e,£5 CQHM 

LMIBSa 2.*S CMilE 

LMam 1.75 awsts 

LU?flfif ?.3& C0453D 

I.USBOCiH .5* CD45?7 

Lfc^:3S(ft 1.25 omsa 

LU3BC<9hl .U& DP4553 

M<;U5SV .S5 CD^SM 

Nt5aQN t 30 CD4SJ3 

NS555V .19 e04M5 

NE^i^A .iS C04Qiga 

NE^5A I.K ^4D3d 

(tf566V 1.M 74004 

N:t5ErV I.OD HtM 

WESTQB *.75 74gi4 

7BLeS M UG^ 

7BIJDa ^ 74C3P 

7BW5 .15 74C4« 

7SjOa 1 49 UdH 

75491 DN . SO 74C7& 

7S492CW 5.I& T4C90 

75494CN .Se r.iC3} 

H hi D CMVf niTfl ^^1^ 



W3^B 

BTtDtJ 

BTOirai 

97SOCJ 

LI^IIB 

iCL7iiia 
ICL7H)7 



1J.95 

13.9g 
9.^5 
7M 



LKMt 
C*3g4& 
cnSMB- 
c;a3I3bi 

C*3W2- 
CA3aB3 

LM»SM 

IJH3UN 
IMJoeK < 
LM311HAI 



.30 

1 10 

I.Sfl 

1.90 

iM 

14 

B,7 

3S 

» 

14 



CMOS 




CD400U 


.2h. 


CD4O0I 


Hb 


CD4Ddf 


.3S 


CP40W 


95 


CD4IMT 


.25 


{:Ct4oaB: 


.95 


Ca4iMI9 


45 


OMidi 


.4S 


OMOIt 


.35 


COffllf 


.a 


C04<in 


45 


awi* 


04 


{a>«f5 


;Ba 


05*01:6 


45 



74C175 

^^C19^ 
7JC22S 

74CSDe 
74C922 
74eO?5 
74C9?7 
BD95 

eTi» 
BT10 
sti:^ 
Bia) 

sras 



f d4 
at 

.4€ 

.95 

I 1Q 
.2i 

.23 

.65 

.95 
.lb 

B5 
95 
li 

M 

.S5 
95 

1 *i 

71 
.39 
.35 
.35 
.30 
3D 
.35 
■M 

ID 
30 
3A 
47 
t.SO 

S^ 
1.54 

95 

«4 

3.?5 

1 m 

1 Si 

1 [f? 

I 51 

t 25 

J50 

2.45 

Jii 

.9i 

300 

15 

^S 

35 



W 
1.£5 
125 
3.£5 
1 GB 

1 ia 

1 ^5 
1.9(1 
5 DO 
7S- 
1.05 
50O 
5.SQ 
ft 75 
5.K 

.55 

.&S 

.Si 

65 

1.25 

1.7S 

1 40 

4.IS 

175 

1.75 



MQS'MERI&nTAflM 



2tDM 
?'0? 1 
23Gl£AL'« 

31CITB-4 

jin-t 

3112-2 
iri14 

2II4L OOlnB 
?114L 450<i!i 
■illSMns 



1 95 
^5 
1 ^.b 
IflS 
4^9 
3.75 

2.S9 
!Z4 
2S0 
? J7 
2.ii! 



i'411fi£0{ln£ 15.4a 
MM5320 4 9S 

WHinfl 5 9* 

reiJIlL e.9s 

42IJW 11, SD' 

93tiS S.-M 

A\W IQ.OD 

4ba 2.id 

ttJOCW 
HM63tl 4 95 

MMS314 3.90 
MMSaeS 1.0& 
MM50i41 14 45 

CTTDlh 8.15 

MM.5375M'N 1.* 
Mh&^7^ffi'N ^ W 
7?in5 1^-5(3 

reo-r 7.50 

7?B 15 H 

j"209 4. 95 

MNcmnmxssQn 



y*RT^FlFO 

AV5-ID«3 & 50 

jwS'ipn ?.&* 

Tir 6.95 

h'|}2,|i|< 4.54) 

25Jj 19.7^ 

;!7C3 395 

27r6Tl iM 

2716 5 ■JWt 5 75 
1271&SVSII .39 M= 

2732 15 [iD 

?7Sn 7 4!V 

a74fl 55.:* 

e?4B-a >i5Ki 

B755A 49 .!t^ 

NKSJ3 ?5S 

Na£gi23 ;>.» 

NS2S1?S 5 7S 

NS2li129 4.T5 

Ni3?&i:i1 4.9S 

ftB2Sl35 S.fi 

Ka^i37 S.75 

K2::i 3.5Q 

GDNttECIOHS 

^ pm tOge 3.51} 

4i pin edflft a, 75 

flS pin Bdge 4.00 
lOQ pill edad 3,55 

1l!KJpineil^ ouw 4.9S 

)C SOCKETS 

PW 1UF PIN tUP 



Of^S. 1 B6 

IW.15P ? 10 

P415S 3.1^ 

Comi*!!* S*fl 9 5D 

Sfltaaltti Hn if n 
AuEd PqcL KM 1:7.H 
lliBltsI CldU K.1L 14. 7S 

flEHS^QIlG4lt«l1% 

LlVpir 1^ .03: 

25 Hf tTP* Wii 

in!o«4 type .015 

lUW pti lyp? fl1? 

35^1 plAte P4C<i. 

5 pri I'lip^ B.75 

^trttlt^pirlype (16 

mr SWTCHEf 

44KJ?ilnirt .S5 

g-p<]3]||Qn .'SO 

ftpOSiliOfi 93 

^paullan .95 

BtMiii^i .95 



I4l 

IE 

IS 
30 



30 
30 
4p 



ESQ! 
E5C12A 

6^22 
6^{i 
6G32 
5551 
«HOCi 
6SfC 

Ea5D 

BO«M 

tiD«^ 

;MA 

ZSC€ 

ZBOOSO 

zaospio 
Zisot^itfls 

ZieflA HART 

zia*, &Mi!i 

2aD ii^lil'Ci 

ZM*:SEOU 

/m S15 ■; 

ZBftA.SiOi 
ZOO^^IB'-^ 

zBDe ttc 
ZBoe pm 
«aii? 

B2M 
B?ii 
B2^ 

efii 

«t?55 
B?S7 

mi 



5.95 
*50 
4.05 
B.7i 
950 

li.Sb 
5.70 

ll.ffi 
4.95 
3.50 
3.95 
a. 50 
&(» 

>a.95 

5.M 
5,95 

s.ei 

S6.:?5 
t6./5 

17 yi 

73.0fr 

15 00 

23 OQ 

23.95 

2S.&5 

17 95 

i^M 

2.25 

3.90 

2 25 

2 50 

4« 

6 50i 

*95 

5.2s 
g.oo 



WIHEWHA^LfUEL J 
FIN PM 

14 55 E4 .9a 

16 57 J» 1.00 

rs .&7 ^ 1.59 
7 lt«|t 14 pnwi(tv in- 



KErBURDS 

5t khr *?^ir:ll k^K^nbrtl ♦;' 

FulV as^nibl^ 

Fiit^^Siuli Pli^lit 

Us\M Encm^iu'B 

LtQlS 

BrfTlllS 

<ifBBn. )Wc«TOia 

Ji.fflbO **«> 

Lir«ap.. Canra. vigjipw v t-n 

Cllpllli UDMoBntlflB Clips 

isok: rwl. Jiip**, flfW*. irsJlff* ttflirl- 

I^MtlNEHnL tnCIALTIlS 14 ItqCh 
CoxTicIf I* line fll bi-adbojris ',Eit squip 

DK WIHE WnAF'TDeH..B !■ IIBfl 
Can-tfrti? Ino c? AP PraductS o si&A. 

SP^EOAi, PfHHurrs 

2 6 MHi Frfli. CMnWr K« 37,55 

30 Mhtj- ftaq [ounMr KS 47.?Ji 



15 

25 
25 



CBrsTM.5 




1 WH? 


4.S& 


?WIHr 


J.50 


4 UH? 


4.1!i- 


5MHt 


4.25 


leUHl 


4 2S 


IS MHl 


3..BC 


JO MHj 


3. BO 


■HMH-i 


3;.M 


V7B8IU 


4.CS 


1 Jfl3? «Hl 


4M 


3 i7B5 MHI 


1.70 


?(lliKlMH; 


1.35 


2.097152 HHi 


*j5J1 


2 fl57e Mhx 


4 SO 


3.27165 MHI 


i.itt 


SOamiUttj; 


4 SO 


5.134 MH2 


'.^B 


5 7U3 MHz 


4 5fl 


E.5^3E MHz 


4.&0 


U.1lA^S MHt 


4.ZS 


1i.432 UHJ 


4.50 


K.llff4 WHr 


4.50 


KEYIDHIIQ ENCDiEnG 


AVStaJE. 


11.95 


fffa-ISDO 


17.95 


^Cfta 


5. an 


74C&29 


5.5D 


HMIC^.5 


795 


D CDHHelDrt Al£3Z 


mas' 


a 35 


35255. 


3M 


Cnvei 


1.57 



at TWtNSFIinMEAS 

f MHE Will. PUIO 

B 3V C ^ aac iiM H .6d mv 2 i-Tip' t7 fl5 

! 95 1JV?5DMS 2.B5 
4!]6iayCT25(;mii3 75 



12VZ50mi 
12 &V ti 6D0nHi 
T3 .aV CT 2 jHlijtS 
12.6V CI * tmp 
1?WCrTa»an|i 
24VCTlOOFna 
24V dt 540 ETiR 



5.95 I3i^ BDOniE 
e&3 12VI Rmp 
IDSQ I2V2 ani« 
5 95 
4.9S 



CaR3t4nl ValtHi tlamlermiT^ i £ 
5V J3 «'ii|i ?tV ' ■ iin'4i 



UAN72.74 Zh'CA 3(r0 

IM,7D4 DC .3M 

0LT0rPDL7B?f) C* .301 

IJl?27,?2a CfcCC .500 

OL747,'7SO CA'K 600 

rM}35Si CG ^7 

F*050&M7 wi;yi .eoQ 

FHD50a'51!] (^'GA .504 

FNDflffl.fleJ Ct'C* .HIIS 
10 ^H di^plti 

752fl ClliraK AhDtOCfllB 

TIL311 Hm 

t*kmM> CC .» 

Ml^4&if] CA .40 

MHJ4B4d CC .4(? 

1)11114471(1 CA .40 

MAN474i) Ct 40 

hlAMg«4D GC .» 

hUwe^iD CA M 

UAN674B cc .ed 

HLfVIIKD TEHMINKL 

Hci(lp|g5fi Jlfl 



.TS 
I.K 

1.09 

1.90 

1.49 

.70 

.« 

90 

2.20 

>.25 

9.59 



180 2CE (Has. 11.55 
jaa2£ Ellis 17 96 
1»1l» 5 95 



4116 luting tiynmiz RAM &/$15.4a 



ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS KITS 

h^U PtrlpliBnil Kits 

SERIAL I/O INTERFACE to 30.000 baud. 
D.T.fl., fnput S output from monitor or basic, or 
use Apple as mteliigent terminal. Bel only (P/N 2} 
S14.95, Kit fP/N 2A) $51.25. Assembled (P/N 
2C) W2.ai. 

PROTOTVPIHG BOARD (P^N 7907) $21.95. 
PARALLEL TRIAC OUTPUT BOARD 8 triacs, 
each can switch 11 OV, 6 A loads, Bd only IP/N 
2101 S15.2(l. Kit{P/N Z10A) $11§.55. 
OPTO-iSOLATED IKPUT BOARD & inputs, can 
be dfjvan from TTL logic, Bd only {PfH 120) 
$15.65, Kit i?fH 120A} $69.fl5. 

Interft&a Kiti 

SERIAUPARALLEL INTERFACE Bidirectional. 

S$ud mtes tram tID to 19.2K, sw selectable 

polarity at input and oytpur strotie, 5 to 8 data 
bits, 1 or 2 stop bits, psrrty add or even or mm, 
ali characters contain a starl bit, +5 4 -12V 
required. 3d only (P/N 101) $11.95. Kit (P/N 
101 Al $42, SI- 
RS aaa/TTL INTERFAGE SidireCtionaL re- 
quires i12V. Kit (P/N 232A) $9.i5. 
RS-23Z.^2amA INTERFACE Bidirectioirai, 2 
passive i^ptO'JSOlat^d circuits, Kit {PfU 7901 A) 
$14.»5. 

PR0M Eraser 

Will erase 25 PROMs in 15 minutes. UltravJolet, 

assembled. 25 PROM capacity $37,50 (with 
timer $89.50). 6 PROM capacity OSHA^'UL VBf- 
sion S7B.5II (with timef |1IU.5CI). 

KJCad Battery Fixer/Charger Kit 

Opens shorr&d calls tttat won't iiold a charge and 
mn ciiarges them up, ail in one kit w.lull parts 
and instruotions. 19,95 




RCA Cosmac 1S02 
Super Elf Computer $106.95 

Tlie Super Eif es a small sirtgie board computer that 
does many bi^ ;htn<js. It's an eitccUcnE Domputer 
tor training and lor leaminct programming with its 
maohin€ l.anguage and yet its easily ex|iandied 
with additional memorv, Full Basic, ASCII 
Keyboands. video etiaracter generBtloit, elc^ 

ROM monttor; State and Mode displays; Single 
step; Optional address displays; Power Supply ; 
Audio Amplifier end Speaker; Fully sock&ted for all 
iC's; Full documentation, 

Ttie Super Bt includes a ROW monitor f&r pro- 
gram loading, editing and execution with SINGLE 
STEP tar pn^ram debugging which is not in- 
cluded in others at the same price. With SINGLE 
STEP you can see the microprDcessor chip oper- 
ating with the udiqug Que^ addre^ and elata bua 
displays belpri, during and att«r executing in- 
structions- Also. CPU mQ<Je and instruction cycle 
are d^oded and displayed on fi L£D indicalofs. 

An RCA 1S61 video gfapliics chip allows you la 
connect to your own TV wKh an inexpensrve video 
nvndulafor to do graphics and games. Tliere is a 
speaker syslem include tor wrtting y(?uT own 
music or using marry music pn^grams already 
written. The speakf^r amplifier may also be used to 
drive relays for control purposes. 

A 24 key HEX kevhoarri incEudes 1^ HEX keys plus 
Iliads re$et, mn, wait, iniNit, memorv pmled, 
monllor salect and single stsi^. Large, on board 
displays provide output and optional high and low 
addtfess. ~Riere is a 44 pin standanl conn^or sloi 



Z8Q Microcomputer 

16 bit t/0. 2 MHz clock, 2K RAM. ROM Bread- 
board space. Excellent for controL Bare Board 
%2BM. Full Kit $99.00. I^onitor $20.00. Power 
Supply Kit $3§.1H]. Tiny Basic $30.00. 

MotJem Kit $80.00 

State of the ail, orig., answer. No tuning neces- 
sary. 103 compatible 300 baud, Inexpenfiive 
acoustic coupler plans included Bd. only 
S17.(M). Article in June R^dio Eierjronscs^ 

60 Hz Crystal Time Base Kit $4,40 

Converts digital clocks fro in AC line frequency to 
crystal time base. Outstanding accuracy. 

Video Modulator Kit $9.95 

Coivert TV set Into a higti quality monitor w/p 
aliecting usage. Com p. kit w/full instruc. 

Multi^volt Computer Power Supply 

Sv 5 amp, ±1flv .Samp. 5^ 1.5 amp, -5v 

-5 amp. 12v ,5 amp. -12v option. ±5v, ±t2v 
are regulated. Basic Kit $35.95. Kit with chassis 
andallhardware $51.95. Add $^.00 shipping. Kit 
of hardware $16, OB- Woodgrain case $10.00. 

SI. 50 shipping. 

IVpe-N-Tailc by Votrax 

Text tP speech synthesiser with uilimit&d vocabu- 
lary, built-in text to speech algorithm. 70 ti) 100 
bits per second speech synlhesiier. RS232C 
Interface $3Sft.OO. 

1802 16K Dynamic RAM Kit $149.00 

Expandable to &M<. Hidden refne^ w/docks up 15o 
4 MHz w/no wait States. AddL 16K RAM $25.00. 
S-t(H^4-slat QQcpansiofi $9.95 

Supe r MQitllor V| A SiNjrcfl LlSltitg $15.00 



Quest Super Basic V5.0 

A new enlianced version of Super Basic now 
avai]at)ie Quest was the first compaf>y worldwide 
to ship a full size Basic tor te02 Systems . A 
complete function Supe<f Basic by Hon Cenker 

including floating p^jlni capability wath scientific 
potation (numljer range ±.t7E^), 32 hit integer 
±2 billion; multi dim arrays, string arrays, string 
manipuialion, cassette l."0; save and load, basic, 
data and machine languaye programs; and over 
75 statements, functions and operations. 
New improved faster verston including IB- 
number and ^sseniiaily unlimited variables. 
Also an exclusive user expandatile command 
library 
Sfinal and Parallel I/O routines included, 

Super Basic on Cassette $55,00, 



for PC cards and a 50 pin connector slot for the 
Quest Super Expansion Board. Power supply and 
sockets ^r all IC's are irtclud^ ^u£ a detailed 
127 pg. instruction manual whictt now Includes 
over 40 pgs. of software info, includirtg a scries of 
lessons to help get you started and a music pro- 
gram and graphics target game. Many schools 
and universities are using the Super Bf as a 
course of study. OEM's use It for tr^aining and 
R&D. 

Remember, other computers only offer Super Elf 
features at additional cost or not at all. Compare 
before you buy. Super Elf KH $106.95, High 
address d pi Ion S8.95, Law address option 
$9.95- Custom Qabinel with drilled and latKlled 
pJeKiglass front panel $24.95. All metal Expansion 
Cabinet, painted and siik screened, with room tor 
5S 100 boards and power ^pply $57,00, NiCad 
Battery Memorv Sa^r Kit $6.95. All kits and 
Options also completely assembled and tested. 

Ilue^ala, a software publication for 1802 com- 
puter users is available by subscription for $12.00 

p«r \Z issues. Single issues $1.50 Issues 1-12 
bound SI 6.50. 

Moews Video Graphics $3.50, Qanrves and Music 
$3,tM. Chip B- Interpreter $5.50, Starship 4K cas- 
sette $14.95. 

Free 14 page brochure 

of complete Super Ett system. 



Super Expansion Board with Cassette Interface $B9.95 

This Is te'uiy an astounding vatue! ITiis board has gr^m bugs guickly, then follow with single step. If 

been designed to aJbw you to decide how you you have the Super Expansion Board and Sispef 

want it optioned. The Super Expansion Board MMiitw the monitor is up and running at the push 

comes vrtlh 41C ol low power RAM fully address- of a button. 



able anywr»ere in 64K with built-in menKsry pro- 
ted and a eassetle interlace Provisions hm^. 
been made lor all other options on the same board 
and it fits neatly into the hardwood cabinei 
atongside the Super Eif. The board includes slots 
for up to 6K of EPHOM (2708, 2758, 271B orTI 
271 &] and is tuify socketed. EPROM can be u&ed 
lor the monitor and Tiny Basic or other purposes. 

A 1K Super nOM Monttor $19.95 is available as an 



Other on board options include Partllel Input and 
Output Ports with full handsbalfe They allow easy 
connection of an ASCH ke>'board to the input port, 
flS 232 and 20 ma Current Loop for teletype or 
other device are on board and if you need nrwre 
memory itiere aiie two S-IQQ slots for static RAM 
or video boards. AJsoa IK Super Monitor version 
2 with video driver for full c^ability display with 
Tiny Basic ^nd a video Interface brjard. Parallef 



on board option in 2708 EPROM which has been I/O Foils $9.85, RS 232 $4.50, TTY 20 ma l..'f 



preprogrammed vflth a prograni lnader,'editor ar>d 
error checking muiti file cassette read /write 

software, (relocatable cassette file) another exclu- 
sive from Quest. It includes register save and 
readout, btack move capability and video graphics 
driver with blinking cursor. Break points can be 
used with the register save lieature to isolate pro- 



Si .95, S-100 $4.50. A 50 pin connector set with 

nbbon cat^ie is ^vailat^ie at $18.95 for easy con- 
nection between the Sirper Elf and the Super 
ixpanston Board. 

Fiower Supply Kit for The complete system (see 
Multi-volt Power Supply below). 



Rockwell AIM 65 Computer 

6502 based sing-le board with full ASCII keyboard 
and 20 column thermal printer. 20 char, alphanu- 
meric display ROM mpnitor,. fully cxp a ridable. 
$419,00. 4K version S449.00 4K Assembler 
$35,00. m. Basic Interpreter S65 00 

Special small power supply 5V 2 A 24V .5A 
assem. in frame $S9.D0. [folded plastic 
enclosure to fif both AIM 65 and power supply 
$52.50. AIM 55 1K in cabinet with power supply, 
swiicii. fuse, cord assem. $&&9.(KI. 4K $579.00. 
A65.'40 5D0D AIM 6540 wim RAM and monttor 
51295.00. RAM Board Kit (16K, $195} (32K, 
$21S} VD640 Video Interlace Kit $119.00. A&T 
$149.00. Complete AIM 65 in thm briefcase with 
power supply $&1B.Q0. Special Package Price: 4K 
AIM. 8K Basic, power supply, cabinet $529.00 

AIM 6&'KfM.''SVM.''Super Elf 44 pin expansion 
board; board with 3 connectors $Z2.95. 

Elf II Adaoter Kit $24.95 

Plugs into Elf II providing Super Elf 44 and SO pin 

plus s-100 tous expansion. (With Super Es<- 
pansion). High and low address displays, state 
and mode LED's optional S18 00, 



^•■- ■■'*»^,_^«* 



•-^ 




Super Color S-1 00 Video Kit$lZ9J5 

Expandable to 256 x 192 high resolution color 
graphics. 6847 with all display modes computer 
controlled. Memory mapped IK RAM expand- 
able to 6K. S-100 bus 1802, 8080. BOSS, Z80, 
etc. Dealers: Sand (of eseelleAt pKctng/ittartiiit 
program. 



TERMS; $5.00 min. order U.S. Funds. Calif, residents add G%tax. 

$10.00 min. VISA and MasterCard accepted. $1.00 insurance optional 
Shipping: Adtl 5%; orders under $2$.Q0— 10%. 



FREE: Send for your copy of our NEW 

QUEST CATALOG, include SSc stamp 



168 73 Magazine • March J982 



rafnsaij the first name in Counters ! 



9 DIGITS 600 MHz $129 




SPtClFlC^TrO!4& 



WIRED 



max 

£,llillill HUP )iH ^w 



its 


UK 





The CT'$0 li the mou tcfsstik: Tutiue packed couMcr ivatUble far \csa 
diiyiSSOD 00^ Advann^idesLpi frflnrrrs ofecliMlc three ickcfible fue limci. 
nmc dkpts. |ue mdiciLUH ud ■ imi^iue disf>ia| bold ^juriiofi which holdi the 
iMtplAyed cotml lAer ihe mpisf sipiBi is mnoveif AJhl 1 1 OmHx TCXO time 
buc a used whuii nubl^ cmsj zciu bcii c«Utar«tkin checks i(«j»t WW V 
DpuatLally. «i iiit^iTLAl ni^itdbAaen p#£k,eittffmj] time bueinpuj mad MicrD^ 
pmktr high itftbiht> cr^'stal oven tune baK are ivnUble The CT-90^ 
perf6rmuice you can cotuit onf 



Sensitivity 

Resaiutwm 



Displijr 
Time bije 



: Hf to«00 MH; 
Uid ihAfi 10 MV i£> ISO MKU 
Leu liuD 50 MV to 500 MHi 
0-J HiilOMHirti^J 

10 Hf (600 MH£ mfl««) 

9 dJiits0 4^ L£D 

SundATd^ 10.000 mHz, 1.0 ppm 20-40 C. 

Optwnal Micro- power ovci:^.1 ppm 2&40 C 

8-15 VACS ISO ISA 



7 DIGITS 525 MHz $99 



WIRED 



SPECIFICATION^; 



Seniiittviiy: 
Resoluiion: 



Disptiy 
Time hue 
Po*er 



2(9 Hz to 525 MHz 

Us* than 50 MV tfl 150 MHi 

Less than 150 MVto500 MHi 

1.0 Hz (5 MH2 range) 

10 Hz f50 MHz rajiie) 

tOOQ KiiiOO MH2 range) 

7 di^ti 4- LED 

10 ppm TCXO 20-40 C 

12 VAC^i 250 ma 



The CT-70 breaks the price bamer on lab qua] icy frequency counters 
Deluxe Taaturea such a^ threefrequencyrajiiiei' each with pre- amplification, 
duaE ^Lectable gate time&, mad |Ate Rtriiviiy mdicatiDn make xnea^uremen^s a 
in&p. The wide frequency range enables you to icc urate ly Jtieasure signaU 
from audio thru UHF wiih I pfKn accuracy - ihat'i.0001%! The CT-70 $i 
the answer to all your measurement needs, m the fields ia^ of ham ihsck 




PWICES; 

CT'70 wired, I yearwarranfy 

CT-70 Kit. 90 day parts *»r- 

raniy 

AC-l AC adapter 

BP-1 Njcad pack + AC 

■dipicr/ charger 



$99.95 



7 DIGITS 500 MHz $79^5 




MINI- 100 wired, 1 yc«r 

•afTKity S7J.95 

AC Z Ac adapter for MINI- 

100 J9S 

BP-Z Nicad pack and AC 

adapte;^ charger 1 1.95 



Here's a hand^', generaJ purpoic opmner ihai presides euovi emmux 
ftaetiocii Ml «D yjibetievable pncc The MINI- [00 doeia'i haire the full 
l&^ueiscy range or lopyl impeilaoee quaJitiei rocuid m higher price uniu lul 
for basic RF itpial oieasurementk tt can't be bead Accurate meaiuremcnii 
can be made from I MKi all the way up-io500 MHi with etcellenl sensitivity 
Ihrouthovt the ranfe, and the two gate Umes let you lelect the rc^olutioa 
deJitvd. Add ihenserndprnck option and the MINI- 100 makes anideaJ additKW 
10 your tool boi for "i&thfr field" frequency checks and repaifiL 



WIRED 



SPECIFIC ATIONS: 

ScnsrUrttf: 
ResolutKHt 



Dtiplayr 
TiilM base 
Poiref: 



1 MKetoSOO MHi 
Le»Uun25 MV 
iOO Hj^ I slow gMtei 
1.0 KHz tfast iBlcl 
7 digits, 0.4 ■ LED 
2-0 ppm 2<V40"C 
5 VDC <g 200 ma 



8 DIGITS 600 MHz $159 




WIRED 



SPECIFICATIONS; 




Raiige: 
Sen&itiviij: 

Resolt^tion 

Display: 
Titne base 
Power 



20 Hi to 600 MHi ThcCT'50 is a versatile lab benchcountenhatwili measure up to600 MHi 

Less Ehan ^^J^^ to i ^^J^^J. *^^ ^ digit precisjon. And. one of tti beit featurei is the Receive Frequency 

Adapter, which mms the CT-SO into a digitaJ reackiui for any receiver. The 
adapter Is easily programmed for any receiver and a simple connection to the 
receiver's VFO is a] I that it required for use Adding tlu receiver adapter in do 
way limiti the operation of the CT-50, the adapter can be conveniently 
i» Itched on oir oit The CT^SO. a counter that can wock double- duty' 



Less than I 50 mv to 600 MHi 
LO Hi 1 60 MH; range] 
1 00 Hi [600 MHi range) 
8digjts0.4" LED 
20 ppm 30-40 C 
110 VAC or 12 VDC 



PRICES; 

CT-50 wir^ ] year warranty 
CT-50 Kit 90 day parts 
warranty 

RA-l, FBcctveT adapter kit 
RA-L wired and pre-program- 
med ( send CQf]^ of receiver 
KhcTnatJcj 



SI 59.95 

119,95 
L4.9S 




PNtE^ 




DM-700 wind 1 yetf- w«nay 


S9995 


01*700 KiL 90 day parts 




warrAHty 


79,95 


AC-l. AC adaptor 


3.95 


BP 3, Nicad piclt *AC 




adapter charger 


19,95 


MP ! Probe kii 


2.95 



DIGITAL MULTIMETER $99^,RED 

The DM-7CI0 otfers ptoi^sskhlbI qiulirv pef^EVfnance *t a ho%bviH price. 
FfV^jTCt icidiide; 26 dittcrcnt rai|p« aiwl 5 fuAftiatu, all mnma^cd m a 
convemeni. ewv co use fornqti Measuretnentf U€ da^ytd Ofl a Im^ l^* 
liigii. '<: vtich LED readout with au^matK ^jeamal placefneni, aumniaxic 
polarmi n ovetnngr indicxiMmand cjvo^loadl pf cMttt^ion up to 1250 vdIiscmi ill 
ranpei. nukinig ir iiirruaUv fpofptoof* Tlie DM-700 loalu p^nt. a kmdsome, 
jrr H^k* ruiQird .ABS ai&e with coovenlefii rctrKrabJe till hail niakra rr an 
idaA iiiJition to ai^v shc^. 



SPECIFICATIONS 


DOACvo^ts. lOOuV tiM KV. 5 nnfis 


DO AC 




current 


0. 1 uA ui LO Amps, 5 fvniCi 


Reti*iaDce 


0.1 ohms to 10 Megohms. 6 ranget 


Input 




impedance: 


10 MeiohmsL DDAC volu 


Accuracj" 


0.1% basic DC volu 


Power 


4*C cells 



AUDIO SCALER 



For high reiolutiori audbmeasuremenis. rauluplies 

UPirt frequency. 

• Great for PL tones 

• MuJtipJLes by 10 or LOO 
■ 0,01 Hi resoluiioni 

S29 95 Kit S39,95 Wired 



ACCESSORIES 



Telescopic whip anienna • BNC plufi , . - S 7 t5 

High impedance probe, light loadinEi . . ,,.,,,.. ^. ..>,,., . 15.95 

Um' pAss probe, far audin meaiurementi »..,,.... 1 5.95 

Direct probe, generaJ purpose usage r r, . , r, . . r . 1 2.95 

Tilt bail for CT 70. 90. MINI-IDO 3-95 

Color burst cnJibrHtion luiil, calibratea counter 

against color TV signal , ...//.,..> ^ 14.95 



COUNTER PREAMP 

Ftir mraiufing exTremelv west slpmis from 10 to 1 .000 
MHi, SmuM 5i:e, powered hv pi up tranH fDrmer- included- 

* Flat 25 db gain 

• BNC Conriecion 

i Great for EnifTing KF with pick- up loop 
il4.93 Kit 144.95 Wired 



^E 



ranisey ekectronic's, inc. 

2575 Baird Rd. Penfield, NY 14526 ^^ 



PHONE ORDERS 
CALL 716-586-3950 



i«iurn nn wigpool lorm lot rafufiji Add S'** fo» thipjM'ng 
»m4j«art4 • -Id a rti«B I ni»,i fft q1 'II O G<w«Ti,«'cn q<M > ^'h COD odd 
t? Oi4«*fcumi*rtlO dd^fl ^Q MV i«vd*nri 4 44'' »ap 



Se* Lift Of Atfrtffistfs on page ^SQ 



TSMagazme • March. 1982 16S 




MINIMUM ORDER $10.00 





THE CORDLESS EXTENSION TELEPHONE **ESCORT" 

Good for up to 300 ft. away from the base unit. 

(Call for quantity prices of 10 and up.) 



RF Transistors 




MRF203 
MI?F216 
MRF221 
MRF226 
MRF227 
MRF23a 
MR F 240 
MRF245 
MRF241 
MRF262 
MRF314 
MRF40fl 
MRF412 
MRF42i 
MRF422A 



31. 
10 



R- 

00 

90 



12.65 
3. 45 
12.65 
15.50 
34. OD 
34.00 
9.20 
20. 70 
13. BO 
25.30 
36.80 
41.40 



MRF422 

MRF42e 

MRF428A 

MRF426 

MRF426A 

MRP449 

MRF449A 

MRF430 

MRF450A 

MttF452 

MRF453 GETiaS 

MRF454 

MRF454A 

MnF455 

MRF455A 

MeF45a 

MHF47a 

MRF4T4 

MRF4T5 

MRF476 C1308 

MHF477 

MRF48$ 

MRF492 

MR F 502 



41-40 
46*00 
46.00 
15.50 
15.50 



MRF604 
MRF629 
MRF648 
MRF90i 
MRF902 



2 

3 

33 

2 



12.65 MRF904 



MRF911 
MnF5l76 
MRFB004 
UFR90 
fiFRSl 
BFR96 
BFW92A 
BFW92 
MMCM9ltf 
MMCM2222 
MMCM2369 
MMCM2484 
MMCM3960A 
MWA120 
MWA130 
MWA2t0 
3, 00 MWAaZO 
23.00 MWA230 
L04 MWA310 



12.65 
13, SO 

13.80 
15.00 

17.25 
19. 90 
21 83 
16.00 
16.00 

19.90 
1 00 
3,00 
2.90 
2.90 

U.50 



07 

45 

35 

15 

8.00 

3.00 

3.00 

3.0D 

2.i0 

1.30 

1.65 

2.20 

1. 15 

1,00 

14. 30 

15.65 

15.00 

15.25 

24 . 30 

10.00 

10.00 

10.00 

10.00 

10.00 

10.00 



TUBES 



BllA 
6360 



6JE6 

6LQ6 6JE6C 

6MH6 



6K:D6 

6LQ6 

6MJ6 

6LF6 

12BY7A 

2E26 

4X 150A 

4CX250B 

4CX250R 

4CX300A 

4CX350A/&321 

4CX35QF/J/B904 

4CX1500B B660 



5.00 

6,00 

10.00 

660 

4.00 

4.69 

?9*99 

45.00 

69.00 

109.99 

im.oo 

loa.aa 

300, 00 



6298 



6146 
6I46A 
6i46B 
S14SW 

6550A 

8906 

8950 

4 -400 A 

4-400C 

572B/T160L 

7289 

3-lOOOZ 

3-'iOOZ 



20.00 

4,69 

30.00 

7.95 

9.00 

9. 99 

12.95 

10.00 

14,00 

13. QO 

145.00 

145,00 

44.00 

229.00 

141.00 



l^oiQ-rola rf amplifier. 

544-4OOI-002, similar to type MIW 401-2. 

1.5 Walls oiUpuL 

440-512 MHt, 



15 4B giufi min. 



$29.99 ^Eh 



Mt>turoLi vt transistgi't 

Selt^cUuin Guide &. Cross-HefL-rence 

Catalog;. 
43{i$s, 



NEW AA N I CADS - GE Part *f41B905HD11-G1 
Pack of 6 for $5.00 OR 60 cells, ten packs - $45.00 

CONNECTORS 

PL-258 

UHF liiiiali^ Lu imp Ivniali- 1.69 

M>359 

UHF 90' 2.50 

UG363 UHF duuUii- fi-noli- 

l^Anvl iiiouiU 2.99 

UHF M 

PL-259ioRCA .90 

F7J-lllfi 

4 pus plus ■ ^^ 

F71-1116 

4 pin jack . 75 
F7I-1120 
6 pm ptu|^ . HS 

rii^iiSi 

6 pin jmck . ^ 

01 n pl«c & pck 

5 piii nutU & ifttxilv .49 
BHC L»G260 
EINC null' fur RG 59LI 1-25 

BN€ uoeflu 

BNC nuiLi- fi»r RG 580 

UO 273 

tiNC Uimiv Ut PL*259 2.50 

Un 274 

um T 



Transistors 





2N2857 
2N 2 85 7 J AN 
2N2949 
2N2947 

^N2nr>o 

aN3375 

3N3553 

2N3SJH 

2N36ti6 

2N3fl66JAN 

2N3tt66JANTX 

2N3925 

2N3948 

2N3950 



2N3959 

2^r3960JA^fTX 

2N40ia 
2N4427 
2N4429 

2N4a77 
2N4959 

2N4976 
1.55 2N5070 
2.50 2N5071 
3.60 2N5iOft 
15,00 2N5109 
4,60 2N5179 
e, 00 2N55e3 
1.57 2N5589 
5,00 2N5590 

1. 30 2N5591 

2. 50 2N5635 
4.00 2K5636 

10.00 2N5637 

2,00 2N3641 

25.00 2K5643 



2 frmalp Tii 1 ISNC »i\;»!t' 


3,75 


UG 21 






Tvpi S tti^lt' 


3.60 


ta 23 






Tvpc N ItM 


iialc 


3.75 


PL-2S9 




.69 


SO- 239 




.69 


F 61 hnui 


lu c-hassis nioiml 




fonrti'tituir 


wiEh hix nut lO 1.99 


UC 306 






HNC juali^ 


to tj*tiiaU* 90' 


2,59 


UG255 






BNC iiiaW 


Lo Itniiilc 90^ 


2.79 


UC 491 






BNC male 


to 60^239 f( mak' 


3 00 


VG 1094 


use ft'imli- 




clmssis niti'urM 


.80 


UG9i4 






BNC f*' 1114 It- io DKC ri-mali* 




RS'232 


H<H>cL<i 


1.00 


RS-232 


Miilf PCB typt- 


2.00 


HS-232 


Fi'jiiali* PCB typt' 


2.00 


Ct-mrotiicf. male 


6.99 


F-59 L-onnutloj for UG 59U 




CEible 


100 13. 95 or 10 2.00 


3.BD 


aN5645 


13. ao 


10,00 


2mH42 


8,00 


1.80 


2N5849 


20 00 


1.30 


2N5942 


40 DO 


7.00 


2N594fi 


19. 00 


1.00 


2tfS862 


57.50 


2.30 


2N6030 


9.20 


15. 00 


ZN60S1 


10 35 


IS. 40 


2N60«2 


11.50 


20. 10 


2N60H3 


13. 25 


4.00 


2N60B4 


IS. DO 


J. 70 


2NG095 


12,00 


1,00 


2Nf>0[^ri 


irj.50 


4.00 


2NB0P7 


17. 25 


B. 65 


2Nfil66 


40.25 


10,35 


2K636B 


2&,75 


13,80 


A210 MR F5 17 


2.00 


10. 3S 


BLY38 


5.00 


12-00 


40280 2N4427 


1 30 


15 50 


40281 2N3920 


7 00 


9.20 


40282 2N3927 


17 25 


15-50 


MMT74 


1 04 



TRANSBTORS/IC'S 

Mm or r ) U M KW 2 5 2 V H F jHkw f r a i iipli 1 1 vf * 
Frt-quency range: H4'148MHz. 
Oulpul power; 25W» 
Minimum g£tiit 19, 2 dB. 

S39 m f-aclv 



CDttES AND BEADS 



Si. 99 f9cl* 



CABLE TIBS 

*, T-18R 100 pu litiir 

mil. spt'c. KMS-SSfiHE, A" 
Mudi lay Tyiuri Curp. 
S2.50 ptr ill VI 10 l^^ - 5^20.00 



^43 


Shitkl Bmd 


if6l 


Toro[d 




-*43 


BJitun 




*/6l 


Baluti 




"61 


Balun 




*6i 


linlun 




*61 


Ikids 




Ferntif Rod i,A % 7 


1/2 


Fi-rj 


rlt4f Deads 1/ 8'' 


long 


Fi-TTiie Bt^4i 3/ r' 


lor^ 


Fen 


rite Beads 1/16' 


■ kmg 



4/ LOO 
1, 1.00 

10/ LOO 
6/1.06 
6/1.00 
4/1,00 

10/ 1.00 
2.90 

1^ l.OQ 
6/1.00 

12 LOO 



170 73 Magazine • March, 1982 







Plug Ins 


Model* 


Description 


Make 


1783A 


Time Mark Generator 


Hew ett Packard 


1A1 


Dual Trace 


Tektronix 


1A2 


Dual Trace 


Tektronix 


2A63 


Differenttal Amp. 


Tektronix 


1A4 


Four Channel Amp, 


Tektronix 


1S1 


Sampling Unit 


Tektronix 


3A72 


Dual Trace Amp. 


Tektronix 


53/54C 


Dual Trace Calibrated Preamp 


Tektronix 


3A75 


Amplifier 


Tektronix 


N 


Samping Unit 


Tektronix 


1754A 


Four Gharrnel Amp, 


Hewlett Packard 


1 750B 


Dual Trace Vertical Amp, 


Hewlett Packard 


3T77 


Sampling Sweep 


Tektronix 


3T4 


Programmable Sampling Sweep 


Tektronix 


10A1 


Differential Amp, 


Tektronix 


3S76 


Sainpling Dual Trace 


Tektronix 




Equipment 


CDC5 


Decade Capacitance 


Cornel /Dubi ier 


CDC3 


Decade Capacitance 


Cornell/Dubilier 


204B 


Dialamatic Volt Meter 


Wavetek 


201 


Dialamalic Vol! Meter 


Wavetek 


10411 A 


Horizontal Gam Calibrator 


Hewlett Packard 


422 


Oscilloscope 


Tektronix 


PS163 


Oscilloscope 


Sencore 


175A 


Oscilloscope Includes: 


Hewlett Packard 



71 D 



2200 
8100 
524 5 L 



6220 

191 5A 

A202-292^4 

1784A 

41 4A 

32D0B 

431C 

431B 

TF1041C 

6328 A/40 IB 

71A 

3121 

353A 

DCIIOBA 

691 B 

ME11/U 

1133A 

M68 U Cana 

74C58 

190 A 

TF1066B 

300 

530 

75D 

180A 

1521B 

6M901 

103 

101 

MAG -4000 

MA71508 



HP3503 



plug ins; 1781B Delay Generator 
1 754A 4 Channel Amp. 

Capacitance/Inductance 

includes: 94A Digital Display 
ISA Bias Supply 

Filter 

Automatic Counter 

Electronic Counter 

includes: 5253A Freq- Counter 
100-500 M C. 

Frequency Multiple/Counter 

Variable Transition Time Output 

Strip Chart Recorder 

Strip Chan Recorder 

Auto Volt Meter 

VHF Oscillator 

Power Meter 

Power Meter 

Vacuum Tube Volt Meter 

Power Meter 

Capacitance/Inductance Meter 

Selective Volt Meter 

Patch Pane! 

Precision Volt Meter 

Sweep Oscillator 

RF Watt Meter With Case 

Frequency Converter 

yicrocompuler Analyzer 

Capacrtance Bridge 

Constant Amplitude &gnai 

Generator 
F.M. Signal Generator 
PotenttometrTC Volt Meter 
Semiconductor Tester 
Direct Capacitance Bridge 
Time Mark Generator 
Graphic Level Recorder 
Monochrome TV Monitor 
Automatic plug in Bread Board 
Automatic plug in Bread Board 
Microwave Circulator 2-4GHZ 
20db ins. 3/1 loss 1 . 1 5-1 SWR 
Microwave Circulator 
1.71-1.85 GHZ 20 db ins 
3/10 loss 1 15-1 SWR 
Microwave Switch 
.5-12.4 GHZ 



Boonton Elect, 



Krhon-Hite 

Dana 

Hewlett Packard 



Systfon Donner 
Hewlett Packard 
Gulton 

Hewlett Packard 
Hewlett Packard 
Hewlett Packard 
Hewlett Packard 
Hewlett Packard 
Marconi Instrument 
Spectra Physics 
Boonton Elect. 
Rycon 

Hewlett Packard 
Calibration Standards 
Hewlett Packard 
Bird Elect. 
General Radio 
Motorola 
Boonton Elect, 
Tektronix 

Marconi Instruments 
Electro Scientific 
B&K Precision 
Boonlon Elect. 
Tektronix 
General Radio 
Setchell/Cartson 
A.P. Products 
A. P. Products 
Microwave Assoc. 

Microwave Assoc. 



Hewlett Packard 



Quantity 


Price 


1 


$ 69.99 each 


4 


$ 350.00 each 




$ 250.00 each 




$ 100.00 each 


4 


$ 450-00 each 




$ 250.00 each 




$ 250.00 each 


5 


$ 79.99 each 




$ 100.00 each 




$ 100.00 each 


3 


$ 90.00 each 




$ 70.00 each 




$ 250.00 each 




$ 200.00 each 


2 


$ 100,00 each 


1 


$ 250.00 each 


4 


;; 19.00 each 


2 


11 19.00 each 




S 100.00 each 




$ 100.00 each 




!S 39.95 each 




S 900.00 each 




$ 409.95 each 


2 


$ 400.00 each 


1 


$ 200.00 each 




$ 300.00 each 




$ 950.00 each 


2 


$ 150.00 each 




i! POR 




n 29-99 each 




$ 150.00 each 




$ POR 




$ 750.00 each 




$ 250.00 each 




$ 150.00 each 




$ 79.99 each 




$ 49.99 each 




$ 300,00 each 




S 99.99 each 




$ 100.00 each 




$ 69.99 each 




$ 200,00 each 




$ 100,00 each 




;; 199.00 each 




{;2000,00 each 




$ 300.00 each 




$ 100.00 each 




$1000.00 each 




$ 250,00 each 




$ 350.00 each 




$1000.00 each 




$ 49,00 each 




$ 500.00 each 




$ 155.00 each 




$ 75 00 each 




$ 50,00 each 




$ 50.00 each 




$ 50,00 each 




$ 50.00 each 



2822 North 32nd street. #1 • Phoenix. Arizona 85008 • Phone 602-956-9423 



p^See List of A^v&rtfser^ on p&ge 130 



73 Magazine • March, 1982 171 



• C©MMPINIIICMfl©INI 

AND YOU THOUGHT CHRISTMAS WAS OVER! 





m 
O 

I CALL TOLL FREE 






o 

EL 



NEW NEW 



NEW 



mill ii>4i HI I mv"- 



His It 41 IN tMiMJM II 'M>)l ^^U't'si «H1ov 




®KENV\/aaD 




SP-230 



TS-830S 



VFO-230 



« ««a>»l*»+q> 



UJ 



"III *.*lf,> 



H t Is M' inq»h aiiMi til I liA 



Hf'.i- 



m ijiilti 



■ m 4 1' I \>; II ' 

I 

'iHiii\fj f riM-Kiii 



JIL SX-200 Programmable Scanner 






o 

m 

a 



UJ 

QC 
Q 



1 Type: PM & AM 

2. Frequency ftange ijiSS— 57M5 
MHz Ff«q. Space 5kHz, D| SO— 38 MHz 
Freq. Space 12,5 khz; cj !08— ISO UHz 
Freq Space 5 kH;r; dj 380—514 MHi 
Freq. Space 12.5 kHz 

3. SensJlivHy: FM a^26— ISO WH/ 
4jjV S'M 120B 0)380— &14 MHz 1 OtjV 
S N T2cS AM fl)26—i BO MHz 1 OuV 
S^^ lOdB 01360— 51^ MHi 2 Ouv S^hi 
TOdB 

4. S«leciJvrty:FM MCftmanfiOc^at- 
ZS HHz AW More man 60 dB aj - i? 



5- Aiidio Qui put: 2 Warn 

6. External Speaker Impedance: *^^& 
odms 

7. Power Supply: i3v DC Mnciudedi 

5, Antenna Impedance; SQ — 75 Dhms, 

Whip of E>tteiOdi Antenna wrin LO/DX 

Connoi [2O0BATT,) 

9. Frequency Stabilily: 25 — ISO 

MHz AJjhin 30O Hz aSO — 514 

Mhz within 1 KHj ra! normal wm- 

peraiurei 




tfl 






m 

I" 
m 



c 

X 

n 

3] 

■n 



D 

> 

i 



m 
z 
o 

X 
m 

33 



3D 



NHz 

INTRODUCTORY SPECIAL $389.95 



rNTHODUCING THE: 
JtL SX-100 SCANNER 




NAV $399.00 



16 Channels 30^54 MHz, 140-180 
MHz, Digital Cbck Date Disptay 
no V. AC or 12-16 V DC, 
Seek Rate Fast I0ch/sec 
Slow 5ch.sec 
Sngh! Green 9 Digit Fr^uency D«s- 
Olay. Ext Antenna Jack Ent 
Speakef Jack. Large Top Mounting 
Bracket Scan Rate Fast Bch/sec 

Slow 4cli^sec 
San Delay Time Variable 0-4 sec 

UNBELIEVABLY PRICED 
ATA LOW $199,95 



R-600 



MIRAGE B-108 Two Meter Amplifier 

Features: lOW in — aOW out. Built-in 
Rece've Preamp. Adjustable De^ay 
for SSB Automatic Internal or Exter- 
nal Relay Switching. Frequency 
Range 144 to 148 MHz. Works for 
SSB, CW or FM Modes. Receive Pre- 
amp Provides lOdb Gain Mm , 5 year 
Warranty (1 Year on Power Trans). 

OUR PRICE *159.95 




NAV Si 79.95 



o 

o 

o 

z 

UJ 



III 



PANASONIC RF-3 100 

•FM/MW/S\V RADIO 
•AC/BATTERY OPERATION 
'3i BAND COVERAGE 
•QUARTZ SYNTHESIZED 

TUNING 
•5 DIGIT FREQUENCY 

READOUT 
•LIMITED 2 YEAR WARRANTY 



OUR MOST POPULAR HANDJE- 

TALKIE IS ON SALE 

THIS MONTH n 

ICOM IC-2A 



*S^ 



p 



> 

z 

O 

z 

O 
CD 



> 
< 
> 




^??^ 




Features 8CM3 Channels, Out- 
put 1.5W or 0.1 5W. Sepa- 
rate SuilHn Speaker and 
Mic. Optional Speaker/ 
Mic Avadabie. Comes with 
Rubber Duck Antenna. 
Battery, and Charger 

CALL FOR 
DISCOUNT PRICES 



o 
m 



3 
O 



• PRICES SuajECT TO CHAfvJGE AND AVAILABILITY ^^^J^^ll 11 A ^VE TRADE WE EXPORT * 



^2S 




iucf ftoiNiiici mmm 

1840 "O" Street Lincoln, Nebraska 68508 
In Nebraska Call (402) 476-7331 



Nationally Advertised Value 




172 73Magaiine • March. 1982 



REPEATERS . mNs«,m!5 QUALITY VHF/UHF KITS 



• LINKS •REPEATERS • TRANSMIHERS 

• RECEIVERS • PREAMPS • CONVERTERS 
TRANSCEIVERS • POWER SUPPLIES 



AT AFFORDABLE PRICES 




FM-5 PC Board Kit - ON LY $1 59.95 

complete with controls, heatsink, etc. 



SAVE A BUNDLE ON 
VHP FM TRANSCEIVERS! 

1 watts, 5 Channels, for6M, 2M, or 220 




HIGH QUALITY FM MODULES FOR 
REPEATERS, LINKS, TELEMETRY, ETC. 





m RZe VHF FM RECEIVER for lOM, 6M, 
2M, 220^ or commercial bands. Fantastic 
selectivity options. Kits from $84.96 to $1 09.95 

• R45OUHFFMRECEIVERfor3e0-520MHj 

bands. Kits in selectivity options from $94.95 

• R1 10 VHF AM RECEIVER Kit for vhf aircraft 
band or ham bands. Only Sd4.95. 



COR KITS Wflth audro mijter and speaker 
amplifier. Only $29.95. 

CWID KITS 158 bits, ffeld programmable, 
cJean aud^o. Only $59.95, 

A1 6 RF TIGHT BOX Deep drawn alum, case 
with tight cover and no seams, 7x8x2 inches. 
Only $18.00, 

SCANNER CONVERTERS Copy 72-76, 
135-144, 24O-270, 40O420, or 806-894 MHz 
barxfe on any scanner Wined/tested On ly $79.95. 




T51 VHF FM EXCITER lor 10M, 8M, 2M. 
220 MHz or adjacent bands. 2 Watts contin- 
uous. Kits only $54.95. 

T451 UHFFM EXCITER 2 to 3 Watts on 450 

ham band or adjacent. Kits only $64,95* 

VHF & UN F LINEAR AMPLIFIERS. Use on 

either FM or SSB. Power levels from 10 to 45 
Watts to go with exciters & xmtg converters. 
Kits from $69.95, 





VHF A UHFTRAWSMITTING CONVERTERS VHF & UHF RECEIVING CONVERTERS 



For SSB, CW, ATV. Ffvl, eta Available for 6M, 2M, 
220, 440 with many IF input ranges. Converler board 
kit only at $79.95 (VHP) or $99. 95 (UHF) or kits 
complete with PA and cabinet as shown. 



20 Modeis cover every practical rf and if range to 
tisten to SSB. F M, ATV, etc. on 6M, 2M . 220, 440. and 
110 aircraft band. Even convert weather down to 2 MI 
Kits from $39.95 and wired units. 




VHF & UHF RECEIVER 

m - —■ . — 

PREAMPS, Low notse. 



VHF Kits from 27 to 300 MHz. UHF 
Kitsfrom300to650 MHz. Broadband 
Kits: 20-650 MHz. Pnces start at 
$14.95 (VHF) and $18.95 iUHF). All 
preamps and converters have notse 
figure 2dB or less* 



Call or Write for FREE CATALOG 

{Send $1.00 or 4 IRC's for overseas MAILING) 
Order by phone or mall • Add $2 S & H per order 
(Electronic answering service evenings & weekends) 
Use VISA, MASTERCARD, Check, or UPS COO. 



amironics, inc. 

65'RMOUL RD. • HILTON NY i4468 

Phone: 71 6-392-9430 



RAMSEY 

ELECTRONICS 
'6s Inc. 



PARTS WAREHOUSE 



Wo rujw hiive avathihli^ a hunrh of qoodtr-^* loo 
good to bypr-iSFK llr^mi^ arip hrnitnd ^^o onlcf today 



THESE BEFORE NOW 



2575 Baird Rd. 
Penfield. NY 14526 

716 586-3950 



MINI KITS - YOU HAVE 
HERE ARE OLD FAVORITE AND NEW ONES TOO. 
GREAT FOR THAT AFTERNOON HOBBY. 



FM 

MINI 

MiKE 




A iuptt nigh ptrformtnc* FM #rrf- 
tvii rnih* iit' Trftnftmitl « t1ib4« 
•4^nii up TO 30O y«rai w>1A t)icep^ 

buill in aiicrrsi mtNt Kit mcludtt 
etf#. mikf ori-Q^f switch mlinni, 
b«tt« r V i n d • uptr mil ruci I pns Th i % 

f'M-a K41 114.95 

FM-3 Wirid tnd T»it«f3 Ift.SS 




Trvnim^ti up to 200 to 

in> FM broAf^catt rt- 

aiO, utti iny typ* Qf 

mikfl Rum en 3 to 9V Type FM-2 

his iddid liniaivt rnikt pre imp 

•iigi. 

FM-1 tail |3.i& FM-f kit |4,«Q 



Color Orgin 

See mu&ic come 
allvet 3 diffsrent 
Hghti MIckar with 
my»4c 0n9 liQtit 
ifcti for, high, 
mpd-ringi and 
lowi Each indK 
¥iduaHy adjutt* 
able and driv«a up 
to 3€€ W fynion 
110 VAC. 

Complete Hit. 
ML-1 
ti.ts 



■y : f ':D ^ttftft I^Of^T*^ Supt* 



Vjdvo WoayifliDf Kit 

i^v iccipEtiTd yidiOHBi^ti Btttuniion 
[hi mirliil' Carnpliti iMt VD*i l7,tl 



Lad ilihhy Kll 
Agr«atattemipng«t- 
tir whi{;h a^tftmaitiy 
n«an«a2 jumboLEOt 
Uit iQf ntfnt ixao^tt 
bu1lon». warndfig 
pantr \[^l% jhytt^fi^g* 
Runi on 3 ici IS volt>. 
Cornpi«ie iitt BL<1 
I2.fli 




tupar ilaulH 

A lupaf leniltiviamplh 
fi0r which w^lipick upi 
pin 0fop ai 15 fwi" Own 
*or monitpnng batiy^l 
^00 m pf ai getf>ffat pur- 
DOW ini>piltfi«f Full 3 M 
"^s oulpul fiifn pr» A 10 
tS ¥0^t| vtn (M& Qlm 
ihtr 
■mplete kit. BN-S 

li.lS 



CfO*i 

Rum pn 3-12 Vdc i wan oul i KHZ good lor C^O 

Alarm Aud'O 0«CMIilQr Compfeii M 13 §9 




Whtinar LIgtit Kll 

An tr^reraiting iiit, amalJ milta 
pick! up Bounds and Converts 
ih«m to light Tha louaar tha 
lOuhd. ti^t brighter ine iighl 
includes mtka, controla up to 
300 W, runa on 110 VAC. 
Complsta kit. WL^I 

IttJS 




Tona Dacodar 

A campiata ton* oaco" 
oar on a imgla ^C 
fioa^d Faaiurat aoo^ 
SOOO H£ adjui!aP<« 
rangt via 20 turn pot voitaga ragu^ 
latipn &67 IC Utalui tor rouch- 
lona bursr d«raetior». FSK. ate 
Can alao be used at a siabia tana 
ancpdar Runion5tol2 voUt 
ComplflTe kit. TO-^t IS.ttS 



Cull Vtjur Phon*.* Ordof *n Tociiiv 
TERMS' Satiiitafiiu^t 4jijaf(Utt^ifi! oi fiioiwv 
loiuiMiiKl COO a<1.1 S^tm M 
Sfi e» Ch ctris iiriilin 4T0 UJ .t^M i i - ■ r.. Ui 



CLOCK KITS 

Your oi^ favohtai ira Nara again. Ovar 7.000 Sold to Ditt. 
Ba on* of th* gan^ and oFdar youn todayl 

Try your hand at building the finest looking clock on the 
market Its satin finish anodlzed aluminum case looks great 
anywhere, wh^le six .4" LED digits provide a nighky readable 
display This is a complete kit r^o extras needed and it only 
takei 1*2 hours to assemble Your choice of esse colors: 
siivef. gold, black (specify) 

Clock kit. 12/24 hour. DC-5 t24.W 

Clock With 10 mm ID timer. 12/24 hour. DC-iO |29.ti 

Alarm clock, 12 houronfy, OC-B S29.S5 

12V DC car clock, DC-7 129-95 

For wired and tested clocks add $10 00 to kit prrce 

SPECIFY 12 OR 24 HOUR FORMAT 



Car Ctock 

TTia UN* KIT, onfy i tofdaf eon-n#crtofii 



*'*/ 



»niEiii Ci>ee« rnflrttmii'i ■! zcf^^mv^ tiM"-&'t3 - tc,^ c r ic "■•'■ 3 *'is I'^c 7 

JwitChM Tth»S a&Oul *i rrnnulffl^ &lOiiy '1 eriflrtt grttf* wt"^ fulQ'^tl'C UF'S^t-Hi 

control ifhQtoctti — •ii'urtt yo^j d' i roi'dnrr '^•idifri* d'tP'tty 04y (!»'' n^^jni G^rvi*! '" • 

Tip» Choice Qf i'lvtr ^ttcn or g^lO ciM lipicify} 

122,11 
l2tJI 



PC'3 *ir IS ht3U* ICJrmH 
OC-3 wir«tt And l»lt|[T 



Urtlrarul T?in«r KH 

Pravioai rnt puic pans in<t PC 
^■ro rtqyirffd ro pravSa a tourta 
pT prtCil^pn tirntng in<j pu'sa 
gen«ratipn Uaat 934 tirnar tc md 
mcludai * ringe pf pat'tl Ip^ mpit 
liming nttdi. 

uT-s Kll is.ie 



lledQIaittrKIt 

Pi'&dutts LOUD **f itiiTtaririj ifid 
atta^tiQ^ gaifing fira*^ Niif lourr^ 
Can luppiy up tP 15 witti of 

Obnoiiioyi audio Runs on 6-1 § VDC 



Stnn Kit 
^roducci upward and downward 
Will cf^araetariittc of a police 
airan & Wpaak audio output, rum 
on 3-15 voitt uiaa 3-45 o^m 
ipatker 
Compiota kit SM-3 12.95 



€il#ndir Alarm Clock 
Thtclockfhiiigot itaH S« S LEDl 
tZ'34 Piou^ inoort 24 hour iiarw 4 
ytAr tiiindar bant'-y btsnup and 
fott mofa Tht iupaf ^00 1 chip la 
.s#d S>jf fvnits inchvv Cofflpiatt 
K ! lais ciia (no; avi^ia&ia} 
0C'€ t14Ji 



Undar 0a«h Car Clock 
f.'vfnboaft .'•{} aci^i iipir 

pH-1 9f«*t^i*»f «3apwr M,it 



MB-1 Ml 



t4JI 



BO HI TlfTi* Bait 
iyr^l on ft- ■:S yDC Law Curffnf |Sf 6mi|. I 
rni PI ■'«! D ni« J d Cu-r irv TB - "? K H If.M 



PARTS PARADE 



Vldao T«rrnlnal 

AcOTipliliiilv ivlhcipnianict Hind ■lc'^B-^id*P IpFmmilcBi'd i^sqiiirit OPi> ir 4BCiI ^tvMii't^'lrid "^v 
ill lilFhtc^EMTie icai^p'ilf l*tni<rii|,i Li^'l ^*|i^»l'«l IF* k^nple IVluppiy )(TAL e'Ott»C]'lliaiV'^C*"°^^'^^ 
rilf-f ilfl MOn - cO'^piH* CQ^np'^Ffr irij hl'^Hoi^H co^C'&i P'l'iCM^iOr Pjir ry itq^ coniroil li^ddiipipv 
A^ctfiKii^d g**^!-!^*! I^'iii ASCII piu«p«r«i''»i •f^DQ'I'd i^pul 'T»-» flnili <iii c'n^f bv^f'i'^*'! wilh 

"- ir iCxivii ana ic<wi*#w« 0Ae,LfFf«f^iiii'a<" 

j.'t E«'*"<n|i a«ti lui iMd in 00 lor •<•*« wMiti tin at 

Paw** SiiPfi (tin 



IC SPECIALS 



LINEAR 



mo 



*► 



5S€ 



Ml 

t45a 

3100 

]d14 



I )i 

1110 

I «1 

ti.aa 

tiao 

II M 

II n 

io^tao« 
I s« 

t j« 

I2,t4 



4011 
4013 

ao4a 



CMOS 



^m 



4S11 



.50 
50 

Isias 

sa^oo 

S2,00 
S1-3S 

11.75 



READOUTS 

rND JAB 4~ C C |1.M 

HTTM^ o c* laa 



TRANSISTORS 



mjITI *4**h| SIMM** 

3Hairti>tr nvt* 

Tra*t<A 
Tfpt T*a 



UJT 



fMiaa 

tiJ^ila 
iMipa 

441« 

■/•laa 

in it 



TTL 



T4S00 

7447 

7475 

7490 

74196 



S.40 

S 59 
S .5^ 
t .50 

fiJS 



SPECIAL 



ttC90 

tone 

720fl 

7207A 

721flO 

7107C 

S314 

5375 ABG 

TOOt 



S15.00 
S 1.25 
$17.50 
S 5.5Q 
S21.00 
S1250 
S 2 95 
S 2.95 
S 6.50 



naa^ilDf Aaft 1 
Aiaodfnant o\ l^oputar va'uM - Mi' 
witi Cut laid fi^f PC counting '4'' 
cintaf %" ^aidt, bag of 3O0 pr 
mora. 

tl.60 



Crfaiaia 

3 579545 MH2 

10.00000 MHZ 
5 243800 MHZ 



Swltchai 

Mtn< togflie SPOT IIJO 

^td ^uiiiPuttpr^l H 3<i1.00 



larphonai 



ij^emt't ij-- I 3Cti tic 

5 for ST 00 



Mini I ohm i|»4i^«f 

iyp« for radioi mihv «tc 
1 lor t2,0D 



15.00 
ti.OD 



AC ASUpttri 

;'*fftt*t,if' 110 VAC ptug 
Of¥t ano 

a S w>e S » mA 11 ao 
ia «iC # teomA tlJO 

'2 fie 3t 250fnA l3 M 



S«|itd Blatt fli^EE-tri 

oulpk^l on S'i3 yac ir TD-3P mA, TTL 
campaTitilt tl.HP 



Slug Tunad Colli 

Small 3/ir He* Siugs tumad coH 
3iyms -10 for Si. 00 



AC Oulitt 

PanaJ Mount y^iTh Laadi 
4^1100 



*. 



FERRITE BEADS 



Sockati 

fl Pin 10/S2.00 

14 Pin l0/t2.00 

16 Pm to/12.00 

24 Pin 4^12.00 

26 Pm 4/12.00 

40 Pin 3/12.00 



0lod«i 
5 T V Zanar »l^1,a<| 

1N914 Type SO/tVOO 
1KV 2Amp i/Sl.OO 
100V lAmp 15/S1.00 



H.VH 



25 AMP 
100V Bridge 
|t.iO each 

Mini-Bridge 50V 

1 AMP 

2 for $1.00 



CAPAGlTdS* 
tAMTALUW 

t^SuF 25V 3^1,00 
1.8 yF 25V 3/S1 00 
.22uF25V3/Sl,00 



ALUHimiW 

^OOd j' ^fv 
5O0 yir Klv Ac« 

i»^r ^av A.*uira<pnja 

*Ouf tSV AH3.>ri0.i1 DO 



PftiC ccnAHic 

0' ^(v $i> 9a 11 Ri 
« *tv till 9Q 

tflDpF n|iao 

Off ifv »iti « 



PC-OC Conv«fi«f 
«S vdc input prod <9 vdc ^ 30rrii 
■'5 vdc praJ<LjE:at-1Svffc@a9mi 11.29 



»K 30 Tum Tnm P^ ft.OO 
1 K, 2D Turn Iftm Pbl I Ja 



Ceramic IF FHIara 

Mini ceramic flllara 7 kHz 

S.W. 455kHiS1.50ea. 



ir 



Tdnun«f Cipi 

Sprigga - ^'^40 pi 

Si«J&<a FOiytKOpyitfti 

Wai. 



Au<iio 

Praicalar 

Make ^tgh reaofution audio 
measurmenta, great tQf mLSlcal 
matrument tuning. PL tones, aic. 
MulMpiies audio UP tn fraQuenQy, 
selectable *10 o? xiOO, gjvei 01 
HZ rasoJulron ii\\h 1 sec gate 
limei Hign seniiiivity of 25 mv, 1 
mtf input z an0 tuiit-m fiitenng 
givaa ^reat performaf^€a Runii 
on dV battery %\\ CMOS 
PS<2 kit S29.91 

PS -2 v^ired S3i.95 




600 MHz 

PRESCALER 



extend the range of your 
counter to 600 MHz Works 
with aN counters Less tnan 
150 mv sensitivity specify - 
10 or *100 

Wired tested. PS-IB $59.95 
Kit PS- IB UAM 



30 Walt 2 mlr PWR AMP 

Sinnple Class C power amp features 3 times power gain 1 Win 
for 8 out. 2 W in for 15 out. 4W in for 30 oul Max output of 35 W. 
mcredib^ value, complete with all parts, less case and T-R relay 
PA-1 30 W pwr amp kit $22.95 

TR-1 RF sensed T-R fel«y kit 6.95 



MR F '235 irintiaipr aa uaaij ^n PA-t 
t-iOdb gain 150 mm ttl.aa 



RF actuated relay senses RF 

(1W) and closes DPDT relay. 

For RF sensed T-R relay 
TR-1 Kit Se.dS 



Powar Supply Kll 

Com pitta rnpia raguiatcdi pa#ar 
supply p'OVid«9 vaniplfl i (o ii volts 11 
200rr>aind *5it 1 Amp Ence^lenllpid 
regulatipn. good ruiaring and unall 
size Lbm iringfprmtrt. rtqulrei 5 % V 
i t A ind 24 VCT 
Complela kil PS-^LT te »5 



Ci>»t*l MicropHofia 
cryttti miiifl carindge 5.75 



CoeM Connactor 

Chaasis mount 

BNC type SI. 00 



Mmi flG''f74 Coa* 

ie a for 11.00 



a Volt W^vmj Clip* 
NHct quiiiTy ctipi t foif n.oe 



h%%\ Qf chQhii 






iini Ftmta^i 



■pn iwQ Mooxi tiJii)o baa ClOOpCi U: 



CdnriMl«in 

a plr« typB geld csntacii lor 
iTiA-1003 CirtlfXli moduli 

pric» .1% •« 



Ladi - ifPuf choica plaaia ipacify 

Mmi Rad Jumbo R«d H»gn iniensiiy R«d, MurmniAor Rk^ l/ll 

Mmi Va4iG>w JuiDbo Vtriow Jui^bo Graaf> t/t1 



HQtE»roEa MV Z20a X PF Morr^tnif cap SO-aO PF 

Hi«*G*^w]/tt.aa 



Tunabia ran^ 



OP-AliP Spaclat 
&l*Fi7 LF 13741 - Difici p-rt fo' pm 74i compi^tjla Pul 500.000 MEG 
input t sypa*' idw 50 pt "rrpul curf#nt 'om poml^ d^ii^ 
50 Ipf pnlf if .00 ie for t^.00 



78MG 
T9VG 
723 
309 K 
7605 



t13» 

11.35 
1,50 
•1.16 
•1.00 



Rtguittpra 



78 12 
7it5 
7905 

7912 
7915 



troo 

11.^00 

ti.2i 

SI, 25 
11.21 



ihrJink Tubing Mubt 

Hi^% pficui oc»i p' »tifin> »iEt V 1 "*" 

■nnnh IP A Grut I Of tpiiui Sa.tl M 



mini TO'92 Haal Knitt 

T^»rrt!«4loy S^and § tor • MOP 

To .^S^J Haal Sink* 3 for II W 



Opto Isolators - 4N2e type 

Opto Refleciora - Pfioto dtode ^ LED 



pH 



$,50 M, 

tt.00 M. 



IMam nni 
Mflia- •ii>4tev p^Kut M^ •''iflfi^ o* T p*4^tei 
tor 1* ptn locMti M at?^ tof ti flC 



c&a 
R**iMartea vinaa «i^ 



liQM 



290 oli#na ip 

itafiija* 



174 73 Magazine • March/19e2 



i 



"TOP QUALITY PARTS FOR LESS 



M.O.H.O. 



pi^* 



(SensBtionBt Nbw Hold Device For Your Phone) 

A Digftaf Research Exclusive. This handy item allows 
your home phone the HOLD option, formerly available only 
to the businessman.Enjoytheconvenfenceof placing calling party 
on hold without monthly charges! 



■ *. 



• Activates using the " *" button on your phone. 
• Pleasant "Tone" to remind caller he is on hold. 
• Unique 4 minute cutoff if calling party is forgotten. 
• Can be used to provide music for the calling party. 
• FCC Approved. 



(% 



Is 



■■1*4 



$37.50 

Assembled & Tested 



MONO «s accessible from any phone in your home, 



Kit $29.95 



Complete 

{For rotary dial add SI. 50 per phone) 



POWER SUPPLY 
TRIPLE OUTPUT 

25 Voits @ .18A 

5 Volts @ .8A 

15 Volts @ r25A 

Isolated independent 
outputs 

Positive or negative 
operation 

Constant Voltage Regu* 
lation 

25 Volt line adjustable 
With 10 torn pot from 
23.5 V to 28 Volts. 120 
Volt - 60 Hz input Fused - 
H=3V4" W=5V2" 0=4" 

$-(495 



Fixed Inductors 

aguh^e/l**^ 12.5 uh^ 8/1°° 

500 uh- Hash Filter 
@ 2 Amps -4/1°° 



Molded Choke 

13uh-B/1"°50mh.6/1**° 



Precision l-lybrid 
Oscillator Module 

Has both 1 MHZ and 2 MHZ 
TTL - outputs —Hermeti- 
cally sealed —Ultra high 
statiility over vvide tennp 
range —originally cost over 
$40,00 each — we made a 
super purchase from a 
major computer manufac- 
turer — 5 Volt operation - 
fits standard 24 pin socket* 
Manufactured by Motorola 
oscillator division. 

MC6871A 



MC6S71A 



50 



3/20 



wMata 



NEO 2137 by NEC 

• Microwave R.F. trans- 
istor (N.P.N.) 

• tvlicromold Package 
#37 

• Dual Emitter leads 

• FT to 4.5 GHZ 

• VCEO 10V-CC 20 
MA. HFE 40-200 

• Gain 10V-20MA- 
1GHZ= 14DB Typical 

• Very low noise - High 
gain 1.5 DB @5D0 
MHZ 

• Cleared for high reli- 
ability space appli- 
cations 

COMPARE 1 ^^ 



2N6058 

12 AMP Darlington NPN 
VCEO - 80 VDC 
IC - 12 ADC 

HFE-3500(Typ.) @5.0ADC 
TO-3 Case 

135 ea. 3/3.50 



1,2 mh- 8/1 



00 



Variable 
inductors 

30-40 uh 
.9uh- 1.2 uh 

11uhto20uh / 
,25 uh -.35 uh 
85uh-.95ufi 



EIAJ#1SS98 

NEC #4981 -7 E 
Microwave - Schottky 

barrier diode 



HP-Hot Carrier diodes 
5082-2835 

99* or 6/5°° 



UNIVERSAL 

TIMER KIT 

* Adjustable from 1 sec 
to 1 hr 

* Control up to 1 amp 
'Turn Thlng$ On Or Oft" 

Kit includes all parts 
necessary to build this 
exciUng kit, Uses Children's 
T.V. programs - Darkfoom 
exposures - Amateur 10 mm 
! D er - Egg Timer - Inter- 
mittent Windshield Wiper 
Absolutely endless uses 
Complete kit incfuding 
power supply, p.c, board 
DPDT relay, and all parts to 
make timer operationaf 

Sg95 



ORDER YOUR FREE 1982 CATALOG TODAYI 

Research: Parts 

P.O. bx 401247 « Gtrlani Ttiiu 7S040 






r 90^ \^M f / 

Pigifal 



ht hrni^n ntit'i% \Cm^h Ui^\ jdd 20;^ RAH 



- ViSA ' MASTEIICARD - AMERICAN EXPRESS ' 



(214) a7i-a46i 



UbJ of A^¥§niS9rM on pag§ f 10 



73MagB2ine • March, 1962 175 



M SFCCIALISTS • CUSHC AAFT • D AAKC -MUM HC V • HUSflOl • HV-GflIN • ICOM • KflNTAON ICS ■ 




O 

o 



3 



& 



8 



S 



w 



SONY 
ICF2001 



DIGITAL 
DIRECT ACCESS 
SHORT WAVE RECEIVER 



> 150KHI -30 MHz + FM BROADCAST 

• PLL SYNTHESIZED WITH SCANNING & MEMORY 

• AC ADAPTOR INCLUDED 

• ^ YEAR SONY D.S.A, FACTORY LIMITED 
WARRANTY 

• AM/CW/SS8 

• SURPRISINGLY AFFORDABLE 

CALL AND ORDER YOURS TODAY 



mM^^^is^^^m^mfm^mriym^^ 



4 






,pf-^^'f/Z»i 



OUR BEST-SELLINQ MULTI-BAND! 




— ^^^IJM- I 1 



P 



^ 



AS LOW AS 



$ 



94 



50 



Add S5.00 

for shipping 

(Cont'l U.S.A.) 



« One hirl tfte lengiti od ccMTwnnoful haG-wove dtpoies 

• MuUi band. MulTi trftqucncy 
■ Mnimum tfficitfiCf — no traps loading oMis, or ituDs 

• Fully isM«nbled ifld pft tuned — w (rwsunfig. no cuRtng 

• All wfatrwf raisd — i kw am ? s kw cw er PEP SS8 

• Proven psrlormance — more Ihan 10,000 tuvt been daUvereti 

• Permii use of \he full capab^lliies ol today's ^-band xcvrs 
« One feed fine for opera Hon on all bands 

80-4OHD/A 80/40 Mtr bands (69). . , , 99,00 
75/40 HD/A 7S/40 Mtr bands (661 ^ ■ ^ 94.50 
75-10HD/A 75/40/20/15/10 Mtr (66). . 126.95 
fl040HO/A 80/40/20/15/10 Mtr (69). . 132.00 



^0m^;^s^^$mmsm 



^yrrtc* 



rCAtirc 



?^tiS 








III 



-V- 



-A' 

if*' 



plut 13.00 

eConi'l U^J 

An ine iMOfkJ'a 5l1ixr«rfv<e broKScasI CMrsdi ace 
fDurs «Hti ifi« Eii<r«sdrQp|wr All B«mt onivmu. 

indi^fdujUy lurvfld iraps make (he Eaiftradroipptfr 
wdth itho «iDvan separiiiEi antunaas, ^acH tun«d lo 
a ditrfirenl irttftrnational brcradcas^ banct Alao 
covers 11 and dOM binOB as weJl ii? IDO ImI. 72 



SWffr WMKf BROADCAST 
BECEtVING AHTEHHA 

* AUTOMATIC BAHDSW1TCHINC! 

< COMPLETELY jWEATHERf»IIOOFi 

• COMPLETE. NO ASSEMBtYNElOeO* 



^: 



% 




* SO, 40. 41, n, 3S, tfi. 1«. 1) A 11M BANDSr ^^ 






Ofwn tHiairice4 End^ine prowtdft ft ti#cr m^icn 19 
Ih* amiPiriTH dn vrtry barKf Cofnes compel*! y 
itsembr^d, and roMy ro tnn^ii with SO ft. ci I 450 
!t} lesl nyldn fupe Overall leriQlh: 43 '10" Wire 
IMJcDpper clad itHl 8and»«^llcMrig Auiomahc 
impedancfi IP rcvr. S0-7B aiima t^iancpd 

Ofily^SfflS 






m 



K\ «S^«»^5Sy'^:?i<r!vi^Ai^ 



fe 



AMECO ALbBAND PREAMP! 
Our Most Popular Preamplifier 

MODEL PLF'2 

$5295 

plus 13.00 shipping 



MODEL PLF-2.. .Improves weak signals as mucli 
as image and spurious rejection of most receiver^. 
Difect switching to rec, or preamp. Includes pwf. 

supp. 117 VAC wrred & tested. %S7M 

MODEL PLF-2E...24G VAC 50«0 H; operation 

.....,,.. S57.9S 

MODEL PT-2„.For transceiver use. Continuously 
tunable from 6 to 160 meters. Features dual-gate 
FET transistor amplifier for improved receiver sen- 
sitivity and low noise figure. Requires no 
transceiver modifications and can handle up to 
250W transcetver output 1 1 7 VAC 60 Hz. . . , 579.95 
MODEL PT*2E...240 VAC 50-60 Hi 0perati0nS84.95 



TRANSCOM 

PROGRAMMABLE SUB AUDIBLE TONE 
ENCODER FOR ICOM HANDHELDS. 







$ 



29 



i9v 



Pkjt S2.00 

thtpping and 
hind ling 

•ONLY 1.1" X 55" X.2" 

• PRESET OUTPUT LEVEL FOR IC2A 

• LOW TONE DISTORTION LESS THAN 1% 
THD 

• TONE STABILITY ± .2% Hz FROM -20C 
TO +70C 

• 1 YEAR LIMITED FACTORY WARRANTY 

• 5VDC POWERED 




ICOM WE'VE SOLD FM GEAR FOR 14 YEARS 

& IN OUR OPINION ICOM IS... 
"SIMPLY THE BEST" 

I 









IC2A, IC2AT 

OUR MOST 

POPULAR HAND 
HELD & THE BEST 
VALUE AVAILABLE 



• COMPACT 

• QUALITY CONSTFtUCTlON 

• VERSATILE 

• AFFORDABLE 

- WIDE RANGE OF ACCES- 
SORIES AVAILABLE 




IC3AT(220MHz) 

IC4AT(440MHz) 



% 
■3 




IC25A 



A LITTLE PACKAGE WITH A 
LOT OF BIG FEATURES.., 

• 25W OUTPUT • MEMORIES 

* ENCODING MIC • SCANNING 



CALL FOR PRICE & AVAILABILITY 






i^Ji 



T^ #-vrhm-n ^^^^L OR WRITE, MASTER CARa VISA, MONEY ORDERS. PERSONAL CHECKS TAKE 3 WEEKS 
TO ORDER: TO CLEAR, ACCEPTED. INTERNATIONAL ORDERS WELCOME, PLEASE REQUEST PRO FORMA 

INVOICE. 

HOURS: MON. THRU WED. 9:30-6:00, THURSFRL 9:30-8:00, SAT. 9:30-3:00 

STOP BY AND VISIT WHEN IN THE CHICAGOLAND AREA!! 



S8 

z 

w 

3 






s 



8 



3 

ai 

m 
m 

3 




176 73Magaiine • March, 1982 






7400 



SISi74QifS 
SM74e3ht 

STtmrn 

£N74]JN 
SNt4|4N 

SNMJJN 
5N742JN 
SN:7il2|M 
SJM74atN 

SHftam 

SMWWN 
5M7JJJN 

SNUJTN 

5N7441N 

SN744N 
5N744(N 
5N7447N 

Shrt«N 

SN74?aN 



»L5a 
ML5H 

74L£iai 

HUS31 
MUSH 

HUSii 

Musai 

WL34a 
»LS4T 
HLSH 
HLSM 
MLSl 

T«LS7J 

HLSa 

1IL5» 
HLSK 



MSn 
M5Q2 
MSOt 

M50* 

Hsai 

MSK 
M51D 

MSll 

HS3B 
M&33 

MS4fl 

i'4SG4 

W5il« 

CAWWH 

CAXHN 

CASMH 
CAJOS»N 



.9 

M 
.A 
Jf 
.1ft 



.» 

.21 

,A 

Jft 



.4d 

JO 

LIO 

» 

.JO 
M 

.A 

.a 



SM747*f* 
SNU7SN 

S^f74•0M 

SrvMCN 

SNMCN: 
9N74eN 
SNHKN 

SN74*?N 

SNMnN 

SNJ«7^J 

SN74lCeN 

5KJ4U4M 

SNM107N 

SMflJlin 
St^74mN 

SMl*mN 

SNUMIN 
&M7il42N 

&NT4143N 
SNJ4L44N 

SJNIMMTN 



-» 

.a 
-** 



L 



SNT4I53r<^ 

SN741WN 
SNxnSSN 



3S 

n 

1.49 



jn 

3.« 

J.4fl 

1.% 
U9 
LS 

M 

.m 

.n 

i.S 
.?9 



iiiftU 

SN7tlS7N 

$NT4iHiN 

5N74l&2:IN 
SN741AIN 
5M741iJPI 

SOfWITN 
5N74mN 

SIM74172N 
5NT4J7JN 
5Mi;4|74M 
SN74|nM 
5M74l)tN 

5NT4U0^t 
sM74it;M 

SN?4|*4N 
&N74l|ftN 
SNT4|fafU 
ST^4)«1^ 
SM74JtIM 
Sf^74l4iJN 

SrJ74I«N 

smmmN 

swwmN 

SN14»IN 
SfV74!?INl 

SlN74a?!ht 
SN7i3|3r4 
Shl74a4'^ 
&Ni743lft1S 

SNnaHM 

SN743SfNf 
SN74B0N 
SNUMJN 



a 

» 
jft 

JI 
JI 



.4ft 
.S 
.2 
JI 

.49 
.4ft 

J9 
.4ft 



74LS 



741-SH 

74LS1U 
7iLS1l4 

74LSUi 

T4LSi32 
74L£m 

74Lsm 
-HLsm 

743-SiJ9 
IlLSIftl 
74LSIB 
74LS15? 

?4l-S]i& 
74L&)il 
74U5l£9 
MLSW 
74LSin 
74i^l?* 



LIS 
.46 

Ji 

M 
M 
M 



m 

M 

,B 

1.15 
].n 
1.15 
LIS 
L& 

L19 

':! 

!.« 

LS 



?4i,sm 

KL5W 

HLStn 

74L&tl7 
HL522|i 
ML5MI 
74LS3I1 
74LSM 
MLSM 

»Lsm 

HLS»] 

74LS3II 
?4LS»6 
74L5»J 

MLSJftl 
74L.S3&1 
HLSH 

HLS37J 

J'4L5374 
74LS17a 
MLSM 

NLSlM 
TiLStTQ 
llb-SH 

tlUS97 



.4& 

M 
.» 
-Mi 

M 
M 
M 



M 
LS 

.«■ 
U 

.n 

■7» 



74S 



MSI33 
USUI 
KSIift 

M&1« 

34Sm 
»Sl3d 
MSIW 
?4»»S1 

msisi 

74&3 74 
H51IA 

ISM 



U9S 
JS 

Ji 
LH 

L3S 
l-JS 

I.S 
US 

2.»S 
IS 



M5?4J 

74S2H 
?4Sai 



T4S3«r 
I453ifi 
MSJ73 
1I5JT4 



MSCfl 
l«S47t 
745411 

ns4>4 

US4]f5. 
nBSTQ 

Ttssn 

MSSU 

7«S»I] 



.99 

LIS 

L» 



CA-LINEAR 

US 

fS 

J5 



CAJfiUM 
CAMieJ 
CAJOKIN 
CAJOBM 



CAJOtSN 
CAIINH 



1. Lj*jijj 

cotooa 

CO*SEil 

comm 
comtf 

CQ44I1 

cwom 

ci:mii|4 
co4ai& 

conn 

CQ4fiII 
C04fll9 

CD40» 
CE^4«el 
CO*IBl 

CP4M* 

cnxoa 

CCMEft 

CDuer 

CtHDd 
C04IS9 

CDUS4 
CD4C» 



Ji 

LD 

Jt 

.as 

.41 

US 
LL4 

Ji 

-i» 

1.1:9 
U» 

ja 

£.» 
ja 

M 
M 



CD-CMOS 



CIMHJ 

cmom 

CO40«* 
CDttlfi 

c:d4du 



CD4«1 
C04«tt 

catmt 
cmoH 

C£H«t 
C049H 

CO«0)t 
CCrtOTl 

CQ4g?t 

CD4ai 



CDI«*I 



LQ 



i.Ti 

3.SQ 

1-J5 

V49 

Ji 

Li* 

Ul 
LU 
Lf5 
IK 

L49 

4» 
.4S 

.» 

M 

JS 

Ji 



CD4«I 

ccwd 

COIOT 
CD4Si4 

C Crisis 

CD45.lt 
CD4ftU 



CI 
CQ4fi>29 
CD4da 
CD4ftG: 

ccriac* 

CD«i> 

CDiaw 

cot 32] 

CCWTM 

MCi440« 

MC 14414 

WCJ44J] 

MCI441? 

MC14411 

MCI44U 

MCl^Jl 

«ffC]:4W( 



H 
M 

.«$ 
J9 

4,fS 

Ji 

1.41 
t.4» 



J9 
J9 

.i9 

li 

li 

L4» 

l-4i 

i.a 
n 

i.fi 

h4f9 

XiA 
M 

Jt 
.» 

1.44 
L4i 



Lift 
lift 
LU 
Lift 

Ml 

i.l« 
L49 

L4a 

1.41 
1.95 

Lll 
L19 

.€' 



^? 
M 

L.n 

1.29 
1.3f 

h 

M 

l.% 

l.» 

a-: 

2.4« 
L9« 
l.H 



J, 25. 
I.4S 

1 n 

- - — *- 

ijft 
n 

2,11 

19^ 

Ifl-.Eii 
12.'.)^ 
12,*5. 



111 



3./i 
LJft 
LIS 
3.M 



2.4f 
.it 

3.n 

IJ* 

].4« 
i« 
?.9S 

iM 

L.n 

M 
IM 
LH 

i.n 

Ln 

2.n 

iLift 

im 

i.« 

ifl.K 

is Jft 

7ja 

LB 






Bulova Quartz Ladies Watches 



■^T7?^~^ 



Out TEMM facn^mr WMEMMmfif 







- 'hhUJCB !*ii«t. Bflir a»*Tf 



YOUR CHOICE - 50%-OFF SUGG. RETAIL PRICE 

CALL OR SEND OftDSR IN fi£fEfi€NCtHQ TO TMl$ AQ FOR Sf^CSAL PRtCE 
Bwcausfl of Linii)|»d Supply. ptai»« provide ■ »*cofHl and Ih^rd c^cHct 

EXAMPLE: e239^6V, SUGQ. flETAlL %i4QM. 50% OFF- YOUR COST *?0.Ofl 



^j'jvr-j^ 



UTBONIX Stick Obplay Sale 



t^iA 




*-—"■■ 







NATIOMAL Stick Display Safe 





COMPUTER ORAIJE CAPACTTOM 



irp-. 



<fv&g Wm^l 



TH 



I n 



m tm 



iSE 

1.IW 
B.Ht 

I. in 
Ei4& 



m 
n 
m 
m 
Jft 

4fl 
in 



an 

t4l 



■STB 



WifOC PMCt 



■D4H 

■ tHt 

tlHC 
■lilt 



HMD 

iimt 



11 
II 

II 

M 

Id 

q 
It 

t| 

T 
II 
H 



Ufa 



WnK *RfCE 



riE 


14.HD 


TH 


iT.Vil 


III 


U.DH 


IM 


41 HH 


im 


4^ 


IH 


iAW 


f ■ 


H nt 


IB 


WiV 


til 


UM 


t4l 


mm 


1^ 


Tt ^B 


Sit 


iOiid 


III 


IP.aDQ 


1 II 


lUDDD 


3 H 


tKIH 



n 

s 

■ 
n 

s 

■m 

i 

lt 

m 



1.14 
IN 
(IS 
I V 
in 
TB 
IP 
IM 
IH 

?« 

II? 
I.li 

■ III 



dvfn JOB OtH^V VUUEt MMJULt — CUX aP WHTE KW 1>im nttHJEA^NH T 



fffffff^ 



LOW PROFILE 
tTtN^ SOCKETS 



J:^ 



fe^ 



sft-iai 



14 win LP 
lifttn LP 
11 Drn LP 

»l»in L^ 
I4l3in LP 
21 pin LP* 

* Pkn LP 

40 p^A LP 



At 
.m 

ja 
Jit 
JI 
at 

M 
M 
-SO 



.If 

JI 

JI 
.44 
.&9 
J2 



.,11 
41 

-38 
.X 
,4J 

.Si 



Wrffr 



I pin sa 

14 Pin 5a 
U em sa 

40Bln5G 



SOLOEflTAIL (GOLO^ 
STANDARD 



Ml 



SD-IOS 



.49 

.S4 
Ji 

M 

ui 



LIS 



.43 
M 
At 

1J0 



.41 
.44 



La 

1.4S 



imnT 



SOLDERTAIL 

STANDARD mm 



I'H 



s^S 



tt^lOO 



14 Din ST 

15 pm ST 

iM 0*n ST 

21 p>n ST 

3t P4n ST 

4D pin ^T 



je 

JS 
.41 

L* 
L9 



.25 
Jt 

■4i 
J« 

Ui 
L45 



JO 

-4a 

JJ 

LIS 



WIRE WRAP SOCKETS 
IGOLDI LEVEL ^3 



J^>* 



M-Jfifi 



I Pifi 
IS D1f« 
14 pin 

it pin 
lA pj(i 
2t] pin 
12 pin 
34 Bin 

ap»n 

K pin 
40 pin 



WW 
vniv 

WW 

WW 

WW 

WW 
WW 

WW 



WW 
WW 



JI 

1.19 
1-41 
L9 

LJi 

2Ji 

2.2S 



J« 



141 
Ltl 



M 
jE7 

JI 

M 

L21 

LW 

La 

L?S 
LB 



1/4 WAH RESISTOR ASSORTMENTS -5% 



AiST, 1 



lA Qnm D Ohfn ^- 11 OnTH Z3 Ohm 

17 Oftm I] f3fun J3 prirn 17 OfitTi M Ohm 



A6ST, 2 iH. 



UQ Onmsa Ofim ?7t O-nm UD Ohm JK Ofim 



50p«i, $1.95 



A6ST. 3 6h^ 



fTOOhmBM OhmWe CShimPJa Ohm m *i rtc 

l.JK l.lK 1,»K 1.2K 2.7K 6ap<i. »i>ab 



AfiST-4 



LJK 



llOlt 



4^^nc 
utt 






CJK 



sopw. S^95 



ASST, S 



OH 
ilK 



UK 



UK 

tTK 



3iM 



41-K 



fiOptii. $1+96 



ASST, 6 Smh 



IftQK 



IIOK 



2»K 



370K 



IJOK 



SOpei. $ 1 »9d 



ASST,7 



avrM 



ljm 



UM 
l.«^ 



UM 



ft.iM 



ASST. Bll 



Wga> S1>95 

Includes Resistor AssiL 1-7 (350 pes.) $10.9S ea. 



110.00 WInlmum Of<t»r — U.S. Fundi Only 
CilH&rnE« R«ald»nls Add S^/d Sfll*£ Tin 
Pcutigft — Ad^j 5% plut $1.SC Irtiufanci 

^ NEW 
7992 
CATALOG 



Sp«c Shvvit — 2$< 
&»nd aae POBiag* for your 
f A£f 1982 JAMECO CATAtOG 
Prkcti Sybjiicl to Chtn^t 





Uj :-r* tWC Mi^J 



ameco 



ELECTRONICS 



1^28 



3f8S 



135S SHOflEWAY ROAD, BELMONT. CA 94002 
PHONE ORDERS WELCOME — (415) 592S097 



Fvtiia. 

704E:Vmit^ 
710ftCPL 

?JMEV/Kll* 
710JCPL 
HOfEv/WII ■ 
TIMCPL 
TlTT^PL 

raoMDR 

7aBtl»G 

720&CJPE 

7jace^//Kit* 

7W.TA1PO 
72STA£vM>I' 

TZflilPA 

^2]«A|Jt 
72l£CiJJ 

77ii^ipr 

"lUi fPli_ 
'i%AlJL 

7240IJE 

7242IJA 

729DIJE 

l^iOuE 

7961 PA 

ISftlPO 

TtnecPA 

TtlZBCPA 
TQiaCPA 
1MJCCPE 

7MJCCPQ 
1WSCCP0 

SBKCPO 
s&i4CCP£ 

IBllCPA 




FufVtiQn ^ie* 

CMO:^ PrpclUon Tlmar JAJ^ 

StopiA'Btch Cnkp, XtL StM 

i^ OJ«ll A/0 ELCD Drlv«} ji,«i 

JC, Circuit Boara. Dlip^iy 34.95 

li'j Omt A/D CLEO OrWiLi |ft.fl» 

lie. Circutt BomwQ, a\iQlmy S.s$ 

fVi Dtflt fKJO LCO Otx- HUD. tfJS 

M DIfIt A/O LED Dlt. HUJi. 17Jft 
LAWBlttafy VtHI inoicitor ILS 

CMOS LEO ^toti^cicn/TidHir Un 

St-DPwAtch CMP, XTL ii.% 
Ton* Oen«rat(7r 5,15 

T B n« G ■ naf it or Ch tp. X T L l?.t5 
OseniAtO^ CPfltrolltr tjfi 

Ffa. Coiint*r Chl«, KTt^ IJjil 

&*v*n D*Ci«a« Counlir ILK 
Clock Cen*r4tPr %.% 

4 Punc. CM05 sioowatcn CKT 13.«£ 

4 P u nc. Sia P wfats:^ C n Ip. X Ti, It.fS 

fl-DJgIt UnN. Countir C.A. 32,00 

l-Ol(hJt Fr»Q|. CDLint«f CA. 3iM 

B^DIlilt Friril. Caunt«r C-C. ILH 

i^Dlglt LED UiP/DOMn COunfvr UJft 

irOiflf LlnHt. L£DO'(v4 tit.S 

LCD *<<* DlfH Un counter ORt iLS 

i'Diiiu i>nlv. CfiHjfiitr DJi 

^ Function CpuntBr Chip, KtL M.M 
CMOS Bll% PfCi|. T|m(r;CaiUnl»r 4,tft 
CMOS Dlvm*"By'2M HCTIm*r 2.« 

CMOS BCD Proq. Tim4r/CPuritir LM 
CMOS BC O ^T09v TI nw r/C Portl** S. S 
CMOS Sftft Ttmt t% II in] t^ 

CMOS VSt TlnHF (14 0kAl J JO 

CMOS OD Amp Cpnipprvlgr 5MV SJ& 
CMOS Qp Amp E«t. QfnMf. 5MV J.*5 
CMOS Puil Op Amp Camp. iMV 3M 
CMOS Tri op Amo Csmp. mAV a.B 
CMOS dutn Op Amp Corrtp. IQMV ?J0 
CMOS Qu^d Op Amp Comp. Ufciv 



VQltjH CMIw*rtrr 



7jfO 

Wiwform <l4fi«rat(i^ 4.K. 

VonoUtntC LPHriitrirnkc Amp ZlJll 

Hppni Stntf-^AP V4tli R4t. DliOOl Z.K 
Volt flvVlnOICitCtr Z.B 

Volt ^pf/tnaicatgr a.95 



74CQ} 
»C4l 

ttoai 

fee to 

74C2IJ 
74CJ0 
74C4? 
74C4* 
74C73 
MCT* 
HC» 
?^C» 

Rcn 

74CIJ 



74C 



MCVT 

74CtS4 
74C1S7 

T4C1« 

74ciei 

?'4Clf2 

74C^ 
74Cin 

Mem 

T4CI4B 
I4C1SQ 

?4Ci55 



LSI 

ua 
La 

1.19 

KSO 
1.4* 
IM 

Lm 

LA 
Lll 
Mi 
l.» 



MCJ4e 
7iC?t4 

'*Cl^i 
74CJS* 

T4c:«3 

74C912 

/4C*ll 

T*cm 

74C1& 

s^ 

WC*tf 



Las 

1*48 

iCi.Sft 

10,9S 

r.ft9 

JULH 
LIO 



LHQOQICN 
LMUCLH 
LMUCLH 
LHSPH?*^ 

TLsnc^ 

TLOMCN 

LH<«e;cQ 

TLJ012CP 
TLflWCN 

LNajpCD 

LWiasK 

LMJUCr^ 

LM»tH 

LMUMH 

LMiBH 
LMM^ClNf 
l_M4fllC^ 
J-.M3a|H 

lv aoiK 

L.VliflCW 

LM2I1/CN 

LMJtjH 

LMllJWP 

LM31JT 

LMJI7K. 

LMIUCN 

LMIBK4 

LM]»K'12 

LJ^XSOK-lS 

HV13ZflT-5. 

I_M3J0T-I3 

LM3»T-li 

LhUEIK 

UU114I4 

LMUIIN 
LM3H2 

UM3»Z 
LM23fiZ 
LM33JT 
LMXITMP 

LM3VM 

LM140K-1? 
UMJ4QK-1S 



i.ia 
4.fta 
4,n 

4.» 
.9 

L» 
}.4| 

1.19 

3M 

Jft.lD 

.W 

Jfi 

LH 

ill 

.n 

.4:1 
li»fl 

UA 

1.J5 
J.Ji 
LS& 
Lift 

Ui 
i.B 
l.» 

l.a 
ijft 
i^ 
i.« 

j» 

Lift 
LS 

IM 

iM 
Jt 



» 



LINEAR 



LW34QT-S 
LWjiaTH 
LMB48T-)S 
LMM1P4 

LM341P-1? 
U 1^341 P-1& 
LM54aP-6 
LM342P-II 
Lr'i}4SP>tft 

LFI&IM 

LFJ55N 
LFiSSN 
LM3SSN 
i^MXiM 

LMXW4 

LMJfJfi 
1.M9GIN 

LVI341M 
LM3S2M 

LM1BN4 
UMIDN 



La 

L£ 

La 

.IS 

.» 

.75 
J» 

La 

JO 
1.00 
l.iO 

1.10 

LOO 
LTl 



LFMN 

L1V1M9H 
TLmCH 
rL49&CP 
NEUM 



LA 

L9& 

1.79 

La 

L« 
Ul 

4ja 

5.00 

4.« 
Lm 



NEsatH 
NE»4CIH 
hlE5*4Mi 
^J■E5SCIA 
NE9KV 
LP^HN 
NEHiN 



Ui 

«je 

L» 



UMiCCN 

hlESTOISf 



L» 



LMTDHH 
LMTOICN 

JLHrtWi 

Lwnift 

LWrxIM 

L1V17J3M 

LMJtlCN 
MCIMISCO 

LATIItM 

LMillOiM 
LJWil4|tCN 

LMI4MN 
LMMKN 
LMI4«N 

LMUTIN 
LMiriN 
LMUTTN-i 

LMin9P4 

LJviuv&r4 
UriSOOaT 
UMttTP 



1.19 

.35 

.» 

i,n 

IJS 

.« 

Lift 

Lift 
l.lft 
i-Jft 



Su4i 

J.B 

l.H 
Ui 



UMtlDN 
I-MIWDN 

LMimC M 

l-MJMSN 

LMj|t4fyt 

uymBN 
LMMmrt 
nc4LSni 
nC4UiN9 

RC4l*lTK 

flC4l»TK 

l_M4ftnA 

4CLl0.3«d 

LMlSBPi 

LMi3M0N 

7S4tthf 
1«iiCN: 

7544? 



Z*» 

M 

i.a 
i.is 
1.1ft 
i-W 
i.m 
Ui 
*.fft 

^.49 

3.S£ 
4.K 

L« 

L« 

JI 



CAPACITOR CORNER 



60 VOLT CEHAMIC DISC CAPACITORS 



Wpf 

^? of 

IfiQpf 
7213 pr 

47D of 



JI JS Ji 

JS J» 

.» ,{& 

.0$ .Ofi 

JK .Oft 



M 



vtiuc 

.OVi^F 

.OliiF 

.li*F 



.01 

.a 
.11 






.01 

,12 



OOtmr 

XESmt 

JO0Rlt 



100 VOLT MY LAR FlLDi CAPAC<TOFt£ 



.a 
Ji 



.» j-f 
.» Jt 



.Imf 

J2nir 



U .11 
JT J] 

J^ 421 



.flft 

.« 

.OG 

.10 



jy 



h20fc OIPPED TANTALUftflS (&Qlidl CAPACIJOn? 



.ly35v 

J5/3SV 

.H/3SV 

,31«v 

47/36V 

mmv 

i*/3SV 



Jft 

.JI- 



.3* 

■ 14 
H 



-2H 

J9 

JI 



*.7/ZSV 

amv 
a^fv 



41 
SI 

?9 



,37 
-41 
.47 

.li 
Ji 



.29 

.f7 
-4ft 
JI 



L3t Ul 
.7f .M 



MINK ALUMINUM f LECTnOLYTlC CAPACITORS 



AxiQl 

.I7/5PV 
l.Q/MV 
Ll/SOV 

4.7/av 
»/aw 

l&fiOV 

?2^v 

4J^V 

<7/5flV 

ZiMBiV 

*JOyav 

220D/1CV 



l'*9 IOOhIM MOh- 



.1? 
.11 
.a 
.If 

.LI 
.24 

,3 
.29 
,3t 
.41 
^ 
,41 

,3f 



.14 
.11 

.IS 

J* 

JI 
.ft 
.» 
.37 
J4 
.4 
M 
M 
.79 



.10 
Al 
J3 

■.II 

.13 

.11 

A1 
.U 
.37 
.14 
J3 
4L 



Radlil 

.4J/SV 
.4T^0V 

li;l/uv 

LWV 

Lf/nv 
*.ijasv 
lo/isv 

10/3fiV 

HJ/5C1V 

410^/9V 



1^99 100-4^ 
45 .13 



.IS 
.IS 

.u 
.u 

.17 
.15 

.15 
.17 
Jft 
.21 

JS 

-» 



.14 
M 

.14 

.U 
.11 
,t4 

Ji 
JI 



5004 
.iJ 

■U 
J* 
41 
J] 
.14 
.1! 
.13 
.14 

■s 

JI 
JI 
.1* 

J" 



I 



^See Ust ot Adveftfsers on page 130 



?3Magazine • March, 1982 177 



r 



DR^CTORV 



Somerset NJ 



Fhoenix AZ 

iT-tr ScmtErMwat'* mail |) i t!^ p H^ %T cMiinjiimk.T>- Nim jcTvj't ootv lnztw^'jtulhorbHJ IQ^M 
(I <riv f?{nntj«m stcicldrtifi!, KriFAuid. li^Mn. aodVAE^^'disfrtmitpr. LjiT^fiifif^^ 

1 .jN-n. MFJ, H6cW. A.'dron. I^rwn, Ci«hrt»ft, mnd ^ip«i >fiwijiU M(irt majflf bnmk m "^tm i 
Mv (iiii(i» Bnimit. aiKi mofr'. Wuiikl liltr In Cumpli^tv «^v1rt and Utihrit'?'. Hii(li«»^ 
y'lrvL' vtiitl PuwrrC:{immiitiU-jiLl(rttiiC4Xirpn, 1640 LTnliinilt'd, 17(tfl tJtvUrti Avenuf. P.O. Btrn'Ml^ 
\\'i%i CnrnvWrnnV Rd.. NimMik Ml FiKUo, Soimnivl NJ 011673. 4mM5ftD, 

2 U^ Watt. 



Culver cm CA 



Phi]adL*lphia VA^ 
CiiiTideii NJ 



J'*"*?*2ES?^!2lS?'"'**t^H'/^''*' W*ii>auiJe*CANiiJ4J MitPiwinrCMigicilimb 



it ivifitipfnent. Uihnvtiiri Citade Tist lit 
«triin>cfiU. fWvT SlilifllHS, Bil^. Stll & Trndr 
aU innrnliir muki:^— HP, tH. f-AR. liSl, ^^-^m^ 

FeiTV Ave.. Caimk'ii tVj OftHM. Mi AMI 



Fontana CA 

t :*iM!ipk'tr lijK* ICOM, IVhTprm, Tfri-Ttic, 
Miruxi". Cubit'. Lunar, wvt 4(XK) dwlfunk 
juctciurts for hifhbyi'iL It^'hniciiiTj. t'^iiKTi- 

l--l«t-tTutiic^. ftCfflft Stemi Avv-, FrmLunj. CA 

S«ti Diegd CA 

Wr hin arid. sHI Snrphr. Armv' NiH^ Hkc- 
iriJ4iHA, id»iiTc*rrriinaf«] Ti^fiiliiriur. Wluii ikiVou 
Wiiril Xii scll't' WrJtn- fur L-utulumje. Elecimnjo 
lm%ti, Lnc„ 440^Ttli Avi^ixv. 1*0 Bux 2<I4^. San 
Pk'KU CA 8*2112, 232-UUit). 

San Jose CA 
SAN FRANCISCO BAY ABEA 

If.riH fprt^rfv haiTu: Km d mw iml u«t "** BviiWinsj, Un^kjun NV 1,1424.337^030*. 
M,ui:i Ciimpjirf«Mrapdii»m|li.mefiK. !ii-nil^ 
Hipiiiiv -.irici^ I'WSf. Wtf fpnriiklizi- 
KtAI 



', 



Central NY 

Aii^ati'iir riidh^hufilwiMKl dLS|iliti^ imadi tdvimr 

ptkv^ A.&.V1. VVqnknft :IU N. ^fviuunSt.. 
F.O, Ben £43. KfMK M^ L3440, 337-364£. 

Syracuie- Rome- U tica NT 

Ketttitring; Kt'iiwinKl, ^ih'mi, tCnXJ. Drukr. 
Ti*[i TiA', ?iwmi. OnTmik M\t\v.i, Htfhui, MFJ, 

*"n. Cin<iltcriiil. Hiiiitk'F. Mmi JViniiiit', Vim 
uiitri tii^diiU|TiHiiitli'd with M||^iii]iiT]t'ri|j'vT^Hi 
<» Wmid. OnekfA CiMinU AirpnTt-Ti^rnii- 



■•-■.' 



«ric^ n«jfl. Wf *pn:ijnizi in ltX*M. Columbui OH 

Mlril|^^ 'tAimfrtrnrMJi Wr Umi uiirld- Tin- lii^^^t and lii-vt Ham Stof^ in tlic mtdviT'^tl 

^^id*. Tele^Cwm tk<ctitifiic&, 15460 Uidon feuiLitin^ qnulir^ K^'^rmiiiutl pKniutb wlili 

AvrTiiM', Smi JwiP CA )J51S4. 3T?-44m wrtrkltiK dkpWv. W'v svW onlv the Ix-^l, 

X" * ^T7 Anllnhri/xd KrELunnirl Sitv U-■l^ UnivcrtiEii 

San Jose CA Anwuur Kadlu Inc.. I2«<J Atda Dr., R^vimkiv 

i\A\ aivii\ tH'v.^'M Amaiviit lUdU^^ntr N(^ & lMjf)t K:^^^llmhu^J OH 4JlMiS. SfilV42fiT. 



Ki^iw^iaJ. HJOM. Ainii-it. 'fcwt^i. T*'n-Tit:^ 
^dintn: Ik nmin hvtv SklM^vr Bdrtdw. Inc.. 137S 
Sfi. Bm>i:om Atv.« San litof (J^ 9S12S< 9W^ 1 101. 



Bend OH 

S^idlitr T^^ ikJritm-n bfank. Cdl lodav fori 
niiin- iiifnirtllAtiaf:i am) inrniiR*' j^MRit (wr draJk-r 

bmd OH 9770(1. 38B4»9U«i. 

Scranton PA 

[COM. Bird. Ciuditlriiii, IkvkmaJi. Ikiku, 
IjirwT]. Husliit, Anlittrui Smt'ijdivUi. Aa(n.*n, 
AvMrti, Ifeldiii, VV"iAL.\V2VS, CDE, AEA, 
Vibrufik'iH Kiiiii Kv^. CESi, AmpliEXHil^ S<iny. 
FauucL'OKini-T. H&^^'. Anwcti. Stitm- IjUElur 
Ekctrads, 1112 Crwdvirw !i|.. Scrantun PA 
imxm. 343^2124. 

San Antonifi TX 

AinK^i'Mr, C^niTimt'rtiiil 2 wjiy Helling Anti-nuu 
lUhb VVBTHY/j, liiaA tbtr ljiftp.%t Stuck nl AniJi- iSp4vkuli.vi5i^ Asdiili. .JWItii, liitd, 11^-KHiii, Sliiik^ 
rtnir Gear In tlip Inirf i-J" mntaiii Wtsl lUhJ ihu tkirU, VUmiiiU-Jt, MitiUind. Ik'nrx'i CiisliCfufl. 
!k-,t Pnct"*. CjiJI rne (or mII vinu hjiii needs. Didectrtc. Kaarit, ICOM, Ml"!, Nv^% Stmn 
t\i^^ DistfilmUnil. 7^ Si». !it«te, Wnmm ID flijIi^r.T^^pu. Ttf^TariindiitlHs^/Appiiuiu.^ 
^E2f>J. S5iI4iH31l. «c i:4aiaiiKiiA CUx.. Inc., 2317 V«dce jK^nQ 
^ ^- tlupd. San Aiitoni.1 -nC 7Sai3. K».33Sil. 

Teme Haute IN 

ViNir hunt KfudtJiuuivn loiutixJ tn f he licnin of 
thr midwest HtxisieT I l«'lrnni<%. trtc. . IfO 



Miami FL 

APTialvur Rn<tiiJ C^cnUJr, |jw, "EvxMithnii; fi>r 
thi Amahni Siikx^ I IKK). 2»05 N.K, 2tid 
Avi-niit'. Mkini FI. XiW, .'ITS-SLMia, T\^'X 
52203S. 

Smynta CA 

Fiir \u]t JCrttifkisjd. Ymsu, ICOM, Dnir and 
iichtrf kunaUiir ntiffck, ctiflnp 1i> ^s itt. Britt'i 
rv%4i-\VA% KjuIki. 2506 N, A^inisiy.,?i4mina 

(pA ooeisa. 432^«i(». 

Preston ID 






' 



V^knna VA 

Mvmlow>v (Itttlrr, P.O« ]kn JLtOU^ Tern: IIjiuU- ^njuphiTtiE tltt- ti.iU>^l In Aitnite'nr KudhJ und I'li^l 
..„.. .. . .^,. K<|nlpnuml. On vnur niiKt 



IN 47SiU0:L £3K-t45ti. 



Littleton MA 

Thr' hant vttm* 4^ S.K mni can rd^ fin. 
wijud. KIOM, Wibcm, Yma^j, Oeo^fitjai. 



KLM 

jm|n^ BfirW ^'ni.tcha &: vi attme^Ttv Wliiftler 
tiKbr tkitciiTn. [k-ajml. Hgyne^'- v ilmt m im by 
rUrwfn, VViUm, Mmlkt. CA\I, TEE^CXTM 
tmr, Comromiii oi t i ow ff jk Ekctmnkii, 1»75 Great 
Hd., Rt. tltt. Ltttletim MA 1>1460, 4m^.Mi4i*. 



mcnl Bank. tn^.. SLtiMill 
22l!»a. y^iS-3350. 



I rip net tUe lSJiiHiMi>^ 
i'^ UfCtfOOk? tiquip- 
}*l. NX^Viimiw VA 



DEALERS 

Ynitr company name and mr^stog^ 
ca n CO n tai n up to 25 w ordsfor an li f- 
Ann Arbor MI He as $iSO yearhj (prepaid), or $15 

Si ll^ fi3f piTT^fnrt^ Uki TtMi Tt'c. F. 1. Vknike. per month (pn^mid quarierhj). No 
^^"'T^;''^^'"''".wir2;"i'^i.iU^^ mnawn aj mail-order hminem or 
v\Ti8rxo. \\ 11?<JIL\ ind wsup bvitjild tht ore& code fyrrmttted. Directory lex* 
— * r Puitrh»^B^QSufiptv»337£. Hoviier and paymctit must reach tis 60 ttays 
A.. ^1^ AH^r Ml ^sHM.lfe«Ba> ,,^ adtance of publication. For tjx- 

Hud^n NH ample, a^hertmn^ for the Matf *82 

viiT CciiU'j liif nil Maj.<jr AjiitiU-uT IJniv Tnfu J,v/, Mail tft 73 Mo^^aziue,, Peter- 
Kiidioiilix'fr.jnic^ w hi i^w«u iiu«d. Hiid- /j„„,(^g/j XH m45H. ATTN; Nannf 

Cmmpa. 



PROPAGATION 



J. H. Neison 
4 Plymouth Dr, 
Whiting NJ 08759 



EASTERN UNITED STATES TO: 



GhUJi w 09 CH H w 



IQ 



il 



14 



» 



tB 



» 23- 



MpASKA 



AAGEMtiHA 



AUSTPtALIA 



CA»4AL 20<NI£ 



^MGLAND 



HAmAlt 



HOU 






II 



r4?v 



21A 



14A 



M 



21& 



7A: 



MEHtCO 



miLIPPINES 



PUCRTORrCD 



&0U1H AFRICA 



US r A 



WEET CQAST 



21 



t>tA 



Ifl 



t4A 



7B 



21i 



14 



14 



H 



14 



U 



14A, 14 



7A 



7A 



7A 



14 



14 



14 



2 



m 



I1.-Z1 



7B 



14B 



14A 14 



7B 



7B 



7B 



7a 



7B 



7A 



31^2i^_I 



7B 



7B 



7» 



14 



Tn 



14 



7B 



7A 



14 



2 



14 



7B 



14 



21A 



14 



31 



14 



14 



^1 



7A 14 



im 



H 



21A 



21J^ 21A 



2-11 



I4A 



21A^ 



14 



21A 



2!A 21ft 



21A 



.21 



14 



ii 



14 



14 



-4 



21 



14B 



21A 



21A 21/1 



iia 



14 



21A 



2^A 



21 



i:?' 



rt 



21 A, 21 A 



il 



2BJU^22 



21 



14A| 14 



3tA ^ia 



7A 



11.2m 



t4 



21A 



f ' 



^A 



2m 2m 21A 2m 



zm 



21 



21 



7B 



CENTRAL UNITED STATES TO 



ALASKA 



AflQEWTINA 



AUSTRALIA 



CA44At ZONE 



iHGLAND 



HAWAII 



IMCllA 






HCK1CO 



miLimii^ 



FUERTO RICO 



SOUTH AFniCA 



U.S. 5. fl 



14 



II 



iia 



21 



7A 



14i 



JA 



21 



14 



21A 14A 



21A 



21 



21 



14A 



14A 



7B 



M 



Ji 



I — -i. 



14A 



ji 



7B 



7B 



14 



14 



14 



14 



7A 



7A 



14fi 



7 



3 

7 



7B 



7B 



JM. 



7B 



lull 



7a 



7B 



J3. 



1 



TB 



J& 



Tl> 



7B 



7B 



Ji 



_££ 



7A 



7B 



7B 



7a 



14 



14 



7B 



ii.^a 



iJM 



34 



ii 



7B 



™J 



14 



-J 

Ji 

21 



14 



14 



li 



21 



il 



14 



14 



14 



?JiB 



21 



21A 



2 Mi 



14 



21A 



11 



21A 



.11 



21 



11 



1^ 



21A 



JH 



2IA 



21A 



14 



21 



^JA.ZB 



ilA 



21A 



2J& 



21A 



14 



ii 



2tA 



21 A 



2tA 



lA 



21A 



im 



21A 



14 



2JA 



21 



21A 



21 



21A 21 



i& 



WESTERN UNITED STATES TO: 






AAOCfUTlfVA 



AUSTRALIA 



CAhtAt 5QNE 



ENCLAI^O 



HAW An 



IMOtA 



4A»APf 



ME KiCO 



milliMlNES 



PUfRronico 



SOUTH AFflICA 



u, a.i, H, 



EAST COAST 



2t 



21 



2m 



21 



7G 



2m 



14 



2m 



21 



2 m 



2m 



14A 



7B 



21P, 



14A 



14 



14 



21 



2m 



2m 



14 



21 



14 



T4 



7B 



14A 



14 



ii 



I4A 



7A 



t4 



14 



UA 



7A 



141^ 



ii 



m 



14 



14 



1^ 



14 



^ | [ 7B 



14B 



7A 7 



Jh 



7B 



M 



M 



m 



IB 



M 



JR 



7B 



7B 



TS 



7B 



7B 



7& 



J^ 



Jl 



M 



14 



JI 



7B 



14 



7B 



7B 



Xi^ 



14 



II 



14B 



ii 



M 



21 



14 



21 



14A 



14 



14 



21 



jm. 



21 



21A 



21 



nA 



11 



uh 



14 



21A 



21A 14 



21 



14 



11 



2 m 



21 



21A 



21A 



ii& 



UA 



21A 



2IA 



21A 



ii 



ii 



21A 



ii 



2m 



14 



Zlh. 



2m 



2m 



21A 



21A 



ii 



2TA 



14 



2i& 



21 



2JA 



2m 



2JiL^i 



?t! 



121 A 121 A 



7B 



First btter = day waves Second = night waves 
A - Next higher frequency may also be useful 
B = Difficult circuit this period F * Fair G = GckkI 
P = Poor * = Chance of sotar fiares; # = of aurora 



SUN 



MON 



7 



1 



G/Q 



G/G 



8 



FAF 



14 15 

G/F G/F 



MARCH 

T\M wej TMJ 



!*+■ 



2 



G/G 



9 



3 



G/G 



Q/F 



10 



4 



G/G 



16 17 



21 22 



G/F 



G/F 




G/F , G/G 



5 



G/G 



12 



G/Q 



6 



G/G 



13 



G/F 



I 



G/G G/G* 



19 20 



23 24 

G/F I F/P* 



25 



28 29 30 131 



G/F 



F/P* 



26 



G/G 



F/P* 



27 



G/G 



G/G G/G 



L_ 



1 



G/G 



G/G 



178 73Magazine • March, 1982 



By Popular Demand . . . 

Yaesu's All-New VHF/UHF Transceiveis! 



Yaesu is proud to irttroduce a new generation of computer/zed VHF and UHF equipment With the features you 
have asked for and the quality you demand, these revolutionary transceivers are your passport to the newest 
frontiers in Amateur Radio! 





COMPLETE OSCAR STATION! 

• FT*48m - 143.5 to 148.5 MHz SSB/CW/FM 

• n*780ll - 430-440 MHz SSB/CW/FM 

• SC-1 Statioii Console w/Digital Cloclc 

A complete microprocessor-based communication 
system wrt^ c^nvenienl switching of scanning and 
microphone controts, AC power supply, and 16 
button tone pad. 



FT-290R 2M MULTIMOOE PORTABLE! 

• Batterr Powerad [NiCd C- Cells Optmnal) 

• LCD Display wttfi Mlplit Uglit 

• USB/LSB/CW/FM with 2.5W HF Output 

An entirely new concept in VHF operating f LCD 
display with full microprocessor control, 10 
memories, two VFO's and multimodetlexibiliiy. all 
from a battery powered package. Telescoping 
antenna built in. Optional Fl-2010 PA and FP-80A 
AC Supply. 




FT-208R 

2 METER FM HAND-HELD! 

• ISO DlSftlay witli lithium Bacliiip Cefl 

• Sofectable 5 kHzIW kHz Scanning 
#10 MefTiories wrth Auto/Desuine Scan 

• 10 Button Tone Encodor 

Yaesu's latest thoroughbred for 2 FM is the 
FT-208R Hand-Held. Four digit LCD display, 10 
memorres, limited band scan, and priority channel 
make this the most versatile hand-tietd ever made 
available to the amateur fraternity. 



FT-690R 

6M MULTIMOOE PORTABLE I 

• USB/CW/AM/FM Batttry Por^blo 

• lO) Fretiiieiicy Display with Night Lifht 

• 10 Memories with Lithium Backup Cell 

Caleb those exciting DX openings with the new 
FT-69QR 6 meter portable. Repeater shift (1 MHz), 
two scafining steps per mode, and dual VFO's tor 
top flexibility, 



Sportirtg uomatctied engineering and manufacturing know-how, Yaesu's tecfinicat staff is 
committed to pushing the state of the art. Yaesu products are backed by a nationwide dealer 
network and two factory service centers for your long-term service needs- So when rt's time 
to upgrade your station equipment, join the thousands of hams that are tired of compromise 
- join them by investing in Yaesu I 



FT-708B 

70 CM FM HAND-HELDf 

• LCD Display with Lithium Backup Cell 

• Selectahlfl 25 icHz/50 kHz Scanning Steps 

• 440-45D Mlb wfth !0 Memories 

• Memory/Band Scan and Limited Band Scan 

• Resume Scan 

#16 Diittofl Tone Encoder 

Yaesu leads the way with its pioneering micro- 
processor controlled 440 MHz hand-held. Priced 
competitively against much simpler units, the 
Fr-708R system includes a full line ot accessories, 
including CTCSS. NiCd chargers, and remote 
speaker/microphone options. 



p-'Sa 



opltons Set your Yssu dealer 

Pnos Ami SptdtlcaDOTs Sublet To 
Change Wnriouf Notice Or DMigito 




Tho radio. 




YAESU ELECTRONICS CORP. 6851 Walthall Way. Paramount, CA 90723 
Eastern Service Ctr., 9812 Princelon-Glendale Rd., Cincinnati. OH 45246 



(213)633-4007 
(513) 874-3100 




mmtom mosm 



KEfSlWOOD 



&fn ALL maaE iRA^mcwiVEm 



A/i 



•otr 



n n n 
u u.u 



HfV 



MODf 



rowEfl/vm 



FWI 



^.SQUELCH ^^^ 
Ml - ' , * -^ LOW 



njSH CM 



TOliE 



%t.»w 



1 « JQ ^ 



£ 



10 



SCAN HOLD 




MIC 






T|^*&13Ci 



All mode (FM/SSB/CW) 25 watts, plus ...!!! 



r 





The TR-01SO is a powerful, yet compact* 
25 watt FM/USB/LSB/CW transceiver 
providing increased versatility of opera- 
tion on the two meter band. It features 
silt memories* memory scan, memory 
baclC'Up CfipabiMtyt automatic band scan, 
all -mode squelch, CW semi break -in, and 
Incorporates microprocessor technology. 
It Is available witb a 16 -key autopatcb 
UP DOWW microphone fMC*46), or a basic 
UP/DOW^ microphone. 

TR-9130 FEATURES: 

* 25 Watts RF output 

All modes. [¥M 5SB CW). utiiLze a new 
high power linear moduk, for more 
reliable FIVt opera Uon and Increased DX 
on SSB or CW 

* FU/USB/LSB/CW all mode operation 
Pot added conve nkrice in ail modes of 
operation, the modt* j>wiich. In combitia- 
\Um with the digital step (DS) switch, 
determines the size (100 Hz. 1 kHz, 5 kHz, 
10 kHz) of the tuning step, and the 
number of digits displayed. 

* Six memories 

On FM. memories i through 5 for simplex 
or ±600 kHz ofTsei. with the OJT^SET 
switch, Memor>^ 6 for non-standard ofTsct, 
All six memories may be uperated 
simple X. any mode, " 

* Hetnory scan 

Scans memories in whieh data is stored- 
Stops on busy rliannels, 

* fnterned battery memory back-up 
With 9 volt Ni-Cd biiitcrv insiallcd. fnol 
KENWOOD supplied), memories wiH be 
retained approximately 24 hours, adequate 
for the typical move from base to mobile, 

A terminal is provided on the rear panel 
for connecting an external back-up supply. 



* Antomatlc band scan 

Scans within whole 1 MHz segments 
tie., 144.0-144.999 MH2I. for improved 
scanning efBcleney 

* Dual digital VFO's 

incorporates twu built-in digital VFO's. 
selected through use of the A/B switch, 
and individually tuned, 

* Transmit frequency tuning for 
OSCAR operations 

On SSB or CW, ilii' [Lining knob or 
UP/IX>UTVI buttons on the microphone 
may be used to adjust the transmit 
frequency during transmission. 

- 16-key autopatcb UP DOWN 
microphone version 
The TR 9130 is av.ulabie with the MC-46 
16-kcy autopateh UP<'DOV\lV microphone, 
or with the basic UP/DOWN microphone. 
Manual UP''IX>WN scan of entire band 
possible using either microphone* 

Squelch circuit on all modes (FM/^SSB/CW] 
The sqtielch circuli is etTeetlve on SSB, 
CW, andFM. 

* Repeater reverse switch 

For cheeking signals on the repeater 
Input, on FM. 

* Tone switch 

For activating a tone device, tnot 
KENWOOD supplied). 

* CW semi break-In circuit with sidetone 
Buik-in. for convenience in CW operations. 

* Digital display with green LED s 

* ffi^ performance receive 'transmit design 
The use of a low-noise dual-gate MOSFET 
plus two monolitlilc cr>'stal (Titers In the 
receiver front'Cnd results in excellent two 

signal chani CI eristics. Care in transmitter 
design asstircs clean signals In all modes. 

Compact size and light weight 

170 (6-11/16] W X 68 (2-11/16) H K 241 
(94/2) D mm (Inch). 2.4 kg (5,3 ibs.) weight. 

specif icaiions and prices 



'■ Eart ended frequency range 
Covers 143.9 to 148.9999 MHz, which 
includes certain MARS and CAP 
finequencies, 

* Transmit offset switch 

"" High performance noise blanker 
Suppresses pulse- type noise on SSB and CW 

" RF gain control 
For all modes of operalion. 

* RIT [Receiver Incremental Tuning) circuit 
Useful during SSB/CW operalions. 

* Amplified AG€ 

Enhances SSB and CW operation. The 
AGC time constant is autometicaliy 
optimlitcd for each mode of operation. 

* HI/LOW power switch 
Selects 25 or 5 watts RF output on FM or CW. 

- AccesBOry terminal 

A four pin accessory terminal Is provided 
for use With a linear ampUner or other 
accessor^'n 

- Snick release mounting bracket (Supplied] 

More Infomiation on the TR-9130 is 
available from all autluirl/i^d dealers of 
Trto-Kenwood Comrnunications 
1111 West Walnut Street Contpton, 
California 90220. 

^KENAA/OOD 




pactiffttr in mnaitur radio 



Accessories: 

• KPS-7 FUed station power supply. 

• TK'l AC adapter for memor\^ back-up. 



Subject t(i FCC Approual, 
are siibfect to vhange wilhoul notice or obligation.